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42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION

EDITED HANSARD • NUMBER 318

CONTENTS

Wednesday, June 20, 2018




House of Commons Debates

VOLUME 148 
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NUMBER 318 
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1st SESSION 
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42nd PARLIAMENT 

OFFICIAL REPORT (HANSARD)

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Speaker: The Honourable Geoff Regan

    The House met at 2 p.m.

Prayer


[Statements by Members]

  (1405)  

[English]

    We will now have the singing of O Canada, led by the hon. member for Portage—Lisgar.
     [Members sang the national anthem]
    Order. I may have another chance later, but before we begin, as we are coming to the end today, I want to thank all our wonderful pages, the procedural staff, the camera operators, the television director, the interpreters, the guards, the cleaners, the people who move furniture around, the finance staff, the information technology staff, human resources, and all the folks who provide services to members of Parliament, committees, and the House of Commons.
    Some hon. members: Hear, hear!
    The Speaker: I know that many members will be doing a lot of driving this summer and travelling around. I ask members to remember to be safe, to stay safe, to rest if they need to, and to be careful on the roads, because we have to be concerned about that at this time of year especially.
    I hope members have a safe and healthy summer.

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

[Statements by Members]

[Translation]

Quebec's National Holiday

    Mr. Speaker, Quebeckers are no strangers to tense political debate, but we are lovers, not fighters. We debate because we each have our own vision of how Quebec should be, and we all feel our own way is the best.
    We debate because we are inspired by our constituents, by people who are proud of who they are and what they do, proud of their families, and proud of the place they call home. They are creative people. They write songs, build airplanes, and jazz up shepherd's pie. They stand by each other. They built themselves a society that gives anyone who wants to work hard a chance. When they decide to do something, they give it their all, knowing that they have just one life to live. That is what we will be celebrating this weekend.
    I hope everyone will have a chance to celebrate with good people, I hope the weather will co-operate, and I hope everyone has a great time. Happy national holiday to all Quebeckers.

Farmers' Market in La Prairie

    Mr. Speaker, the Marché des jardiniers in La Prairie is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The minister and I will be heading there next Monday to mark the occasion.
    Three Montérégie farmers, Paul Boudrias, Honoré Daigneault, and Moïse Riendeau, led the initiative to create the market in 1968, supported by the Société de l'agriculture de La Prairie. Three generations of vegetable producers have followed, which shows the market's popularity. There are 96 stalls accommodating about 30 merchants.
    The Marché des jardiniers is a very special place in my community. It is where customers can meet their farmers, where they can see for themselves the quality, freshness, and variety of products on offer, while speaking directly with the people who work so tirelessly to produce them.
    To highlight the importance of those relationships, I wish to salute all producers and the Quebec Produce Growers Association. These are the people who feed our families, and they are the driving force behind our vibrant local agricultural sector.

[English]

Retirement Congratulations

    Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to my friend Ed Anderson, who recently retired as the mayor of Boissevain-Morton.
    First elected to the town council in 1980, Ed then served as mayor from 1994. Altogether, that is 38 years of continuous public service. During his tenure, the community built a new water plant, a new fire hall, a new library, a new theatre, a new recycling building, and much more. When the community was in need, Ed rolled up his sleeves and attracted a physician and two new veterinarians to town. With Ed at the helm, Boissevain is now known for its beauty, winning multiple Communities in Bloom awards, including at the international level.
    I want to thank Ed for his incredible commitment to the people of Boissevain. The town is certainly better off than it was 38 years ago, and that is a tribute to his leadership. I wish him all the best in his retirement and want to thank his wife Lynn and daughters Erin and Darcy for lending their father during his time of public service.

Canada Summer Jobs

    Mr. Speaker, as the school year winds down, kids across the country are gearing up for their jam-packed summer vacations. Students from kindergarten to post-secondary have big plans for the summer, and for many older students in my riding, those plans include their summer jobs.
    Thanks to the Canada summer jobs program, 526 students from across Avalon will have meaningful and exciting work this summer. This totals over $1.2 million in investments in the youth of my riding, who will work as camp counsellors and soccer coaches and at festivals and seasonal shops, where they will all learn, grow, and have fun. This is an important investment, and I am proud of our government's commitment to keep investing in our youth.
    On that note, I would like to wish all students and teachers in Avalon a safe and happy summer holiday. I ask everyone to be extra cautious as they drive around at this time of year and to have an eye out for kids as they are busy playing and enjoying their time off.
    Happy summer vacation to one and all.

  (1410)  

Indigenous Peoples Day

    Mr. Speaker, every year on June 21, first nations, Métis, and Inuit people gather in their communities to celebrate National Indigenous Peoples Day. Over the course of this weekend, there will be concerts and dances, traditional powwows, parades, community meals, and the sharing of stories.
    Many cultural exchanges take place on Indigenous Peoples Day, and today I want to give special recognition to all the elders, community organizers, and indigenous women across Canada who make these celebrations special. Without the work of volunteers like them, June 21 would not be what it is today. I wish everyone in Canada could see their efforts.
    I invite everyone from across Canada to contact their local first nation, Métis, or Inuit communities to see what events they are hosting this year. I invite everyone to experience our unique cultures, to share photos, to learn our shared history, to maybe learn a phrase or two in the local language, and to celebrate everything there is about indigenous people in Canada. Happy Indigenous Peoples Day.

Justice Robyn Diamond

    Mr. Speaker, May 29 marked the passing of the Honourable Madam Justice Robyn Diamond, whose work in family law has changed the lives of children and families in Manitoba, Canada, and around the world.
    Justice Diamond was the first female legal manager of the crown counsel's family law unit in Manitoba. In September 1989, she was appointed a judge on the Court of Queen's Bench. She represented Canada in the International Hague Network of Judges and attended the fourth, fifth, and sixth special commissions in The Hague.
    The longest-serving federally appointed female judge in Manitoba, and one of the 10 longest-sitting female judges in Canada, Justice Diamond's passion for the legal rights and protection of children will be greatly missed by her colleagues and by members of the Canadian and international judiciary.
    Our thoughts are with her sons, Richard and Michael, and husband, Harvey, as they celebrate her life of dedication to family, friends, and the community.

Member for Lambton—Kent—Middlesex

    Mr. Speaker, as we are wrapping up this legislative session before we head back to our ridings, I am reminded of the time, the commitment, and the responsibility we carry with this job. For 12 and a half years, I have had the privilege of serving my constituents in Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, and I am not done yet. We all know that this job requires the support of our families, our significant others, and our spouses. For me, my biggest supporter is my wife, Barb. Sometimes I need that person in front of me to slow me down, and sometimes at the end of the day, I need that little bit of wind at my back.
    No, it it not her birthday, and it is not our anniversary. It is simply that I want to say to her, “Thank you, and you're the best.”

Public Safety

    Mr. Speaker, recently Surrey has witnessed several shootings. I am terribly saddened by the gang and gun violence and the tragic loss of life. Surrey is in crisis, and the residents are concerned for our community. That is why I am requesting that the Minister of Public Safety, and/or his parliamentary secretary, come to Surrey and meet with stakeholders and also discuss the allocation of $326 million for our gangs and gun violence strategy. Surrey requires the funding immediately. We must come together for constructive dialogue and bring forward concrete solutions to help save the lives of our youth. Enough is enough.

Ramadan Rangers

    Mr. Speaker, over the past three years, the Ramadan Rangers, from my riding, have been raising money and collecting donations of food and toys for local organizations in the spirit of Ramadan.
     The Ramadan Rangers started with seven kids who wanted to support their community during Ramadan. In their first year, the Rangers collected food for local food banks. Last year they collected toys, which went to children's hospitals. This year the Rangers have grown to over 100 children, who have been working tirelessly to raise money for three women's shelters. Last week they announced that they had raised $27,000 in support of Halton Women's Place, Sakeenah Homes, and Nisa Homes. All three organizations provide services for women and children experiencing violence and are dedicated to ending violence against women.
    I am extremely proud of the Ramadan Rangers, who embody the giving spirit of Ramadan and of Oakville North—Burlington.

  (1415)  

Tribute to Member of the Clergy

    Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise and pay tribute to my dear friend Father Stefano Penna. Father Penna is returning to the diocese of Saskatoon after many years serving the good people of Edmonton at Neuman College, the Annunciation Catholic Church in my riding, and many other organizations. He has a heart the size of the Prairies and continues to give to anyone in need.
     Father Penna is one of those lifelong learners, with an insatiable thirst for knowledge. His alma mater includes the University of Saskatchewan, the Toronto School of Theology, Rome's Gregorian University, and a school you might have heard of, Yale University. However, despite all his schooling, he has never learned how to deliver a homily in a timely fashion.
     I would need the whole day to note all that Father Penna has done in serving his community and his faith. However, seeing as I have only a minute, I will thank Father Penna for his friendship, his guidance, his wisdom, and all that he has done in serving his community. Saskatoon is blessed to have him back, and Edmonton is blessed for having had him.

Child Poverty

    Mr. Speaker, all children are precious. It is very important that we give them not only a healthy and safe environment to grow up in, but also the tools to help them be successful in our society. Over the years, Cape Breton has seen challenging economic times, which has created one of the highest child poverty rates in the country.
    With the various programs and investments by our government, we are turning the Cape Breton economy around. With the Canada child benefit, payments in my riding alone average $720 per family each month. This is helping 12,000 children. What I am hearing from parents at home is that this money not only helps with necessities, but it also helps to put kids in after-school activities such as soccer, hockey, and dance.
     Our government has additionally invested $35 million in early learning and child care in our province over the next three years. Are we there yet? No. That is why I am looking forward to our government's poverty reduction strategy, which will be released in the upcoming weeks. I commend all who had input into this strategy, and I hope all members will support it when it comes before the House.

Teaching Excellence

    Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize an extraordinary educator from my riding, Fundy Royal. Mr. Benjamin Kelly, of Caledonia Regional High School in Hillsborough, received the 2018 Prime Minister's Award for Teaching Excellence in STEM. Mr. Kelly is an inspirational teacher who understands that our lives as Canadians are becoming more digital every single day, and that it is essential for future generations to take advantage of the unparalleled global opportunities provided by STEM education.
    Mr. Kelly's students sail the “seven Cs” in class, with hands-on learning about collaboration, communication, critical thinking, creativity, character, citizenship, and computational thinking. The work of Mr. Kelly and so many other amazing educators in schools throughout Fundy Royal, and indeed across Canada, is bringing our government's investments in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to life and preparing our youth for the economic opportunities of tomorrow.

Human Rights

    Mr. Speaker, recently some of my Conservative colleagues and I met with a group of young Yazidis who were previously in captivity, enslaved by Daesh. These young people proceeded to tell us stories that were truly the things of nightmares. Loved ones being killed before their eyes, children being sexually assaulted, and torture are only a few of the many horrors they have lived through.
     While many people seem to believe that the war against Daesh has been won, thousands of Yazidis and other religious and ethnic minorities are still enslaved by this death cult, and even more have been displaced. I ask the government, and all Canadians, not to forget the Yazidis who are still in captivity and all those who are still being persecuted and terrorized by Daesh.
    Canada must continue to prioritize Yazidi refugees and work to improve the UNHCR selection process to ensure that internally displaced people like the Yazidis qualify for resettlement, so that these families can be reunited.

World Refugee Day

    Mr. Speaker, on this World Refugee Day, I rise to commemorate the strength, courage, and perseverance of the 22.5 million refugees presently around the world. Our world has become an unwelcome place for refugees. As people flee to safety, to borders or to shores, they are routinely barred from entry. Refugee families and children are split up and incarcerated. Women and children face sexual and gender-based violence at alarming rates. LGBTQ2 refugees face increased persecution. Refugees live in deplorable conditions, with limited food, medicine, and water. Being a refugee is not a crime, and being born a refugee should not be a life sentence.

  (1420)  

[Translation]

     Canadians are proud to have welcomed generation after generation of refugees. However, we cannot ignore our failures, such as the Komagata Maru and MS St. Louis incidents. We need to learn from the past and make sure we offer a safe, welcoming environment to all those who reach our borders seeking protection.

[English]

World Refugee Day

    Mr. Speaker, today is World Refugee Day. Globally, conflict, persecution, and disaster have forced over 65 million people to flee their homes in search of safety. Over 22 million are recognized as refugees. Half of them are children. Wealthy nations are increasingly turning a blind eye to this humanitarian crisis and are closing the doors to refugees. The U.S. has forcibly torn migrant children away from their parents.
    Canada has long been a defender of human rights and a champion for the most vulnerable, but how far we have fallen from the pedestal, from action taken because of Alan Kurdi to the inaction in the face of the 2,000 frightened migrant children locked up in baby jails.
    On World Refugee Day, l thank all the aid workers, and I call on all parliamentarians to use their voices to defend the voiceless, and to use their power to aid the powerless.

Calgary Stampede

    Mr Speaker, I rise today to shamelessly promote my hometown and one of the greatest annual traditions in the country, the Calgary Stampede. Having joined with the Calgary Exhibition in 1912, the Stampede has weathered recessions, world wars, floods, and even a relocation to New York.
    However, thanks to the vision of Guy Weadick, it now attracts over one million visitors a year. Showcasing the best of our province, our western culture, and our strength as a community, the Stampede is just simply 10 days of gosh darn fun.
    Whether one wants to ride the midway, watch the rodeo, take in a grandstand show, or attend one of the amazing concerts, I invite everyone on both sides of the House to come to Calgary for the Stampede. Yahoo.

Cannabis Act

    Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the passing of Bill C-45 in the Senate and to recognize the substantial work undertaken by all parliamentarians. I sincerely thank senior officials and our incredible support staff who have contributed to legislation that will legalize and strictly regulate the production, distribution, and consumption of cannabis in Canada. The evidence that nearly a century of prohibition has failed us is overwhelming, and it has compelled us to do a better job of protecting our kids and keeping our communities safe.
    I want to acknowledge the excellent work of our task force and the thousands of Canadians who have contributed to the national discussion on this important issue. We are indebted to our provincial and territorial counterparts, indigenous leaders, and municipalities for their hard work and partnership. We will continue to work with all levels of government, indigenous communities, and law enforcement to transition to a responsible legal framework that works for all Canadians.
     As the process of implementation unfolds, I would remind everyone that until the current criminal prohibition is repealed and replaced, the law remains in effect and should be obeyed.

ORAL QUESTIONS

[Oral Questions]

[Translation]

Ethics

    Mr. Speaker, today is a terrific day for the voters of Chicoutimi—Le Fjord. Our new colleague, Richard Martel, is arriving on the Hill today.
    Unfortunately for Richard, more details emerged today about the Prime Minister's trip to India. This was a trip that sparked a diplomatic crisis after a terrorist got on the guest list. On top of that, the Prime Minister's negotiating skills led to a deal where India gets an investment of $750 million and Canada gets a measly $250 million.
     We now know that this trip cost at least $1.5 million. Why was this?

  (1425)  

    Mr. Speaker, I also wish to congratulate Richard Martel on his win in Chicoutimi—Le Fjord. I want to thank all the candidates and especially all the voters who participated in the electoral process. It is enormously important for people to get involved, and we are very proud of this.
     Since today is our last day, I also want to take this opportunity to thank the House of Commons pages who served us so well this year.

[English]

    I want to thank all the pages who have been here working hard for us. I thank them for everything they have done throughout this year. I thank all the staffers for seeing us through to the summer.

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is incapable of managing taxpayers' money responsibly. More than $8 million on a temporary skating rink, $215,000 for an illegal vacation on a private island, at least $1.5 million for a disastrous trip to India, and tens of thousands of dollars on non-essential items to renovate the Prime Minister's cottage in Harrington Lake.
    Why does the Prime Minister keep spending so recklessly and sending the bill to the next generation?
    Mr. Speaker, we promised Canadians that we would invest in the middle class and those working hard to join it.
    That is exactly what we have done with historic investments in infrastructure and with the Canada child benefit, which is helping nine out of 10 families and will lift 300,000 children out of poverty. We lowered taxes for the middle class and increased them for the well-off. Not only are we investing for the benefit of Canadians, but we also secured the strongest growth in the G7 last year. We are creating the growth that Canadians need.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, he says he is investing in the middle class. Since when does the Prime Minister's family count as the middle class? Instead of planning for Canada's economy against the external threats that face us, where are his priorities? Where are his investments? Well, there is $8,500 for new boat racks, $13,000 for a new deck with sun umbrellas, and $7,500 for a new play structure.
    I have bought many swing sets and play structures for my kids. Can the Prime Minister tell me what exactly is part of a $7,500 swing set?
    Mr. Speaker, we got elected on a commitment to invest in the middle class and those working hard to join it, and that is exactly what we have done. The first thing we did was lower taxes for the middle class and raise them on the wealthiest 1%, which the Conservatives voted against. Then we delivered on a Canada child benefit, which helps nine out of 10 Canadian families by not sending child benefit cheques to millionaires. It is lifting hundreds of thousands of kids out of poverty across the country, and the Conservatives voted against it.
    The Conservatives continue to look for boutique tax cuts for the wealthiest Canadians while we are supporting middle-class Canadians right across the country, and we will continue to do just that.
    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is writing cheques from taxpayers' accounts to his own family to reimburse it for personal costs. It does not end there. He spent $28,000 to groom his cross-country ski trails, $5,000 for a new golf cart, and more than $4,000 to wire up his new sauna, but I have to come back to the swing sets. I have bought several for my family. I am trying to imagine what goes into a $7,500 swing set.
    Can the Prime Minister tell me, is there a chair lift for the slide, are the seats on the swing ergonomically designed, and will he finally reimburse taxpayers for that expense?
    Mr. Speaker, the National Capital Commission is responsible for ensuring the appropriate and timely maintenance for all official residences, including Stornoway.
     The NCC is conducting much-needed rehabilitation work at Harrington Lake in order to conserve this federally designated heritage building. The RCMP will also be conducting work to enhance the security features at Harrington Lake. The NCC is working to address these issues in a timely fashion.

  (1430)  

    Mr. Speaker, I just want to let the Prime Minister know that, if he will allow me, I will be seeking unanimous consent after question period to table a document entitled “Sportspower 8 station swing set”. It has a wonderful slide, seesaw, and several swings, and it only costs $198.
    Will he allow me to table this document after question period?
    Mr. Speaker, we are in a tariff conflict with the United States. We are seeing horrific images of children being detained across the United States. We are seeing indigenous peoples in this country challenged, needing better opportunities. We are seeing a broad range of issues that matter on this the last day of the spring sitting of the House of Commons. We are moving forward on the legalization of marijuana, which I know the Conservatives have issues with. However, this is what the Leader of the Opposition chooses to spend his last day in Parliament before the summer—
    Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
    Order. I remind the hon. opposition House leader and others that the time to make their arguments is when they have the floor, and not when someone else has the floor.

[Translation]

    The hon. member for Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques.

Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship

    Mr. Speaker, two days after accusing the NDP of playing politics because it condemned the separation of children from their migrant parents at the Mexico-U.S. border, the Prime Minister now recognizes that the situation is unacceptable.
    Now that he has condemned the situation, can the Prime Minister tell us whether he still believes that the United States is a safe country for asylum seekers?
    Mr. Speaker, Canadians across the country are troubled by the images that we have seen. As I said, what is happening is unacceptable. I cannot imagine the pain these families are experiencing.
    The safe third country agreement has been in place for more than 10 years and we continue to seek ways to modernize it. We are in ongoing talks with the United States. We will continue to closely monitor developments in the United States.
    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister cannot have his cake and eat it too. A safe third country means that the country with which we signed an agreement is a place where asylum seekers are treated fairly, humanely, and decently.
    He criticized a situation in the United States where children are being separated from their migrant parents.
    I will repeat the question. Beyond talking points, if he is prepared to condemn what is happening in the United States, if he is prepared to say that that situation is unacceptable, will he now say that the country that is treating people that way is no longer a safe third country for refugees?
    Mr. Speaker, as I said, this situation is unacceptable. We are monitoring the situation in the United States very closely. We will continue to work with the Americans on border protection and the agreements we have with them, while protecting our values and the way we do things in Canada. We will be loud and clear about that. We obviously do not do things the same way.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, the fact is that over 2,000 migrant children are already in baby jails. The parents do not know where they are or when they will see them again.
    The head of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement confirmed parents' worst fears. He expects hundreds of separated children will never see their parents again. They will be lost in the system forever.
    Does the Prime Minister recognize that as long as Trump is in power, the U.S. will never be a safe country for asylum seekers?

  (1435)  

    Mr. Speaker, as I have said, what is happening is wrong. None of us can imagine what these families are going through and I know all Canadians have the well-being of children first and foremost in their minds. As I have said numerous times both at home and abroad, I will always stand up for the values that Canadians hold dear. This is something that I will continue to do.
    Mr. Speaker, while Trump closed the doors to those fleeing gang violence and domestic violence, yet many fleeing from Central America cite gang violence as the main reason to seek asylum. Trump's policy is in violation of the UN convention for gender-related persecution. As long as Trump is in power, the U.S. will never be a safe country for asylum seekers.
    Will the Prime Minister show the moral leadership by suspending the safe third country agreement?
    Mr. Speaker, Canadians across the country are very concerned with the stories and images that we have witnessed. As I have said, what is happening in the United States is wrong. I cannot imagine what these families are going through.
     As I have said many times, the safe third country agreement is over 10 years old. We will continually look for ways to modernize it and be in conversation with the Americans on this. We will continue as well to closely monitor developments in the United States.

[Translation]

Government Spending

    Mr. Speaker, more information about the cost of the Prime Minister's disastrous trip to India is coming to light: $17,000 for one single Canadian chef who prepared one single meal; $60,000 to rent chauffeured vehicles; and hundreds of thousands of dollars to feed and house the 77-member delegation that included 21 MPs, most of whom did not attend any working meetings during the trip.
    The tab is now at $1.5 million and climbing.
    How can the Prime Minister justify that kind of spending to Canadians?
    Mr. Speaker, Canadians want us to be effective on the world stage.
    During our trip to India, we announced bilateral investments totalling over $1 billion that will help create 5,800 jobs in Canada. We also announced $11.5 million for the right start initiative to empower the world's poorest women and girls. These commitments will benefit the middle class and those working hard to join it.
    I would point out that this nine-day trip cost much less than Stephen Harper's six-day trip to India a few years ago.
    Mr. Speaker, the problem with the Prime Minister's reckless spending is that he is doing it on the taxpayers' dime and with no end in sight. We have just learned how much the Prime Minister is spending on his summer home: $3,000 on sun umbrellas—I am not sure where he finds them—; $7,500 on a swing set; $12,000 to replace a dock; and $5,000 on a golf cart.
    Meanwhile, 80% of Canadians and Canadian families are paying more taxes under this government.
    How can the Prime Minister justify that kind of spending while hard-working Canadians are just trying to make a living—
    Order. The right hon. Prime Minister.
    Mr. Speaker, perhaps the Conservatives have forgotten why Stephen Harper's trip to India was so expensive for taxpayers. It was because he wanted to bring his own limousines with him, at a cost of $1.5 million. That is the Conservative approach to such matters.
    With respect to Harrington Lake, the National Capital Commission is responsible for ensuring the appropriate and timely maintenance of all official residences. The National Capital Commission is conducting much-needed rehabilitation work at Harrington Lake in order to preserve this federally-designated heritage building.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, I find the indignation with which the Prime Minister emotes very troubling when it comes to his discussing his expenses on the India trip. Primarily the Prime Minister is not above scrutiny when it comes to expenses that he incurs, and in fact, he signs off on these. For the India trip alone, they flew in $5,000 worth of wine, charged $5,000 on cellphone costs, and $60,000 for personal chauffeurs.
    Did the Prime Minister sign off on all of these expenses?
    Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government spent over $1.5 million bringing Stephen Harper's limos from Ottawa to India for his trip because he wanted to travel around in the style to which he was accustomed. That is completely irresponsible.
    We were proud that our trip to India, which covered nine days and secured one billion dollars' worth of bilateral investment, cost significantly less than his six-day trip.

  (1440)  

    Once again, Mr. Speaker, we are confronted with anger from the Prime Minister that we have the audacity to ask questions about his spending habits. In the private sector, they say that the tone is set at the top. The tone of the Liberal government is a culture of spending in excess. That is all this is.
    Maybe the Prime Minister can tell me why, at his personal retreat at Harrington Lake, he thinks it is okay to spend $10,000 for a new patio, $12,000 for deck and dock upgrades, and $60,000 in total on these upgrades when Canadians are worried about paying for his carbon tax.
    Mr. Speaker, I would not want to make an error in the House of Commons. I need to point out that the armoured limos only cost $1 million to bring to India. I am sorry; I got the number wrong, previously.
    We remain focused on investing and growing the economy and supporting Canadians. That is why we lowered taxes on the middle class and raised them on the wealthiest 1%. The Conservatives voted against that. That is why we are delivering a Canada child benefit that delivers more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families and is lifting hundreds of thousands of kids out of poverty. Again, the Conservatives voted—
    I would ask the hon. member for Edmonton Manning and others not to be speaking when someone else has the floor. The idea is that each side gets to make its arguments. Often the other side does not like those arguments, but each side gets to make them and we need to listen and hear the other side whether we like it or not.
    The hon. opposition House leader.
    Mr. Speaker, it is becoming increasingly clear that the Prime Minister is out of touch with the struggles of everyday Canadians. He is using his job to pay for his celebrity lifestyle.
    The Prime Minister thinks he is entitled to his entitlements. He spares no expense when he wants to be pampered and showered with luxury. Who would have guessed that he could use $1.5 million for six days to dance around India? It is unbelievable. When will he stop using taxpayer dollars as his own personal bank account? It is not.
    Mr. Speaker, we were pleased to secure over $1 billion in two-way investment between India and Canada. We were pleased to secure at least 5,800 new jobs in investment in Canada from that trip. We were pleased to do a lot of good work on that nine-day trip, for less than it cost Stephen Harper and the Conservatives to do a six-day trip just a few years before.
    We stay focused on the things that matter to Canadians: on growing the economy in ways that are far greater than the Conservatives were able to do for 10 years.
    Mr. Speaker, with regard to the India trip, I do not recall Prime Minister Harper bringing along on the trip his own personal chef—what was that: $17,000—and, may I add, a terrorist.
    Maybe the Prime Minister needs to park the arrogance and swagger for just a split second. We know summer is around the corner. We know what that means. The Prime Minister is going to be taking quite a bit of time off, so perhaps he could at this moment have a bit of humility and tell Canadians he is sorry for abusing their tax dollars and he will not do it again.
    Mr. Speaker, the member opposite highlighted that, indeed, summer is around the corner. We will be spending it across the country engaging with Canadians, as will every member of this House. Hopefully, there will be a little time for families for many of us as well, but we know all of us in this House will continue to stay focused on our responsibilities for Canadians.
    It is interesting that on this last day in the House, when plenty of big things are happening around the world, the Conservatives are making the choice to play petty politics and make personal attacks. There are so many big issues we can and should be talking about. I encourage them—
    The hon. member for Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.

[Translation]

Public Safety

    Mr. Speaker, does anyone think it is normal for people to get killed for demonstrating?
    Is it true that people expressing their right to peaceful protest run the risk of being shot at? Though upsetting, that is the opinion of the former Governor of the Bank of Canada, David Dodge.
    Demonstrations are on the horizon. Thousands of people are furious at the Liberal government's decision on the Kinder Morgan pipeline. They will speak out and they have the right to do so.
    Can the Prime Minister assure the House that he will not use infiltration and intimidation tactics or excessive force against our fellow citizens?

  (1445)  

    Mr. Speaker, it is extremely important to us that Canadians have freedom of expression and the right to disagree with the government on decisions made in Canada. It is a very important right that we encourage.
    However, obviously, we all expect these demonstrations, these expressions, to be carried out in accordance with the law and to not endanger others. We live under the rule of law and we expect those laws to be obeyed.

[English]

The Economy

    Mr. Speaker, many Canadians are asking themselves what happened to that shiny, progressive, climate-fighting Prime Minister. He was the guy who once said, “No relationship is more important to me...than the [relationship] with Indigenous Peoples”, “governments grant permits...[but] only communities grant permission”, and this classic, “We have a chance to build...economies that are clean,...growing,...and forward-looking.” Then he bought a $4.5-billion, 65-year-old leaky pipeline.
    For all those people who thought he was progressive, thought he believed in the new economy, and thought he was going to fight climate change, whatever happened to that guy?
    Mr. Speaker, our government is investing $8 billion in clean technology and renewable energy. That is where we are focused on moving forward. We are also moving forward with the pan-Canadian approach to fight climate change, one that understands that growing the economy and protecting the environment need to go together.
    Unfortunately, the NDP does not get that and still thinks there is a choice to be made between the environment and the economy. When it comes to indigenous peoples, it only listens to those who agree with it, and have nothing to say about the indigenous communities that support energy projects.

International Trade

    Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice dismissed the concerns of Canadian auto workers, saying everything was just fine. It is not fine when TD Bank says 160,000 jobs are at risk. The Minister of Foreign Affairs is unable to provide details on her plan to protect the jobs of workers in the auto industry.
    I am going to ask again a simple question to the Prime Minister. What is the plan to protect auto manufacturing jobs in Canada?
    Mr. Speaker, we have consistently stood up for Canadian interests and Canadian jobs, and we will continue to. We are standing up strongly against these unfair steel and aluminum tariffs that are challenging for our industry and our workers. I have said to workers directly, right across the country, that we will be there for them.
    The threat of tariffs that could be imposed on autos would be absolutely unacceptable. We continue to work with the industry in Canada and in the United States to ensure that never happens. We know we need to continue to stand up for Canadians, and we will do just that.

The Economy

    Mr. Speaker, the government's superclusters program is said to hand over $950 million of Canadian taxpayer money to for-profit companies. Of the many applications received, nine were shortlisted, and then five were selected to receive the funds, shutting out agrifood, oil and gas, infrastructure, mobility systems, and mining applications.
    How does the Prime Minister justify picking winners and losers, leaving Canadian taxpayers on the hook for his corporate welfare scheme?
    Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to repeat the announcement that within our supercluster strategy, we are moving forward with the protein supercluster, which benefits prairie communities right across the Prairies. They will definitely benefit from the kinds of investments, the kinds of innovation, and the kinds of leadership that investment in agriculture needs to happen.
    We are proud to be supporting our farmers and our agrifood businesses. The Conservatives talk a good game, but were never there for them when it came to actually creating growth.

Carbon Pricing

    Mr. Speaker, I will tell members about the Liberal support for agriculture. According to the numbers from the Parliamentary Budget Officer, the Liberals' carbon tax will devastate Canadian agriculture. At $50 a tonne, the Liberal carbon tax will cost a Manitoba pork producer more than $36,000 a year; a rancher in Alberta, $13,000; and a wheat grower in Saskatchewan, $12,000. As for potato farmers in P.E.I, the agriculture minister thinks they should be paying $20,000 a year in carbon tax.
    Does the Prime Minister agree with these numbers? If not, will he end the cover-up and release the cost of the Liberals' farm-killing carbon tax?
    Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives spend all of their time trying to twist in the wind because they do not admit that climate change is a problem, do not have a plan to fight climate change, and therefore cannot reveal the details of their plan.
    We have been transparent in the election campaign and ever since, and in the budget. We have demonstrated that we are moving forward on growing our economy and protecting the environment, at the same time as moving forward on a concrete plan with all provinces to fight climate change. That is what we are doing. The Conservatives cannot say what they are doing because they do not know what they are doing, because they do not have a plan.

  (1450)  

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, the cover-up continues. The United States is not the only one attacking our dairy farmers. The Liberal Party is going to force dairy farmers to pay a carbon tax. For an average dairy farm, the price tag will be $17,000 in Quebec and $28,000 in British Columbia. Unfortunately for dairy farmers in the Maritimes, the Prime Minister did not forget about them. The bill will be $21,000 in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, $18,000 in Prince Edward Island, and—I hope everyone is sitting down—a whopping $39,000 in Newfoundland and Labrador.
    Why is the Prime Minister condoning these attacks, which are threatening Canada's family farms?
    Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are making up numbers to distract us from the fact that they have absolutely no intention of fighting climate change. They cannot tell us what their plan for fighting climate change is, because they have no plan for fighting climate change. All their attacks are designed to keep everyone from realizing that they have no plan and are not even interested in fighting climate change. The Conservatives have not changed a bit since their 10 years of inaction.

[English]

Indigenous Affairs

    Mr. Speaker, yesterday, I asked the Liberals if they would support my private member's bill to make National Indigenous Peoples Day a statutory holiday. Instead of saying whether they would support it, the minister spoke about the government's celebrations taking place. People already know about the celebrations. What they want is for the Liberals to actually recognize the importance of providing people with a time and opportunity to celebrate.
    Therefore, I am asking again: Will the Liberals support my bill and make National Indigenous Peoples Day a statutory holiday?
    Mr. Speaker, no relationship is more important to us than the relationship with indigenous peoples, and that is why, when we talk about moving forward on issues on this, we need to make sure that it is not folks in Ottawa deciding what is going to happen. It needs to be in consultation and in partnership with indigenous people. That is why we are looking very closely at the calls to action, and looking very closely at relationships with indigenous communities to figure out the best way to move forward on commemorating reconciliation. We look forward to having more to say soon on this issue.
    Mr. Speaker, so many indigenous people are asking for this day to be a statutory holiday, and the Prime Minister is clearly not listening.

[Translation]

    The government continues to show that it does not really respect first nations and the UN declaration that it adopted. It is not listening to indigenous communities, as illustrated by the botched consultation on pipeline projects.
    Will it at least support my colleague's bill so that all Canadians can celebrate with indigenous peoples and recognize their rights?
    Mr. Speaker, I am very proud that every year we come together to acknowledge the fundamental contributions that first nations, Inuit, and Métis people have made to the identity and culture of all Canadians. We are working with indigenous peoples to establish a nation-to-nation relationship between the Inuit and the crown and a government-to-government relationship based on respect, partnership, and recognition of rights. We will continue to work with our partners on shared priorities, including this celebration

[English]

Public Safety

    Mr. Speaker, our government is proposing measures that represent a reasonable and common-sense approach to firearm policy to make Canadians less vulnerable to gun violence. First, I want to be clear that this bill would not recreate a federal long-gun registry.
    As parliamentarians, I strongly believe that we have no greater responsibility than keeping Canadians safe. Can the Prime Minister explain how enhanced background checks makes society, gun owners, and Canadians safer and more secure?
    Mr. Speaker, we are strengthening Canada's firearm laws in a common-sense, focused, and effective way. We are enhancing background checks, which the committee had further strengthened, so that people with a history of criminality or mental illness associated with violence cannot access firearms. We are formalizing best practices among retailers so that they make sure buyers have a valid licence. We are also investing unprecedented funding of $327 million to tackle gun-related violence and gang activities in Canada.
    We are prioritizing community safety while respecting responsible firearm ownership.

  (1455)  

[Translation]

Marijuana

    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has no respect for the provinces. His government introduced a bill to legalize marijuana and is ordering the provinces to administer it. The provinces accepted the challenge and sought to implement a plan for their residents, but the Prime Minister dug in his heels and imposed conditions. During the 2015 federal election campaign, the Liberals promised to work in partnership with the provinces.
    Here is the perfect opportunity for the Prime Minister to do so. Will he respect the decisions of Quebec and Manitoba to prohibit home cannabis production, yes or no?
    Mr. Speaker, we promised to improve our system to better protect our young people and take money and profits out of the hands of organized crime. That is exactly what we did, and we did it in partnership with the provinces. We always work in partnership with the provinces.
    These measures have been passed in Parliament and we are now preparing to move forward with them, but the province are asking for more time. We listened to them and agreed to their requests. The legalization of marijuana will take effect on October 17, 2018.
    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister says all kinds of nice things and makes all kinds of nice promises, but life is not about what gets said; it is about what gets done.
    Quebec already has its legislation. It has already said it will not allow cultivation in apartments, condos, or homes.
    Will the Prime Minister listen to Quebec, or is he gearing up for a court battle with Quebec? Will he listen to Quebec or not?
    Mr. Speaker, we are proud to have passed our bill to legalize, strictly regulate, and restrict access to marijuana. This measure will keep marijuana out of the hands of children and profits out of the hands of criminals.
    I just gave the member opposite a very precise answer. I will repeat it to be sure he understands. This legislation will come into force on October 17. We made that decision because three of our largest provinces, including Quebec, asked for a little more time. I know how important it is to do this properly, and that is why we are giving Quebec more time.

[English]

Public Safety

    Mr. Speaker, Nada is a young Yazidi mother from Iraq. When ISIS invaded her community, she was sold as a sex slave. She recently recounted coming face to face with Abu Tawfiq, the man she says sold her and bought her. He was not in jail. He was not in Iraq. He is a free man in London, Ontario.
    We need to believe victims, and the Liberals let this guy into our country.
    Will the Prime Minister take responsibility for allowing ISIS terrorists to walk our streets freely and finally send these war criminals to The Hague?
    Mr. Speaker, in regards to the Yazidis, our government has proven to be a global leader in welcoming refugees and we have more than doubled Canada's refugee numbers. We have provided a new home to more than 1,300 women and their families who endured the brutality of Daesh, 85% of whom are Yazidi.
    Our government's commitment to supporting vulnerable women and girls is unwavering. We announced $20 million to expand our refugee program, specifically targeting women and girls.
    We will continue to expedite applications so that their family members who escaped Daesh can join their relatives in Canada.
    Mr. Speaker, after sitting with a Yazidi woman who survived sexual slavery, one leaves awed by her strength, concerned for her welfare, and left with a deep, white-hot desire to bring her justice. When we wax eloquent about #MeToo, we cannot forget our obligation to bring justice to women who have had their bodies used as tools of war.
    Why does the feminist Prime Minister continually refuse to commit to refer Canadian ISIS terrorists to the International Criminal Court?
    Mr. Speaker, our security agencies take all potential threats very seriously and use the full tool kit of measures, including surveillance, the no-fly list, revoking passports, and laying criminal charges when sufficient evidence exists. We trust our police forces and intelligence services to do their work and to do it well.
    I find it troubling that the Conservatives seem to want elected officials to directly intervene with police officers and tell them who should be arrested and when they should be arrested.
    We will continue to trust those responsible for the safety of Canadians to do their jobs.

  (1500)  

Persons with Disabilities

    Mr. Speaker, Canada ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities eight long years ago but to this day we have failed to implement it. That is why Canadians are watching as the minister tables the government's long-awaited accessibility act this afternoon. People living with disabilities need more than a vague promise for a barrier-free Canada.
    Could the Prime Minister tell us if today's legislation will fulfill Canada's obligations to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities?
    Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to ensuring the full participation of people with disabilities in society, and we have taken steps to do so. We support a variety of programs and services to assist those with disabilities to gain employment, to develop skills, and to gain experience.
    For 10 long years, the Harper Conservatives promised to deliver legislation for persons with disabilities but did nothing. I am not going to break with parliamentary privilege, but I will confirm that we will be introducing this historic accessibility legislation before the House rises for the summer.

[Translation]

Health

    Mr. Speaker, the number of victims of Lyme disease doubled in Quebec in 2017, and this number continues to grow every year as a result of climate change.
    The government created the federal framework on Lyme disease one year ago, but the guidelines are still not being applied. If this disease is not treated, it can cause cardiac and neurological problems. False negatives are quite common.
    When will victims of Lyme disease have access to better diagnostic testing and treatments for chronic cases in Canada?
    Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for her question. This is an issue that affects far too many Canadians. I know that it is very difficult to live with Lyme disease.
    We realize that a lot of research is needed on this disease. We are committed to working with those suffering from Lyme disease and with researchers to find the best approach to protect all Canadians.
    This is a very important issue, and I thank the member for raising it in the House of Commons.

[English]

Foreign Affairs

    Mr. Speaker, the Iranian regime continues to brutalize its own citizens. Mohammad Salas, a bus driver and member of a religious minority, was arrested. He was then tortured. His phoney confession was then broadcast on state television. It was used as the only evidence in his trial. On Monday, at dawn, he was executed. Then the regime refused to allow his family to even see the body.
    When will the Liberal government start to support the Iranian people and stop fantasizing about normalizing relations with this vicious, murderous, terrorist regime?
    Mr. Speaker, we deeply oppose Iran's support for terrorist organizations, its threats toward Israel, its ballistic missile program, and its support for the murderous Assad regime. We will always defend human rights and hold Iran to account for its actions.
    We led a resolution at the United Nations in November, calling on Iran to comply with its international human rights obligations. We will continue to maintain sanctions on Iran, which include restrictions on sensitive goods and a list of individuals and entities subject to asset freezes, with whom all transactions involving property are prohibited.
    Mr. Speaker, yesterday the foreign affairs minister finally acknowledged genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Daesh in Syria and Iraq. However, the government has yet to acknowledge genocide against Christian communities in the same areas, Assyrian, Chaldean and other Christians who live in communities alongside Yazidis and have often been treated in exactly the same way.
     Will the Prime Minister today also acknowledge the Christian victims of this genocide?
    Mr. Speaker, our government stands strong in the fight against Daesh and will continue to be part of the coalition, as we defend minorities of all types from the murderous terrorist organization of Daesh and the like. We continue to support victims of Daesh from all different cultures and religions. We have looked at resettling numerous minority refugees who are victims of Daesh.
     We will continue to hold our place in the world in defending victims and minorities against the murderous actions of Daesh.
    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister just mentioned holding Iran to account. Last night the MP for Richmond Hill organized an event on the Hill for a regime-friendly Iranian lobbying group. Last week this same group publicly criticized the House of Commons for passing a motion condemning Iran.
    The Iranian regime is an oppressive abuser of human rights. Does the Prime Minister approve of the actions of the MP for Richmond Hill, organizing parliamentary meetings for a group that supports the Iranian regime?

  (1505)  

    Mr. Speaker, as politicians, we engage with a broad range of people, but we have been unequivocal. We deeply oppose Iran's support for terrorist organizations, for its threats toward Israel, its ballistic missile program, and its support for the murderous Assad regime.
    We will always defend human rights and hold Iran to account for its actions. We continue to maintain sanctions on Iran, which include restrictions on sensitive goods, and a list of individuals and entities subject to asset freezes.
     We will always remain firm in our defence of human rights and are standing against state sponsors of terrorism around the world.

[Translation]

Health

    Mr. Speaker, we have all seen the troubling statistics. In 2016, more than one million Canadians had to choose between feeding their family, heating their home, and filling the prescriptions they needed. I have heard similar complaints in my riding of Kitchener-Centre.

[English]

    In budget 2018, we proudly announced the creation of an advisory council on the implementation of national pharmacare. Could the Prime Minister please update the House on the progress that our government has made in this area?

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, I congratulate the member for Kitchener Centre for his work on this file and for his excellent French.
    Canadians can be proud of our publicly funded, universal health care system. However, there is always room for improvement. That is why we created the Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare, which will study, evaluate, and recommend pharmacare options. We also announced the names of the accomplished members of the council. We look forward to their report, so that we can give Canadians a better system.

[English]

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship

    Mr. Speaker, in two months the Prime Minister will close the high-performing Vegreville immigration office, killing 288 jobs, dozens more in town, and millions in local revenue. It will not even save tax dollars. It will cost nearly $47 million more for renos and leasing for only 32 extra jobs in Edmonton.
     The Prime Minister ignores the pleas of workers, the union, the town, and Alberta representatives of all parties at all levels. He is hurting the 74% of women supporting their families and disabled workers with long-term placements in the office.
    Will the Prime Minister please stop this unfounded, cold-hearted closure?
    Mr. Speaker, over the past two years, Canadians across the country have been thanking us for reinvesting in immigration services and processing times, after 10 years of Conservatives shutting down, creating backlogs, starving our immigration systems from being able to actually process the backlogs and giving them the resources they needed.
     We know we need to do better on processing times. We need to invest in our immigration system. That is exactly why we are ensuring we have the capacity in our system to treat the files that Canadians and new Canadians expect us to treat rapidly and efficiently.
    I would ask the hon. member for Lakeland to stop interrupting.
    The hon. member for Port Moody—Coquitlam.

Fisheries and Oceans

    Mr. Speaker, recently a Liberal MP said, “The time has come to transition to closed containment salmon aquaculture in British Columbia.” I could not agree more.
     Canada is well-positioned to become a world leader in closed containment, but we need action now. Globally, money is being invested in land-based salmon farming. Florida, for instance, is building a 90,000-tonne facility. It is time for Canada to invest in a safe, sustainable industry that protects wild salmon and employment, and develops new technologies, jobs, and export opportunities.
    Will the Prime Minister commit today to transition these farms to land?
    I have to also ask the hon. member for Grande Prairie—Mackenzie not to talk when someone else has the floor.
    The right hon. Prime Minister.
    Mr. Speaker, we have tasked the federal science adviser to actually look into the question of aquaculture so we can make evidence-based policy moves going forward.
    However, I would highlight for my colleague from the NDP that he should have a conversation with his provincial counterparts, if he is not fighting with them as they are with their provincial counterparts in Alberta. They just approved continued tenure for aquaculture farms. That is the decision on the provincial side and we know there are significant concerns that we are moving forward—

  (1510)  

    The hon. member for Kildonan—St. Paul.

Infrastructure

    Mr. Speaker, severe weather events are a significant and growing problem across Canada. My province of Manitoba has seen first-hand the devastating effects flooding can have on our communities. These floods have forced residents from homes, businesses to relocate or close, and caused residents to worry annually what the year's flood season may bring.
    Could the Prime Minister please update the House on the steps that our government is taking to improve the resiliency of Canadian communities, especially those in Manitoba?
    Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Kildonan—St. Paul for her hard work in her community.
    Our government knows that climate change is real and that the frequency of severe weather events like flooding is increasing. That is why this week we were proud to announce a federal investment of almost $250 million in the Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin outlet channels. Alongside the province, our investment will allow for the management of the flows of these watersheds and protect the communities of the region for years to come.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship

    Mr. Speaker, troubling reports are surfacing that the Minister of Immigration is planning on removing Her Majesty from the oath of citizenship. Could the Prime Minister confirm if his government is discussing removing Her Majesty from the oath of citizenship?
    Mr. Speaker, I can confirm that we are not considering removing Her Majesty from the oath of citizenship.

Carbon Pricing

    Mr. Speaker, the federal government has repeatedly stated that provinces will keep their revenues from carbon pricing. However, next year is a renewal of equalization. If carbon revenues are added to the formula, then each province's carbon tax base would count against its equalization entitlement, effectively clawing back the money.
    Will the government include carbon pricing in equalization and, if so, how will it ensure that provinces actually keep the revenue?
    Mr. Speaker, we know that both the Conservatives and the NDP think there is a false choice between either the environment or the economy. Apparently, the CCF does as well.
     We know that the only way to move forward is to invest in protecting our environment while growing our economy. That is exactly what we are doing with our national framework on fighting climate change. We are proud that we have been transparent about the way we are moving forward on that. We have been clear with Canadians that this is a priority for us.
     The Conservatives do not even have a plan. The NDP want to present a false choice. We are just glad to see the CCF back in the House.
    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. In a moment I will be asking for unanimous consent to present a motion.
    Last night, the Senate passed Bill C-45, important legislation that will positively change 100 years of legal, social, and economic attitudes towards cannabis. It will legalize an activity that the vast majority of Canadians regard as acceptable.
    That is why, Mr. Speaker, if you seek it, I hope you will find unanimous consent for the following motion: That, in the opinion of the House, given the passage of Bill C-45 and the imminent legalization of cannabis for personal recreational use, and recognizing that many Canadians are facing criminal charges, experiencing criminal sanctions, or bearing criminal records for cannabis offences that are soon to be legal, the government should take all necessary steps to immediately provide pardons for those burdened by criminal records for cannabis offences that will soon be legal.
    Does the hon. member have unanimous consent of the House to propose the motion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, this is the last opportunity for the House to adopt Bill C-79 before adjourning for the summer. Discussions have taken place, and if you seek it, you will find, I hope, unanimous consent for the following motion: That notwithstanding any Standing Order or usual practice of the House, Bill C-79, An Act to implement the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership between Canada, Australia, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, be deemed to have been read a second time and referred to a committee of the whole, deemed reported without amendments, deemed concurred in at report stage, and deemed read a third time and passed.

  (1515)  

    Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

[Private Members' Business]

[English]

Latin American Heritage Month Act

     The House resumed from June 13 consideration of Bill S-218, An Act respecting Latin American Heritage Month, as reported (without amendment) from the committee, and of Motion No. 1.
    Mr. Speaker, I believe if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:
     That, in relation to Bill S-218, An Act respecting Latin American Heritage Month, standing in the name of the Member for Thornhill, the Order made on Wednesday, June 13, 2018, respecting the deferral of the recorded division on motion No. 1 at report stage standing in the name of the member for Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, be discharged and that the motion be deemed defeated; the bill be deemed concurred in at the report stage; the motion for third reading of the bill be deemed moved, the question on the motion be deemed put and a recorded division be deemed requested and taken immediately.
     Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to propose the motion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    The Speaker: The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.

    (Motion agreed to)

    Accordingly, pursuant to order made earlier today, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at third reading stage of Bill S-218 under private members' business.
    Call in the members.

  (1520)  

    (The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 876)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Allison
Amos
Anandasangaree
Anderson
Arnold
Arseneault
Arya
Ashton
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Barlow
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Bibeau
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Boissonnault
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Carrie
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Chen
Chong
Choquette
Christopherson
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
Davies
DeCourcey
Deltell
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Dreeshen
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Duvall
Dzerowicz
Easter
Eglinski
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fergus
Fillmore
Finley
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Gallant
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gerretsen
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Gourde
Graham
Grewal
Hajdu
Hardcastle
Harder
Hardie
Hébert
Hehr
Hoback
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jeneroux
Johns
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kang
Kelly
Kent
Khalid
Khera
Kitchen
Kusie
Kwan
Lake
Lambropoulos
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
LeBlanc
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leitch
Leslie
Levitt
Liepert
Lightbound
Lloyd
Lobb
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Lukiwski
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKenzie
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maguire
Malcolmson
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
Mathyssen
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morneau
Morrissey
Motz
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nater
Nault
Ng
Nicholson
Nuttall
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
O'Toole
Ouellette
Paradis
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Raitt
Ramsey
Rankin
Ratansi
Rayes
Reid
Rempel
Richards
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Saroya
Scarpaleggia
Scheer
Schiefke
Schmale
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Shields
Shipley
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sopuck
Sorbara
Sorenson
Spengemann
Stanton
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tootoo
Trost
Trudeau
Trudel
Van Kesteren
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Vecchio
Virani
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Whalen
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wong
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 300

NAYS

Nil

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion carried.

    (Bill read the third time and passed)


GOVERNMENT ORDERS

[Government Orders]

  (1525)  

[Translation]

Impact Assessment Act

    Pursuant to order made on Tuesday, May 29, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded divisions at third reading of Bill C-69.
    The question is on part 1 regarding the impact assessment act, part 2 regarding the Canadian energy regulator act, the title, the preamble, the schedule, and all clauses in part 4, except clauses 85, 186, 187, and 195.

  (1530)  

    (The House divided on the elements, which were agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 877)

YEAS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Anandasangaree
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Baylis
Beech
Bibeau
Bittle
Blair
Boissonnault
Bossio
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Chen
Cormier
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Drouin
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Easter
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fergus
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Grewal
Hajdu
Hardie
Hébert
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kang
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
LeBlanc
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lightbound
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maloney
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morneau
Morrissey
Murray
Nassif
Nault
Ng
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Poissant
Qualtrough
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sorbara
Spengemann
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Tootoo
Trudeau
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Whalen
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 168

NAYS

Members

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Arnold
Ashton
Aubin
Barlow
Barsalou-Duval
Beaulieu
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Brosseau
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carrie
Chong
Choquette
Christopherson
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cullen
Davies
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Dreeshen
Dubé
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Duvall
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Finley
Fortin
Gallant
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Hardcastle
Harder
Hoback
Hughes
Jeneroux
Johns
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kusie
Kwan
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Laverdière
Leitch
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacGregor
MacKenzie
Maguire
Malcolmson
Marcil
Mathyssen
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Motz
Nantel
Nater
Nicholson
Nuttall
O'Toole
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Plamondon
Quach
Raitt
Ramsey
Rankin
Rayes
Reid
Rempel
Richards
Sansoucy
Saroya
Scheer
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Stanton
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Thériault
Trost
Trudel
Van Kesteren
Vecchio
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 132

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare these elements carried.

[English]

    The next question is on part 3 regarding the Navigation Protection Act, and clauses 85, 186, 187, and 195 of part 4.
    Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, I believe that if you seek it, you will find agreement to apply the result from the previous vote to this vote, with Liberal members voting in favour.
    Mr. Speaker, we agree to apply, with Conservatives voting no.

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, the NDP also agrees to apply the vote and will vote no.
    Mr. Speaker, Québec Debout agrees to apply the vote and will vote no.
    Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois agrees to apply the vote and will vote no.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, the CCF agrees to apply and will vote no.
    Mr. Speaker, the Green Party agrees to apply and votes yes.
    Mr. Speaker, I agree to apply and will be voting in favour.

  (1535)  

    Mr. Speaker, I agree to apply and will be voting yes.
    Is there agreement to proceed in this fashion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    (The House divided on part 3 and clauses 85, 186, 187, and 195 of part 4, which were agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 878)

YEAS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Anandasangaree
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Baylis
Beech
Bibeau
Bittle
Blair
Boissonnault
Bossio
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Chen
Cormier
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Drouin
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Easter
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fergus
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Grewal
Hajdu
Hardie
Hébert
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kang
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
LeBlanc
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lightbound
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maloney
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morneau
Morrissey
Murray
Nassif
Nault
Ng
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Poissant
Qualtrough
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sorbara
Spengemann
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Tootoo
Trudeau
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Whalen
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 169

NAYS

Members

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Arnold
Ashton
Aubin
Barlow
Barsalou-Duval
Beaulieu
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Brosseau
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carrie
Chong
Choquette
Christopherson
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cullen
Davies
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Dreeshen
Dubé
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Duvall
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Finley
Fortin
Gallant
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Hardcastle
Harder
Hoback
Hughes
Jeneroux
Johns
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kusie
Kwan
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Laverdière
Leitch
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacGregor
MacKenzie
Maguire
Malcolmson
Marcil
Mathyssen
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Motz
Nantel
Nater
Nicholson
Nuttall
O'Toole
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Plamondon
Quach
Raitt
Ramsey
Rankin
Rayes
Reid
Rempel
Richards
Sansoucy
Saroya
Scheer
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Stanton
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Thériault
Trost
Trudel
Van Kesteren
Vecchio
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 131

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare these elements carried.

[Translation]

    (Bill read the third time and passed)

Firearms Act

    The House resumed from June 19 consideration of Bill  C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms, as reported (with amendments) from the committee, and of the motions in Group No. 1.
    Pursuant to order adopted Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at report stage of Bill C-71.

  (1540)  

    (The House divided on Motion No. 1, which was negatived on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 879)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Arnold
Barlow
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Block
Brassard
Calkins
Carrie
Chong
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Dreeshen
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Finley
Gallant
Généreux
Genuis
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Harder
Hoback
Jeneroux
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Leitch
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacKenzie
Maguire
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Motz
Nater
Nicholson
Nuttall
O'Toole
Paul-Hus
Raitt
Rayes
Reid
Rempel
Richards
Saroya
Scheer
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Stanton
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Trost
Van Kesteren
Vecchio
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 85

NAYS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Anandasangaree
Arseneault
Arya
Ashton
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Benson
Bibeau
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Boissonnault
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Chen
Choquette
Christopherson
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
Davies
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Dzerowicz
Easter
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fergus
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Garrison
Gerretsen
Gill
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Grewal
Hajdu
Hardcastle
Hardie
Hébert
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Johns
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kang
Khalid
Khera
Kwan
Lambropoulos
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
LeBlanc
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lightbound
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
Mathyssen
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morneau
Morrissey
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Ramsey
Rankin
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rudd
Ruimy
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sorbara
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tootoo
Trudeau
Trudel
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Whalen
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 212

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare Motion No. 1 defeated. I therefore declare Motions Nos. 2 to 28 defeated.

[English]

     moved that the bill, as amended, be concurred in at report stage.

  (1545)  

    Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    The Assistant Deputy Speaker (Mr. Anthony Rota): All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.
    Some hon. members: Yea.
    The Assistant Deputy Speaker (Mr. Anthony Rota): All those opposed will please say nay.
    Some hon. members: Nay.
    The Assistant Deputy Speaker (Mr. Anthony Rota): In my opinion the yeas have it.
    And five or more members having risen:

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, I think if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent to apply the result from the previous vote to this vote, with Liberal members voting yes.
    I would also like to take this opportunity to wish you, your team, all employees of the House, and every member of Parliament an excellent summer.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, we agree to apply, and we also agree to wish everyone a good summer. We will be strongly voting no.

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, the NDP agrees to apply the vote, it also agrees to wish everyone a good summer, and it will vote yes.
    Mr. Speaker, we agree to apply the vote and will vote yes.
    Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois agrees to apply the vote, we will vote yes, and we also wish everyone a good summer.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, the Green Party agrees to apply and agrees to wish everybody a very well-deserved break. We will also vote yes.
    Mr. Speaker, I agree to apply, and I vote yes. I wish everybody a happy summer.
    Mr. Speaker, I agree to apply, and I will be voting yes. I look forward to going to some cooler weather.
    (The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 880)

YEAS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Anandasangaree
Arseneault
Arya
Ashton
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Benson
Bibeau
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Boissonnault
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Chen
Choquette
Christopherson
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
Davies
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona)
Dusseault
Dzerowicz
Easter
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fergus
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fuhr
Garrison
Gerretsen
Gill
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Grewal
Hajdu
Hardcastle
Hardie
Hébert
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Johns
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kang
Khalid
Khera
Kwan
Lambropoulos
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
LeBlanc
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lightbound
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
Mathyssen
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morneau
Morrissey
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
O'Connell
Oliphant
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Ramsey
Rankin
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rudd
Ruimy
Sahota
Saini
Sajjan
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schulte
Serré
Sgro
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sorbara
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Tabbara
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tootoo
Trudeau
Trudel
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Whalen
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 212

NAYS

Members

Aboultaif
Albas
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Arnold
Barlow
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Block
Brassard
Calkins
Carrie
Chong
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Dreeshen
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Finley
Gallant
Généreux
Genuis
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Harder
Hoback
Jeneroux
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Leitch
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacKenzie
Maguire
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Motz
Nater
Nicholson
Nuttall
O'Toole
Paul-Hus
Raitt
Rayes
Reid
Rempel
Richards
Saroya
Scheer
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Stanton
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Trost
Van Kesteren
Vecchio
Wagantall
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 85

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion carried.

Message from the Senate

    I have the honour to inform the House that a message has been received from the Senate informing this House that the Senate has passed the following bill, to which the concurrence of the House is desired: S-214, an act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (cruelty-free cosmetics).

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

[Routine Proceedings]

[English]

House of Commons Calendar

    Pursuant to Standing Order 28(2)(b), I have the honour to lay upon the table the House of Commons calendar for the year 2019.

International Trade

    Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the treaty entitled “Protocol Amending the Free Trade Agreement Between the Government of Canada and the Government of the State of Israel”, done at Montreal on May 28. An explanatory memorandum is included with this treaty.

Government Response to Petitions

    Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 13 petitions.

Accessible Canada Act

     (Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

  (1550)  

    Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to table, in both official languages, a charter statement with respect to Bill C-81, an act to ensure a barrier-free Canada.

[Translation]

Committees of the House

Official Languages 

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the 12th report of the Standing Committee on Official Languages entitled “Toward a Real Commitment to the Vitality of Official Language Minority Communities”.
    I would like to point out that the committee met in Brome—Missisquoi, Quebec, to examine the anglophone side of the issue and in Isle Madame, Nova Scotia, to consider the francophone side. I want to thank the clerk, Christine Holke, and analyst, Lucie Lecomte, and all members of the committee, as well as the staff.

[English]

    Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to the report.

National Defence  

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 11th report of the Standing Committee on National Defence, entitled “Interim Report on Russia's Interference in Moldova”.

[Translation]

Procedure and House Affairs  

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the 67th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

[English]

    The committee advises that pursuant to Standing Order 91.1(2), the subcommittee on private members' business met to consider the order for the second reading of a private member's bill originating in the Senate and recommended that the item listed herein, which it has determined should not be designated non-votable, be considered by the House.
    The committee also advises that pursuant to Standing Order 91.1(2), the subcommittee on private members' business met to consider the items added to the order of precedence on Monday, June 4, and recommended that the items listed herein, which it has determined should not be designated non-votable, be considered by the House.
    Pursuant to Standing Order 91.1(2), the report is deemed adopted.

Government Operations and Estimates  

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the 15th report of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, entitled “Modernizing Federal Procurement for Small and Medium Enterprises, Women-Owned and Indigenous Businesses”.
    I also want to thank, with great sincerity, the very hard work done by our clerk and analyst, who put together an extremely comprehensive report, which I think will be able to provide a good road map for not only this government but future governments in dealing with procurement issues for SMEs.
    Finally, for all the committee members of OGGO, particularly members such as the member for Edmonton West, this was an incredibly long and arduous study, but it has paid off in spades. Hopefully the government will pay attention to the recommendations.
    Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to the report.
    Mr. Speaker, with regard to the report tabled by my colleague, the member for Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, also known as the resort city of Regina Beach, I want to inform the House that official opposition members of the committee have provided a supplementary report to accompany the report presented by the committee.
    We agree in principle with many of the elements of the report prepared by the committee, but we felt that there were some key elements heard during witness testimony that we believe were under-represented in the report. Of these, we wanted to highlight the following points: that the government commit to concrete action in simplifying the overly complex procurement process for small businesses; that it reduce the red tape in the process so that small and medium-sized enterprises can access and fairly compete on federal procurement opportunities; and that it ensure that the federal departments involved in managing procurement projects understand their role in contributing to meaningful reform.
    We were provided with incredibly strong testimony throughout the study, and we want to thank the many witnesses who took time out of their busy schedules to contribute their knowledge and expertise to the study.

[Translation]

Public Safety and National Security  

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the 25th report of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security entitled “Use of Ion Mobility Spectrometers by Correctional Service Canada”.

  (1555)  

[English]

Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act

     He said: Mr. Speaker, I rise today to introduce an act to amend PIPEDA, our privacy laws for the commercial sector.
     The bill aims to implement our parliamentary privacy committee's unanimous recommendations to strengthen the enforcement powers of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, including the power to make orders, and broader discretion to audit organizations for compliance with our laws. What we have is an ombudsman. What we need is a regulator. The bill also provides for significant financial sanctions where organizations intentionally or recklessly breach our privacy rights. Where organizations obtain a financial benefit from using our personal information, they should suffer a financial loss when they misuse our personal information. If we take privacy seriously, we need both strong rules and a strong privacy regulator.

     (Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Parliament of Canada Act

    He said: I rise today to table Bill S-234, an act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (Parliamentary Visual Artist Laureate). I would like to begin by acknowledging the work of Senator Bovey, from my home province of Manitoba, and Senator Moore of Nova Scotia, in the creation of this bill and thank them for their work in moving it forward in the other chamber.

[Translation]

    This bill gives parliamentarians the opportunity to send a clear message to Canada's artistic community that we appreciate and recognize the importance of its work not only to our country's culture, but also to our society's economy.

[English]

    Furthermore, the position of an artist laureate would enable artists from all regions of Canada and of different backgrounds to have a national platform to showcase their work. Arts and culture is one of the most powerful tools we have for making social change. This bill celebrates artists and recognizes their importance to this great country of Canada.

     (Motion agreed to and bill read the first time)

Petitions

Time Bank System  

    Mr. Speaker, I am honoured today to present a petition signed by hundreds of people in Don Valley North and across Canada who are calling on the Government of Canada to create a time bank system. Time banks in other countries help address the physical, social, and mental health needs of a growing number of seniors and persons with disabilities. Therefore, hundreds of petitioners today are calling on the government and the National Seniors Council to support the creation of a time bank system as soon as possible in this country.
    I want to point out that there is an abundance of petitions to present today. We only have 15 minutes to do so, but actually, we are down to 14. If members could keep their comments on the petitions as short as possible, we will get as many people in as possible and then everybody can leave for the summer holiday and know that their petitions were tabled.
    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I suspect if you were to canvass the House, you would likely find unanimous consent to allow members who want to present their petitions today to do so.

  (1600)  

    Some hon. members: Agreed.

Canada Summer Jobs Program  

    Mr. Speaker, I rise to present a petition from my constituents.
     Canadians across the country feel that the Canadian summer jobs program attestation violates their fundamental freedoms. The petitioners request that the Liberal government respect the Charter of Rights, especially those in section 2.

Human Organ Trafficking  

    Mr. Speaker, increasing concerns about international trafficking in human organs removed without consent continues to be an issue that requires legislation to be brought forward. There are currently two bills before Parliament proposing to impede the trafficking of human organs, Bill C-350 and Bill S-240. The petitioners ask the government to support this.

Canada Summer Jobs Program  

    Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to present petitions from people in both Saskatchewan and Manitoba who protest the government's summer job attestation statement. They are very concerned that it discriminates against Canadians who have both pro-life and pro-traditional marriage viewpoints.

Nuclear Disarmament  

    Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present petition e-1402, with 1,451 signatures, initiated by Barbara Birkett and a group of Oakville residents who are passionate about nuclear disarmament.
    The petitioners say that the use of any nuclear weapons would have catastrophic consequences and nuclear weapons are the only weapons of mass destruction not yet prohibited by an international agreement. They call upon the Government of Canada to sign and ratify the United Nations Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

Canada Summer Jobs Program  

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour of presenting two petitions on the Canada summer jobs attestation. These petitions were initiated by my colleague from Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, but a significant number of my constituents signed the petition as well.
    The petitioners are extremely concerned with the violation of their freedom of conscience, freedom of thought, and freedom of belief, which are fundamental freedoms. They call on the Prime Minister to defend their freedoms and remove the attestation requirement from the Canada summer jobs program.

Carbon Pricing  

    Mr. Speaker, this petition was presented to me by a lady named Anita Payne, who ran against me for the Green Party. She has continued to work hard with both myself and the provincial member, who she also ran against, on behalf of climate change issues. I want to congratulate her on that.
    The petition essentially asserts that the $50-a-tonne carbon tax proposed by the federal government is insufficient. The petitioners call upon the federal government to extend the carbon fee to at least $150 by the year 2030.

[Translation]

Public Safety  

    Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to present the electronic version of petition e-1482. I presented the paper version, with 924 signatures, a few weeks ago.
     Last spring, Ottawa was hit by historic flooding. The petition calls on the government to consider the possibility of amending the Income Tax Act, specifically the section on RRSPs, so that victims of natural disasters can withdraw their personal savings to rebuild their homes without incurring immediate penalties.

Public Transit  

    Mr. Speaker, I am presenting a petition on active and public transit signed by people in my riding.
    Given that active and public transit takes cars off the road and improves air quality so Canadians can breathe a little easier, the petitioners call on the Government of Canada to invest in building transit infrastructure, buying buses, and developing safe, well-planned cycling networks. The petitioners state that these measures would improve the quality of the environment, the quality of life for residents, and economic development for the regions.

[English]

Human Organ Trafficking  

    Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure for me to present two petitions today.
    The first is in support of my private member's bill, Bill C-350, that deals with forced organ harvesting, as well as a similar bill in the Senate, Bill S-240. I note that the Senate was on the verge of passing it last night, but other matters intervened. I am hopeful that Bill S-240 will be passed as soon as the House returns so we can get on with addressing this important matter in the chamber.

  (1605)  

Canada Summer Jobs Program  

    Mr. Speaker, my second petition is about the Canada summer jobs program. While MPs are enjoying their summer, many not-for-profit organizations will be struggling as a result of their now inability to access funding on an equal basis as a result of the Liberals' summer jobs values test attestation.
     The petitioners call on the government to respect section 2 rights guaranteed in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, to recognize that diversity actually is our strength, and to do away with the attestation.

Refugees  

    Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present a petition on behalf of constituents in my riding of South Shore—St. Margarets. These constituents recognize the challenges refugees face when coming to Canada, like having to learn a new language or securing employment, and because of this, they wish to see resettled refugees exempt from travel loan repayment.

Volunteer Service Medal  

    Mr. Speaker, I rise to table a petition signed by people from Espanola calling for the return of a Canadian volunteer service medal. They remind us that at one time this medal was issued to recognize Canadians who served voluntarily in the Canadian Forces but was stopped around 1947.
    The petitioners note that Veterans Affairs Canada considers any former member of the Canadian Forces who was released with an honourable discharge and successfully underwent basic training to be a veteran. They ask the government to recognize this service by creating and issuing a new Canadian volunteer service medal. The medal would be available to those who volunteered to serve Canada in the regular forces, reserve military forces, and cadet corps support staff who have completed 365 days of uninterrupted honourable duty. The new medal would cover service from September 2, 1945 to the present day in perpetuity.

The Environment  

    Mr. Speaker, I am presenting e-petition 1490, which is put together by indigenous leaders who are calling on the Liberals to withdraw the proposed tanker ban on B.C.'s north coast because it is really an attack on Canadian oil. It was imposed without meaningful consultation, does not apply to foreign tankers, and it will stop pipelines, including the proposed Eagle Spirit pipeline from Bruderheim in my riding of Lakeland, to the coast for export.
    This e-petition is signed by 6,810 Canadians and they seek real consideration of all impacted communities and the major negative social and economic impacts of the tanker ban on all of Canada.

Bosnia and Herzegovina  

    Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present petition e-1455 in both official languages.
    The petitioners call on the Canadian government to seriously consider the reopening of the Canadian embassy in the beautiful and historic city of Sarajevo. The petition has been signed by hundreds of Canadians across the country who believe that it is in our best interest to provide diplomatic leadership in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Human Organ Trafficking  

    Mr. Speaker, I rise to present a petition on the serious issue of international trafficking in human organs that are removed from victims without their consent. There are two pieces of legislation currently before the House, Bill C-350 and S-240 from the Senate. Constituents are urging the Parliament of Canada to move quickly to get legislation in place to prohibit this heinous act.

Canadian Nuclear Laboratories  

    Mr. Speaker, I rise today on behalf of the many workers at Canadian Nuclear Laboratories who were told three years ago this September that they would be kicked out of the public service pension plan. They are calling on the government to make the legislative changes necessary in order to keep them in the plan, as they have been for the last three years, despite not technically working for government.

RCMP  

    Mr. Speaker, I also rise on behalf of civilian members of the RCMP who had been told at one point that they would be transitioned into the public service and, of course, were concerned about the Phoenix pay system. They were then told that it would be postponed until Phoenix was fixed, and have now been told that the deeming will happen in the year 2020, even though the Auditor General has said that fixing Phoenix may take much longer.

The Environment  

    Mr. Speaker, first, I would like to draw reference back to petition No. 421-02359 that I presented on May 9 and at which time I provided my own personal opinion on the petition. I later found out that it was outside of the procedure of the House. Therefore, I apologize for doing that and will chalk it up as a learning experience.
    However, I rise to present a petition that reads: whereas Kinder Morgan is an American oil company based in Texas; and whereas Kinder Morgan paid no taxes to the Government of Canada in 2017; and whereas in Canada dozens of first nations still do not have access to clean drinking water, we are facing a housing a crisis, and renewable energy projects are desperate for more funding, the petitioners call on the Government of Canada to refrain from using Canadian taxpayer money to bail out Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and instead invest in green energy projects that respect indigenous rights.

  (1610)  

Killer Whales  

    Mr. Speaker, it is my distinct honour to rise today to present to the House a petition that was developed by the students at Salt Spring Elementary School. They worked very hard to present a petition to the House calling for urgent action to protect the southern resident killer whales of the Salish Sea.
    The petitioners point out that these whales will soon become extinct if we do not save them. They believe that the oceans protection plan is a good start, but that much more needs to be done to protect the southern resident killer whales.
    The petitioners call on the government to take action to deal with disturbances from whale-watching operations and from other vessels that are operating in the vicinity of the southern resident killer whales, and to take urgent action to protect the whales from physical and acoustic disturbance.

Human Organ Trafficking  

    Mr. Speaker, I rise to present petitions from individuals who are concerned about the international trafficking of human organs.
     The petitioners ask us to please move quickly with legislation that will end this horrific practice.

[Translation]

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis  

    Mr. Speaker, I would like to present two petitions today.
    The first petition has to do with myalgic encephalomyelitis. This disorder, which currently affects thousands of Canadians, is a devastating nervous system disorder for which there is no effective treatment and that is still little-known in the medical community. There is a lack of funding for research on this disorder.
    The petition was signed by nearly 480 people from across Quebec who are calling for increased funding for research to develop treatments that are tailored and accessible to all those with this disorder.

Trans Mountain Pipeline  

    Mr. Speaker, the second petition has to do with the purchase of the Trans Mountain pipeline, which was obviously a shock to Canadians across the country. For example, in my riding of Hochelaga, which is quite far from British Columbia, the petition garnered 600 signatures in under three days.
    These petitioners are calling on the Liberal government to reverse its decision to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline, adopt real measures to invest this money in green energy, and listen to the provinces, first nations, and all of the Canadians who oppose this pipeline.

[English]

Pharmacare  

    Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to table yet another petition signed by residents of Winnipeg North. It is about the pharmacare program.
     The petitioners want to see a national pharmacare system put into place for prescription medicine.

Justice  

    Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to stand here to present a petition.
    We all hold the integrity of our children at the heart of every decision we make. A constituent of mine, Delphine Brooker, asked me to propose this petition on her behalf. She did the hard work in our community. Over 139 people signed this petition from our community alone.
     The petitioners want us to focus on our children first in any decision we make here and in any proposed changes made to sexual offences involving children. We again hold our children as the top priority.

[Translation]

Seniors  

    Mr. Speaker, I wish to present a petition regarding automatic registration for the guaranteed income supplement. Most of the petitioners are members of the Saint-Damase branch of the FADOQ.
    The federal government announced that it was launching a process to automatically register seniors for the GIS, but that process will not apply to everyone who is eligible. It will not apply until they reach the age of 65. This is an important federal government program because it provides low-income seniors who collect old age security with extra income.
    For these reasons, the petitioners are calling on the government to extend automatic registration for the GIS to all seniors.

  (1615)  

[English]

Canada Summer Jobs Program  

    Mr. Speaker, I have a petition in which citizens and residents of Canada draw to the attention of the government section 2 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which identifies, among other things, freedom of conscience, freedom of thought, and freedom of belief as fundamental freedoms.
     The petitioners call upon the government to defend the freedom of conscience, thought, and belief, and withdraw the attestation requirement for applicants to the Canada summer jobs program.

Justice  

    Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to table a petition today on behalf of my constituents, who are members of the Knox United Church in Parksville and who support the Parksville-Qualicum Interfaith Kairo committee.
     The petitioners call for recommended changes to the justice system so decision-makers, such as judges and juries, are, under all circumstances, are fully representative of the community affected by an alleged crime.

The Environment  

    Mr. Speaker, I have another petition from people who are in support of Motion No. 151.
    The petitioners call on the government to create a national strategy to combat plastic pollution and create regulations aimed at reducing single-use plastics, plastic debris discharged from stormwater outfalls, permanent and dedicated annual funding for cleanup of derelict fishing gear, and education and outreach campaigns.
    On behalf of the constituents of Courtenay—Alberni, Mr. Speaker, I want to wish you a wonderful summer. I wish the same to all the pages and staff on the Hill, and to my colleagues as well.

Canada Summer Jobs Program  

    Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to present a petition signed by many constituents in my riding of Perth—Wellington. The petitioners call on the Prime Minister to defend the constitutionally protected fundamental freedoms of Canadians, including freedom of conscience and religion, and to remove the attestation for participants in the Canada summer jobs program.

[Translation]

Public Transit  

    Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a petition signed by over 1,000 people who support the reinstatement of the public transit tax credit, something that is really important to many people living in urban centres, such as Montreal. It is also important to people living on modest incomes, because it was often the only tax credit they were entitled to at the end of the year. It is very important to us and to the petitioners that it be reinstated.

[English]

Small Business  

    Mr. Speaker, it is my great pleasure to present two petitions, one with 9,772 signatures, the other one with 4,857 signatures, both of which call on the Minister of Finance and the Government of Canada to take care and ensure that any consultations on small business tax changes are done appropriately, with full power to ensure that they are done with diligence and respect for the complexity of the impact of taxation on Canadian business.

Myanmar  

    Mr. Speaker, it is with great honour that I would like to table e-petition 1282 in the House of Commons. The Canadian rapporteur on Myanmar reported back to Canada on the horrific humanitarian conditions faced by the Rohingya people, where there is clear evidence to support that crimes against humanity have been committed. Alongside thousands of Canadians, we call on the government to make a commitment to support the Rohingya people and to pressure Myanmar to stop the violence and ensure that those responsible for violations are held to account.

Human Organ Trafficking  

    Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present this petition. There are two bills before Parliament proposing to impede the trafficking of human organs obtained without consent or as a result of a financial transaction: Bill C-350 in the House, and Bill S-240 in the Senate. Therefore, I am pleased to present these signatures from people mostly in the greater Toronto area urging the Parliament of Canada to move quickly on the proposed legislation to amend the Criminal Code and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act to prohibit such acts.

Vision Loss  

    Mr. Speaker, I rise with probably the last piece of business we are going to have for the spring of 2018. I know that as we shutter this place and go home to our constituencies, all of us are going to be able to re-energize and have a very safe summer.
    I am rising with a petition for the Government of Canada from concerned citizens who understand that vision loss is a public health problem that is increasing and that we need to have a national action plan. Therefore, the petitioners are calling for that kind of national framework, because the government has an important role in a coordinated response for prevention, for research, for therapy, for public education, and for treatment. Of course, that is the whole purpose of the petition. I congratulate these citizens on being so forthcoming in their care for other people.

  (1620)  

Questions on the Order Paper

    Mr. Speaker, I would like to first quickly thank the team over at the PCO who handle all these tablings, specifically the team in the Office for the Coordination of Parliamentary Returns, in particular Nicole, Paul, Claudette, and Martina, who have done a tremendous job of ensuring that we respond to all questions asked by members. I would add to that list Stephanie and Jevan.
    The following questions will be answered today: Questions Nos. 1756 and 1814.

[Text]

Question No. 1756--
Ms. Georgina Jolibois:
     With regard to the Pan-Canadian Health Human Resource Strategy, since fiscal year 2015-16: (a) which geographic areas has the government identified as “areas of high need, including rural and remote settings”; (b) how many healthcare workers have accepted employment in the areas identified in (a); (c) how many, broken down by number and percentage, of those healthcare workers identified in (b) were offered permanent, full-time employment; and (d) how many, broken down by number and percentage, of those identified in (b) were accepted by people who self-identify as Indigenous (First Nations, Métis, or Inuit)?
Mr. Bill Blair (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, Lib.):
    Mr. Speaker, the pan-Canadian health human resource strategy, HHRS, was a Health Canada funded initiative to help recruit and retain health care providers and promote optimal working conditions for them. Although funding for projects under the HHRS concluded in 2015-16, Health Canada continues to examine health workforce priority issues, including the planning, organization, and delivery of health services through the pan-Canadian committee on health workforce.
    With regard to (a), although the Government of Canada provides financial support to the provinces and territories for health care services, the responsibility for matters related to the administration and delivery of the health workforce, including identifying areas of need and managing the supply and distribution of the health workforce, falls within provincial and territorial jurisdiction.
    With regard to (b), Health Canada does not collect this data. Please refer to response (a).
    With regard to (c), Health Canada does not collect this data. Please refer to response (a).
    With regard to (d), Health Canada does not collect this data. Please refer to response (a).
Question No. 1814--
Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:
     With regard to the statement in the House of Commons by the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness on May 22, 2018, in relation to terrorist travellers under the previous government that “Not one was charged”: (a) prior to making the statement, was the Minister briefed by officials on the charges laid against Awso Peshdary, John Maguire and Khadar Khalib, in February 2015; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, why did the Minster provide information to the House which was contrary to the information officials provided to him; and (c) if the answer to (a) is negative, why did the Department fail to provide the Minister with the pertinent information?
Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Lib.):
     Mr. Speaker, on May 22, 2018, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness said in the House of Commons, “I would note that under the Harper government some 60 terrorist travellers returned to Canada. Not one was charged.”
    Prior to November 4, 2015, no criminal charges were brought against any individual who returned to Canada after participating in terrorist activity.
    Charges laid against Awso Peshdary were for actions taken on Canadian soil. John Maguire and Khadar Khalib were charged in absentia.

[English]

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns

    Furthermore, if the government's responses to Questions Nos. 1752 to 1755 and 1757 to 1762 could be made orders for return, these returns would be tabled immediately.
    Is it the pleasure of the House that the aforementioned questions be made orders for return and that they be tabled immediately?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.

[Text]

Question No. 1752--
Mr. Earl Dreeshen:
     With regard to concerns that individuals who have received a northern living allowance are reassessed by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) at a higher rate compared to the general population: (a) for the last year where statistics are available, what percentage of taxpayers were reassessed by CRA who (i) received a northern living allowance, (ii) did not receive a northern living allowance; and (b) what is the percentage of taxpayers who were reassessed, broken down by province or territory of residence?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1753--
Mr. Earl Dreeshen:
     With regard to expenditures on conference fees since January 1, 2016, and broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation and other government entity: (a) what is the total amount spent on conference fees; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) amount, (ii) host and title of conference, (iii) date of conference, (iv) location, (v) number of attendees paid for by the government?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1754--
Mr. Earl Dreeshen:
     With regard to expenditures on the rental of aircraft since January 1, 2016, and broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation and other government entity: (a) what is the total amount spent on the rental of aircraft; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) amount, (ii) vendor, (iii) dates of rental, (iv) type of aircraft, (v) purpose of trip, (vi) origin and destination of flights, (vii) titles of passengers?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1755--
Ms. Georgina Jolibois:
    With regard to all federal funding in the riding of Desnethé-Missinippi-Churchill River for fiscal year 2017-18: (a) how many projects have received funding from a department of agency in the last fiscal year; (b) what projects have received funding from a department or agency in the last fiscal year; and (c) what was the value of the projects that have received funding from a department or agency in the last fiscal year?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1757--
Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
     With regard to the Kathryn Spirit: (a) did the government ask Lloyds to conduct a study of the hazardous materials onboard the wreck and if so, (i) when was it conducted, (ii) did the company’s employees access, visit or see the wreck at Beauharnois, (iii) did they analyze samples from the wreck, (iv) if they did not have access, what are the reasons, how could they have written their report and what ship served as the model for writing the report, (v) does the report recommend that a detailed environmental inspection be carried out and that a full environmental survey be conducted to validate the presence of hazardous materials, and if so, were the inspection and survey completed, (vi) if so, what were the findings of the inspection and the survey, broken down by material and concentration; (b) what were the waste, materials and liquids removed from the wreck that were sent to a facility outside the worksite for recycling or disposal in accordance with paragraph 10.3 of the statement of work broken down by (i) date, (ii) description, (iii) quantity, (iv) disposal or recycling site; (c) on what date did the Kathryn DJV consortium provide the government with the project management plan, (i) did it include the emergency response plan, (ii) if it was not included, when was the emergency response plan provided to the government representative; (d) did the government provide the emergency response plan to the Beauharnois and Chateauguay fire services, and if so, (i) on what date, (ii) in what format (mail, email, other); (e) according to government information, when did the consortium provide the emergency response plan to the Beauharnois and Chateauguay fire services and (i) have they provided updated versions since then, (ii) if so, which versions, broken down by date and format; (f) what company did Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) hire to monitor the worksite in order to ensure compliance with health and safety regulations and (i) what specific mandate did PSPC give it, (ii) how does the company monitor the worksite, broken down by each task and the number of people involved, (iii) has this company found any violations of the workplace health and safety regulations broken down by date and description of these violations; (g) what company did PSPC hire to monitor the worksite in order to ensure compliance with environmental regulations and (i) what specific mandate did PSPC give it, (ii) how does the company monitor the worksite, broken down by each task and the number of people involved, (iii) has this company found any violations of the environmental regulations broken down by date and description of these violations; (h) was contaminated water removed from the Kathryn Spirit, broken down by (i) date, (ii) ship compartments, (iii) type of pollutant found, (iv) how it was treated; (i) did the consortium discharge into Lac St-Louis any water contained in the Kathryn Spirit, broken down by (i) discharge date, (ii) discharge site, (iii) date of the Environment Canada analysis, (iv) content of the Environment Canada analysis; and (j) did Environment Canada refuse to discharge water into Lac St-Louis; (i) was Environment Canada given notice before each water discharge, pumping or other by the company into the lake or any other waterway as called for by the statement of work?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1758--
Ms. Hélène Laverdière:
    With regard to the export of Canadian military goods and technology: (a) how many export permits has the Minister of Foreign Affairs approved since she was appointed to the position in 2017, broken down by (i) which countries are to receive these military goods or technology, (ii) goods or technology included in the export permit, (iii) monetary value, (iv) Canadian manufacturer, (v) anticipated date of receipt, (vi) date on which the contract was signed; (b) what was the role of the Canadian Commercial Corporation in brokering each deal; (c) on what dates were the relevant human rights assessments conducted; (d) on what date did the Minister receive the relevant human rights assessment; and (e) what are the potential monetary penalties should the export permit be cancelled at a later date?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1759--
Mr. Alistair MacGregor:
     With respect to the Victoria Flying Club, and complaints registered with Transport Canada by constituents in the riding of Cowichan-Malahat-Langford, concerning frequent and low-flying aircraft: (a) how many complaints have been received by Transport Canada since October 19, 2017; (b) how many photos, aircraft registration numbers and witnesses have been provided to Transport Canada to corroborate information supplied by the public in relation to public complaints; (c) what information has been provided to the constituents by Transport Canada; and (d) what steps is Transport Canada taking to address complaints registered by the constituents concerning frequent and low-flying aircraft?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1760--
Mr. Tom Lukiwski:
     With regard to the impact of the government’s decision to impose a $50 per tonne carbon tax on the people of Saskatchewan: (a) what are the details of all studies the government has done related to how much the carbon tax will cost the average Saskatchewan farm family, including (i) who conducted the study, (ii) methodology, (iii) findings; and (b) what is the government’s own projection regarding how much money the $50 per tonne carbon tax will cost the average Saskatchewan farm family?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1761--
Ms. Sheila Malcolmson:
     With regard to the five proposed anchorages east of Gabriola Island, British Columbia: (a) how many meetings has the Minister of Transport held with Snuneymuxw First Nation, broken down by (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) attendees, (iv) recommendations that were made to the Minister; (b) what are the details of any briefing notes or correspondence related to the meetings referred to in (a), including the (i) title, (ii) date, (iii) sender, (iv) recipient, (v) subject matter, (vi) file number; (c) how many meetings has the Transport Canada representative held with Snuneymuxw First Nation, broken down by (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) attendees, (iv) recommendations that were made to the Minister; and (d) what are the details of any briefing notes or correspondence related to the meetings referred to in (c), including the (i) title, (ii) date, (iii) sender, (iv) recipient, (v) subject matter, (vi) file number?
    (Return tabled)
Question No. 1762--
Mr. Kelly McCauley:
     With regard to the allocations from Treasury Board Central votes for central vote 40 in the Main Estimates 2018-19: (a) what are the project breakdowns for the funding committed under the following initiatives, namely (i) Securing Market Access for Canada’s Agriculture and Agri-Food Products, (ii) Strengthening Canada’s Food Safety System, (iii) Canada’s Co-chairmanship of the G-20 Framework Working Group, (iv) Sustainable Aquaculture Program, (v) Ensuring Rules-Based and Responsible Trade (horizontal item), (vi) Indigenous Health: Keeping Families Healthy in Their Communities, (vii) Renewing the Matrimonial Real Property Implementation Support Program, (viii) Improving Access to the Digital Economy, (ix) Adapting Canada’s Weather and Water Services to Climate Change Ensuring the Safe Operation of Tankers, (x) Strengthening Capacity for Environmental Assessments, (xi) National Research Council, (xii)Strengthening the Canadian Judiciary; and (b) of the initiatives listed in (a), (i) what are the full-time equivalents required for each project operating under each initiative, (ii) what is the estimated run-time for each project operating under each initiative, (iii) what is the expected amount of top-up for each project under each initiative, (iv) what is the class for Assessed Project Management Capacity for each project under each initiative, (v) what are the risk and complexity assessments for each project under each initiative, (vi) which of the projects under each initiative listed require third party evaluation?
    (Return tabled)

[English]

    Finally, I would ask that all remaining questions be allowed to stand.
    Some hon. members: Agreed.

Motions for Papers

    Mr. Speaker, I ask that all notices of motions for the production of papers be allowed to stand.
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    The Assistant Deputy Speaker (Mr. Anthony Rota): Pursuant to order made Tuesday, June 19, 2018, we have some matters to take care of.

Customs Act

[Translation]

    (Bill C-21. On the Order: Government Orders:)

    May 9, 2018—Third reading of Bill C-21, An Act to amend the Customs Act—The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

    (Bill, as amended, read the third time and passed on division)

Fisheries Act

    (Bill C-68: On the Order: Government Orders:)

    June 13, 2018—Third reading of Bill C-68, An Act to amend the Fisheries Act and other Acts in consequence—The Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

    (Motion for third reading deemed moved, bill read the third time and passed on division)

Federal Public Sector Labour Relations Act

[English]

    (Bill C-62. On the Order: Government Orders:)

    June 11, 2018—Consideration at report stage of C-62, an act to amend the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations Act and other acts, as reported by the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities without amendment—The President of the Treasury Board.

    (Bill concurred in, read the third time and passed on division)

Wrecked, Abandoned or Hazardous Vessels Act

    (Bill C-64. On the Order: Government Orders:)

    June 19, 2018—Third reading of Bill C-64, an act respecting wrecks, abandoned, dilapidated or hazardous vessels and salvage operations—The Minister of Transport.

    (Bill read the third time and passed)

Ways and Means

Motion No. 24  

[Translation]

    (Motion No. 24. On the Order: Government Orders:)

    May 28, 2018—Ways and Means motion to implement a multilateral convention to implement tax treaty related measures to prevent base erosion and profit shifting.

    (Motion agreed to on division)

Multilateral Instrument in Respect of Tax Conventions Act

    (Bill C-82. On the Order: Introduction of Bills:)

    May 28, 2018—First reading of Bill C-82, An Act to implement a multilateral convention to implement tax treaty related measures to prevent base erosion and profit shifting—Minister of Finance

    (Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code

[English]

    (Bill C-46. On the Order: Government Orders:)

    June 14, 2018—Consideration of the amendments made by the Senate to Bill C-46, an act to amend the Criminal Code (offences relating to conveyances) and to make consequential amendments to other acts—The Minister of Justice.

    (Motion agreed to on division)

Canada Elections Act

    (Bill C-50. On the Order: Government Orders:)

    June 14, 2018—Consideration of the amendments made by the Senate to Bill C-50, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act (political financing)—The Minister of Democratic Institutions.

    (Motion agreed to on division)

Committees of the House

Procedure and House Affairs 

[Translation]

     June 4, 2018—That the 64th Report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs entitled, “Code of Conduct for Members of the House of Commons: Sexual Harassment between Members”, presented to the House on Monday, June 4, 2018, be concurred in.

    (Motion agreed to)

  (1625)  

[English]

Parliamentary Budget Officer

    June 19, 2018—Notice of Motion—That, pursuant to Standing Order 111.1(2) and in accordance with subsection 79.1(1) of the Parliament of Canada Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. P-1, the House approve the appointment of Yves Giroux as Parliamentary Budget Officer for a term of seven years—Leader of the Government in the House of Commons.

    (Motion agreed to on division)

    It being 4:25 p.m., pursuant to order made Tuesday, June 19 the House stands adjourned until Monday, September 17 at 11 a.m. pursuant to Standing Orders 28(2) and 24(1).
    I want to wish all members a wonderful summer. I want to thank all the staff for putting up with us all this time and all the pages for serving us so well.
    Have a wonderful summer.
    (The House adjourned at 4:25 p.m.)
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