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House of Commons Procedure and Practice

Second Edition, 2009

House of Commons Procedure and Practice - 21. Private Members' Business - Private Members' Hour

 

Private Members’ Business is considered for one hour every sitting day.[140] At the beginning of a parliament, Private Members’ Business is suspended until the List for the Consideration of Private Members’ Business and the Order of Precedence have been established, and the report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs indicating those items which remain votable has been presented to the House.[141] Once the report of the Committee has been presented, Private Members’ Business begins the following day.[142]

The Order of Precedence for Private Members’ Business indicates to all Members when particular items are expected to be taken up for consideration. However, because Private Members’ Business may be suspended for a number of reasons, and because the Speaker is obliged to “make all arrangements necessary to ensure the orderly conduct of Private Members’ Business”, an additional notice is required by the Standing Orders. The Speaker must give Members at least 24 hours’ notice before an item in the Order of Precedence can be considered. This notice is published in the Notice Paper.[143] If no notice is published, then Private Members’ Business is suspended that day and the House continues with whatever business was previously before it.[144] When Private Members’ Business is suspended on a Monday, when it is the first order of business of the sitting, the House proceeds to consider Government Orders at 11:00 a.m.[145] During Private Members’ Hour, items in the Order of Precedence are considered in the order in which they are listed and normally only one item is considered each day.[146]

*   Exchange of Items

If the sponsor of an item is unable to move his or her motion on the day set by the Order of Precedence and has given the Speaker at least 48 hours’ written notice, the Speaker may arrange to exchange the position of the sponsor’s item with that of another Member in the Order of Precedence, with the permission of the Members involved.[147] Exchanges are limited in that the item which is moving up the Order of Precedence must be eligible to be debated. This means that if the item has been designated as non-votable by the Subcommittee on Private Members’ Business, the item cannot be exchanged so as to move the item forward for debate until the appeal process is complete or the sponsor waives the right to appeal.[148] In addition to the requirement for an item’s votable status to be confirmed before it is debated,[149] the need for 10 sitting days to elapse between the first hour and the second hour of an item’s consideration can also limit which items are eligible to be exchanged.[150]

Where an exchange is sought by a Member, the Speaker attempts to find another Member willing to switch dates for the consideration of his or her item. If no exchange is possible, Private Members’ Hour is suspended for that day, the House continues with the business before it,[151] and the Member’s item is consequently dropped to the bottom of the Order of Precedence and marked with an asterisk.[152] If Private Members’ Hour is suspended on a Monday, the House takes up Government Orders during that time.[153]

Once an item is marked with an asterisk, its sponsor may not request an exchange, though he or she may accept an exchange requested by another Member. Furthermore, if the sponsor fails to proceed with the item the next time it reaches the top of the Order of Precedence, thereby causing the suspension of a second Private Members’ Hour, then the item is dropped from the Order Paper.[154]

Members sponsoring items on which debate has previously begun (motions, bills at second reading and bills at third reading) may request an exchange, but, if an exchange is not possible, debate on their item will proceed. If the sponsor is not present, he or she will lose the five minute right of reply at the end of the debate. Also, the Speaker will not permit any amendment without the consent of the sponsor.[155]

*   Cancellations and Suspensions

Although Private Members’ Hour is regularly scheduled for each day that the House sits, there are some situations when it may be cancelled or suspended. The cancellation or suspension of the Hour has been a matter of concern to the House ever since the adoption of the modern rules relating to Private Members’ Business in 1986.[156]

The consideration of Private Members’ Business may be cancelled or suspended for a number of reasons:

*       There is no Private Members’ Business until the List for the Consideration of Private Members’ Business and the Order of Precedence have been established, and the initial report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs indicating those items which remain votable has been presented to the House.[157]

*       Should Members not have 24 hours’ notice of the item to be considered during Private Members’ Hour, the Speaker will advise the House that Private Members’ Business will be cancelled for that day; the House will continue with, or revert to, the business before it prior to the time designated for Private Members’ Business.[158]

*       If the Member scheduled to move an item gives the required 48 hours’ written notice that he or she is unable to do so on the day scheduled, and no exchange of items is possible, Private Members’ Business will be cancelled that day, and the House will continue with the business before it prior to Private Members’ Hour. The item is also dropped to the bottom of the Order of Precedence and marked with an asterisk.[159]

*       If, at the beginning of Private Members’ Business, the sponsor of an item set for consideration is not present to move the item, and has failed to provide the necessary notice, then Private Members’ Business is cancelled for that day and the sitting is suspended for the duration of Private Members’ Hour (on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, the House usually gives its consent to proceed immediately to the Adjournment Proceedings or to adjourn). The item is dropped to the bottom of the Order of Precedence and marked with an asterisk.[160] The hour cannot be used for other business without the unanimous consent of the House.

*       If, at the beginning of Private Members’ Business, the sponsor of an item set for consideration declines to move the item, then Private Members’ Business is cancelled for that day and the sitting is suspended for the duration of Private Members’ Hour (on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, the House usually gives its consent to proceed immediately to the Adjournment Proceedings or to adjourn). The item is not proceeded with and is dropped from the Order Paper.[161] The Hour cannot be used for other business without the unanimous consent of the House.

*       Private Members’ Business is cancelled if debate does not begin by 30 minutes after the time Private Members’ Hour would have ordinarily ended. The Speaker reschedules the debate within the next 10 sitting days as an extra hour of Private Members’ Business.[162]

*       There is no Private Members’ Business on the day of the presentation of the Speech from the Throne.[163]

*       Private Members’ Business is cancelled when, during the course of a session, the House must proceed to the election of a new Speaker. The scheduled item does not lose its place in the Order of Precedence.[164]

*       Private Members’ Business is cancelled on any day designated for the presentation of the Budget, if the presentation is scheduled to take place prior to Private Members’ Hour.[165] The scheduled item does not lose its place in the Order of Precedence.[166]

*       On the last supply day in June, except if it falls on a Monday, the consideration of Private Members’ Business is cancelled in order to allow more time to consider and dispose of the main estimates. The scheduled item does not lose its place in the Order of Precedence.[167]

*       Private Members’ Business is cancelled if the House is debating a motion arising from a prima facie question of privilege. The scheduled item does not lose its place in the Order of Precedence.[168]

*       To ensure that the government is not prevented in any way from introducing its legislation, the Standing Orders provide that the House complete “Introduction of Government Bills” at every sitting, even if it means suspending all or part of Private Members’ Hour. If proceedings under “Introduction of Government Bills” have not been completed on a Tuesday or Thursday prior to Statements by Members, Routine Proceedings will continue immediately after Question Period until the completion of all items under “Introduction of Government Bills”.[169] If Private Members’ Business is not reached and the Speaker adjourns the House, then the item scheduled for that day does not lose its place in the Order of Precedence. The provisions of the Standing Orders adding an extra hour of Private Members’ Business to another day do not apply.[170]

*       Private Members’ Business is cancelled when a Minister moves a motion in relation to a matter the government considers to be of an urgent nature, and debate subsequently takes place during the time scheduled for Private Members’ Business.[171] The item does not lose its place in the Order of Precedence. If such a motion is moved during Private Members’ Hour, only the remaining time allotted for consideration of the item being debated is suspended.[172] If the maximum one hour of debate allowed on the motion extends into Private Members’ Hour, then the beginning of Private Members’ Hour is delayed.[173]

*       Private Members’ Business is not taken up when a motion to adjourn the House is adopted prior to the beginning of Private Members’ Hour. The scheduled item does not lose its place in the Order of Precedence.[174]

*       Private Members’ Business is not taken up when the House adjourns due to a lack of quorum prior to the beginning of Private Members’ Hour. The scheduled item does not lose its place in the Order of Precedence.[175]

*       Private Members’ Business, or the remainder thereof, is suspended when the House adjourns due to a lack of quorum during Private Members’ Hour. A votable item is dropped to the bottom of the Order of Precedence while a non-votable item is dropped from the Order Paper.[176]

*       Private Members’ Business is cancelled if an emergency debate begins prior to Private Members’ Hour. The Speaker reschedules the debate within the next 10 sitting days as an extra hour of Private Members’ Business.[177]

When Private Members’ Business is suspended on Monday, the House takes up Government Orders during the time designated for Private Members’ Business.[178]

*   Delays and Interruptions

If Private Members’ Hour is delayed or interrupted for any reason, the debate on the item of business before the House is then extended or rescheduled so that no time is lost.[179] When the beginning of Private Members’ Hour is delayed because of a recorded division,[180] a question period on a time allocation motion or a closure motion,[181] or if Private Members’ Business is interrupted so that Members may attend the Royal Assent ceremony in the Senate Chamber,[182] or by an emergency alarm,[183] then Private Members’ Hour is extended by the amount of time that was lost. Similarly, when the time provided for Government Orders has been extended by 90 minutes or less because of a ministerial statement, the start of Private Members’ Hour will be delayed by a corresponding amount of time.[184] If debate on Private Members’ Business does not begin or resume by 30 minutes after the time Private Members’ Business would have ordinarily ended, the remaining time or the entire hour is added to another sitting.[185]

*   Rescheduling of Debate

The rescheduling of any unused time of a Private Members’ Hour due to a delay or interruption is done at the discretion of the Speaker within 10 sitting days and after consultation with the Member involved.[186] No more than one adjournment period as provided in the parliamentary calendar may intervene in the rescheduling of the debate.[187] The rescheduled business is considered during an additional Private Members’ Hour, which is added to the daily schedule of the House, normally after the ordinary time of daily adjournment.

The regular 24 hours’ notice of the item to be considered is given to the House. The notice is published in the Notice Paper on the day the additional debate is to take place.[188] The Order Paper entry referring to the rescheduled debate, or to a debate waiting for rescheduling, appears at the top of the list of “Items in the Order of Precedence”.[189] The Standing Orders do not provide for an exchange between a Member whose item of business has been rescheduled and another Member who has an item in the Order of Precedence.

On days when Private Members’ Business has been rescheduled, the Adjournment Proceedings are delayed by the amount of time required to complete the rescheduled debate.

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[140] The current schedule for Private Members’ Hour is as follows: Monday, 11:00 a.m. to noon; Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.; and Friday, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. This schedule came into effect on February 14, 1994, following the adoption of amendments to the Standing Orders on February 7, 1994 (Journals, February 7, 1994, pp. 112‑20). Members are not permitted to propose the continuation or extension of the sitting pursuant to Standing Order 26 during Private Members’ Business. However, if, within the first 30 minutes of debate on the first day of consideration of the report and third reading stages of a private Member’s bill, it is not disposed of, then during any time then remaining on that day, any Member may propose a motion to extend the debate on the second day for a period not to exceed five consecutive hours pursuant to Standing Order 98(3).

[141] Standing Order 91.

[142] See the Eighth Report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented to the House and deemed concurred in on May 30, 2006 (Journals, pp. 207‑8) (with Private Members’ Business beginning on May 31, 2006, Journals, p. 218).

[143] Standing Order 94(1)(a). On one occasion, the Speaker gave notice of two items for the same day. On December 5, 1996, Bill C-341, An Act to establish the terms and conditions that must apply to a referendum relating to the separation of Quebec from Canada before it may be recognized as a proper expression of the will of the people of Quebec, sponsored by Stephen Harper (Calgary West) was placed in the Order of Precedence (Order Paper and Notice Paper, December 6, 1996, p. 23). On January 14, 1997, Mr. Harper resigned his seat (Journals, February 3, 1997, p. 1025). On March 3, 1997, Bill C-341 was the first item in the Order of Precedence (Order Paper and Notice Paper, p. 23). This created a situation not provided for in the Standing Orders. When the House reached Private Members’ Business the item would be called, not proceeded with and dropped to the bottom of the Order of Precedence, and Private Members’ Hour would be suspended for that day. So that the House would not lose the hour, the Speaker gave notice of two items, C-341 and Motion M-126, sponsored by Art Hanger (Calgary Northeast), the second item in the Order of Precedence (Order Paper and Notice Paper, p. iii). At the beginning of Private Members’ Business on March 3, 1997, Bill C-341 was called and dropped to the bottom of the Order of Precedence (Debates, p. 8475). The House then proceeded to the consideration of Mr. Hanger’s motion (Journals, p. 1173). By unanimous consent on March 4, 1997, the sponsor of Bill C-341 was changed to Preston Manning (Calgary Southwest) (Journals, p. 1232, Debates, p. 8643, Order Paper and Notice Paper, p. 30; March 6, 1997, p. 29).

[144] Standing Order 94(1)(b).

[145] Standing Order 99(2).

[146] The Member is advised in advance of the day when his or her item is scheduled for debate. On occasion, two or more items have been considered during Private Members’ Hour by unanimous consent. See, for example, Journals, July 21, 1988, pp. 3250‑1; June 27, 1989, pp. 468‑70; June 7, 1990, pp. 1852‑5; June 18, 1992, pp. 1800‑1; November 28, 1996, p. 935; April 28, 1999, pp. 1780‑1. The House has also extended Private Members’ Business by 30 minutes in order to have two items considered (Journals, March 18, 1997, p. 1310; March 19, 1997, pp. 1319‑20). For further information, see the section in this chapter entitled “Rescheduling of Debate”.

[147] Standing Order 94(2)(a). In the First Session (1997‑99) of the Thirty‑Sixth Parliament, there had been an increasing loss of time for Private Members’ Business due to Members not being available for exchanges. This matter was discussed by the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs (see Evidence, April 15 and April 20, 1999). This issue was addressed with the adoption of the current rule, Standing order 94(2), preventing Members from seeking an exchange if they have failed to be present when their item is called for debate or if an exchange has been requested and is not possible. The Standing Order was adopted when the House concurred in the Third Report of the Special Committee on the Modernization and Improvement of the Procedures of the House of Commons, presented to the House on February 28, 2003 (Journals, p. 492) and, pursuant to the Order adopted by the House on February 28, 2003 (Journals, p. 492), deemed concurred in on March 17, 2003 (Journals, p. 495).

[148] In one case where the Subcommittee on Private Members’ Business had reported to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs that an item be designated non‑votable and in another case where the Standing Committee had reported to the House that an item be designated non‑votable, exchanges involving these items were permitted which placed these items farther down the Order of Precedence. This allowed these Members to avoid having the Speaker drop their items to the bottom of the Order of Precedence should they reach the top of the Order of Precedence before the House had taken a decision on their non-votable status. It also ensured that Private Members’ Business would not be cancelled if one of these items should reach the top of the Order of Precedence. See the exchange of position in the Order of Precedence between Rob Moore (Fundy Royal) (Bill C‑268) and John Reynolds (West Vancouver–Sunshine Coast–Sea to Sky Country) (Bill S‑2), Order Paper and Notice Paper, November 26, 2004, pp. 17, 22; November 29, 2004, pp. 17, 21; and the exchange of position between Pauline Picard (Drummond) (Bill C‑482) and Guy André (Berthier–Maskinongé) (Bill C‑469), Order Paper and Notice Paper, December 11, 2007, pp. 26, 28; December 12, 2007, pp. 28, 30.

[149] Standing Order 91.1(1).

[150] Standing Order 93(2).

[151] Standing Order 94(2)(b). See, for example, Debates, March 23, 1994, p. 2694; April 11, 2002, p. 10332; December 5, 2002, pp. 2336‑7; February 12, 2004, p. 529; February 17, 2004, p. 709; March 10, 2005, p. 4292; March 22, 2005, p. 4476; May 5, 2005, p. 5743; October 5, 2006, p. 3737; October 24, 2007, p. 347.

[152] Standing Order 94(2)(c).

[153] Standing Order 99(2). See, for example, Debates, November 18, 1994, p. 8004; March 7, 1997, p. 8790; May 8, 1998, p. 6736; September 22, 2000, p. 8564; January 27, 2003, p. 2689; February 6, 2004, p. 283.

[154] Standing Order 94(2)(c). See also, Debates, February 12, 2004, p. 529; April 19, 2004, p. 2047; April 18, 2008, p. 5131; June 19, 2008, p. 7199.

[155] Standing Order 93(3).

[156] In its Third Report presented to the House in June 1986, the Standing Committee on Private Members’ Business expressed concerns about the suspension of Private Members’ Hour: “Since debate began under the new rules …, there have been, theoretically, thirty‑two hours for Private Members’ Business; but only fifteen have been used. Ten were suspended because of allotted days and seven were lost because Members in whose name the motions stood were unable to attend the House” (Journals, June 19, 1986, p. 2365).

[157] Standing Orders 91, 91.1 and 99.

[158] Standing Order 94(1)(b). When this occurs, the item is dropped to the bottom of the Order of Precedence (Standing Order 42(2)). See Speaker Parent’s ruling, Debates, April 18, 1997, pp. 9919‑20, and Order Paper and Notice Paper, April 17, 1997, p. 23; April 18, 1997, pp. 23, 27, iii.

[159] Standing Order 94(2)(b) and (c). See also Order Paper and Notice Paper, October 24, 2007, p. 17; October 25, 2007, pp. 21, vi.

[160] See, for example, Debates, April 19, 2004, p. 2047; June 9, 2005, p. 6920; November 28, 2005, p. 10183; February 15, 2008, p. 3184.

[161] Standing Order 42(1).

[162] Standing Order 30(7).

[163] Standing Order 94(1)(b) requires that 24 hours’ notice be provided by the Speaker of the item to be considered during Private Members’ Hour and as there is no opportunity to provide such notice on the first day of a session, no Private Members’ Business is taken up.

[164] Standing Orders 2(3) and 99.

[165] Standing Order 99(1). Pursuant to Standing Order 83(2), if the House is considering Private Members’ Business at the time specified for the presentation of the Budget, the Speaker will interrupt the proceedings and the proceedings will be deemed adjourned.

[166] See, for example, the Budget days of 2004 and 2005 (Order Paper and Notice Paper, March 23, 2004, pp. 11, 15, iv; March 24, 2004, pp. 17, iii; February 23, 2005, pp. 15, 21, iii; February 24, 2005, pp. 19, iv).

[167] Standing Order 99(1). See, for example, entries in the Order Paper and Notice Paper illustrating that such items did not lose their place in the Order of Precedence and indicating that notice pursuant to Standing Order 94(1)(a) was not given (June 12, 2003, pp. 25, 31, vi; June 13, 2003, pp. 31, iv; June 14, 2005, pp. 33, iii, iv; June 15, 2005, pp. 35, iii; June 7, 2007, pp. 29, 39, v; June 8, 2007, pp. 39, v). For further information, see Chapter 18, “Financial Procedures”.

[168] See, for example, Speakers’ statements, on Friday, February 1, 2002 (Debates, p. 8619) and Friday, November 4, 2005 (Debates, pp. 9552‑3) announcing the cancellation of Private Members’ Business on the following Monday. See also entries in the Order Paper and Notice Paper illustrating that such items did not lose their place in the Order of Precedence and indicating that notice pursuant to Standing Order 94(1)(a) was not given while the House debated privilege motions (February 1, 2002, pp. 27, iv; February 4, 2002, pp. 27, iv; February 5, 2002, pp. 29, v; November 3, 2005, pp. 33, iv; November 4, 2005, pp. 33, v; November 14, 2005, pp. 35, vi; November 15, 2005, pp. 35, v).

[169] Standing Order 30(4)(a).

[170] Standing Order 30(4)(b) and (7).

[171] Standing Orders 53 and 99(1). No debate of this nature has ever led to the cancellation of Private Members’ Business. For further information, see Chapter 15, “Special Debates”.

[172] On at least two occasions, motions pursuant to Standing Order 53 have been moved during Private Members’ Hour. In both cases, the motion was deemed withdrawn after debate and Private Members’ Business resumed. See Journals, June 10, 1999, p. 2097; June 8, 2007, p. 1499.

[173] Standing Order 30(7).

[174] Standing Orders 41 and 42(3). See, for example, Bill C‑357, Taiwan Affairs Act, (Jim Abbott (Kootenay–Columbia)), which was scheduled to be taken up for debate on May 11, 2005, but the House adjourned prior to reaching Private Members’ Hour. It retained its place in the Order of Precedence. The House again adjourned prior to Private Members’ Hour on May 12 and 13, 2005. In each instance, Bill C‑357 maintained its position at the top of the Order of Precedence. On May 16, 2005, the item was taken up for debate. See Journals, May 11, 2005, pp. 740‑2; May 12, 2005, pp. 745‑6; May 13, 2005, pp. 751‑4; May 16, 2005, p. 755; Order Paper and Notice Paper, May 11, 2005, pp. 31, iv; May 12, 2005, pp. 29, iii; May 13, 2005, pp. 29, iii; May 16, 2005, pp. 29, iv.

[175] Standing Orders 29(3), 41 and 42(3).

[176] Standing Orders 29(3), 30(7) and 41(2). See, for example, Journals, October 19, 1995, p. 2032; Order Paper and Notice Paper, October 19, 1995, p. 19; October 20, 1995, pp. 22‑3.

[177] Standing Orders 52(14), 30(7) and 99. Thus, when an emergency debate takes place on a Friday, Private Members’ Hour is cancelled. See, for example, Debates, June 13, 1986, p. 14388.

[178] Standing Order 99(2).

[179] Standing Order 30(7).

[180] See, for example, Journals, March 28, 2007, p. 1180; November 21, 2007, p. 194. This occurs frequently on Wednesdays when deferred recorded divisions on items of Private Members’ Business are taken.

[181] Standing Order 67.1(2). See, for example, Debates, October 7, 2003, pp. 8249, 8255, 8299; June 12, 2007, pp. 10452, 10457, 10515. In the case of a question period on a closure motion, if the motion is adopted prior to the beginning of Private Members’ Hour, then the debate on the closured motion, which may continue until 8:00 p.m. (Standing Order 57), is adjourned at the time regularly scheduled for Private Members’ Hour and so Private Members’ Business is not delayed. Debate on the closured motion then resumes at the end of Private Members’ Hour until 8:00 p.m. See Debates, June 23, 2005, pp. 7688, 7693‑4, 7743.

[182] See, for example, Journals, April 13, 2000, pp. 1612‑3; May 31, 2000, pp. 1769‑70; September 21, 2000, pp. 1937‑8; April 18, 2007, pp. 1235‑6.

[183] See, for example, Debates, February 16, 2000, p. 3625.

[184] Standing Order 33(2). See, for example, Debates, November 2, 2006, p. 4657; March 29, 2007, p. 8097; November 1, 2007, p. 702.

[185] Standing Order 30(7). On April 23, 1996, for instance, Private Members’ Hour was scheduled to take place from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Because of a ministerial statement, Government Orders was extended by 72 minutes. Moreover, it was then followed by a recorded division. As a result, the House was not ready to proceed with Private Members’ Business until 7:15 p.m., 45 minutes after the time at which it would normally have ended. Pursuant to this Standing Order, the Speaker had to reschedule the debate for another sitting. See Debates, April 23, 1996, p. 1880; Journals, May 2, 1996, pp. 289‑90, Order Paper and Notice Paper, pp. 15, iii‑iv. For other cases where Private Members’ Business has been rescheduled, see Motion M‑300 (Debates, December 1, 1998, pp. 10772‑3; December 7, 1998, p. 10945; Journals, December 8, 1998, pp. 1427‑8; Order Paper and Notice Paper, December 1, 1998, pp. 21, iv; December 8, 1998, pp. 21, iv); Motion M‑211 (Debates, February 22, 2000, p. 3927; February 24, 2000, p. 4006; Journals, March 2, 2000, p. 1065; Order Paper and Notice Paper, February 22, 2000, pp. 25, iii; March 2, 2000, pp. 27, v); Motion M‑160 (Debates, June 6, 2000, p. 7599; June 12, 2000, pp. 7842‑3; Journals, September 20, 2000, p. 1933; Order Paper and Notice Paper, June 6, 2000, pp. 27, v; September 20, 2000, pp. 35, iv); Bill S‑10 (Debates, November 27, 2001, p. 7602; November 28, 2001, p. 7635; Journals, December 6, 2001, p. 931; Order Paper and Notice Paper, November 27, 2001, pp. 27, iv; December 6, 2001, pp. 27, iv); Bill C‑280 (Debates, March 25, 2003, p. 4702; March 28, 2003, p. 4863; Journals, April 1, 2003, p. 642; Order Paper and Notice Paper, March 25, 2003, pp. 25, vii; April 1, 2003, pp. 23‑4, iv‑v); Bill C‑235 (Debates, March 26, 2003, p. 4776; March 28, 2003, p. 4863; Journals, April 3, 2003, pp. 655‑6; Order Paper and Notice Paper, March 26, 2003, pp. 29, iii; April 3, 2003, pp. 25, iv‑v); Motion M‑136 (Debates, October 28, 2003, p. 8884; Journals, October 30, 2003, p. 1211; Order Paper and Notice Paper, October 28, 2003, pp. 36, vi; October 30, 2003, pp. 35, iv); Motion M‑153 (Debates, October 5, 2005, p. 8471; October 7, 2005, p. 8562; Journals, October 20, 2005, pp. 1182‑3; Order Paper and Notice Paper, October 5, 2005, pp. 36, iv; October 20, 2005, pp. 31, iii‑iv); Motion M‑242 (Debates, March 21, 2007, p. 7743; March 22, 2007, p. 7815; Journals, March 27, 2007, p. 1167; Order Paper and Notice Paper, March 21, 2007, pp. 40, vi; March 27, 2007, pp. 34, iii‑iv); Motion M-310 (Debates, March 5, 2008, pp. 3700-1; March 10, 2008, p. 3859; Journals, March 12, 2008, pp. 588-9; Order Paper and Notice Paper, March 12, 2008, pp. 41, v-vi).

[186] Standing Order 30(7). See, for example, Debates, February 24, 2000, p. 4006; June 12, 2000, pp. 7842‑3; November 28, 2001, p. 7635; March 28, 2003, p. 4863; October 7, 2005, p. 8562; March 22, 2007, p. 7815; March 10, 2008, p. 3859.

[187] See, for example, the Speaker’s statements designating days following a summer adjournment and the adjournment for Thanksgiving, Debates, June 12, 2000, pp. 7842‑3; October 7, 2005, p. 8562.

[188] See, for example, Order Paper and Notice Paper, October 20, 2005, pp. iii‑iv; March 27, 2007, pp. iii‑iv.

[189] See, for example, Order Paper and Notice Paper, October 20, 2005, p. 31; March 27, 2007, p. 34.

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