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MINUTES OF PROCEEDINGS
 
Meeting No. 25
 
Tuesday, April 8, 2008
 

The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage met at 3:32 p.m. this day, in Room 112-N, Centre Block, the Chair, Gary Schellenberger, presiding.

 

Members of the Committee present: Hon. Jim Abbott, Hon. Michael D. Chong, Hon. Denis Coderre, Dean Del Mastro, Ed Fast, Luc Malo, Francis Scarpaleggia, Gary Schellenberger, Hon. Andy Scott and Bill Siksay.

 

Acting Members present: Bernard Bigras for Maria Mourani and Tina Keeper for Hon. Hedy Fry.

 

In attendance: Library of Parliament: Marion Ménard, Analyst; Lara Trehearne, Analyst. House of Commons: Marc Toupin, Legislative Clerk.

 
The Committee proceeded to the consideration of matters related to Committee business.
 

Denis Coderre moved, — That the Committee adopt the following report:

Whereas:

• Bill C-10, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act, including amendments in relation to foreign investment entities and non-resident trusts, and to provide for the bijural expression of the provisions of that Act, which deals among other things with the regulation of film and television production, is currently the subject of consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce;

• The Minister has just proposed that various industry stakeholders explain their views on Bill C-10, and this process is likely to monopolize their time and resources;

• The outcome of the consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce of Bill C-10 may result in amendments to Bill C-327, An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act (reduction of violence in television broadcasts);

• The outcome of the consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce of Bill C-10 could have repercussions for the television industry in general;

• Bill C-10 touches on a sensitive aspect of Canadian society, freedom of expression, and it would be inappropriate to mix consideration of this Bill with consideration of another bill, C-327, some details of which overlap.

Therefore, be it resolved that this Committee, pursuant to Standing Order 97.1, recommends that the House of Commons do not proceed further with Bill C-327, An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act (reduction of violence in television broadcasts), and that the Chair present the report to the House.

Debate arose thereon.

 

Jim Abbott moved, — That the motion be amended by replacing the words

“ • Bill C-10, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act, including amendments in relation to foreign investment entities and non-resident trusts, and to provide for the bijural expression of the provisions of that Act, which deals among other things with the regulation of film and television production, is currently the subject of consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce;

• The Minister has just proposed that various industry stakeholders explain their views on Bill C-10, and this process is likely to monopolize their time and resources;

• The outcome of the consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce of Bill C-10 may result in amendments to Bill C-327, An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act (reduction of violence in television broadcasts);

• The outcome of the consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce of Bill C-10 could have repercussions for the television industry in general;

• Bill C-10 touches on a sensitive aspect of Canadian society, freedom of expression, and it would be inappropriate to mix consideration of this Bill with consideration of another bill, C-327, some details of which overlap. ”

with the words

“•Bill C-327 has a laudable goal of seeing a reduction of violence in society;

•Notwithstanding this goal, Bill C-327 has been confirmed by witnesses as being the wrong means to achieve the goal;

•The committee unanimously supports freedom of expression, including in the media of film and television”.

Debate arose thereon.

 

By unanimous consent, on motion of Andy Scott, it was agreed, — That the amendment be amended by adding after the word “society” the following: “particularly as it relates to children”, that the amendment be amended by replacing the words “Bill C-327 has been confirmed by witnesses as being” with the words “witnesses convinced the Committee that Bill C-327 is ” and that the amendment be amended by adding after the word “goal” the following: “The Committee also notes the number of witnesses who spoke to the need for education media literacy and parental engagement”.

 

Bill Siksay moved, — That consideration of the motion be tabled until after we have gone to clause-by-clause.

 

RULING BY THE CHAIR

 

The Chair ruled the proposed motion inadmissible.

 

The Committee resumed consideration of the amendment of Jim Abbott, as amended.

 

After debate, the question was put on the amendment of Jim Abbott, as amended, and it was agreed to, by a show of hands: YEAS: 9; NAYS: 2.

 

The amendment, as amended, read as follows:

That the amendment be amended by replacing the words

“• Bill C-10, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act, including amendments in relation to foreign investment entities and non-resident trusts, and to provide for the bijural expression of the provisions of that Act, which deals among other things with the regulation of film and television production, is currently the subject of consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce;

• The Minister has just proposed that various industry stakeholders explain their views on Bill C-10, and this process is likely to monopolize their time and resources;

• The outcome of the consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce of Bill C-10 may result in amendments to Bill C-327, An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act (reduction of violence in television broadcasts);

• The outcome of the consideration by the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce of Bill C-10 could have repercussions for the television industry in general;

• Bill C-10 touches on a sensitive aspect of Canadian society, freedom of expression, and it would be inappropriate to mix consideration of this Bill with consideration of another bill, C-327, some details of which overlap. ”

with the words

“• Bill C-327 has a laudable goal of seeing a reduction of violence in society, particularly as it relates to children;

• Notwithstanding this goal, witnesses convinced the Committee that Bill C-327 is the wrong means to achieve the goal;

• The committee unanimously supports freedom of expression, including in the media of film and television;

• The Committee also notes thte number of witnesses who spoke to the need for education, media literacy and parental engagement”.

 

By unanimous consent, on motion of Jim Abbott, it was agreed, — That the amendments to Bill-327 proposed by Bill Siksay be recorded in the Minutes of Proceedings.

Proposed amendments from Bill Siksay reads as follows:

That Bill C-327, in Clause 4, be amended by replacing lines 10 and 11 on page 3 with the following:

“4. This Act comes into force on the earlier of (a) a day to be fixed by order of the Governor in Council; and (b) six months after the day on which this Act receives royal assent.”

That Bill C-327, in the Preamble, be amended (a) by replacing, in the English version, line 14 on page 1 with the following: “AND WHEREAS the broadcasting industry has its” (b) by deleting lines 19 to 22 on page 1.

That Bill C-327, in Clause 1, be amended by replacing lines 3 to 10 on page 2 with the following: ““and” at the end of subparagraph (iii) and by adding the following after subparagraph (iv): (v) contribute to understanding the connections between the depiction of violence in programming and violence in society; and (vi) promote media literacy education and media awareness education for Canadians of all ages;”.

 

The Committee resumed consideration of the motion, as amended of Denis Coderre.

 

After debate, the question was put on the motion, as amended, and it was agreed to on the following recorded division: YEAS: Jim Abbott, Michael D. Chong, Denis Coderre, Dean Del Mastro, Ed Fast, Tina Keeper, Francis Scarpaleggia, Andy Scott — 8; NAYS: Bernard Bigras, Luc Malo, Bill Siksay — 3.

 

The motion, as amended, read as follows:

That the Committee adopt the following report:

Whereas:

• Bill C-327, An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act (reduction of violence in television broadcasts), has the laudable goal of seeing a reduction in violence in society, particularly as it relates to children;

• Notwithstanding this goal, Bill C-327 witnesses have convinced the Committee that Bill C-327 is the wrong means to achieve the goal;

• The Committee unanimously supports freedom of expression including in the media of film and television;

• The Committee also notes the number of witnesses who spoke to the need for education, media literacy and parental engagement.

Therefore, be it resolved that this Committee, pursuant to Standing Order 97.1, recommends that the House of Commons do not proceed further with Bill C-327, An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act (reduction of violence in television broadcasts), and that the Chair present the report to the House.

 

At 4:16 p.m., the Committee adjourned to the call of the Chair.

 



Catherine Cuerrier
Clerk of the Committee

 
 
2008/05/08 2:47 p.m.