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HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA
42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION

Journals

No. 437

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

2:00 p.m.



Prayer
National Anthem
Statements By Members

Pursuant to Standing Order 31, Members made statements.

Oral Questions

Pursuant to Standing Order 30(5), the House proceeded to Oral Questions.

Motions

By unanimous consent, it was resolved, — That the House: (a) extend its condolences to all the victims of violence and war in Sri Lanka; (b) call on the Government of Sri Lanka to promote justice for those affected by the Easter Sunday attacks, protect the rights of religious minorities, and defend all places of worship; (c) reaffirm Canada's call for Sri Lanka to implement its obligations within a clearly specified timeframe as mandated under the United Nations Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 and 40/1, as well as Canada’s support in advancing accountability, peace, and reconciliation among all peoples on the island; and (d) call upon the United Nations to establish an international, independent investigation into the allegations of genocide against Tamils committed in Sri Lanka, including the last phase of the armed conflict in 2009.

Government Orders

Ways and Means

Pursuant to Order made Tuesday, June 18, 2019, the House proceeded to the putting of the question on a Ways and Means motion to amend the Income Tax Act (Sessional Paper No. 8570-421-34), notice of which was laid upon the Table on Monday, June 17, 2019. (Ways and Means No. 34)

The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:

(Division No. 1375 -- Vote no 1375)
YEAS: 256, NAYS: 36

YEAS -- POUR

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Allison
Amos
Anandasangaree
Anderson
Arnold
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barlow
Barrett
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Bennett
Benzen
Bergen
Berthold
Bezan
Bibeau
Bittle
Blair
Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis)
Block
Boissonnault
Bossio
Boudrias
Brassard
Bratina
Breton
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Carrie
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Chong
Clarke
Cormier
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
Davidson
DeCourcey
Deltell
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Diotte
Doherty
Dreeshen
Drouin
Dubourg
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)

Dzerowicz
Easter
Eglinski
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Falk (Provencher)
Fergus
Fillmore
Finley
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Freeland
Fuhr
Gallant
Genuis
Gerretsen
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Gourde
Graham
Hajdu
Harder
Hardie
Hébert
Hoback
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jeneroux
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kang
Kelly
Kent
Khalid
Khera
Kitchen
Kmiec
Lake
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Lefebvre
Leslie

Levitt
Liepert
Lightbound
Lloyd
Lobb
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
Lukiwski
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKenzie
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maguire
Manly
Martel
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McColeman
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morrissey
Motz
Murray
Nassif
Nater
Ng
Nicholson
Nuttall
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poilievre
Poissant
Qualtrough
Raitt
Ratansi
Rayes
Reid
Rempel

Rioux
Robillard
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Saroya
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schmale
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Shields
Shipley
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sorbara
Sorenson
Spengemann
Stanton
Ste-Marie
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tilson
Trost
Trudeau
Van Kesteren
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Viersen
Virani
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Whalen
Wilson-Raybould
Wong
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Yurdiga
Zahid
Zimmer

Total: -- 256

NAYS -- CONTRE

Angus
Ashton
Aubin
Benson
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brosseau

Cannings
Caron
Choquette
Christopherson
Cullen
Dubé
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Garrison

Hardcastle
Hughes
Johns
Jolibois
Julian
Laverdière
MacGregor
Masse (Windsor West)
Mathyssen

Moore
Nantel
Quach
Ramsey
Rankin
Sansoucy
Singh
Stetski
Trudel

Total: -- 36

PAIRED -- PAIRÉS

Beaulieu

LeBlanc

Total: -- 2

Deferred Recorded Divisions

Private Members' Business

Pursuant to Order made Tuesday, May 28, 2019, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), seconded by Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), — That Bill C-331, An Act to amend the Federal Courts Act (international promotion and protection of human rights), be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:

(Division No. 1376 -- Vote no 1376)
YEAS: 49, NAYS: 238

YEAS -- POUR

Angus
Ashton
Aubin
Barsalou-Duval
Beaulieu
Benson
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brosseau

Cannings
Caron
Choquette
Christopherson
Cullen
Dubé
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Garrison
Gill
Hardcastle
Hughes

Johns
Jolibois
Julian
Kang
Laverdière
MacGregor
Manly
Masse (Windsor West)
Mathyssen
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
Moore
Nantel

Pauzé
Philpott
Plamondon
Quach
Ramsey
Rankin
Sansoucy
Singh
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Thériault
Trudel
Weir

Total: -- 49

NAYS -- CONTRE

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Allison
Amos
Anandasangaree
Anderson
Arnold
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barlow
Barrett
Baylis
Beech
Bennett
Benzen
Bergen
Berthold
Bezan
Bibeau
Bittle
Blair
Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis)
Block
Boissonnault
Bossio
Brassard
Bratina
Breton
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Carrie
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Chong
Clarke
Cormier
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
Davidson
DeCourcey
Deltell
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Diotte
Doherty
Dreeshen
Drouin
Dubourg
Duguid

Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Easter
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Falk (Provencher)
Fergus
Fillmore
Finley
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Gallant
Genuis
Gerretsen
Gladu
Godin
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Gourde
Graham
Hajdu
Harder
Hardie
Hébert
Hoback
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jeneroux
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kelly
Kent
Khalid
Khera
Kitchen
Kmiec
Lake
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Lefebvre

Leslie
Levitt
Liepert
Lightbound
Lloyd
Lobb
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
Lukiwski
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKenzie
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maguire
Martel
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McColeman
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morrissey
Motz
Murray
Nassif
Nater
Ng
Nicholson
Nuttall
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Paul-Hus
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Picard
Poilievre
Poissant
Qualtrough
Raitt
Ratansi
Rayes
Reid
Rempel

Rioux
Robillard
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Saroya
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schmale
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Shields
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sorbara
Sorenson
Spengemann
Stanton
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Vandal
Vaughan
Viersen
Virani
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Whalen
Wilson-Raybould
Wong
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Yurdiga
Zahid
Zimmer

Total: -- 238

PAIRED -- PAIRÉS

Beaulieu

LeBlanc

Total: -- 2


Pursuant to Order made Tuesday, May 28, 2019, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Ms. Sidhu (Brampton South), seconded by Ms. Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles), — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize that one in four Canadians is living with diabetes or pre-diabetes, and, without treatment, diabetes can result in life-threatening complications, and that diabetes awareness and education can help identify early signs of diabetes and prevent onset for millions of Canadians, and that as the birthplace of insulin, Canada should be a leader in diabetes awareness by declaring November of every year as Diabetes Awareness Month. (Private Members' Business M-173)

The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:

(Division No. 1377 -- Vote no 1377)
YEAS: 285, NAYS: 0

YEAS -- POUR

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Allison
Anandasangaree
Anderson
Angus
Arnold
Arseneault
Arya
Ashton
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barlow
Barrett
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Bennett
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Berthold
Bezan
Bibeau
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis)
Block
Boissonnault
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Bratina
Breton
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Carrie
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Chong
Choquette
Christopherson
Clarke
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
Davidson
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Diotte
Doherty

Dreeshen
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Dzerowicz
Easter
Eglinski
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Falk (Provencher)
Fergus
Fillmore
Finley
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Gallant
Garrison
Genuis
Gerretsen
Gill
Gladu
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Gourde
Graham
Hajdu
Hardcastle
Harder
Hardie
Hébert
Hoback
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jeneroux
Johns
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Julian
Kang
Kelly
Kent
Khalid
Khera
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lambropoulos

Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Liepert
Lightbound
Lloyd
Lobb
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
Lukiwski
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKenzie
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maguire
Manly
Martel
Masse (Windsor West)
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
Mathyssen
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McColeman
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Moore
Morrissey
Motz
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nater
Ng
Nicholson
Nuttall
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poilievre
Poissant
Quach

Qualtrough
Raitt
Ramsey
Rankin
Ratansi
Reid
Rempel
Rioux
Robillard
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Saroya
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schmale
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Shields
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sorbara
Sorenson
Spengemann
Stanton
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tilson
Trost
Trudel
Van Kesteren
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Viersen
Virani
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Whalen
Wilson-Raybould
Wong
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Yurdiga
Zahid
Zimmer

Total: -- 285

NAYS -- CONTRE

Nil--Aucun

PAIRED -- PAIRÉS

Beaulieu

LeBlanc

Total: -- 2

Daily Routine Of Business

Tabling of Documents

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Alghabra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade Diversification) laid upon the Table, — Report by Export Development Canada on Canada Account Operations for the fiscal year 2017-2018. — Sessional Paper No. 8525-421-111.


Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change) laid upon the Table, — Document entitled "An Examination of Governance, Existing Data, Potential Indicators and Values in the Ottawa River Watershed". — Sessional Paper No. 8525-421-112.


Pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) laid upon the Table, — Government responses, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), to the following petitions:

— No. 421-03602 concerning federal-provincial agreements. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-245-03;

— No. 421-03625 concerning Canadian heritage. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-88-13;

— No. 421-03630 concerning road transportation. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-34-13;

— Nos. 421-03699, 421-04050, 421-04055, 421-04057, 421-04058 and 421-04059 concerning social benefits. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-165-10;

— No. 421-04045 concerning the Employment Insurance Program. — Sessional Paper No. 8545-421-180-13.


Presenting Reports from Interparliamentary Delegations


Pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), Mr. Paradis (Brome—Missisquoi) presented the report of the Canadian parliamentary delegation of the Canada-France Interparliamentary Association respecting its participation at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Canada-France Interparliamentary Association, held in Gard and Alpes-Maritimes, France, from April 8 to 12, 2019. — Sessional Paper No. 8565-421-55-07.


Presenting Reports from Committees

Mr. Paradis (Brome—Missisquoi), from the Standing Committee on Official Languages, presented the 17th Report of the Committee, "Modernization of the Official Languages Act". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-632.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 119 to 123, 134 to 142 and 148 to 151) was tabled.


Mr. Ellis (Bay of Quinte), from the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs, presented the 14th Report of the Committee, "Effects of Mefloquine Use Among Canadian Veterans". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-633.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 115 to 119 and 123) was tabled.


Mr. Whalen (St. John's East), from the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration, presented the 26th Report of the Committee, "Improving Settlement Services Across Canada". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-634.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 141 to 143, 150, 151, 153, 155, 159 and 166) was tabled.


Mr. Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country), from the Standing Committee on National Defence, presented the 17th Report of the Committee, "Improving Diversity and Inclusion in the Canadian Armed Forces". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-635.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 112, 125, 126, 130, 134 to 136 and 145 to 147) was tabled.


Mr. Bagnell (Yukon), from the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented the 99th Report of the Committee, "Advice for the Consideration of the Procedure and House Affairs Committee in the 43rd Parliament". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-636.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 162 and 163) was tabled.


Mr. Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot), from the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, presented the 69th Report of the Committee, "Processing of Asylum Claims, Report 2 of the 2019 Spring Reports of the Auditor General of Canada". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-637.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 139 and 145) was tabled.


Mr. Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot), from the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, presented the 70th Report of the Committee, "Call Centres, Report 1 of the 2019 Spring Reports of the Auditor General of Canada". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-638.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 139 and 145) was tabled.


Mr. Bagnell (Yukon), from the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented the 100th Report of the Committee, "Advice for the Consideration of Committees of the House of Commons in the 43rd Parliament". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-639.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 162 and 163) was tabled.


Ms. Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean), from the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, presented the 29th Report of the Committee, "Raising her Voice: Confronting the Unique Challenges Facing Women Human Rights Defenders". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-640.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meeting No. 148) was tabled.


Mr. Casey (Cumberland—Colchester), from the Standing Committee on Health, presented the 29th Report of the Committee, "Violence Facing Health Care Workers in Canada". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-641.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 144, 145, 150, 151 and 154) was tabled.


Mr. Levitt (York Centre), from the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, presented the 30th Report of the Committee, "Democratic Strain and Popular Discontent in Europe: Responding to the Challenges Facing Liberal Democracies". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-642.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 135 to 139, 148 and 149) was tabled.


Mr. Levitt (York Centre), from the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, presented the 31st Report of the Committee, "Human Rights Situation in Russia". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-643.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meetings Nos. 142 and 147 to 149) was tabled.


Mr. Levitt (York Centre), from the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, presented the 32nd Report of the Committee, "Situation in Sri Lanka". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-644.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meeting No. 150) was tabled.


Mr. Levitt (York Centre), from the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, presented the 33rd Report of the Committee, "The Human Rights Situation in Iran". — Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-645.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the Committee requested that the government table a comprehensive response.

A copy of the relevant Minutes of Proceedings (Meeting No. 150) was tabled.


Introduction of Private Members' Bills

Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock), seconded by Ms. Gladu (Sarnia—Lambton), Bill C-463, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (orders of prohibition and orders restricting publication), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Ms. Brosseau (Berthier—Maskinongé), seconded by Ms. Trudel (Jonquière), Bill C-464, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (small brewery, winery or distillery tax credit), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Dusseault (Sherbrooke), seconded by Ms. Trudel (Jonquière), Bill C-465, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code (automated external defibrillators), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Ms. Raitt (Milton), seconded by Mr. Carrie (Oshawa), Bill C-466, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (disclosure of information to victims), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.


Motions

By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, notwithstanding any standing or special order or usual practice of the House, on Thursday, June 20, 2019, after the taking of any recorded division deferred until the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions, the House shall proceed to the consideration of Private Members’ Business for two hours to consider, during the first hour, the motion for second reading of Bill C-431, An Act to amend the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act (investments), and, during the second hour, the motion for second reading of Bill C-429, An Act to amend the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (packaging), after which the House shall return to the consideration of Government Orders until the ordinary hour of daily adjournment.


By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, in relation to the broadcasting of committee proceedings, after the opening of the 43rd Parliament, and once the necessary infrastructure has been installed, the House authorize: (a) televising or webcasting of up to six simultaneous meetings, provided that no more than two of the meetings are televised; (b) that the electronic media be permitted to video record meetings that are not televised, in accordance with the existing guidelines; and (c) that Standing Order 108(3)(a)(v) be amended to read “the review of and report on the broadcasting of the proceedings of the House and its committees;”.


By unanimous consent, it was resolved, — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize the sacrifices Canadian military families make on a daily basis and the contributions of these families to the fabric of our society, and show appreciation for their ongoing commitment to the safety and security of Canada by designating the third Friday in September of each year “Military Family Appreciation Day".


Presenting Petitions

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were presented as follows:

— by Mrs. Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing), one concerning military medals and decorations (No. 421-04548) and three concerning health care services (Nos. 421-04549 to 421-04551);

— by Mrs. Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville), one concerning assisted suicide (No. 421-04552), one concerning firearms (No. 421-04553) and one concerning sex selection (No. 421-04554);

— by Ms. Ratansi (Don Valley East), one concerning cannabis (No. 421-04555);

— by Mr. Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith), one concerning the use of animals in research (No. 421-04556) and one concerning military facilities (No. 421-04557);

— by Mr. Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot), eight concerning health care services (Nos. 421-04558 to 421-04565), thirty-two concerning sex selection (Nos. 421-04566 to 421-04597), fourteen concerning assisted suicide (Nos. 421-04598 to 421-04611) and forty-six concerning impaired driving (Nos. 421-04612 to 421-04657);

— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), two concerning the pension system (Nos. 421-04658 and 421-04659), one concerning Old Age Security benefits (No. 421-04660), one concerning road transportation (No. 421-04661), two concerning the protection of the environment (Nos. 421-04662 and 421-04663), one concerning environmental pollution (No. 421-04664), one concerning international development and aid (No. 421-04665) and four concerning health care services (Nos. 421-04666 to 421-04669);

— by Ms. Moore (Abitibi—Témiscamingue), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-04670);

— by Mr. Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre), one concerning drinking water (No. 421-04671);

— by Mrs. Zahid (Scarborough Centre), one concerning Libya (No. 421-04672);

— by Mr. Anderson (Cypress Hills—Grasslands), eight concerning medical assistance in dying (Nos. 421-04673 to 421-04680) and one concerning unborn children (No. 421-04681);

— by Ms. Rempel (Calgary Nose Hill), one concerning federal-provincial agreements (No. 421-04682);

— by Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River), two concerning cell phone towers (Nos. 421-04683 and 421-04684), two concerning the grain industry (Nos. 421-04685 and 421-04686), two concerning Old Age Security benefits (Nos. 421-04687 and 421-04688) and one concerning health care services (No. 421-04689);

— by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), one concerning aboriginal affairs (No. 421-04690);

— by Mrs. Lockhart (Fundy Royal), one concerning the grain industry (No. 421-04691);

— by Mr. Anandasangaree (Scarborough—Rouge Park), one concerning refugees (No. 421-04692);

— by Mr. Poilievre (Carleton), one concerning access to information (No. 421-04693);

— by Mrs. Wong (Richmond Centre), one hundred concerning health care services (Nos. 421-04694 to 421-04793);

— by Mr. Dusseault (Sherbrooke), two concerning refugees (Nos. 421-04794 and 421-04795);

— by Ms. Brosseau (Berthier—Maskinongé), one concerning infrastructure funding (No. 421-04796);

— by Mr. Barsalou-Duval (Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères), one concerning the St. Lawrence River (No. 421-04797);

— by Ms. Sahota (Brampton North), one concerning India (No. 421-04798);

— by Mr. Longfield (Guelph), one concerning the Canada Post Corporation (No. 421-04799);

— by Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands), one concerning road transportation (No. 421-04800) and one concerning climate change (No. 421-04801);

— by Mr. Albrecht (Kitchener—Conestoga), one concerning illicit drug use (No. 421-04802);

— by Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-04803), one concerning China (No. 421-04804), one concerning health care services (No. 421-04805), one concerning Afghanistan (No. 421-04806), one concerning Egypt (No. 421-04807) and one concerning refugees (No. 421-04808);

— by Ms. Ramsey (Essex), one concerning Cameroon (No. 421-04809) and two concerning women's rights (Nos. 421-04810 and 421-04811);

— by Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), one concerning housing policy (No. 421-04812).


Questions on the Order Paper

Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the answers to questions Q-2478, Q-2479, Q-2481, Q-2482 and Q-2484 on the Order Paper.


Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into Orders for Return:

Q-2477 — Mr. Trost (Saskatoon—University) — With regard to the Investments to Combat the Criminal Use of Firearms (ICCUF): (a) what has been the total cumulative federal actual spending on ICCUF since its inception; (b) what are the total number of firearm prosecutions initiated; and (c) what are the total number of successful firearm prosecutions? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2477.


Q-2480 — Mr. Trost (Saskatoon—University) — With regard to the total number of serving RCMP officers in each province for each year since 2001: (a) how many were charged with a criminal offence that were (i) violent, (ii) non-violent; (b) how many were convicted of these crimes that were (i) violent, (ii) non-violent; (c) of those charged with these crimes, how many remained on active duty, broken down by crimes that were (i) violent, (ii) non-violent; and (d) how many lost their jobs as a result of these criminal charges that were (i) violent, (ii) non-violent? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2480.


Q-2485 — Mr. Lobb (Huron—Bruce) — With regard to corrections to government websites since January 1, 2016: (a) how many corrections have been made to erroneous, incorrect, or false information placed on government websites; and (b) what are the details of each correction, including the (i) website address, (ii) information which had to be corrected, (iii) corrected information? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2485.


Q-2486 — Mr. Lobb (Huron—Bruce) — With regard to Access to Information Requests received since January 1, 2016, broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity: (a) how many requests required extensions in excess of (i) 180 days, (ii) one year, (iii) two years; (b) in how many cases was the information released in the time period noted in the original extension letter sent to the requestor; (c) in how many cases did the government fail to provide the documents in the time period set out in the original extension letter sent to the requestor; and (d) what is the longest extension for requests currently being processed, broken down by each department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2486.


Q-2487 — Mr. Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies) — With regard to concerns raised by the Privacy Commissioner of Canada about information shared on Facebook: (a) what specific safeguards does each department and agency have in place to ensure that information individuals share with government entities on Facebook is not exploited; (b) does any government department or agency collect information obtained through Facebook, including on interactions individuals have with the government on Facebook and, if so, what are the details, including (i) type of information collected, (ii) number of individuals who have had information collected since January 1, 2016; and (c) what specific action, if any, has each department or agency taken to safeguard information since the concerns were raised by the Commissioner? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2487.


Q-2488 — Mrs. Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London) — With regard to the establishment of the Canadian Drug Agency proposed in Budget 2019: (a) where is the Canadian Drug Agency, or the transition office set up to create the Agency, located; (b) will the Agency be a stand-alone Agency or a division of Health Canada; (c) how many employees or full-time equivalents are currently assigned to the Agency or the establishment of the Agency; (d) which government official is responsible for overseeing the creation of the Agency; and (e) what are the details of all consultations the government has conducted in relation to the Agency, including (i) name of organization, individual, or provincial government consulted, (ii) date, (iii) type of consultation, (iv) results of consultation? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2488.


Q-2489 — Mr. Van Kesteren (Chatham-Kent—Leamington) — With regard to materials prepared for ministers between January 1, 2019, and May 1, 2019: for every briefing document or docket prepared, what is the (i) date, (ii) title or subject matter, (iii) department’s internal tracking number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2489.


Q-2490 — Mr. Van Kesteren (Chatham-Kent—Leamington) — With regard to materials prepared for Ministerial exempt staff members between January 1, 2019, and May 1, 2019: for every briefing document or docket prepared, what is the (i) date, (ii) title or subject matter, (iii) recipient, (iv) department’s internal tracking number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2490.


Q-2491 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — With regard to the government’s sale of assets over $1,000 since January 1, 2016: (a) what were the assets sold, specifying (i) the asset sale price, (ii) the name of the purchaser, (iii) whether multiple bids were received, (iv) for what amount the asset was purchased by the government, (v) the reason for the sale; (b) was a third party used for the sale and, if so, (i) what is the name of the third party, (ii) was this contract tendered or not; (c) in the case where a third party was used, how much was the third party paid for their services; (d) for the government’s sale of stocks, (i) how much of the stock was sold, (ii) how much does the government still hold; (e) for sale of privately held companies in which the government held a position, (i) does the government still hold a position in the company, (ii) did the government have a market assessment done before the sale and, if so, by whom, (iii) what was the difference in the amount the government projected from the sale and the actual amount received; (f) how much income did the asset bring in during the year prior to its sale; and (g) how much was spent marketing the sale of each asset? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2491.


Q-2492 — Mr. Obhrai (Calgary Forest Lawn) — With regard to each expenditure contained in each budget or budget implementation bill since fiscal year 2016-17, inclusively: (a) has the Department of Finance done an economic impact analysis of the expenditure; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, what is the date, name and file number of any record which constitutes part of that analysis; (c) has the Department of Finance relied on any economic impact analysis of any organization outside government on the expenditure or not; (d) if the answer to (c) is affirmative, (i) which organizations analysed the measure, (ii) what is the date, name and file number of any record obtained from that organization which constitutes part of that analysis; and (e) what were the findings of each analysis in (b) and (d), broken down by expenditure? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2492.


Q-2493 — Mr. Obhrai (Calgary Forest Lawn) — With regard to government advertising since January 1, 2016: (a) how much has been spent on billboards, advertising and other information campaigns, broken down by (i) date released, (ii) cost, (iii) topic, (iv) whether any analysis of the effectiveness of the advertising campaign was carried out and, if so, the details of that analysis, (v) medium, including publication or media outlet and type of media used, (vi) purpose, (vii) duration of campaign (including those that are ongoing), (viii) targeted audience, (ix) estimated audience; and (b) what are the details of all records of related correspondence regarding the aforementioned billboards, advertising and other information campaigns, broken down by (i) relevant file numbers, (ii) correspondence or file type, (iii) subject, (iv) date, (v) purpose, (vi) origin, (vii) intended destination, (viii) other officials copied or involved? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2493.


Q-2494 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — With regard to penitentiary farms, and agriculture and agri-food employment operations of CORCAN: (a) in what agriculture and agri-food employment operations are offenders at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions presently engaged, and in what numbers, broken down by location; (b) in what agriculture and agri-food employment operations are offenders at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions planned to engage in 2019 and 2020 respectively, and in what numbers, broken down by location; (c) are offenders at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions engaged, or will they be engaged, in agriculture and agri-food employment operations, at any time, off of Correctional Service of Canada premises and, if so, to what extent, at what locations, by whom are those locations managed, in what numbers, and for what purposes, listed by location; (d) does Correctional Service of Canada or CORCAN have any contracts or relationships, with respect to labour provided through agriculture and agri-food employment operations at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions, with Feihe International or Feihe Canada Royal Milk and, if so, when were they engaged, for what purpose, for what length of time, under what conditions, for what locations, and how will offenders at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions be involved and to what extent, broken down by contract or relationship; (e) does the Correctional Service of Canada or CORCAN have any supply agreements, with respect to products generated by agriculture and agri-food employment operations at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions, with Feihe International or Feihe Canada Royal Milk and, if so, when were they engaged, for what purpose, for what length of time, under what conditions, for what locations, and how will offenders at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions be involved and to what extent, broken down by agreement; (f) of the $4.3 million allocated over five years in Budget 2018 for agriculture and agri-food employment operations at penitentiary farms, how much has been spent, at what locations, and for what purposes, broken down by fiscal year; and (g) what funds have been spent from Correctional Service of Canada's capital budget on infrastructure, equipment, and improvements to penitentiary farm and agriculture and agri-food employment facilities at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions, at what locations, and for what purposes, broken down by fiscal year since 2015? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2494.


Q-2495 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — With regard to Parks Canada water level management: (a) on the last occasion in June, July, or August 2018, for which data is available when a 12-inch stop log was removed from the Bobs Lake Dam, (i) what was the maximum water level increase (in centimetres) measured at Beveridge Dam, Lower Rideau Lake, and Poonamalie Locks, respectively, (ii) what was the period of time before the maximum water level increase was registered at Beveridge Dam, Lower Rideau Lake, and Poonamalie Locks, respectively; (b) what are the water levels on Christie Lake, in five centimetre increments, from 154.5 metres to 156 metres above mean sea level in relation to the rates of water-flow, in cubic meters per second, leaving Christie Lake at Jordan’s Bridge (at the east end of Christie lake); (c) what are the water-flow rates on Christie Lake, in cubic metres per second, leaving the Bobs Lake dam, less the out flow rates at Jordan’s Bridge, in 0.5 cubic meters per second increments, in relation to the rate of water level rise, expressed in millimetres per hour; (d) how will the new Bobs Lake Dam be managed to mitigate upstream and downstream flooding and the potential resultant environmental and property damage; (e) what have been the daily water levels, from January 1, 2000, to the present date, for each of (i) Bobs Lake, (ii) Christie Lake, (iii) Beveridge Dam, (iv) Lower Rideau Lake; (f) what have been the daily maximum water-flow rates, in cubic meters per second, for each of (i) Bobs Lake, (ii) Christie Lake, (iii) Beveridge Dam? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2495.


Q-2496 — Mrs. Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster) — With regard to government contracts awarded to IBM since January 1, 2016: (a) how many sole-sourced contracts have been awarded to IBM; (b) what are the descriptions of these contracts; (c) what are the dollar amounts for these contracts; and (d) what are the dates and duration of each contract? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2496.


Q-2497 — Mr. Barrett (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes) — With regard to the government’s claim that its senator selection process is “non-partisan”: how does it reconcile this claim with the Globe and Mail story which stated that “The Prime Minister’s Office acknowledges that it uses a partisan database called Liberalist to conduct background checks on prospective senators before appointing them to sit as independents”? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2497.


Q-2498 — Mr. Richards (Banff—Airdrie) — With regard to partnerships signed between the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and Huawei since January 1, 2016: (a) what are the details of each partnership, including (i) date signed, (ii) duration of partnership, (iii) terms, (iv) amount of federal financial contribution; and (b) does the Prime Minister’s National Security Advisor approve of these partnerships? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2498.


Q-2499 — Mr. Richards (Banff—Airdrie) — With regard to the approximately 103,000 non-citizens who were found to be on the National Register of Electors illegally: (a) how many voted in the 42nd general election, held in 2015; (b) how many voted in each of the 338 electoral districts in the 42nd general election; (c) how many voted in any federal by-election held since October 20, 2015; and (d) what is the breakdown of (c), by each riding where a by-election has been held? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2499.


Q-2500 — Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar) — With regard to government commitments and the 271 commitments which, according to the Mandate Tracker, the current government has failed to complete as of May 3, 2019: (a) what is the government’s excuse or rationale for not accomplishing each of the 271 commitments not listed as completed or met, broken down by individual commitment; and (b) of the 271 commitments which have not been completed, which ones does the government anticipate completing prior to October 2019? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2500.


Q-2501 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — With respect to the West Block of Parliament: (a) is West Block subject to the Ontario Fire Code and the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, is the building subject to regular fire safety inspections, and on what dates have fire safety inspections taken place since January 2017; (b) is West Block subject to any other form of fire or safety codes or acts and, if so, what are those codes or acts, and what is the extent to which West Block is subject to each; (c) does West Block, as a whole, comply with the Ontario Fire Code and, if so, on what date was this certified; (d) is each space within West Block in compliance with the Ontario Fire Code and, if so, on what date was this certified, broken down by room or space, as applicable; (e) has each of West Block’s stairwells and exits been inspected for compliance with the Ontario Fire Code or the Fire Protection and Prevention Act and, if so, what were the details of instances where concerns, instructions, or conditions were expressed or imposed for compliance purposes; (f) is West Block, or any space or part thereof, subject to or in receipt of any exemptions or waivers to the Ontario Fire Code or the Fire Protection and Prevention Act and, if so, what are the details for each instance the location, room, or space, the subject of the exemption or waiver, the authorizing section of the Fire Code or Fire Protection and Prevention Act, the reason for the exemption or waiver, the date of application for the exemption or waiver, the date the exemption or waiver was granted, by whom the exemption or waiver was granted, any instructions or conditions that accompanied the exemption or waiver and, if applicable, the date on which the exemption or waiver expired, will expire, or was revoked; (g) has West Block, or any space or part thereof, since January 2017, had a request for an exemption or waiver denied and, if so, identify for each instance the location, room, or space, the subject of the request for exemption or waiver, the applicable section of the Fire Code or Fire Protection and Prevention Act under which the request was denied, the reason for the denial, the date requested, the date the exemption or waiver was denied, by whom it was denied, and any instructions or conditions that accompanied it; (h) what spaces in West Block have been identified as being potentially hazardous due to a likelihood of congestion in the event of a fire, evacuation, or other emergency, identifying in each instance the space, the identified hazard, the reason, and any amelioration actions or procedures that have been adopted; (i) have any complaints or concerns been received respecting West Block’s doorways, exits, stairwells, or exit, emergency, or traffic flow signage and, if so, identify in each instance the nature and details of the complaint or concern, the date on which it was received, the institutional or professional affiliation of the source of the complaint or concern, and any actions taken to ameliorate it; (j) respecting installed exit signage, which consists of overhead or high, wall-mounted rectangular signs featuring a white human figure on a green background, what requirements, guidelines, or standards governed and informed the selection, design, placement, and function of this exit signage; and (k) respecting installed exit signage, what are the reasons for using the white-on-green signage, versus red, text-based signage or other types of signage? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2501.


Q-2502 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — With regard to federal government investments in housing, for each fiscal year since 2015-16: (a) what was the total amount of federal funding spent on housing in the city of Vancouver; (b) what was the total amount of federal funding spent on housing in the federal riding of Vancouver Kingsway; (c) how much funding was allocated to each of the following programs and initiatives in the city of Vancouver (i) the Rental Construction Financing initiative, (ii) Proposal Development Funding, (iii) Investment in Affordable Housing, (iv) Affordable Housing Innovation Fund, (v) Non-profit On-Reserve Funding, (vi) Prepayment, (vii) Reno & Retrofit CMHC, (viii) Renovation Programs On Reserve, (ix) Retrofit On-Reserve and Seed Funding; (d) how much funding was allocated to each of the following programs and initiatives in the federal riding of Vancouver Kingsway (i) the Rental Construction Financing initiative, (ii) Proposal Development Funding, (iii) Investment in Affordable Housing, (iv) Affordable Housing Innovation Fund, (v) Non-profit On-Reserve Funding, (vi) Prepayment, (vii) Reno & Retrofit CMHC, (viii) Renovation Programs On Reserve, (ix) Retrofit On-Reserve and Seed Funding; (e) how much federal funding was allocated to housing subsidies in the city of Vancouver for (i) Non-Profit On-Reserve Housing, (ii) Co­operative Housing, (iii) Urban Native Housing, (iv) Non-Profit Housing, (v) Index Linked, (vi) Mortgage Co­operatives, (vii) Rent Geared to Income, (viii) and Federal Community Housing Initiative; (f) how much federal funding was allocated to housing subsidies in the federal riding of Vancouver Kingsway for (i) Non­Profit On-Reserve Housing, (ii) Co-operative Housing, (iii) Urban Native Housing, (iv) Non-Profit Housing, (v) Index Linked, (vi) Mortgage Co-operatives, (vii) Rent Geared to Income, (viii) Federal Community Housing Initiative; (g) what was the total amount of federal housing funding distributed as grants in the city of Vancouver; (h) what was the total amount of federal housing funding distributed as grants in the federal riding of Vancouver Kingsway; (i) what was the total amount of federal housing funding distributed as loans in the city of Vancouver; and (j) what was the total amount of federal housing funding distributed as loans in the federal riding of Vancouver Kingsway? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2502.


Q-2503 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — With regard to government funding for each fiscal year from 2015-16 to 2019-20 allocated within the constituency of Vancouver Kingsway: what is the total amount, broken down by (i) department or agency, (ii) initiative, (iii) amount? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2503.


Q-2504 — Mr. Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola) — With regard to the Allowance for people aged 60 to 64 program: (a) how many people receive this allowance each year; (b) how many people apply; (c) how many request are approved; (d) for the requests that are denied, what are the three most common reasons invoked; (e) how many people are deemed ineligible, and what are the three most common reasons; (f) what was the total budget to deliver the program, broken down for the last five years; (g) what was actually spent in the last five years, broken down by province and territory; (h) how many full-time equivalents and part-time equivalents work directly on the program; (i) how much does the program cost to administer; (j) how is the program marketed; (k) what were the advertising costs and how much was budgeted and spent in the last five years; (l) has the government reviewed this program and, if so, what was found; and (m) for the reviews in (l), are there reports of reviews available online and, if so, where? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-2504.

Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Trudeau (Prime Minister), seconded by Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), — That Bill C-100, An Act to implement the Agreement between Canada, the United States of America and the United Mexican States, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on International Trade;

And of the amendment of Ms. Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh), seconded by Mr. Masse (Windsor West), — That the motion be amended by deleting all the words after the word “That” and substituting the following:

“the House decline to give second reading to Bill C-100, An Act to implement the Agreement between Canada, the United States of America and the United Mexican States, because it:

(a) fails to improve labour provisions that are necessary to protect good jobs;

(b) allows for an extension of drug patents that will significantly increase the cost of medicine for Canadians;

(c) leaves the environment vulnerable due to the absence of clear, enforceable protection provisions;

(d) is being rushed through the legislative process, without adequate time and attention for such a crucial trade agreement;

(e) will shift the levers of power within the economy away from governments and workers, in favour of corporations, by weakening public regulations on public health and the environment; and

(f) puts the poorest and most marginalized Canadians at further risk by failing to ensure the protection of human rights, gender equality and inclusive economic growth.”.

The debate continued.

Private Members' Business

At 5:31 p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 30(7), the House proceeded to the consideration of Private Members' Business.

Ms. Raitt (Milton), seconded by Mr. Carrie (Oshawa), moved, — That, in the opinion of the House: (a) rights of victims deserve proper consideration in our criminal justice system; (b) the parole system must avoid unnecessary revictimization; and (c) the government should amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act prior to the next election, so as to provide victims with an explanation of how dates are determined for offenders’ eligibility for temporary absences, releases and parole. (Private Members' Business M-229)

Debate arose thereon.

Pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the Order was dropped to the bottom of the order of precedence on the Order Paper.

Government Orders

Pursuant to Standing Order 57, Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), seconded by Mr. Lametti (Minister of Justice), moved, — That, in relation to the consideration of Senate amendments to Bill C-75, An Act to amend the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other Acts and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, the debate not be further adjourned.

Pursuant to Standing Order 67.1, the House proceeded to the question period regarding the moving of the closure motion.

The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:

(Division No. 1378 -- Vote no 1378)
YEAS: 149, NAYS: 67

YEAS -- POUR

Aldag
Alghabra
Anandasangaree
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Baylis
Beech
Bennett
Bibeau
Bittle
Blair
Boissonnault
Bossio
Bratina
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Cormier
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Drouin
Dubourg
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Easter
Ehsassi
El-Khoury

Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fergus
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardie
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe

Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lightbound
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
McDonald
McGuinty
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morrissey
Murray
Nassif
Ng
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Picard
Poissant

Qualtrough
Ratansi
Robillard
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sorbara
Spengemann
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Whalen
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Zahid

Total: -- 149

NAYS -- CONTRE

Albas
Aubin
Beaulieu
Bergen
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brosseau
Cannings
Caron
Carrie
Chong
Choquette
Clarke
Cullen

Davidson
Doherty
Dreeshen
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Eglinski
Fast
Finley
Gallant
Garrison
Genuis
Hardcastle
Harder
Hughes
Johns
Jolibois
Julian

Kent
Kmiec
Lake
Lobb
Lukiwski
Manly
Masse (Windsor West)
Mathyssen
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Nantel
Nater
Pauzé
Plamondon
Poilievre
Quach

Ramsey
Rankin
Reid
Saroya
Schmale
Sopuck
Sorenson
Stanton
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Thériault
Trudel
Viersen
Wagantall
Waugh
Webber

Total: -- 67

PAIRED -- PAIRÉS

Beaulieu

LeBlanc

Total: -- 2

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Lametti (Minister of Justice), seconded by Mr. Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness), — That a Message be sent to the Senate to acquaint Their Honours that, in relation to Bill C-75, An Act to amend the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other Acts and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, the House:

agrees with amendments 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12(b), 13 and 14 made by the Senate;

proposes that amendment 3 be amended to read as follows:

“3. Clause 239, pages 90 and 91:

(a) on page 90, replace lines 2 and 3 with the following:

“dictable offence that is punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment, other than an offence listed in section 469, the justice”;

(b) on page 90, replace lines 18 and 19 with the following:

“able by 14 years or more of imprisonment, an offence listed in section 469 that is not punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment or an”;

(c) on page 90, replace line 44 with the following:

“section 469 that is punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment,”;

(d) on page 91, replace lines 20 and 21 with the following:

“offence listed in section 469 that is punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment, the justice shall endorse on the informa-”;”;

proposes that amendment 4 be amended to read as follows:

“4. Clause 240, pages 92 and 93:

(a) on page 92, replace line 11 with the following:

“14 years or more of imprisonment, other than an offence mentioned”;

(b) on page 92, replace lines 25 to 27 with the following:

“offence that is punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment, an offence listed in section 469 that is not punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment or an offence mentioned in section”;

(c) on page 92, replace line 41 with the following:

“section 469 that is punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment,”;

(d) on page 93, replace line 20 with the following:

“is punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment, the justice or”;”;

proposes that, as a consequence of Senate amendments 3 and 4, the following amendment be added:

1. Clause 238, page 89: Replace line 33 with the following:

“fence that is punishable by 14 years or more of imprisonment is be-”;

proposes that amendment 6 be amended by replacing the words “an intimate partner — and, in particular, a partner” with the words “a person” and by replacing the words “on the basis of sex or is an Aboriginal person” with the words “because of personal circumstances — including because the person is Aboriginal and female”;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 10 made by the Senate because the Bill already provides flexibility to the provinces and territories with respect to agent representation while also recognizing regional diversity in respect of how legal representation is regulated across Canada, and because the amendment could have unintended repercussions for the provinces and territories; and, the Government continues to work with the provinces and territories to support the effective implementation of these reforms;

proposes that amendment 12(a) in the English version be amended by replacing the words “apply in Bill C-45” with the words “apply if Bill C-45”.

The debate continued.

At 8:01 p.m., pursuant to Order made earlier today under the provisions of Standing Order 57, the Speaker interrupted the proceedings.

The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:

(Division No. 1379 -- Vote no 1379)
YEAS: 161, NAYS: 58

YEAS -- POUR

Aldag
Alghabra
Amos
Anandasangaree
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Bennett
Bibeau
Bittle
Blair
Boissonnault
Bossio
Boudrias
Bratina
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Chen
Cormier
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Drouin
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Easter
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis

Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fergus
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardie
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lightbound

Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Manly
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morrissey
Murray
Nassif
Ng
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poissant
Qualtrough

Ratansi
Robillard
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sorbara
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Weir
Whalen
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Zahid

Total: -- 161

NAYS -- CONTRE

Aboultaif
Albas
Aubin
Bergen
Bezan
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brosseau
Cannings
Caron
Carrie
Choquette
Clarke

Clement
Cullen
Davidson
Doherty
Dubé
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Eglinski
Fast
Finley
Garrison
Genuis
Hardcastle
Harder
Hughes

Johns
Jolibois
Julian
Kmiec
Lake
Lobb
Lukiwski
Masse (Windsor West)
Mathyssen
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Nantel
Nater
Poilievre
Quach
Ramsey

Rankin
Rayes
Reid
Saroya
Schmale
Sorenson
Stanton
Stetski
Trudel
Viersen
Wagantall
Waugh
Webber

Total: -- 58

PAIRED -- PAIRÉS

Beaulieu

LeBlanc

Total: -- 2


The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Trudeau (Prime Minister), seconded by Ms. Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons), — That Bill C-100, An Act to implement the Agreement between Canada, the United States of America and the United Mexican States, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on International Trade;

And of the amendment of Ms. Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh), seconded by Mr. Masse (Windsor West), — That the motion be amended by deleting all the words after the word “That” and substituting the following:

“the House decline to give second reading to Bill C-100, An Act to implement the Agreement between Canada, the United States of America and the United Mexican States, because it:

(a) fails to improve labour provisions that are necessary to protect good jobs;

(b) allows for an extension of drug patents that will significantly increase the cost of medicine for Canadians;

(c) leaves the environment vulnerable due to the absence of clear, enforceable protection provisions;

(d) is being rushed through the legislative process, without adequate time and attention for such a crucial trade agreement;

(e) will shift the levers of power within the economy away from governments and workers, in favour of corporations, by weakening public regulations on public health and the environment; and

(f) puts the poorest and most marginalized Canadians at further risk by failing to ensure the protection of human rights, gender equality and inclusive economic growth.”.

The debate continued.

At 9:43 p.m., pursuant to Order made Thursday, June 13, 2019, under the provisions of Standing Order 78(3), the Speaker interrupted the proceedings.

The question was put on the amendment and, pursuant to Order made Tuesday, May 28, 2019, the recorded division was deferred until Thursday, June 20, 2019, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.


The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness), seconded by Mr. Champagne (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities), — That a Message be sent to the Senate to acquaint Their Honours that, in relation to Bill C-83, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and another Act, the House:

agrees with amendments 1, 4(a) and 5(b) made by the Senate;

proposes that amendment 2 be amended by replacing the text of the amendment with the following:

“(c.1) the Service considers alternatives to custody in a penitentiary, including the alternatives referred to in sections 29 and 81;

(c.2) the Service ensures the effective delivery of programs to offenders, including correctional, educational, vocational training and volunteer programs, with a view to improving access to alternatives to custody in a penitentiary and to promoting rehabilitation;”;

proposes that amendment 3 be amended by replacing the text of the amendment with the following:

“(2.01) In order to ensure that the plan can be developed in a manner that takes any mental health needs of the offender into consideration, the institutional head shall, as soon as practicable after the day on which the offender is received but not later than the 30th day after that day, refer the offender’s case to the portion of the Service that administers health care for the purpose of conducting a mental health assessment of the offender.”;

proposes that amendment 4(b)(i) be replaced by the following amendment:

“1. Clause 10, page 7: replace lines 25 to 28 with the following:

“(2) The Service shall ensure that the measures include

(a) a referral of the inmate’s case, within 24 hours after the inmate’s transfer into the structured intervention unit, to the portion of the Service that administers health care for the purpose of conducting a mental health assessment of the inmate; and

(b) a visit to the inmate at least once every day by a registered health care professional employed or engaged by the Service.”;”;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 4(b)(ii) because it may not support the professional autonomy and clinical independence of healthcare professionals and does not take into account the inmate’s willingness to be transferred to a hospital or the hospital’s capacity to treat the inmate;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 5(a) because it would result in a significant addition to the workload of provincial superior courts, and because further assessments and consultations with the provinces would be required to determine the probable legislative, operational and financial implications at federal and provincial levels, including amendments to the Judges Act and provincial legislation and the appointment of additional judges;

proposes that amendment 6 be amended to read as follows:

“6. Clause 14, page 16:

(a) replace line 7 with the following:

“48 (1) Subject to subsection (2), a staff member of the same sex as the inmate may”;

(b) add the following after line 15:

“(2) A body scan search of the inmate shall be conducted instead of the strip search if

(a) the body scan search is authorized under section 48.1; and

(b) a prescribed body scanner in proper working order is in the area where the strip search would be conducted.”;”;

proposes that amendment 7(a) be amended by replacing the text of the French version of the amendment with the following:

“c) l’identité et la culture autochtones du délinquant, notamment son passé familial et son historique d’adoption.”;

proposes that amendment 7(b) be amended to read as follows:

“(b) replace lines 32 and 33 with the following:

“ing the assessment of the risk posed by an Indigenous offender unless those factors could decrease the level of risk.”;”;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 8 because extending the concept of healing lodges designed specifically for Indigenous corrections to other unspecified groups is a major policy change that should only be contemplated following considerable study and consultation, and because it would impede the ability of the Correctional Service of Canada, which is responsible for the care and custody of inmates pursuant to section 5 of the Act, to be part of decisions to transfer inmates to healing lodges;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 9 because extending of the concept of community release designed specifically for Indigenous corrections to other unspecified groups is a major policy change that should only be contemplated following considerable study and consultation;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 10 because allowing offenders’ sentences to be shortened due to the conduct of correctional staff, particularly given the existence of other remedies, is a major policy change that should only be contemplated following considerable study and consultation, including with provincial partners, victims’ representatives, stakeholder groups and other actors in the criminal justice system;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 11 because five years is an appropriate amount of time to allow for robust and meaningful assessment of the new provisions following full implementation.

The debate continued.

Motions

By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, notwithstanding any Standing or Special Order or usual practice of the House:

(a) the motion respecting the Senate Amendments to Bill C-91, An Act respecting Indigenous Languages, be deemed adopted;

(b) the motion respecting the Senate Amendments to Bill C-92, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, be deemed adopted;

(c) Bill C-98, An Act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act and the Canada Border Services Agency Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, be deemed to have been concurred in at the report stage, and deemed read a third time and passed;

(d) Bill C-101, An Act to amend the Customs Tariff and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act, be deemed to have been concurred in at the report stage, and deemed read a third time and passed on division; and

(e) when the House adjourns on Thursday, June 20, 2019, it shall stand adjourned until Monday, September 16, 2019, provided that, for the purposes of any Standing Order, it shall be deemed to have been adjourned pursuant to Standing Order 28 and be deemed to have sat on Friday, June 21, 2019.

Government Orders

The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness), seconded by Mr. Champagne (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities), — That a Message be sent to the Senate to acquaint Their Honours that, in relation to Bill C-83, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and another Act, the House:

agrees with amendments 1, 4(a) and 5(b) made by the Senate;

proposes that amendment 2 be amended by replacing the text of the amendment with the following:

“(c.1) the Service considers alternatives to custody in a penitentiary, including the alternatives referred to in sections 29 and 81;

(c.2) the Service ensures the effective delivery of programs to offenders, including correctional, educational, vocational training and volunteer programs, with a view to improving access to alternatives to custody in a penitentiary and to promoting rehabilitation;”;

proposes that amendment 3 be amended by replacing the text of the amendment with the following:

“(2.01) In order to ensure that the plan can be developed in a manner that takes any mental health needs of the offender into consideration, the institutional head shall, as soon as practicable after the day on which the offender is received but not later than the 30th day after that day, refer the offender’s case to the portion of the Service that administers health care for the purpose of conducting a mental health assessment of the offender.”;

proposes that amendment 4(b)(i) be replaced by the following amendment:

“1. Clause 10, page 7: replace lines 25 to 28 with the following:

“(2) The Service shall ensure that the measures include

(a) a referral of the inmate’s case, within 24 hours after the inmate’s transfer into the structured intervention unit, to the portion of the Service that administers health care for the purpose of conducting a mental health assessment of the inmate; and

(b) a visit to the inmate at least once every day by a registered health care professional employed or engaged by the Service.”;”;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 4(b)(ii) because it may not support the professional autonomy and clinical independence of healthcare professionals and does not take into account the inmate’s willingness to be transferred to a hospital or the hospital’s capacity to treat the inmate;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 5(a) because it would result in a significant addition to the workload of provincial superior courts, and because further assessments and consultations with the provinces would be required to determine the probable legislative, operational and financial implications at federal and provincial levels, including amendments to the Judges Act and provincial legislation and the appointment of additional judges;

proposes that amendment 6 be amended to read as follows:

“6. Clause 14, page 16:

(a) replace line 7 with the following:

“48 (1) Subject to subsection (2), a staff member of the same sex as the inmate may”;

(b) add the following after line 15:

“(2) A body scan search of the inmate shall be conducted instead of the strip search if

(a) the body scan search is authorized under section 48.1; and

(b) a prescribed body scanner in proper working order is in the area where the strip search would be conducted.”;”;

proposes that amendment 7(a) be amended by replacing the text of the French version of the amendment with the following:

“c) l’identité et la culture autochtones du délinquant, notamment son passé familial et son historique d’adoption.”;

proposes that amendment 7(b) be amended to read as follows:

“(b) replace lines 32 and 33 with the following:

“ing the assessment of the risk posed by an Indigenous offender unless those factors could decrease the level of risk.”;”;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 8 because extending the concept of healing lodges designed specifically for Indigenous corrections to other unspecified groups is a major policy change that should only be contemplated following considerable study and consultation, and because it would impede the ability of the Correctional Service of Canada, which is responsible for the care and custody of inmates pursuant to section 5 of the Act, to be part of decisions to transfer inmates to healing lodges;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 9 because extending of the concept of community release designed specifically for Indigenous corrections to other unspecified groups is a major policy change that should only be contemplated following considerable study and consultation;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 10 because allowing offenders’ sentences to be shortened due to the conduct of correctional staff, particularly given the existence of other remedies, is a major policy change that should only be contemplated following considerable study and consultation, including with provincial partners, victims’ representatives, stakeholder groups and other actors in the criminal justice system;

respectfully disagrees with amendment 11 because five years is an appropriate amount of time to allow for robust and meaningful assessment of the new provisions following full implementation.

The debate continued.

Mr. Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly), seconded by Ms. Trudel (Jonquière), moved the following amendment, — That the motion be amended by deleting all the words after the word “That” and substituting the following: “the amendments made by the Senate to Bill C-83, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and the Abolition of Early Parole Act, be now read a second time and concurred in.”.

Debate arose thereon.

Messages from the Senate

Messages were received from the Senate as follows:

— ORDERED: That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that House that the Senate has passed Bill C-84, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (bestiality and animal fighting), without amendment.

— ORDERED: That, in relation to Bill C-58, An Act to amend the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that House of the following:

That the Senate agrees to the amendments made by the House of Commons to Senate amendments, including amendments made in consequence of Senate amendments; and

That the Senate does not insist on its amendments to which the House of Commons has disagreed.

— ORDERED: That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that House that the Senate has passed Bill C-88, An Act to amend the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act and the Canada Petroleum Resources Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, without amendment.

— ORDERED: That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that House that the Senate has passed Bill C-93, An Act to provide no-cost, expedited record suspensions for simple possession of cannabis, without amendment.

Returns and Reports Deposited with the Clerk of the House

Pursuant to Standing Order 32(1), papers deposited with the Clerk of the House were laid upon the Table as follows:

— by Mr. Champagne (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities) — Reports of the Office of Infrastructure of Canada for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019, pursuant to the Access to Information Act and to the Privacy Act, R.S. 1985, c. A-1 and P-21, sbs. 72(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8561-421-876-05. (Pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(h)(v), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics)

— by Mr. Garneau (Minister of Transport) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 28th Report of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, "Assessing the Impact of Aircraft Noise in the Vicinity of Major Canadian Airports" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-533), presented to the House on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-533.

— by Mr. Garneau (Minister of Transport) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 29th Report of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, "Supporting Canada’s Flight Schools" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-540), presented to the House on Tuesday, April 9, 2019. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-540.

— by Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 18th Report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, "Clean Growth and Climate Change in Canada: Forestry, Agriculture and Waste" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-546), presented to the House on Tuesday, April 9, 2019. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-546.

— by Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 19th Report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, "Clean Growth and Climate Change in Canada: How Canada Can Lead Internationally" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-547), presented to the House on Tuesday, April 9, 2019. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-547.

— by Ms. McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change) — 2019-2020 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, pursuant to the Federal Sustainable Development Act, S.C. 2008, c. 33, sbs. 7(2). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-1050-03. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development)

— by Ms. Murray (President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Digital Government) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 88th Report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, "Question of Privilege Related to the Matter of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Publications Respecting Bill C-71, An Act to Amend Certain Acts and Regulations in Relation to Firearms" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-534), presented to the House on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-534.

— by Ms. Murray (President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Digital Government) — Response of the government, pursuant to Standing Order 109, to the 15th Report of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, "Impacts of Canada’s Regulatory Structure on Small Business: between protection and competition" (Sessional Paper No. 8510-421-552), presented to the House on Monday, April 29, 2019. — Sessional Paper No. 8512-421-552.

Petitions Filed with the Clerk of the House

Pursuant to Standing Order 36, petitions certified by the Clerk of Petitions were filed as follows:

— by Mr. Waugh (Saskatoon—Grasswood), one concerning the use of animals in research (No. 421-04813);

— by Mr. Allison (Niagara West), one concerning refugees (No. 421-04814);

— by Mr. Hoback (Prince Albert), two concerning international trade (Nos. 421-04815 and 421-04816), seven concerning medical assistance in dying (Nos. 421-04817 to 421-04823), one concerning the grain industry (No. 421-04824), three concerning discrimination (Nos. 421-04825, 421-04827 and 421-04828), one concerning abortion (No. 421-04826) and eight concerning firearms (Nos. 421-04829 to 421-04836);

— by Mr. Kent (Thornhill), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-04837);

— by Mr. Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies), one concerning organ transplants (No. 421-04838);

— by Ms. O'Connell (Pickering—Uxbridge), one concerning the protection of the environment (No. 421-04839) and one concerning the use of animals in research (No. 421-04840);

— by Mr. Schiefke (Vaudreuil—Soulanges), one concerning the grain industry (No. 421-04841).

Adjournment

At midnight, the Speaker adjourned the House later today at 10:00 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).