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42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION

EDITED HANSARD • NUMBER 309

CONTENTS

Wednesday, June 6, 2018




House of Commons Debates

VOLUME 148 
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NUMBER 309 
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1st SESSION 
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42nd PARLIAMENT 

OFFICIAL REPORT (HANSARD)

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Speaker: The Honourable Geoff Regan

    The House met at 2 p.m.

Prayer


[Statements by Members]

  (1405)  

[English]

    We will now have the singing of O Canada, led by our wonderful pages.
    [Members sang the national anthem]
    The Speaker: Well done. An outstanding rendition.

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

[Statements by Members]

[Translation]

Climate Change

    Mr. Speaker, this is Canadian Environment Week, and climate change will be one of the issues the Prime Minister raises at the G7 meeting. As usual, he will take official photos with world leaders and celebrate the historic progress made under his leadership.
    Curiously, this is also the week he decided to go to Alberta to visit the pipeline he just bought with Quebeckers' money. This new acquisition means Canada can triple the amount of bitumen it sells to western and Asian markets.
    At least 350 more oil tankers will pass through unique Pacific coast ecosystems every year, yet the Prime Minister has the gall to talk about marine pollution at the G7. Seriously. His blatant hypocrisy will make it clear to his global partners that Canada intends to play an environmentally destructive role in the fight against climate change.

Acadian Games

     Mr. Speaker, this year the greater Miramichi area will be hosting the Jeux de l'Acadie for the first time. This is the 39th such gathering of Acadian and francophone communities from the four Atlantic provinces since 1979. Over 3,000 athletes will take part in 11 sporting events and cultural activities.
    It is not just the athletes who take part in this annual event. Over 3,500 volunteers give over 600,000 hours of their time. With a budget of over $350,000 and a total of 27,000 visitors expected by the end of the Jeux de l'Acadie, the event should generate over $1.6 million in economic benefits.

[English]

    From June 27 to July 1, the Acadian community of Miramichi, as well as all Miramichiers, will proudly roll out the red carpet and welcome everyone from across Atlantic Canada.

[Translation]

    In 2018, Miramichi is the place to be.

[English]

Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry Service Award

    Mr. Speaker, last year I had the honour and privilege to honour 150 worthy individuals across Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry by awarding them the SDSG Canada 150 Service Award. These individuals had demonstrated commitment and dedication to our community through volunteerism and public service.
    The response across the riding was overwhelming. Because there are so many quality volunteers in our riding, many deserving constituents did not receive an award. Therefore, I am delighted to announce that the SDSG Service Award will return on an annual basis.
     The SDSG Service Award is awarded in recognition of residents in Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry who have made outstanding contributions to their communities. I am asking everyone across Canada who knows deserving constituents living in SDSG to please nominate them for the 2018 award. Nomination forms and details can be found on my website, at guylauzon.ca.
    I should point out that there is no problem with members saying their own names.

[Translation]

Paralympic Sports

    Mr. Speaker, today, we are fortunate to welcome to the Hill people from the Paralympic Foundation of Canada as part of the ImagiNation campaign.

[English]

    The Paralympic Foundation of Canada launched ImagiNation in 2017, a four-year initiative to ensure that more Canadians with a disability are given the opportunity to choose sport and to become athletes who excel on the world stage. lmagiNation will increase access to coaching, equipment, and training environments for thousands of Canadians with a disability as well as invest in individuals with the drive and talent to compete on the world stage.

[Translation]

    Our government is honoured to work with the Paralympic Foundation of Canada and to provide financial support to ensure that Canadians with a disability can incorporate sports into their lives. Whether we are talking about a local game or a paralympic podium, we are working to create a healthy and accessible Canada that is open to all.

  (1410)  

Carmel Moreault

    Mr. Speaker, on May 1 at 7:15 p.m., Carmel Moreault, a firefighter from Témiscouata-sur-le-Lac had just finished dinner with his partner when he got a call about an alarm at the Cascades plant. At 8 p.m., he texted his partner telling her not to wait up because there was a fire.
    Fifteen minutes later, she received a call from the station chief informing her that Carmel had had an accident. The sprinkler system had filled a ventilation pipe with water, and he was crushed by the pipe. Carmel Moreault did not survive. He was the first firefighter from Témiscouata-sur-le-Lac to die in the line of duty.
    I saw so much love from his community at his funeral. More than 250 firefighters from Quebec and New Brunswick were there to show their solidarity and pay tribute to him one last time.
    I want to offer my sincere condolences to his family, and in particular his partner, Sylvie, his children, the mother of his children, and his mother, Lucienne, as well as his colleagues from stations 35 and 36 in Témiscouata-sur-le-Lac.
    This tribute pales in comparison to the sacrifice Carmel made for his community.

[English]

Killick Coast Games

    Mr. Speaker, from St. Thomas parish to Logy Bay is a breathtaking and treacherous area of my riding known locally as the Killick Coast. The brave and hardy inhabitants are well known for their history, camaraderie, and competitive spirit.
    This August, Torbay plays host to athletes aged 11 to 17 from the communities of Portugal Cove–St. Philip's, Flatrock, Bauline, Pouch Cove, and Logy Bay-Middle Cove-Outer Cove in a variety of team sports as part of the 13th annual Killick Coast games. A hallmark of the games are the honorary patrons, community leaders who have contributed to sport and youth mentorship and whose accomplishments are to be celebrated.
    Most importantly, the athletes foster lifelong friendships that preserve community attachment. Organizations like the Killick Coast Games that build communities deserve our support. I invite the House to rise with me and show support for the Killick Coast and its commitment to lifelong support for sport, friendship, and community.

Taxation

    Mr. Speaker, Canadians do not like to be told what to think or how to behave by their government. This is what the Liberals are doing with their carbon tax, shaping behaviour through taxes to force compliance with the Liberal agenda. The problem with a carbon tax is that it takes the market out of the equation and undervalues innovators and entrepreneurs. The Liberal one-size-fits-all solution of taxing Canadians to bend their behaviour is demeaning and counterproductive.
    In Saskatchewan, we value our environment and our economy through renewable energy, crop diversification, zero tillage, forestry management, and infrastructure planning, just to name a few. Saskatchewan is full of innovative people. Look at the modern farm equipment, all invented by farmers solving problems without government interference. Innovations like catalytic converters, carbon scrubbers, electric cars, and solar panels were neither invented by government nor inspired by taxes.
     Entrepreneurs and researchers are our best resource to create solutions that everyday Canadians are motivated to embrace and implement. The misguided Liberal government needs to scrap this tax and get out of the way.

Prime Minister's Awards

    Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate two educators from my riding of Don Valley East on receiving the 2018 Prime Minister's Award. This award recognizes exceptional teaching practices and a commitment to inspiring students.
    The first recipient is Hafiz Printer, who teaches grades 10 to12 at the lsmaili Tariqah and Religious Education Board Canada. Mr. Printer is admired by his students for engaging them in their learning. He fosters a safe classroom environment for students to openly debate and learn.
    The second recipient is Ms. Isabelle Wong, a kindergarten teacher at St. Ignatius of Loyola Catholic School. Ms. Wong focuses on character development to ensure that her students become responsible citizens and lifelong learners.
    I am proud to honour these two educators for their remarkable achievements and their excellence in teaching. I hope their students are inspired to do better.

Retirement Congratulations

    Mr. Speaker, one of the delightful privileges of this job is the joy of meeting and working with people so accomplished as to make one wonder what one has done with one's life. Bruce Kidd is one such person. He recently retired from the University of Toronto Scarborough campus as principal and vice-president. Those of us of a certain age will know Bruce as an Olympic athlete and a Commonwealth champion. Others will know him as a scholar, others as a university administrator, and still others as a human rights advocate.
    The Bruce Kidd I know, however, is a gentle, wise, and skilled man who represented the very best of UTSC. As with many great people, he listened before he spoke. He thought before he acted, and he attributed to others the credit that was rightly his. He was very modest about his accomplishments.
    No one could begrudge Bruce a long and comfortable retirement. However, I doubt that he will actually retire. I look forward to seeing Bruce in his next reincarnation after his so-called retirement.

  (1415)  

Relay for Life

    Mr. Speaker, I look around the chamber and I do not see anyone who has not been affected by cancer. A loved one, a friend, a colleague, no one is immune. This weekend, I will be participating in the 26th annual Canadian Cancer Society's Prince George version of Relay for Life. It will mark my 19th year of participating in the Relay for Life. The last two years, I walked the full 24 hours, and this year I have set my goal to walk the full 24 hours as well. I walk for those whom we have lost. I walk for those who have beaten cancer, like my brother Trent, who is my hero. He has beaten it not once, but twice. I also walk for those who are in a fight for their lives as we speak. I walk because I know cancer can be beaten.
    Today, I issue a challenge to the member for York Centre, and indeed to all members, to join me in the fight, participate this weekend in a walk in their area, or donate to cancer.ca, and let us end this deadly disease now.

Welland Rose Festival

    Mr. Speaker, Welland, Ontario has been known as the Rose City since 1921. Since it began, in June 1961, the Welland Rose Festival has brought together people from across Niagara to celebrate the heritage and traditions of the city for which the world-famous canal is named. Beginning with the coronation ball, the month-long rose festival includes family events across the city, such as an art show, a fishing derby, concerts, and a grand parade.
    Please join me, Mr. Speaker, in congratulating and expressing our sincere appreciation to all the staff, sponsors, and volunteers who present the 57th annual Welland Rose Festival.

Grandmothers Advocacy Network

    Mr. Speaker, I stand today to welcome the amazing women who have come to the House from across the country representing the Grandmothers Advocacy Network, or GRAN. GRAN is a phenomenal organization that is actively involved in advocating for the human rights of grandmothers and their children. Its campaigns support the United Nations sustainable development goals of health, education, and gender equality, working to increase access to life-saving medication, improve access to quality education, and end violence against women and girls.
    This afternoon, GRAN is holding an event in room 330, Wellington Building, from 4:00 to 5:30, or maybe just a bit later. I invite all my colleagues to join me at the event this afternoon to participate in a dialogue about the need for inclusion of African grandmothers in a feminist international agenda.
    I welcome everyone from GRAN and encourage them to keep up the incredible work.

74th Anniversary of D-Day

    Mr. Speaker, 74 years ago today, in 1944, more than 150,000 allied soldiers assaulted occupied Europe from the air, sea, and land, turning the tide of the Second World War on D-Day. Over 14,000 Canadians would participate in this historic battle on the shores of Normandy. Canadian troops bravely stormed Juno Beach and decisively defeated the entrenched Nazis. Our heroic soldiers captured more enemy territory on that day than did any of our allies.
    This serves as a testament to the true strength of character and resolve that existed with the members of the Canadian Armed Forces then, as today. Three hundred and fifty-nine Canadians paid the ultimate price to liberate others from the perilous oppression of Nazi occupation. We must never forget their sacrifice, their courage, and their sheer determination in the face of overwhelming odds.
    As Canadians, we thank those who came before us and sacrificed their lives so that we may live peacefully in the greatest nation on Earth, our home and native land, Canada.

  (1420)  

Portuguese Heritage Month

    Mr. Speaker, boa tarde.
    Last month, during the state visit of the Portuguese prime minister, António Costa, both he and our Prime Minister paid tribute to the Portuguese community and its contributions to Canada. They both expressed pride that this year, for the first time ever at the national level, Canada will be celebrating June as Portuguese Heritage Month, and June 10 as Portugal Day.
    I would like to thank all the Portuguese leaders, clubs, associations, and media, not only in my riding, Davenport, but also across the country, who have tirelessly promoted the Portuguese culture, language, and community. They serve as an inspiration for this national recognition. It is to honour them and their aspirations for the Portuguese to be recognised at the highest level of our nation and be celebrated for their many contributions to Canada.
    Whether cheering on Ronaldo during the World Cup, singing along to a Shawn Mendes tune, or eating pastéis de nata, Portugal's famous custard tart, we should take the time to celebrate Portugal this month.
    Viva Portugal, and viva Canada. Obrigada.

North Island—Powell River

    Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to serve the people of North Island—Powell River.
    It is the Local Hero Awards that happened in several communities in my riding, and the fact that the community of Woss was awarded the courage and bravery award, recognizing the incredible power of a community that faced the worst of tragedies with courage and bravery.
     It is the totem pole raised at North Island Secondary School in Port McNeill. Over 1,000 community members came together, indigenous and non-indigenous, to celebrate reconciliation. It is the tears of the elders who watched, many of them residential school survivors, who never thought the day would come when their grandchildren would dance around a totem pole that stands in front of their school.
    It is all the cadets in my riding who support their communities so well, most recently the Powell River Royal Canadian Army Cadets, who recognized their cadets and shared the challenges of rural and remote community cadets programs.
    What an honour it is to represent people who work so hard, who care about their communities so much, and who remember one another during the hardest of times. I am proud and humbled to serve them.

[Translation]

D-Day

    Mr. Speaker, June 6, 1944, D-Day, the longest day, marked a turning point in human history. On that day, 132,000 American, British, French, and Canadian troops stormed the Atlantic Wall in Normandy to liberate Europe from Nazi oppression.
     Over 14,000 Canadian heroes from across the country went ashore that day, and 355 never returned. This was the first day of a gruelling operation that would drag on for nearly three months. The Canadians' efforts made it possible to push inland to Caen, paving the way for the liberation of France and western Europe.
    As a former commanding officer of the Régiment de la Chaudière, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2019 and was the only French-Canadian regiment to take part in the Juno Beach landing, I am especially honoured to commemorate this historic day.
     In memory of all those who fell on the battlefield fighting for freedom, let us show our undying gratitude to these heroes by saying, “Never again”.
    Aere Perennius!

[English]

74th Anniversary of D-Day

    Mr. Speaker, today marks the 74th anniversary of the D-Day invasion. We pause to reflect on what took place on the shores of Normandy and pay our respects to the fallen.
    Alongside allied forces, thousands of Canadian soldiers played a crucial part in the D-Day offensive to liberate France.

[Translation]

    We must never forget the 340 Canadians who died at Juno Beach on this day alone in 1944. Many more would perish as the Allies advanced into western Europe. Their heroism and their courage will forever be etched in our memories. These men and women fought selflessly to give us the freedom and opportunities we all enjoy today.
    The events of that day shaped our identity as a nation.

[English]

    We must never forget the sacrifices made by Canadian veterans on D-Day. Our veterans represent the very best of Canada, having put their lives on the line in the defence of democracy, freedom, and justice.
    Lest we forget.

ORAL QUESTIONS

[Oral Questions]

  (1425)  

[Translation]

International Trade

    Mr. Speaker, during his interview on U.S. television last weekend, the Prime Minister spoke about NAFTA negotiations on supply management.
    The Prime Minister said, “We were moving towards flexibility in those areas that I thought was very, very promising.”
    What concessions has the Prime Minister made on supply management?
    Mr. Speaker, our party created supply management. Our party has always unequivocally defended supply management. We will continue to do so. Dairy producers in Quebec and across Canada know just how much we support for them.
    We will always defend the supply management system. However, if the Conservatives want to talk about supply management, I would ask the Leader of the Opposition why he appointed someone who opposes supply management as the critic for innovation and economic development.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, we have known for a long time that under this U.S. administration, our trade relationship has been volatile and under grave risk.
    Given this, can the Prime Minister tell us how much money was set aside in his budget and where we might find any mention of a contingency plan to deal with the trade disruption between Canada and the United States?
    Mr. Speaker, as we have said from the very beginning, with this particular American administration, we have to be ready for everything, and we are.
    That is why, as soon as the U.S. put forward punitive, unacceptable tariffs on steel and aluminum in Canada, we were, right away, ready with a list of retaliatory measures that target American companies and American producers for which there are alternatives available to Canadian citizens.
     We know that tariffs end up hurting the citizens of the country that brings them in. We want to avoid hurting Canadians. That is why we are consulting with Canadians on those retaliatory measures.
    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's own officials have confirmed that the deficit for this year will be over $18 billion.
    Can the Prime Minister tell us if he has any idea how much higher the deficit will be as a result of any support that may be necessary for the industries and workers affected by the trade disruption between the United States and Canada?
    Mr. Speaker, the member opposite well knows that the government will be there for workers and industries affected by these punitive American measures. That is what I told steel and aluminum workers over the past months as I travelled across the country to engage with them.
    It is interesting that the member opposite speaks about deficits. In the last election, Canadians had a very clear choice. The Conservatives, their choice, their option, was actually austerity and cuts. Our proposal to Canadians was investing in the middle class and the people working hard to join it, investing in our communities, and growing the economy the way the Conservatives were not able to for 10 years.
    Mr. Speaker, the Liberals' budget has in fact turned out to be built on borrowing and tax cuts on those very same middle-class Canadians they pretend to want to help.
    Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
    Hon. Andrew Scheer: Sorry, tax hikes.
    Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
    Order. We all like applause, most of the time, but not necessarily always. The hon. Leader of the Opposition has the floor.
    Mr. Speaker, Conservatives are always thinking about tax cuts. I will correct the blues after this to make sure they reflect tax hikes.
    On the subject of tariffs, we know that tariffs collected by the government will raise revenue for the Government of Canada. Will the Prime Minister assure the House and Canadians that any new revenue for the government will be used to lower taxes for affected workers and the businesses that employ them?
    Mr. Speaker, the member opposite pointed out that he thinks about tax cuts. The issue is that Conservatives think about tax cuts for the wealthiest Canadians.
    The first thing we did was bring in a tax cut for the middle class, and we raised taxes on the wealthiest 1%. For 10 years, Conservatives tried to put forward an agenda for growth that was focused on giving benefits and boutique tax cuts to the wealthiest Canadians, hoping that somehow it would trickle down to everyone else.
    It did not, which is why the Conservatives had terrible growth for 10 years. We are investing in the middle class and those working hard to join it, and giving them more money—

  (1430)  

    The hon. Leader of the Opposition.
    Mr. Speaker, now more than ever Canada needs to open up new markets and diversify our trading relationships. The trans-Pacific partnership would achieve just that. Despite the Prime Minister's delaying and jeopardizing that deal, it is essential that the bill implementing the deal be passed quickly.
     When will the Prime Minister commit to introducing the legislation for this trade agreement and can he commit that it will be passed before the House rises?
    Mr. Speaker, we are proud of the work we have done in diversifying Canada's trade. Under this government, we signed the CETA deal with Europe and we actually moved forward on a CPTPP, which highlights that a progressive trade deal can work for our workers and for the growing economies of Asia. We are pleased with our record on trade and growth.
     We are happy to announce that we will be introducing into the House the bill for the ratification of the new CPTPP before the House rises for the summer.

Natural Resources

    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister promised Canadians he would be a climate change leader, and he committed to eliminate public subsidies for oil and gas companies.
     However, climate change leaders do not buy pipelines with public money. Climate change leaders do not allow $3 million bonuses to be given to top oil executives. Climate change leaders do use public money to build long-term job creation in renewable energies.
     Could the government explain why it makes sense for a climate change leader to buy a pipeline?
    Mr. Speaker, we made a commitment to Canadians that said we understood we needed to grow the economy and protect the environment together. Those on the other side of the House would have Canadians believe that there is still a choice to be made between what is good for the economy and what is good for the environment. We on this side of the House know they must go together.
     That is why we are moving forward with a world-class oceans protection plan, a national price on carbon pollution, and getting our resources to new markets, other than the United States, for our oil. That is what we know we need to do. That is what we are going to keep doing, despite the false choice proposed by the members opposite.
    Mr. Speaker, we hear the government just spent $4.5 billion in renewable energies, but it spent it on a pipeline.

[Translation]

    Last week, the majority of MPs had the good sense to vote in favour of the bill introduced by my colleague from Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou to enshrine the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People in Canadian law. The Prime Minister himself voted in favour of it.
    How can he say he respects indigenous rights while forcing a pipeline through despite opposition from a number of first nations?
    Mr. Speaker, yesterday, I had the privilege of sitting down with representatives of indigenous communities that will be affected by this new pipeline. We talked about the impact on their communities. We have set up a committee to consult and listen to communities. We will ensure that the pipeline has a positive impact, and we will minimize any negative repercussions.
    I am proud of the reconciliation work we are doing. We will keep working with all indigenous peoples. We will listen to them. We will respect all points of view.
    Mr. Speaker, in 2015, the Prime Minister was a superstar, a breath of fresh air, and a new champion of the environment. Three years later, everyone is shaking their heads. What happened to Canada? What happened to Mr. Selfie, to Paris Match's new pet?
    After adopting Stephen Harper's targets, the Prime Minister bought a pipeline. Today, we learned that Canada ranks lowest among the G7 countries when it comes to eliminating oil subsidies. We came in seventh out seven.
    Will the Prime Minister finally keep his promise, do the right thing, and eliminate all oil subsidies?
    Mr. Speaker, in 2015, the choice was clear for Canadians.
    The NDP was proposing to make Canadians choose between what is good for the environment and what is good for the economy. The Liberal Party told Canadians that we understood how important it was to create a strong economy while protecting the environment. The two go hand in hand.
    That is exactly what we are doing. We are putting a national price on carbon pollution, implementing a historic oceans protection plan, and securing new markets for our resources.
    That is what Canadians expect.

  (1435)  

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, as the Prime Minister prepares to play host to the G7, Canadians and many around the world are asking themselves, “What happened to this guy?”
     We all remember that great defender of the planet who promised to end fossil fuels subsidies. However, a new report shows that when it comes to the G7 and those same subsidies, Canada ranks seventh out of seven. That would be last. That would be after Donald Trump's America.
     Therefore, rather than eliminate the subsidies, the Prime Minister went out and bought a 65-year-old pipeline. When will he end this circle of hypocrisy and finally come clean with Canadians and keep his promise to them and to the world?
    Mr. Speaker, I am happy to have the opportunity to reinforce that we have indeed committed, and are on track, to phase out inefficient fossil fuel subsidies by the year 2025. To do this, we announced in our very first budget the expiration of the tax writeoffs on capital investments in LNG facilities. In budget 2017, we announced the elimination of certain tax credits for exploration expenses in the oil and gas sector. We are developing our resources while protecting our environment, including safeguarding our oceans and combatting climate change.
     Our government understands that a clean environment and a strong economy go hand in hand.

[Translation]

Agriculture and Agrifood

    Mr. Speaker, every day the Liberal government demonstrates how completely out of touch it is with the farming community. The Liberals called our farmers tax cheats and are imposing a carbon tax that farmers do not want. They are changing Canada's food guide and imposing labels that make no sense on agricultural products. All their actions are having so-called unintended consequences on farmers.
    My question for the Prime Minister is quite simple. Does he also believe that yogourt, cheese, and fruit juice are a health hazard?
    Mr. Speaker, we on this side of the House are very proud of the support we provide to our farmers. The Conservatives cut nearly $700 million from agriculture budgets, whereas we are investing in hard-working Canadian farmers.
    We reached a trade agreement with Europe that will increase our agricultural exports by over $1.5 billion per year, and the comprehensive progressive agreement on the trans-Pacific partnership will boost them by over $1 billion a year. We invested $350 million to help dairy producers and processors modernize their operations, and we will always support Canadian farmers.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, farmers are struggling to survive and the Liberal imposed taxes are not helping. Now the agriculture minister is claiming that farmers support the Liberal carbon tax.
     The chair of the Western Canadian Wheat Growers said, “I'm not sure who has been briefing [the] Minister... but he is dead wrong if he thinks that most farmers support a carbon tax.”
    Does the Prime Minister agree with the minister that farmers like his carbon tax or will he listen to farmers and recognize that the carbon tax is crippling our farm families?
    Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives like to talk a good game on farmers, but the reality is different. While the previous government cut nearly $700 million from agriculture and agrifood, we have invested in hard-working Canadian farmers.
    Our government signed CETA, which will boost our agricultural exports by one and a half billion dollars a year, and the CPTPP, which will boost our agricultural exports by over a billion dollars a year. We have secured our $2-billion canola trade with China. We have invested $100 million in agricultural science and innovation. We have invested $350 million to help dairy farmers and processors modernize. We will always—
    The hon. member for Carleton.

Carbon Pricing

    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has a budget bill before the House of Commons right now that Finance Canada admits will raise the price of gas, home heating, and most other consumer goods that Canadians buy.
    How much will the Prime Minister's carbon tax cost the average Canadian family?
    Mr. Speaker, for 10 years Stephen Harper and his Conservatives did nothing on protecting the environment. However, over those years, a number of provinces stepped up and put forward a price on carbon pollution. Actually, we presently have a situation in which 80% of our citizens live in jurisdictions where there is a carbon price in effect.
     We are continuing to move forward to demonstrate that a national price on carbon will be fair for those provinces that already have it and grow the economy for everyone.

  (1440)  

    Mr. Speaker, if the provinces were already doing it, the Prime Minister would not have to introduce a budget bill forcing them to do it. Clearly this is a federally imposed tax. Clearly he would have read the briefing notes that his departments have given him about the cost of that tax. He knows the cost.
    Again, how much will this Liberal carbon tax imposed by the Prime Minister cost the average Canadian family?
    Mr. Speaker, I hate to have to correct the member opposite. In fact, it was during his government that many provinces moved forward on pricing carbon pollution.
     We have a situation in which British Columbia, Alberta, Quebec, and Ontario have all moved forward with pricing of carbon pollution, and we know that it has to be done right across the country. That is exactly what we are ensuring, but we are working with the provinces to ensure they can put forward a model that works for them, as long as it is fairly stringent and impactful right across the country.
    I am having difficulty hearing the answers. I would like to ask the member for St. Albert—Edmonton and others not to be yelling when someone else has the floor. It is very straightforward.
    The hon. member for Carleton.
    Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister uses the word “stringent”. There is no doubt that it will have a stringent effect on household budgets. There is also no doubt the Prime Minister supports high gas prices. He said so when he was in Vancouver, celebrating $1.60 a litre gas prices. There is also no doubt that his carbon tax will raise the price of consumer goods upon which middle-class Canadians rely.
    It is his bill, so how much will his carbon tax cost the average Canadian family?
    Mr. Speaker, unlike the years of the Harper Conservatives, we work with provinces as we move forward on pan-Canadian issues and projects. That is why we are working with provinces like Manitoba, Nova Scotia, and others to establish how they want to move forward on putting a price on pollution.
     We know we need a price on pollution across the country. It needs to be equivalent and effective right across the country. However, every jurisdiction will get to determine how that money comes in and how it returns that money to the people who need it.
    Mr. Speaker, we have no doubt that the Prime Minister will work with any politician as part of his plan to raise taxes on Canadians. It is his form of trickle-down economics. He scoops up money from working class consumers, gives it to the federal government, trickles it down to provincial politicians, and then expects us to believe that a few drops will go back to the people who originally paid for it in the first place. If that is true, then why can he not tell us this. How much will his carbon tax cost the average Canadian family?
    Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the member opposite's expertise in trickle-down economics. That is what the Conservatives specialized in for 10 years. They gave boutique tax credits to wealthy Canadians, delivered child benefit cheques to millionaire families, and then when we moved forward with lowering taxes for the middle class and raising them on the wealthiest 1%, they voted against it. Then we moved forward on a Canada child benefit to give more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families and did not send child benefit cheques to millionaires, while lifting hundreds of thousands of kids out of poverty. The Conservatives voted against it. Their positions are clear.

Indigenous Affairs

    Mr. Speaker, the Liberals voted against the NDP motion to implement the rights of indigenous peoples in their pipeline project, but just a few days ago voted to put those same rights into Canadian law.
     The Prime Minister cannot pretend that indigenous voices are all the same and ignore the clear opposition to his pipeline. The Liberals are denying the rights of first nations, Métis, and Inuit people. Does the government really not see that or does it just not care?

  (1445)  

    Mr. Speaker, I very much respect the member opposite's voice, but I do need to highlight that there are a range of voices in indigenous communities and we need to listen to all of them.
     There are people in indigenous communities who were opposed to this pipeline and other economic development projects. There are some who are in favour of it. We are working with all of them, including through entities like the Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee, a committee that we put together exactly for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.
     We are going to continue to work in the spirit of reconciliation on a nation-to-nation relationship that respects UNDRIP.

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, this is yet another example of a government that talks a lot, but is always missing in action when it comes to making important decisions that affect entire indigenous communities.
    Last week it voted to support the rights of indigenous peoples. This week, it is voting against our motion, which is a concrete way to support these rights.
    Can the Liberals do more than just talk, and talk, and talk about the rights of indigenous people?
    Mr. Speaker, I would say that it is the NDP that talks, and talks, and talks, while we deliver results for first nations and indigenous peoples. We have eliminated many boil water advisories, we have built schools, and we are moving forward with partnerships on governance and on treaties. We are working hand in hand with indigenous communities across the country to keep our promise of nation-to-nation reconciliation.
    We will continue to respectfully work with first nations without claiming to speak for them like the NDP does.

[English]

International Trade

    Mr. Speaker, in March, the President of the United States announced that he would be introducing tariffs on steel and aluminum. After that, he announced there would be an exemption for Canada and Mexico until May 1. He then announced a further extension of that exemption until June 1. Most recently, he indicated that, of course, the exemption was going to be lifted. All through that time, the Prime Minister had an opportunity to consult on the tariffs that he is now proposing to counter the steel and aluminum tariffs. My question is simple. Why did he wait so long and put us in a position where we cannot react right away?
    Mr. Speaker, I want to pause to thank Canadians. Over the past months, and indeed over a year now, Canadians have been united in our approach to dealing with the U.S. administration. Across political lines, across provincial capitals, across industries, Canadians have been speaking with a clear and united voice that we stand together and that we stand against punitive measures by the United States, that we will support our neighbours, that we will support our workers, and that we will remain united and proud Canadians. I want to thank all members of this House and all Canadians for the solidarity they continue to show on this issue.
    Mr. Speaker, Canadians really are watching what is going on because they are quite concerned. They see an economy that is going to be put at risk and they are looking for answers from the Prime Minister. Unfortunately, today we have not received any answers from the Prime Minister. He was asked four times about how much a carbon tax would cost a Canadian family. He did not tell us the answer. He was asked how much more deficit was going to be accumulated because of the trade war we are in. He did not give us an answer. These are things that Canadians care about.
     He did give us one answer. He told us that he is going to introduce legislation to affirm the CPTPP, the free-trade deal that we negotiated. Will he guarantee that it is going to pass?
    Mr. Speaker, I very much respect the laundry list the member put forward. However, we can list the concrete results we have delivered for Canadians over the past two and a half years. Whether it be signing the CPTPP, which the Conservatives were not moving forward on; whether it was concretizing a CETA that was in dire straits when we came into office; whether it is delivering an energy infrastructure that will get our oil resources to new markets, which they failed to do for 10 years; whether it is actually investing in infrastructure in our communities, lowering taxes for the middle class, and raising them on the wealthiest 1%, these are the things that—
    The hon. member for Richmond—Arthabaska.

[Translation]

Public Safety

    Mr. Speaker, when the Prime Minister announced that the G7 would be held in La Malbaie, his government also said that workers in the region would be put to use. Unfortunately, that is not what happened. Workers everywhere are currently in a situation of forced unemployment.
    Can the Prime Minister tell the people of La Malbaie whether compensation is provided for and what he is going to do for the hotel managers, innkeepers, and restaurant owners who are unable to put their employees to work before and during the G7?

  (1450)  

    Mr. Speaker, last week, I had the opportunity to visit La Malbaie in the Charlevoix region to meet with locals. They told me that they were proud to welcome the world, to show them the beauty of Charlevoix and to encourage people to come visit and discover this magnificent region.
    Obviously, they know that there will be some inconveniences and challenges that come with hosting our visitors and dealing with security. We are continuously working with the public and with their elected representatives to ensure that everything goes smoothly.
    Mr. Speaker, an event like the G7 summit naturally has an impact on local residents. Everyone knows that. Not only are honest workers currently prevented from getting to their place of work, but local shops, businesses, and homes will be exposed to vandalism.
    Under such circumstances, we would expect the government to look after victims of vandalism and provide compensation.
    Will the Prime Minister formally promise to compensate every victim of vandalism during the G7?
    Mr. Speaker, I am proud to be hosting world leaders in the beautiful region of Charlevoix.
     When I was there, I learned that a company from La Baie, a borough of Saguenay, won the contract to supply food to all the security and military personnel who will be present. This community will be reaping substantial profits.
    I can assure my colleague that the compensation policies for affected local businesses are exactly the same as they were when the Conservatives hosted their summit in 2010.

Sports

    Mr. Speaker, this week we all heard the many traumatizing stories of sexual abuse from Canadian athletes. This is unacceptable, and the government must do something to protect our athletes.
    National sports bodies in Canada are responsible for policing themselves in matters of sexual abuse. What is wrong with this picture? It creates conflicts of interest and endangers the safety of our athletes.
    When will the government do something to keep these young athletes safe?
    Mr. Speaker, harassment of any kind is unacceptable.
    The safety and security of athletes, coaches, and officials is always our top priority. All Canadians deserve the opportunity to participate in a sport environment that is free of discrimination and harassment. That is why all federally-funded sport organizations must have an anti-discrimination, harassment, and abuse policy.
    We are currently reviewing our existing funding policies to ensure that organizations continue to promote healthy, harassment-free environments.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, if policies are neglected, they are worthless. The government has to have zero tolerance for sexual abuse in Canadian sports. Right now, the onus is on sporting organizations to be responsible for policing these complaints. That is not fair to these organizations. Canada needs an independent body to handle cases of sexual abuse in Canadian sport.
     Under the recent Safe Sport Act in the United States, independent bodies investigate these cases. It is time for Canada to do the same. When is the government going to step up?
    Mr. Speaker, this government and all Canadians have been very clear. Harassment of any kind is completely unacceptable, and the safety and security of athletes, coaches, and officials is always our top priority.
     All Canadians deserve the opportunity to participate in a sport environment that is free of discrimination, harassment, and harmful behaviour. That is why all federally funded sport organizations must have an anti-discrimination, harassment, and abuse policy in place to be eligible for sport support program funding, which Sport Canada reviews to ensure compliance.
    We are currently reviewing our existing funding policies to ensure that organizations continue to promote harassment-free environments.

The Environment

    Mr. Speaker, the real impact of climate change cannot be understated. The challenge governments face is striking the right balance between an evolving economy and protection of the environment now and for future generations.
    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change repeatedly says that “We're all in this together” as a global community and that “international collaboration is essential to make sure we are leaving a healthy environment and a strong economy to our kids and grandkids.”
    Can the Prime Minister describe Canada's global plan to meet these global challenges?

  (1455)  

    Mr. Speaker, strong action is needed to tackle climate change, all the while generating the long-term economic development that will grow the middle class and support a clean economy.
    Yesterday, on World Environment Day, we appointed Patricia Fuller as Canada's new ambassador for climate change. Working together on climate change, oceans, and clean energy is one of the key themes of our G7 presidency.
     We are working to ensure that we are leaving a healthy environment and a strong economy to our kids and grandkids.

Natural Resources

    Mr. Speaker, well, we only wish that were true.
    Canada is a country rich in natural resources, home to innovative businesses, and populated by hard-working Canadians. Our country should be attracting investment, but instead we are repelling it. In fact, we are so opposed to private sector investment in the energy sector that we have killed three pipeline projects worth over $100 billion. Now, we have taken $4.5 billion and given it to Kinder Morgan to take its projects elsewhere.
    When will the Prime Minister stop attacking Canada's energy sector and start putting the interests of Canadians first?
    Mr. Speaker, on the member's first comment, it is true that we just appointed Patricia Fuller as Canada's new ambassador for climate change.
    On the issue of pipelines, for 10 years the Conservatives tried to move forward on getting our oil resources to new markets, and they failed. They failed because they refused to understand that the only way to grow a strong economy is to protect the environment at the same time. That is what we are demonstrating with a national price on carbon pollution, with a world-class oceans protection plan, with $8 billion worth of investment in clean energy projects and renewable technologies. We know the way—
    The hon. member for Edmonton Riverbend.
    Mr. Speaker, in Kinder Morgan's 2017 annual report to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, it valued the Trans Mountain pipeline at $2.5 billion, and yet the Prime Minister paid $4.5 billion to purchase the pipeline. We now know that a lot of the extra padding went to executive bonuses.
    If Kinder Morgan says its pipeline is worth $2.5 billion, why did the Prime Minister pay it $4.5 billion in taxpayers' money to leave Canada?
    Mr. Speaker, it is a real shame to see the trapped ideology of the Conservatives who are playing politics with this issue. I can tell them that I was just in Alberta yesterday talking to oil sands workers, talking to pipeline workers, who are deeply grateful that we are able to move forward on building this pipeline project after years of the Conservatives being unable to do so. Why were the Conservatives unable to do so? It is because they did not understand that the only way to build a strong economy is to protect the environment at the same time. This government is doing both, and that is why we are getting it done.

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, $4.5 billion in taxpayers' money is going directly to Houston, Texas. That is eight times more than Kinder Morgan spent on the pipeline. That is $2 billion more than Kinder Morgan itself estimated the pipeline to be worth.
    When Kinder Morgan executives made that deal, they called Houston.

[English]

    They did not say, “Houston, we have a problem”. No, instead, they said, “Houston, it's party time” with $4.5 billion of Canadian taxpayers' money, thanks to the Liberal Party of Canada.

[Translation]

    Why is the Liberal government sending $4.5 billion to Texas?
    Mr. Speaker, I understand that the Conservatives are feeling a bit lost. For years, they have been demanding that we do what they could not, and that is to build a pipeline to give Canada access to new markets other than the United States. The Conservatives were unable to do that, but we did so, at their request. Now that we have delivered on their main demand, they have to try to find a way to attack us and play petty politics. Fortunately, workers across Canada understand that we did the right thing for them.

  (1500)  

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, before selling the Trans Mountain pipeline to the Prime Minister for $4.5 billion, Kinder Morgan valued its Canadian assets at $2.5 billion. That is quite a deal if one is Kinder Morgan. Kinder Morgan did not ask for any Canadian tax dollars. All it wanted to do was to build a pipeline.
    Why did the Prime Minister pay Kinder Morgan $2 billion more than the pipeline was worth and allow Kinder Morgan to invest and create jobs outside of this country?
    Mr. Speaker, one almost has to feel sorry for the Conservatives. For 10 years, they tried to get this done, and were unable to do it. Then, for two and a half years, while we were in government, they have been screaming at us to get this pipeline built, and now, when we are finally getting this pipeline built, they do not know what to do with themselves. So they fall back on their silly attacks, on playing politics, on their rigid ideology that somehow, suddenly, they do not think that public investment has any place in the development of our natural resources, which, of course, the great Peter Lougheed disagreed with them about. We know that we are doing the right thing, the right way.

Marijuana

    Mr. Speaker, a Senate report has just concluded that Canadians who use cannabis after it is legalized and try to cross the border to the United States could be denied entry, but worse, those who do not answer certain questions in pre-clearance could face up to two years in prison under Bill C-23, which calls it resisting or wilfully obstructing an American officer, even on Canadian soil.
    Can the Prime Minister confirm whether or not Canadians who simply refuse to answer American officers in Canada about their cannabis use could face fines or imprisonment?
    Mr. Speaker, let me be very clear about one thing. The reason we are moving forward on the legalization of marijuana is because the current system does not work. It does not protect our kids from the harmful impact of marijuana, and it delivers billions of dollars every year to criminal organizations that make profits off of that.
    We are also highlighting that cannabis is not somehow a positive health food supplement that we encourage everyone to use. It is a controlled substance. We are trying to make it more difficult for kids to access, and people need to be honest when they cross the border if they choose to enter a different country.
    Mr. Speaker, I am going to help the Prime Minister out. Conservatives and Liberals voted for Bill C-23, which gave unprecedented powers to American border officers on Canadian soil. Luckily, the NDP was here raising exactly these concerns, because now what we are seeing in the Senate report is that with the legalization of marijuana, any person on Canadian soil, not crossing the border and subject to another country's laws, but here in Canada, could potentially be fined or imprisoned under that very legislation.

[Translation]

    My question for the Prime Minister is simple. Is that the case, yes or no? When will he finally take that issue up with his American counterparts?

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, we are, of course, in ongoing discussions with our American counterparts on a broad range of border issues, and we will continue to be, but at the same time, I hope the NDP is not suggesting that somehow a sovereign country cannot make determinations about how it handles people entering its own borders. Of course, we would never expect or allow any other country to dictate to us who or how we can or cannot let someone into our country. We will ensure that we are also respecting other countries' sovereignty in doing that at the same time as we stand up for Canadians, and of course, for the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

National Defence

    Mr. Speaker, yesterday the men and women of the Canadian Armed Forces were ordered to return their sleeping bags and rucksacks because of an equipment shortage.
    The Prime Minister is failing our Canadian Armed Forces. Already he broke the Liberal promise and cut another $2.3 billion from defence spending. This is unacceptable. How can Canadians trust the Prime Minister to buy navy ships and fighter jets when he cannot even get buying sleeping bags right? How can we trust him to provide the right equipment to our troops who are about to deploy to Mali?
    Mr. Speaker, here we go again. The Conservatives pretend that they are friends to our troops, but for 10 years they underinvested, they politicized, they played games with procurement, and they nickel-and-dimed our veterans, yet they are easy to stand up with inflated rhetoric any time there is a challenge.
    We are going to continue to work with the men and women of our Canadian Forces to ensure that they have the equipment and the support they need to do their jobs as they stand up for Canada with their lives and livelihoods on the line. We continue to support our troops, not just with words, like them, but with dollars and cents that go the distance.

  (1505)  

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, on June 6, 1944, 14,000 Canadian soldiers landed on the beaches of Normandy. On June 6, 2018, our soldiers are being asked to hand in their rucksacks and sleeping bags to the quartermaster. This is outrageous. What is the Prime Minister doing in the meantime? He is spending $10 million on Omar Khadr, $7 billion on a pipeline that a company could have taken care of itself, and $7 million on a temporary skating rink right here in front of Parliament.
    Mr. Prime Minister, do you think that we are going to send our soldiers to Mali under those conditions?
    The hon. member for Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles ought to be aware that he has to direct his comments to the chair. When he says “you” here, that usually means the Speaker. I do not think he was speaking to me.
    The right hon. Prime Minister.
    Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is looking to politicize the fact that today is the 74th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, but we on this side of the House are thinking about what unfolded on the shores of Normandy and paying tribute to our fallen soldiers. The monumental achievements of those young men transformed this great country. Their determination to fight for freedom, democracy, peace, and security was passed down to future generations. As an expression of our gratitude to their bravery and perseverance, we thank and salute the men and women who played a pivotal role all those years ago. Lest we forget.

[English]

Ethics

    Mr. Speaker, responding to questions about the fisheries minister's surf clam decision, the minister's most senior official confirmed that the Liberal-connected Five Nations had the lowest participation of first nations out of all the applicants. She also confirmed that she had no knowledge of the minister's family connection to the unincorporated entity. She confirmed multiple times that this was the minister's sole, personal decision.
    When did the minister become aware of the minister's family connections, and when did he know that Five Nations had the least amount of indigenous participation?
    Mr. Speaker, our decision to introduce indigenous participation is consistent with our commitment to developing a renewed relationship between Canada and indigenous peoples. Enhancing access to the Arctic surf clam fishery broadens the distribution of benefits from this public resource, and it is a powerful step toward reconciliation. When the Conservatives went through a similar process to increase access to this fishery, they chose to exclude indigenous peoples.
    Of course, the member will continue to work with the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner and follow his advice.

[Translation]

Transportation

    Mr. Speaker, Montreal's public transit system is the most heavily used in the country. Many Montrealers make the eco-friendly choice to get around the city by metro, bus, and bike share. I am very pleased with our government's recent decision to help with planning the blue line extension to Anjou.
    I would like to ask the Prime Minister how the government plans to help maintain the existing network and ensure quality service going forward.
    Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel for his question.
    Public transit is a priority for our government because it enables Canadians to spend less time on the road and more time with their loved ones. I am proud of this week's announcement that we will be giving the Société de transport de Montréal over $450 million to help it purchase buses, build a new garage, and renovate Montreal metro system equipment.
    That is what it means to invest in our communities.

[English]

Indigenous Affairs

    Mr. Speaker, three years ago, a young Cree girl was suffering chronic pain and was taking daily medication for a jaw misalignment. She simply needed $6,000 in dental work. Instead of showing compassion and common sense, the government decided to take Josey and her family to court, for over $110,000 in costs, to fight. Seven months ago, we suggested that it was time to quit the fight and show some compassion and change the policy.
    Can the Prime Minister tell us how this represents using taxpayer dollars for reconciliation?

  (1510)  

    Mr. Speaker, in 2015, Canadians asked our government to step up on reconciliation and build a new relationship, nation to nation, with indigenous peoples, and that is exactly what we are doing. In partnership with them, in respect with them, we are working with indigenous communities across this country to respond to their needs, to deliver on the services they need, to build the housing, invest in the schools, and create the infrastructure necessary for them to determine their own future and for them to thrive in this country.
    We are doing this hand in hand, in partnership, in respect, and that is what we will continue to do.

[Translation]

Canadian Heritage

    Mr. Speaker, after two years, one month, and 14 days of incessant consultation, the Minister of Canadian Heritage finally made an announcement yesterday. I could hardly believe it. Did she have new measures or reforms to announce? Of course not. She announced a new panel of experts, the second in two years, which will issue its recommendations in 2020, after the next election. That is cynicism. Two years ago, the minister was bragging about her political courage and promised legislative changes in 2017.
    By doing nothing for four years, is this government not jeopardizing our culture for no other reason than to get re-elected at the expense of our culture?
    Mr. Speaker, we will continue to protect and to promote our culture.
    The Broadcasting Act has not been reviewed since 1991. It predates smart phones and the ubiquitous use of the Internet. We are reviewing the act to ensure that it reflects today's realities and that the system in place is fair for everyone. The guiding principle for the review is clear: anyone who profits must contribute. No one gets a free pass.
    We are also going to protect and strengthen CBC's mandate to make sure that Harper-style budget cuts can never happen again.

[English]

Public Safety

    Mr. Speaker, Canada is generally a very safe country, but there have been recent trends of an increase in guns and gangs violence. The responsibility for keeping communities safe starts at home, and working with communities to prevent crime will help them stay safe and resilient.
    Can the Prime Minister tell us what our government is doing to keep Canadian kids away from gangs, which will allow them to live full and productive lives?
    Mr. Speaker, today we are launching a new call for proposals under the youth gang prevention program and the crime prevention action fund. These programs address the impact of gangs and violence on youth, especially in indigenous and high-needs communities. This is on top of unprecedented annual funding we announced last year of up to $100 million. We will keep working to enhance public safety by focusing on prevention, effective law enforcement, and strong community partnerships.

[Translation]

Official Languages

     Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister spoke about the review of the CRTC Act. The last time the Official Languages Act was comprehensively reviewed was when the Conservatives were in power in 1988. In light of the new challenges and issues they are dealing with, francophones, Acadians, and anglophones from Quebec are all asking that the act be reviewed. The Federal Court agrees and is asking Parliament to review the act. The Liberals are the only ones not on board.
    What exactly is the Prime Minister waiting for to modernize the Official Languages Act?
    Mr. Speaker, the Official Languages Act is important to our party and also to our country. Protecting Canada's linguistic minorities is at the core of who we are as a country. We will continue to stand up for linguistic minorities and strive to improve the Official Languages Act.
    I can confirm that we are preparing to modernize the Official Languages Act. We will work with all Canadians to ensure we get it right.

[English]

Health

    [Member spoke in Inuktitut]
    [English]
    Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Prime Minister. Two communities in my riding have recently declared that they are in crisis. These declarations stem from the fact that there are too few mental health supports and an increased number of suicide attempts. Of the recent $118 million announced for first nations and Inuit mental health, Nunavut receives only $500,000 annually, despite the fact that the suicide rate is 10 times the national average. The current government has sent additional support to first nations communities in crisis. Will the government do the same for Inuit communities?
    Mr. Speaker, we recognize that the mental health challenges facing indigenous people are deep-rooted, and the need for support is immense. In Nunavut, we are working with our partners and have invested $189 million over 10 years in the community-led Nunavut wellness agreement as well as $8.4 million, this year alone, for mental health support for Inuit. We are supporting ITK's national Inuit suicide-prevention strategy and will continue to work with partners to respond to the mental health needs in the territory.

  (1515)  

[Translation]

    The hon. member for Beauport—Limoilou on a point of order.
    Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my colleague from Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix, I would like to move a motion in the House, but first I would like to give some background.
    The G7, a major event, is starting soon. This kind of event sometimes attracts mass protests that sadly lead to unrest. Over the past few months, serious concerns about this event have been raised in the media or through public consultations by many residents from the ridings of Québec, represented by the Minister of Families, Louis-Hébert, represented by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Louis-Saint-Laurent, Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, and Beauport—Limoilou, where protests will—
    Order. The member seems to be getting into debate. I would ask him to get to his question.
    Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions, and I hope you will find unanimous consent for the following motion: that the House hope for the success of the G7 meeting in La Malbaie and defend the right to protest, but denounce possible acts of violence and vandalism, thank the police forces who will be deployed this week to keep residents and visitors safe, and call on the government to formally pledge to compensate residents and business owners in the unfortunate event of unrest and damage in the Charlevoix region and in the city of Quebec.
    Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move this motion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.

[English]

    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. In a moment I will be asking for unanimous consent to table some documents. The documents speak to the issue of Kinder Morgan and the fact that it valued its assets at $2.5 billion, yet the Prime Minister paid $4.5 billion.
    I would like to table these documents, the SEC filings of Kinder Morgan Canada, to show that the assets are in fact valued at $2.5 billion in spite of the Prime Minister's assertion.
    Does the hon. member have unanimous consent of the House to table the documents?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.

Points of Order

Standing Orders—Notice of Time Allocation 

[Points of Order]
    Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw to the attention of the House a matter concerning the notice of time allocation regarding Bill C-59. Bill C-59 was referred to committee before second reading and is now before the House at report stage.
     If you read Standing Order 78(3), Mr. Speaker, it allows a time allocation motion to cover both the report and third reading of a bill provided that the bill is consistent with Standing Order 76.1(10).
    Standing Order 76.1(10) refers to a bill that was sent to committee after second reading, not before second reading.
     Standing Order 76.1(10) is the Standing Order that deals with the report stage of a bill that was referred to committee before second reading and Standing Order 78(3) does not refer to it.
    Therefore, there is no provision in our Standing Orders that would allow a time allocation motion to cover both the report and third reading stages of a bill that was sent to committee prior to second reading.
    I concede time allocation motions have covered both the report and third reading stages of some bills that were referred to committee before second reading, however, no member had ever objected to this practice nor pointed out to the Speaker that it was simply out of order. The fact that the former opposition turned a blind eye to this breach does not make it right.
    Since Bill C-59 is the first in this Parliament that has been referred to committee before second reading and notice having been given to time allocate, now is the time, Mr. Speaker, for you to take a look at this matter and ensure the government begins following the House rules.
    Finally, I would add one point to my submission. Standing Order 76.1(10) deems the report stage of Bill C-59 to be an integral part of second reading. We are actually talking about two stages plus third reading, another situation not anticipated by Standing Order 78(3).

  (1520)  

    I thank the hon. member for Red Deer—Lacombe for raising his point of order. I will come back to the House in due course.
    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I am pleased to inform the House that proper notice was in fact given last night. There was a point of clarification. If the member checks Hansard and reads just a bit further on, as a member who was here until midnight, I can assure him clarification was indeed given.
    I thank the hon. government House leader for that.

Decorum  

    Mr. Speaker, this is not a novel point of order. It relates to Standing Order 16 and 18, but in particular to Standing Order 16, related to interrupting members when they speak, in this case, the Prime Minister.
    I can assure other members that I feel like screaming a good deal of the time when I listen to the Prime Minister, but I do not. It violates the rules of this place when I cannot hear the Prime Minister deliver a response. I do not recall, from this seat, having trouble hearing Stephen Harper. I do not think he spoke louder than the current Prime Minister. The noise from this quarter of Conservatives is unacceptable. It violates our rules.
    Order, please. Clearly I encourage members to listen and not to interrupt when someone else has the floor. I would appreciate that also when the Chair is speaking.

[Translation]

    Mr. Speaker, I am seeking the unanimous consent of the House to move the following motion: That the House: 1) send good wishes for the G7 summit in Charlevoix; 2) protect the right to protest, but condemn potential acts of violence; 3) thank and congratulate the police forces that will be deployed this week to keep residents and visitors safe; and 4) support the enforcement of the same guidelines for compensating residents and business owners in the Charlevoix area and in Quebec City as those enforced by the Harper government in Huntsville in 2010.
    Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    The Speaker: Order. I ask the hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent and other members to stop interrupting and stop talking.

[English]

    Order, please. I would ask the member for Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame to do that as well.
     The member for Cariboo—Prince George is rising on a point of order, however, we cannot have unlimited numbers of points or order, by the way.
    Mr. Speaker, in a moment I will be asking for unanimous consent. There has been a considerable amount of misinformation on that side of the House in regard to the minister's decision to award the lucrative surf clam contract to his colleague's brother and those with close family ties to the Liberal Party of Canada.
    The minister, along with the Prime Minister, have repeatedly said this was about reconciliation, and they have misrepresented the previous government's commitment to the indigenous participation with this fishery.
    Yesterday at committee the minister's most senior staff acknowledged the commitment of the previous government to aboriginal participation in this fishery. In order to clear up the government's inaccurate misrepresentation once and for all, I would like to seek unanimous consent to table the Government of Canada 2015 news release, which states:
     With this increase in TAC, the Integrated Fisheries Management Plan provision for new entrants has been triggered and, as such, Fisheries and Oceans Canada is commencing a process to introduce a new entrant or new entrants to the fishery. This process includes consultation with the current licence holder, industry and First Nations and will conclude in the coming weeks.
    Does the hon. member for Cariboo—Prince George have the unanimous consent of the House to table the document?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.

  (1525)  

Oral Questions  

    Mr. Speaker, it is my privilege to stand today in the House and express my concern in regard to comments made by our hon. Prime Minister during answering questions in regard to the carbon tax. He indicated to the House that he had worked with all the provinces and that the provinces were working toward this with him. Clearly, we all know the Province of Saskatchewan is not in agreement.
    I thank the hon. member for Yorkton—Melville for her additional comments. We try to avoid the continuation of question period after that time is expired.
    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. In a moment I will once again be seeking unanimous support. Unfortunately, it seems the government continues to suppress the facts in the surf clam case. I would like to seek unanimous consent to table the Federal Court documents pertaining to the current case against the government in regard to the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard awarding a lucrative surf clam contract to his colleague's brother and his wife's cousin. These documents—
    Does the hon. member for Cariboo—Prince George have the unanimous consent of the House to table this document?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. Today, during question, I referred to the defence spending shortfall by the government. This information comes from the document, “Strong, Secure, Engaged So Far” by David Perry of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. I am going to ask for consent to table this.
     The document states:
...the capital allocations to date are falling well short of the projections contained in SSE. The DND's capital allocation for 2017/2018 as of Supplementary Estimates C for 2017/2018 was $4 billion (the green dot in Figure 6). This final year-end allocation represents the maximum DND can spend on capital in 2017/2018. This is well short of the $6.3 billion in capital spending projected for 2017/2018 in SSE...
    I ask for unanimous consent to table this report so Canadians can get all the information they need, as well as inform the government of all its own shortfalls.
    Does the hon. member for Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman have the unanimous consent of the House to table this document?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I would like to seek unanimous consent to table some important documents I believe the House needs to see so everybody can then have a fulsome discussion.
     We asked the Prime Minister four times today, although we have actually been asking for weeks, about the price and the cost of the carbon tax. We have documents here that my hon. colleague, the member for Carleton, has worked very hard to get, which would reveal the cost of the carbon tax to Canadians. Unfortunately they have been redacted, but it would be important I table those documents today. This is something that has been in dispute. We are getting ready to rise very soon for the summer, and Canadians need to know how much the carbon tax is going to cost.
    Does the hon. opposition House leader have the unanimous consent of the House to table this document?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.

[Translation]

    The hon. member for Mégantic—L'Érable on a point of order.
    Mr. Speaker, during question period I asked the Prime Minister a question about the upcoming food labelling policy. I asked him whether he believed that yogourt, cheese, and fruit juice were health hazards. Based on the Prime Minister's answer, it seems clear that he had the wrong paper.
    I am seeking the unanimous consent of the House to table the brief from Les Producteurs de lait du Québec, which confirms that the policy to put warning labels on the front of packaging could stigmatize a number of dairy products. I am seeking the unanimous consent of the House to inform the Prime Minister of the impact that the food labelling policy will have on milk producers.
    Does the hon. member for Mégantic—L'Érable have the unanimous consent of the House to table this document?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    The Deputy Speaker: The hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent is also rising on a point of order.

  (1530)  

    Mr. Speaker, during question period, I did not refer to a historic event that occurred in 1971, the well-known Apollo 13, On the contrary, I was referring to a very specific document, issued in the United States, regarding Kinder Morgan's financial statements.
    As all Canadians know, Kinder Morgan just received $4.5 billion in Canadian taxpayers' money for the Trans Mountain pipeline. In the first table on page 134 of that document, it states in black and white that the pipeline was assessed at $2.5 billion.
    I ask for the unanimous consent of the House to table this document so that Canadians are fully informed of the facts.
    Does the hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent have the unanimous consent of the House to table this document?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.

[English]

    The Deputy Speaker: I must say at this point that we are getting similar requests in successive points of order. I think it is apparent that the House is not in favour of receiving these documents.
    I see the hon. member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan rising on a point of order. We will hear him now. However, I will say that we do need to get on to the business of the House.
    The hon. member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan.
    Mr. Speaker, at the moment I will not seek to table documents. I have a point of order on a totally unrelated standing order that I think is very well grounded.
    An hon. member: Sit down.
    Mr. Garnett Genuis: Members who are asking me to sit down should listen, especially the members of PROC, who know the rules.
    My good colleague from Red Deer—Lacombe gave an important point of order, and in response to it the government House leader said something like “As a member who was here until midnight last night”. It is an important convention in this House not to refer to the presence or absence of members during debate. I do not know if she was referring to herself or to my good friend from Red Deer—Lacombe, but especially during late sittings, it is a grievous violation of the rules of procedure for members to make insinuations about who was or was not here late into the night. I think the government House leader should be called to order.
    Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
    Order. Order.
    I thank the hon. member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan for raising the issue. Of course, this does happen in the course of debate. Members from time to time will make reference to either the absence or presence of members. He is right, indeed, that it is not acceptable to do so. However, I did note that the hon. government House leader was referring to herself in that case, and we certainly recognize that members can refer to their own presence in the chamber.

Private Members' Business

[Private Members' Business]

[English]

Aboriginal Cultural Property Repatriation Act

    The House resumed from May 30 consideration of the motion that Bill C-391, An Act respecting a national strategy for the repatriation of Aboriginal cultural property, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
    It being 3:34 p.m., pursuant to an order made on Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at second reading stage of Bill C-391, under private members' business.
    Call in the members.
    Before the taking of the vote:

  (1550)  

[Translation]

    It is my duty, pursuant to Standing Order 38, to inform the House that the questions to be raised tonight at the time of adjournment are as follows: the hon. member for Chilliwack—Hope, Foreign Investment; the hon. member for Nanaimo—Ladysmith, Justice; and the hon. member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, Foreign Affairs.

  (1600)  

[English]

    (The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 725)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Allison
Amos
Anderson
Arseneault
Arya
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Carrie
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Chong
Choquette
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Deltell
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duvall
Dzerowicz
Eglinski
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Fillmore
Finley
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Freeland
Fry
Fuhr
Gallant
Garneau
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gerretsen
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Gourde
Graham
Hardcastle
Harder
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jeneroux
Johns
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kelly
Kent
Khalid
Khera
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leitch
Leslie
Levitt
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
Lukiwski
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
Mathyssen
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Moore
Morrissey
Motz
Mulcair
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Nicholson
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poilievre
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Rankin
Ratansi
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Saroya
Scarpaleggia
Schmale
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Shields
Shipley
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sopuck
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tilson
Tootoo
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Vecchio
Viersen
Virani
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Whalen
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wong
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 279

NAYS

Nil

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion carried. Accordingly, the bill stands referred to the Standing Committee on Heritage.

    (Bill read the second time and referred to a committee)

    Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, I regret that I was not in the chamber while you were reading the start of the motion. I still voted, and I know that was not in order. I would ask for the unanimous consent of the House to have my vote count in support of this bill.
    Is there unanimous consent of the House to record the vote of the hon. member for Chilliwack—Hope in favour?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, I actually was in the lobby and heard the motion being read by you. I was actually with the government whip. My apologies to the House for missing it. I did vote. I did hear the reading of it. I believe it was counted. I also ask for unanimous consent that my vote stand.
    Is it agreed?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.

Opportunity for Workers with Disabilities Act

    The House resumed from May 31 consideration of the motion that Bill C-395, An Act to amend the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
    Pursuant to the order made on Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at second reading stage of Bill C-395 under private members' business.

  (1610)  

    Before the Clerk announced the results of the vote:
    I see the hon. members for Lambton—Kent—Middlesex and Chatham-Kent—Leamington. Just one at a time.
    Mr. Speaker, the burden of the office, the long hours, and my age, I guess, caused a momentary lapse of judgment. My vote should read in support of the motion.
    I thank the hon. member.
    The hon. member for Lambton—Kent—Middlesex.
    Mr. Speaker, I remember a little while ago seeing a colleague or a friend of mine on the other side vote twice. I thought I would try it; it is wrong. So I do want my vote to count as a yes.

  (1615)  

    (The House divided on the motion, which was negatived on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 726)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Arya
Aubin
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Brosseau
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carrie
Chong
Choquette
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cullen
Deltell
Di Iorio
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Dubé
Duvall
Eglinski
Erskine-Smith
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Finley
Gallant
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Hardcastle
Harder
Hughes
Jeneroux
Johns
Jolibois
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Laverdière
Leitch
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Long
Lukiwski
MacGregor
MacKenzie
Malcolmson
Mathyssen
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Moore
Motz
Nantel
Nicholson
Nuttall
Paul-Hus
Poilievre
Quach
Rankin
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Sansoucy
Saroya
Scheer
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 116

NAYS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Arseneault
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Bittle
Blair
Bossio
Boudrias
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Cormier
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Drouin
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Freeland
Fry
Fuhr
Garneau
Gerretsen
Gill
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lockhart
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morrissey
Murray
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poissant
Qualtrough
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tootoo
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Whalen
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 167

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion defeated.

[Translation]

Department of Industry Act

    The House resumed from June 1 consideration of the motion that Bill C-396, An Act to amend the Department of Industry Act (financial assistance), be read the second time and referred to a committee.
    Pursuant to order made on Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at second reading stage of Bill C-396 under private members' business.

  (1620)  

    (The House divided on the motion, which was negatived on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 727)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Aubin
Barsalou-Duval
Beaulieu
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Brosseau
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carrie
Chong
Choquette
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cullen
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Dubé
Duvall
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Finley
Fortin
Gallant
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Hardcastle
Harder
Hughes
Jeneroux
Johns
Jolibois
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Laverdière
Leitch
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacGregor
MacKenzie
Malcolmson
Marcil
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Moore
Motz
Nantel
Nicholson
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Plamondon
Poilievre
Quach
Rankin
Reid
Richards
Sansoucy
Saroya
Scheer
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Thériault
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 119

NAYS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Baylis
Beech
Bittle
Blair
Bossio
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Cormier
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Drouin
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fry
Fuhr
Garneau
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maloney
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morrissey
Murray
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Poissant
Qualtrough
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Spengemann
Tan
Tassi
Tootoo
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 159

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion defeated.

  (1625)  

[English]

Endangered Whales

    The House resumed from June 4 consideration of the motion, and of the amendment.
    The House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the amendment.
    The question is as follows. May I dispense?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    [Chair read text of the amendment to the House.]

  (1635)  

    (The House divided on the amendment, which was agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 728)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Allison
Amos
Anderson
Arseneault
Arya
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barlow
Baylis
Beech
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Bossio
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Carrie
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Chong
Choquette
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Deltell
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duvall
Dzerowicz
Eglinski
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Fillmore
Finley
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fry
Fuhr
Gallant
Garneau
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gerretsen
Gladu
Godin
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Gourde
Graham
Hardcastle
Harder
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hehr
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jeneroux
Johns
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kelly
Kent
Khalid
Khera
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lloyd
Lobb
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
Lukiwski
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKenzie
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Moore
Morrissey
Motz
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Nicholson
Nuttall
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poilievre
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Rankin
Ratansi
Reid
Richards
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Saroya
Scarpaleggia
Scheer
Schmale
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Shields
Shipley
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sopuck
Sorenson
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tilson
Tootoo
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Vecchio
Viersen
Virani
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wong
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 273

NAYS

Members

Barsalou-Duval
Beaulieu
Boudrias
Gill
Marcil

Total: -- 5

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the amendment carried.
    The question is on the main motion as amended. Shall I dispense?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    [Chair read text of motion to House]
    The Deputy Speaker: Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion as amended?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
     Some hon. members: No.
    The Deputy Speaker: All those in favour of the motion as amended will please say yea.
    Some hon. members: Yea.
     The Deputy Speaker: All those opposed will please say nay.
    Some hon. members: Nay.
     The Deputy Speaker: In my opinion the yeas have it.
    And five or more members having risen:

  (1645)  

    (The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 729)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Allison
Amos
Anderson
Arseneault
Arya
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barlow
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Carrie
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Chong
Choquette
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Deltell
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duvall
Dzerowicz
Eglinski
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Fillmore
Finley
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fry
Fuhr
Gallant
Garneau
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gerretsen
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Gourde
Graham
Hardcastle
Harder
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jeneroux
Johns
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Kelly
Kent
Khalid
Khera
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lloyd
Lobb
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
Lukiwski
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKenzie
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Moore
Morrissey
Motz
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Nicholson
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poilievre
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Rankin
Ratansi
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Saroya
Scarpaleggia
Scheer
Schmale
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Shields
Shipley
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Sopuck
Sorenson
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tilson
Tootoo
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Vecchio
Viersen
Virani
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wong
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 278

NAYS

Nil

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion, as amended, carried.
    Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I love whales, but I do not know whether I was counted as supporting the motion. Could you check please?
    It is good.

Supporting New Parents Act

    The House resumed from June 5 consideration of the motion that Bill C-394, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (parenting tax credit), be read the second time and referred to a committee.
    Pursuant to an order made on Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at second reading stage of Bill C-394 under private members' business.

  (1655)  

[Translation]

    (The House divided on the motion, which was negatived on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 730)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Barlow
Barsalou-Duval
Beaulieu
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Block
Boudrias
Brassard
Calkins
Carrie
Chong
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Finley
Fortin
Gallant
Généreux
Genuis
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Harder
Jeneroux
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacKenzie
Marcil
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Motz
Nicholson
Nuttall
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Plamondon
Poilievre
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Saroya
Scheer
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Ste-Marie
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Thériault
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 91

NAYS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Arseneault
Arya
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Baylis
Beech
Benson
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Bossio
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Choquette
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duvall
Dzerowicz
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fry
Fuhr
Garneau
Garrison
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardcastle
Harvey
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Moore
Morrissey
Mulcair
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Rankin
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rota
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Spengemann
Stetski
Tan
Tassi
Tootoo
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Weir
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 188

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion defeated.

Child Health Protection Act

    The House resumed from June 5 consideration of Bill S-228, An Act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (prohibiting food and beverage marketing directed at children), as reported (with amendments) from the committee.
    Pursuant to order made on Tuesday, May 29, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at report stage of Bill S-228 under private members' business.

  (1705)  

    (The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 731)

YEAS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Arseneault
Arya
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Benson
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Choquette
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duvall
Dzerowicz
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Fry
Fuhr
Garneau
Garrison
Gerretsen
Gill
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Graham
Hardcastle
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Johns
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Moore
Morrissey
Mulcair
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Rankin
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tootoo
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Weir
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 197

NAYS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Barlow
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Block
Brassard
Calkins
Carrie
Chong
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Finley
Gallant
Généreux
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Harder
Jeneroux
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacKenzie
McCauley (Edmonton West)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Motz
Nicholson
Nuttall
Paul-Hus
Poilievre
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Saroya
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 78

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion carried.
    Mr. Speaker, unless I am mistaken, members are not allowed to talk on the phone in the House of Commons. Since some of the members opposite are doing so, I would request that you please remind them.
    I thank the hon. member for Hochelaga for raising that point of order. She is right. Members should not use their cell phones to make calls. I must insist that members stop doing so.

GOVERNMENT ORDERS

[Government Orders]

  (1710)  

[English]

Budget Implementation Act, 2018, No. 1

     The House resumed from June 5 consideration of the motion that Bill C-74, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures, be read the third time and passed, of the amendment and of the amendment to the amendment.
    Pursuant to order made on Tuesday, May 29 the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the amendment to the amendment to the motion at third reading stage of Bill C-74.
     The question is as follows. Shall I dispense?
    Some hon. members: No.
     [Chair read text of amendment to the amendment to House]

  (1715)  

    Before the Clerk announced the results of the vote:
    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. When you read the motion of the subamendment we are voting on now, you accurately said that I was the seconder to that motion. It was not followed by my constituency name. There being another member in the chamber with the same last name, I would not want some historian to be confused if ever they were to search the records and someone may have made an error between Ms. or Mr.
    I thank the hon. member for his clarification. I think I did read it, but there is no doubt at all now.
    (The House divided on the amendment to the amendment, which was negatived on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 732)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Barlow
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Block
Brassard
Calkins
Carrie
Chong
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Finley
Gallant
Généreux
Genuis
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Harder
Jeneroux
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacKenzie
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Motz
Nicholson
Nuttall
Paul-Hus
Poilievre
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Saroya
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 80

NAYS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Arseneault
Arya
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Benson
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Choquette
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duvall
Dzerowicz
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Freeland
Fry
Fuhr
Garneau
Garrison
Gerretsen
Gill
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardcastle
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Johns
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Moore
Morrissey
Mulcair
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Rankin
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tootoo
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Weir
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 200

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the amendment to the amendment defeated.

[Translation]

    The Speaker: The next question is on the amendment. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the amendment?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    The Speaker: All those in favour of the amendment will please say yea.
    Some hon. members: Yea.
    The Speaker: All those opposed will please say nay.
    Some hon. members: Nay.
    The Speaker: In my opinion the nays have it.
    And five or more members having risen:

  (1725)  

[English]

    Before the Clerk announced the results of the vote:
    Mr. Speaker, I may have been mistakenly counted as the member for Vaughan—Woodbridge. I wonder if you could verify the record.
    I can assure the member that has been checked and I thank him for raising it.
    The hon. member for Sarnia—Lambton is rising on a point of order.
    Mr. Speaker, I was a bit slow getting to my feet. I wanted to verify that my vote is counting as a yes.

[Translation]

    (The House divided on the amendment, which was negatived on the following division:
 

(Division No. 733)

YEAS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Barlow
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Block
Brassard
Calkins
Carrie
Chong
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Finley
Gallant
Généreux
Genuis
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Harder
Jeneroux
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacKenzie
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Motz
Nicholson
Nuttall
Paul-Hus
Poilievre
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Saroya
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vandal
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 81

NAYS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Arseneault
Arya
Aubin
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Barsalou-Duval
Baylis
Beaulieu
Beech
Benson
Bittle
Blaikie
Blair
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Bossio
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Brosseau
Caesar-Chavannes
Cannings
Caron
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Choquette
Cormier
Cullen
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Donnelly
Drouin
Dubé
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Duvall
Dzerowicz
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fortin
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Freeland
Fry
Fuhr
Garneau
Garrison
Gerretsen
Gill
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardcastle
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hughes
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Johns
Jolibois
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Laverdière
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacGregor
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Malcolmson
Maloney
Marcil
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Moore
Morrissey
Mulcair
Murray
Nantel
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Pauzé
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Plamondon
Poissant
Quach
Qualtrough
Rankin
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sansoucy
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Spengemann
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Tan
Tassi
Thériault
Tootoo
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Weir
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 199

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the amendment lost.

[English]

    The next question is on the main motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
    Some hon. members: No.
    The Speaker: All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.
    Some hon. members: Yea.
    The Speaker: All those opposed will please say nay.
    Some hon. members: Nay.
    The Speaker: In my opinion the yeas have it.
    And five or more members having risen:

  (1730)  

    (The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 734)

YEAS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Baylis
Beech
Bittle
Blair
Bossio
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Cormier
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Di Iorio
Drouin
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Freeland
Fry
Fuhr
Garneau
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maloney
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morrissey
Murray
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Poissant
Qualtrough
Ratansi
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Spengemann
Tan
Tassi
Tootoo
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 159

NAYS

Members

Aboultaif
Albrecht
Allison
Anderson
Aubin
Barlow
Barsalou-Duval
Beaulieu
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Boudrias
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Brosseau
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carrie
Chong
Choquette
Clarke
Clement
Cooper
Cullen
Deltell
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Dubé
Duvall
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Finley
Fortin
Gallant
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gill
Gladu
Godin
Gourde
Hardcastle
Harder
Hughes
Jeneroux
Johns
Jolibois
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Laverdière
Liepert
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacGregor
MacKenzie
Malcolmson
Marcil
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)
Moore
Motz
Mulcair
Nantel
Nicholson
Nuttall
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Plamondon
Poilievre
Quach
Rankin
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Sansoucy
Saroya
Schmale
Shields
Shipley
Sopuck
Sorenson
Ste-Marie
Stetski
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Thériault
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 121

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion carried.
    The hon. parliamentary secretary to the government House leader is rising on a point of order.

Routine Proceedings

[Routine Proceedings]

[English]

Government Response to Petitions

    Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's responses to five petitions.
    While I am on my feet, I move:
That the House do now proceed to orders of the day.
    Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?
    Some hon. members: Agreed.
     Some hon. members: No.
     The Speaker: All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.
    Some hon. members: Yea.
     The Speaker: All those opposed will please say nay.
     Some hon. members: Nay.
    The Speaker: In my opinion, the yeas have it.
    And five or more members having risen:
     The Speaker: Call in the members.

  (1810)  

    (The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)
 

(Division No. 735)

YEAS

Members

Aldag
Alghabra
Alleslev
Amos
Arseneault
Arya
Ayoub
Badawey
Bagnell
Baylis
Beech
Bittle
Bossio
Bratina
Breton
Brison
Caesar-Chavannes
Carr
Casey (Cumberland—Colchester)
Casey (Charlottetown)
Chagger
Champagne
Chen
Cormier
Cuzner
Dabrusin
Damoff
DeCourcey
Dhaliwal
Dhillon
Drouin
Dubourg
Duclos
Duguid
Duncan (Etobicoke North)
Dzerowicz
Ehsassi
El-Khoury
Ellis
Erskine-Smith
Eyking
Eyolfson
Fillmore
Finnigan
Fisher
Fonseca
Fortier
Fragiskatos
Fraser (West Nova)
Fraser (Central Nova)
Freeland
Fry
Fuhr
Garneau
Gerretsen
Goldsmith-Jones
Goodale
Gould
Graham
Hardie
Harvey
Hébert
Hogg
Holland
Housefather
Hussen
Hutchings
Iacono
Joly
Jones
Jordan
Jowhari
Khalid
Khera
Lambropoulos
Lametti
Lamoureux
Lapointe
Lauzon (Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation)
Lebouthillier
Lefebvre
Leslie
Levitt
Lockhart
Long
Longfield
Ludwig
MacAulay (Cardigan)
MacKinnon (Gatineau)
Maloney
Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia)
May (Cambridge)
McCrimmon
McDonald
McGuinty
McKay
McKenna
McKinnon (Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam)
McLeod (Northwest Territories)
Mendès
Mendicino
Mihychuk
Miller (Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs)
Monsef
Morrissey
Murray
Nassif
Nault
Ng
Oliver
O'Regan
Ouellette
Paradis
Peschisolido
Peterson
Petitpas Taylor
Philpott
Picard
Poissant
Qualtrough
Rioux
Robillard
Rodriguez
Rogers
Romanado
Rudd
Ruimy
Rusnak
Sahota
Saini
Samson
Sangha
Sarai
Scarpaleggia
Schiefke
Schulte
Serré
Shanahan
Sheehan
Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon)
Sidhu (Brampton South)
Sikand
Simms
Sohi
Spengemann
Tan
Tassi
Vandal
Vandenbeld
Vaughan
Virani
Wilkinson
Wilson-Raybould
Wrzesnewskyj
Yip
Young

Total: -- 156

NAYS

Members

Aboultaif
Allison
Anderson
Aubin
Barlow
Beaulieu
Benson
Benzen
Bergen
Bernier
Berthold
Bezan
Blaikie
Blaney (North Island—Powell River)
Block
Boulerice
Boutin-Sweet
Brassard
Brosseau
Calkins
Cannings
Caron
Carrie
Chong
Choquette
Clarke
Cooper
Cullen
Davies
Diotte
Doherty
Donnelly
Dubé
Duvall
Eglinski
Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster)
Falk (Provencher)
Fast
Finley
Fortin
Gallant
Garrison
Généreux
Genuis
Gladu
Gourde
Hardcastle
Harder
Hughes
Jeneroux
Jolibois
Kelly
Kent
Kitchen
Kmiec
Kusie
Lake
Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry)
Laverdière
Lloyd
Lobb
Lukiwski
MacGregor
MacKenzie
Malcolmson
May (Saanich—Gulf Islands)
McCauley (Edmonton West)
McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo)
Moore
Motz
Nantel
Nicholson
Nuttall
Paul-Hus
Pauzé
Plamondon
Poilievre
Quach
Rankin
Rayes
Reid
Richards
Sansoucy
Saroya
Schmale
Shields
Sopuck
Sorenson
Ste-Marie
Strahl
Stubbs
Sweet
Tilson
Trost
Van Kesteren
Van Loan
Vecchio
Viersen
Wagantall
Warawa
Warkentin
Waugh
Webber
Weir
Wong
Yurdiga
Zimmer

Total: -- 107

PAIRED

Nil

    I declare the motion carried.
    It being 6:13, the House will now proceed to the consideration of private members' business as listed on today's Order Paper.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

[Private Members' Business]

Latin American Heritage Month Act

    The House proceeded to the consideration of Bill S-218, An Act respecting Latin American Heritage Month, as reported (without amendment) from the committee.

[English]

Speaker's Ruling  

    There is one motion in amendment standing in the Notice Paper for the report stage of Bill S-218. Motion No. 1 will be debated and voted upon.

[Translation]

    I will now put Motion No. 1 to the House.

Motion in Amendment  

Motion No. 1
    That Bill S-218 be amended by deleting the short title.
    He said: Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to stand here today and salute the contribution of Latin Americans, people from Latin American countries, and their presence in Quebec, particularly in my riding of Longueuil-Saint-Hubert. I would like to take advantage of this opportunity to thank the authors of the bill and my colleagues here in the House who are responsible for bringing this bill forward for our consideration today.
    The bill before us today invites Parliament to recognize that members of the Latin American community in Canada have made an invaluable contribution to Canada's social, economic, and political fabric. Designating a Latin American heritage month will allow Canadians to learn more about this contribution and ensure that it is never forgotten.
    The bill also notes that Latin American communities from across the country would take advantage of Latin American heritage month to celebrate and share their unique culture and traditions with all Canadians.
    What is more, the bill notes that October is an especially important month for Latin American communities the world over. It would designate October as Latin American heritage month across Canada.
    This bill talks about the diversity of Latin American communities in Quebec and Canada from diverse countries and states and their significant contribution to the broader communities around them, to community spirit, the economy of our towns and villages, and to the social fabric of our country. The presence of these communities with which Quebeckers share a certain affinity, similar values and culture, and where—

  (1815)  

[English]

    Order. I would ask the members who are having conversations to please take them out of the chamber. The House is in session, and we are having a debate here.
    The hon. member for Longueuil—Saint-Hubert.

[Translation]

    Madam Speaker, I note that this bill mentions the diversity of Latin American communities in Quebec and Canada, since Latin Americans come from various countries and states, and the important contributions they have made to the broader communities around them, to community spirit, to the economy of our cities and towns, and to the social fabric of our country. The presence of communities with which Quebeckers share a certain affinity, similar values and culture, and where there is mutual recognition, contributes a great deal to our communities, and that is what I want to acknowledge about this bill.
    Quebec's intercultural project is based on this ability to live together and work together to build a community. This involves recognizing our shared values and the contributions of every individual, which are shaped by his or her personal experience and cultural background.
     It is also the reason why this bill proposes that Quebeckers and Canadians learn more about the contributions of Latin American Canadians, to provide an opportunity to remember and recognize them. That is what designating a Latin American heritage month would do. It would allow us to learn about the achievements of Latin American Canadians in communities throughout Quebec, particularly in our own neighbourhoods, like Longueuil and Saint-Hubert, where I live. The same holds true in communities across Canada that have been enriched by the contributions of people from many different backgrounds.
    There is a reason why October has been proposed for Latin American heritage month. As mentioned in the bill, October is an important month for Latin Americans. Fall is a time when many Latin American countries, including Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Chile, celebrate their independence.
     Many of these countries were among the first former colonies to declare independence in the 19th century, and some became models of republican harmony. They projected the idea that racial segregation could be consigned to the dustbin of history, along with colonial institutions and economic exploitation.
    There are other reasons why this bill proposes making October a month for celebrating Latin American communities. October was chosen because of certain traditions and customs. We know that it is a significant month in Latin America and South America, since it is the month when Costa Rica celebrates the Day of Cultures, Venezuela observes the Day of Indigenous Resistance, Argentina marks the Day of Respect for Cultural Diversity, Brazil has its Children's Day, and various Latin American cultures celebrate the Day of the Dead.
    We feel that dedicating the 10th month of the year to our Latin American communities would give members of those communities an opportunity to share these cultural traditions with their neighbours. The bill also notes that this event would bring people together and give them a chance to share and celebrate this rich cultural heritage.
     A little while ago, L'Actualité published a profile of Quebec's Latin American community that highlighted the strong kinship between Quebeckers and the tens of thousands of members of that community, who often refer to themselves as Latino-Quebeckers. According to the article, 90% of Latino immigrants choose to learn French when they settle in Quebec. The community has a political presence in Quebec too, with people like former minister Joseph Facal and the member for Honoré-Mercier, who is originally from Argentina.
    Our cities bear witness to the political history of these peoples. The statue of Simón Bolívar located five minutes from here, just off Rideau Street, was a gift to Canada from Venezuela, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. We also have Salvador Allende Street in Laval, a tribute to the former Chilean president who was assassinated in a coup d'état. Let us not forget Quebec City's Parc de l'Amérique-Latine at the mouth of the Saint-Charles River, which pays tribute to great figures in Latin American History, such as poet, writer, and Cuban national independence hero José Martí, Haitian independence hero Toussaint Louverture, and military leader Bernardo O'Higgins, a hero who fought for Chilean independence.
     However, those who have left the most indelible mark on Quebec are the men and women who made a life here. Thousands of people from various Latin and South American countries now live in Quebec City, Gatineau, Sherbrooke, and the area I am from, Longueuil and Saint-Hubert.
    At the Nouvelle Vie church in Longueuil, there are Venezuelan, Peruvian, Cuban, and Quebec musicians. The Sacré-Coeur-de-Jésus church on Brodeur Street hosts colourful family celebrations.
    Since I was elected in 2011, one of the encounters that stood out for me was the one with Marco Carpinteyro, who has worked with the Table Itinérance Rive-Sud for many years and who, to me, is one of the greatest examples of community involvement. Although Marco does a lot of work in the community, and everyone back home in Longueuil agrees, I am sure that if you asked him what he is most proud of, he would say his children. He teaches them about his heritage every day, since the most beautiful language of all is the one spoken by our children.

  (1820)  

    It is in our best interests to actively create stronger relationships with Latin American countries, to build cultural bridges, and to share our ambitions with trade blocs like Mercosur. The Latin American communities established here, in Quebec and Canada, can help facilitate these joint projects. These communities and their heritage also make unique contributions to our culture and to the spirit of community in Quebec.
    I am very proud to highlight these contributions today and to support this proposal to designate a Latin American heritage month that we can celebrate in all of our communities every year.

[English]

Points of Order

Standing Orders  

[Points of Order]
    I rise to respond to a point of order raised earlier today by the hon. member for Red Deer—Lacombe with respect to the notice of time allocation given on Bill C-59 yesterday evening.
     I would like to offer that House of Commons Procedure and Practice, third edition, at page 673, states:
     In the case of a bill referred to committee before second reading, the motion can pertain to both the report stage and second reading stage as well as the third reading stage. The amount of time allocated for any stage may not be less than one sitting day or its equivalent in hours.
    A good example of this was when the previous Parliament, on May 28, 2015, adopted a motion for time allocation at report stage and second reading stage and at the third reading stage, as referenced in footnote 142 on page 673 of House of Commons Procedure and Practice.
    As such, I would argue that the notice is indeed in order.
    I appreciate the additional information and can indicate, as well, that I was in the House yesterday when the government House leader actually did clarify her motion. Resuming debate.
[Private Members' Business]

[English]

Latin American Heritage Month Act

     The House resumed consideration of Bill S-218, An Act respecting Latin American Heritage Month, as reported (without amendment) from the committee, and of the motion in Group No. 1.
    Madam Speaker, it is a delight to speak in the House tonight about Bill S-218, an act respecting Latin American heritage month.
    I want to honour the memory of the hon. Senator Tobias Enverga, who first brought the bill forward in the Senate. The senator passed away recently, which was a real shock to everyone. He was loved by all, and he was considerate of all.
    It is important to note that the reason Senator Enverga brought the bill forward was that he noticed that there were other heritage days. There was German heritage day, Italian heritage day, and Asian heritage day. There is nothing wrong with that, but he felt it was important, with 500,000 Latin American Canadians living in Canada and contributing richly to our society, that we honour them as well with a special heritage month.
     There are those who get tired of the different days, weeks, and months we have. They feel that perhaps they all become less special when there are so many of them. However, I think that is because we, as parliamentarians, are more aware of them. We come every day to the House and there are ribbons to wear for a certain occasion, or a flower of some sort, or some little thing. We are aware of all the days we celebrate different events, but not everyone is aware of them. The Latin American community in Canada, and people who enjoy the Latin American community, will be very happy to share in this month.
    I thought I would give the House a bit of exposure to Latin American culture through my eyes as I have travelled around the world. My first experience with Latin American culture was in Colombia. I decided, when I was 25, that I was going to take a trip and experience the world. I went to a small village in Colombia. I loved the people immediately. I was at a resort. I was taught to dance. The Latin American people are well known for their excellent dancing. Their dance moves are incredibly stylish, and the men just seem to know how to dance. In fact, it is alleged that the government whip is an incredibly good dancer. I have not seen it myself, but I would not be surprised, because the Latin American people are great dancers.
    Because I learned to dance, when I returned, I would go to Toronto to a salsa club there, and the Latin American crowd would be there. It was such a festive environment.
    That was my first exposure.
     One of the others things I loved was the food I experienced. When I travelled globally for Dow Chemical, I went to Argentina, Chile, Brazil, and all over the place, and I really experienced different cuisine. I also spent quite a bit of time in Mexico. I absolutely love Mexican food.
    Some of the rich experiences I had were with the way they put on their meals. The people in Brazil have a tradition called churrascaria. It is a dinner where they bring a lot meat. The meat comes on long swords, and people are given paddles with a green side and a red side. If people want the meat to keep coming, they keep the green side up. When they want the meat to stop coming, they turn the red side up. It is amazing. There are different cuts. It is very enjoyable cuisine, and the experience was very special.
    The cuisine in Mexico was mostly good, although I did have a couple of experiences with the local specialities of ant eggs and crickets, which I ate, but I would not include it in what I consider to be fine Latin American cuisine.
    I also experienced the work ethic of the Latin American people, which is excellent. With Dow, I was in charge of quality globally. I had the opportunity to do an audit in Brazil. I have audited all over the world, and I have found things amiss or not correctly done. In Brazil, I was amazed. Everyone was doing their jobs, everyone was following procedures, and there were no defects to be found. I said, in surprise, to one of my Brazilian counterparts that everyone was doing everything they were supposed to do. He said, “Of course they are, because if they don't, they are fired.” The discipline, the work ethic, of the Latin American people is something to be admired. Their productivity should be as well.
    From an employee satisfaction point of view, in every plant Dow had in a Latin American community they were the happiest people and the most productive people.

  (1825)  

    I have had involvement in a number of other countries and different experiences. I was involved in a mission trip to Nicaragua and was exposed to the people there, and even the ones who are living in a lot of poverty are so loving and hospitable. They have such a passion for life, family, and God. I really embrace those values. The people who have come to Sarnia—Lambton from a Latin American community have brought those values with them to the community. There are more Latin Americans living in Ontario and Quebec than in the rest of the country, so we are more fortunate. However, I know that people across Canada will be able to experience the culture of those people and the love they have for our country. They are fiercely loyal and patriotic, and having a month to celebrate them makes a lot of sense.
    This bill picks October because of the celebrations that go on in different countries during that month. For example, there is Día de las Culturas, the day of the cultures, in Costa Rica; Día de la Resistencia Indígena, the day of indigenous resistance, in Venezuela; Día del Respeto a la Diversidad Cultural, the day of respect for cultural diversity, in Argentina; Día de las Américas, the day of the Americas, in Uruguay; and, in Brazil, the feast day of Our Lady of Aparecida and Día das Crianças, children's day. Puerto Rico and Chile also wrap up their independence celebrations in October, and many countries, such as Mexico, end October with a three-day celebration called Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead, a celebration of their ancestors. That is why we are picking October for this month.
    I am not exactly sure why the party to the left decided that it wanted to remove the short title. I think the short title, “Latin American Heritage Month” is fine. It describes exactly what it is.
    I want to give some information about the different countries that make up the Latin American public, just in case people do not know. We talked about Mexico and Columbia already. El Salvador is on the list, as well as Peru, Brazil, Chile, Venezuela, Argentina, Cuba, Guatemala, Ecuador, Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Honduras, Paraguay, Uruguay, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Panama, and Puerto Rico. A lot of those countries I have not yet been to, so there are a lot of Latin American experiences I can have globally, and I still have years to do that.
    Meanwhile, everybody should embrace the Latin Americans who have come to Canada. Everyone in the House should support this bill. We will have a lot of fun celebrating Latin American heritage month. I am sure the food will be good. I am sure the dancing will be good. I am not sure I will be dancing very well. There are YouTube videos out there that show me trying to do a tango to Madonna's Material Girl, but I will leave that for people to find.
    We could honour the people by recognizing the contribution they have made in helping to build our country and our communities, and bringing that passion for love, life, family, and God to our country.
    I am going to wrap up by saying again that I appreciate Senator Tobias Enverga's bringing this bill forward in the Senate. I appreciate the member for Thornhill being the sponsor here in the House and paying this the attention it deserves. I am pleased that this would join the many other heritage days we have, such as German Heritage Month, Asian Heritage Month, Italian Heritage Month, and all the other days, months, and weeks we celebrate in the House. It is something worth celebrating, and I will be very proud to enjoy all the cuisine, the dancing, and the passion on those days.

  (1830)  

    Madam Speaker, gracias and obrigado. I am pleased to rise today to speak to Bill S-218, an act respecting Latin American heritage month. This bill recognizes the contributions of the Latin American community to Canada and seeks to establish the month of October as Latin American heritage month.
    Canadians of Latin American origin have been foundational in communities across our country going back to the early 1970s. The government supports Bill S-218 as a meaningful way to reflect on and celebrate the significant contributions that Latin American Canadians have made, and continue to make, to the social, economic, and political fabric of this country. It also gives a unique opportunity for all Canadians to celebrate Latin American culture and its traditions.

[Translation]

     Before going into further details about the important contributions of this community to Canadian society, let me begin by outlining the principles that support the fabric of Canada.

[English]

    As was stated in the 2015 Speech from the Throne:
    As a country, we are strengthened in many ways: by our shared experiences, by the diversity that inspires both Canada and the world, and by the way that we treat each other.
    Given the strong and growing presence of individuals of Latin American ancestry, formal recognition of Latin American heritage month will provide us with a terrific opportunity to recognize the contribution of this community in celebration of our diversity and our inclusive society here in Canada.
    It is important to note that the term "Latin American" can be used to refer to communities from the parts of the Americas where Spanish or Portuguese is the main language, and it refers to all people originating from the geographic area of Latin America. This includes Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking communities, as well as francophone communities and the indigenous peoples of the region.
    The “Latin American” reference was the one preferred by the late Senator Tobias Enverga, who introduced Bill S-218 in the Senate in 2016. We thank him for that contribution to Canadian parliamentary business and for the legacy he is leaving with this bill. Senator Enverga explained that he consulted members of the communities and the public and gave consideration to taking on a more inclusive framing or terminology to the commemoration.
     That is why the bill refers to “Latin America”, which includes Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela, as well as Puerto Rico, the French West Indies, and other islands.

  (1835)  

[Translation]

    As we all know, immigration has played, and will continue to play, a key role in the development of our country. Canada offers a way of life that attracts thousands of newcomers every year.

[English]

    The first wave of Latin American immigrants arrived in Canada in the early 1970s, with the arrival of about 68,000 people.
    I will digress for a moment to say that I personally had the privilege to work with dozens of persons of Latin American heritage as a young student in 1995, in my first year of law school at the University of Toronto. As a law student, I was working with an entity called the Centre for Spanish-Speaking Peoples, on Bathurst Street, just south of Dupont in downtown Toronto. The CSSP was a small clinic, but it was vital for Latin Americans, primarily refugee applicants, who confronted challenges with navigating the legal system and our immigration laws. That experience was extremely formative for me in many ways, not just in terms of my development and training as a young lawyer, but also in terms of my knowledge, understanding, and exposure to Latino culture.
    Canadians of Latin American heritage continue to make major contributions to Canadian society in ways that build a strong and prosperous nation. Noting this continued credit to Canada, let me say a few words about some prominent Canadians of Latin American heritage.

[Translation]

    In terms of academics, Professor Alejandro Adem, a Latin American Canadian of Mexican descent, has made important contributions to the field of mathematics. Professor Adem has been a professor in the department of mathematics at the University of British Columbia since 2005 and holds a Canada Research Chair. He is currently the CEO and scientific director of Mitacs, Canada.
    With respect to sport, Mauro Biello, born in Montreal and of Latin American heritage, was the head coach and director of player personnel for the Montreal Impact professional soccer team for eight years. Prior to joining the Impact’s coaching staff, Mr. Biello had a 19-year professional playing career, including 16 seasons in Montreal. In 389 career games played with the Montreal Impact, Mr. Biello scored 77 goals and 67 assists for 221 points during the regular season, playoffs and championship games.

[English]

    I would note for the record that I have had the pleasure of personally observing the passion of the Latin American community for football in the city of Montreal, when I watched a match with a colleague, the member for LaSalle—Émard—Verdun. We watched the Toronto team, TFC, take on Montreal Impact two years ago during the elimination matches. Although, as the member for Parkdale—High Park, I was cheering for my local squad, I was extremely impressed with the engagement of the 60,000 people who filled the Big O in Montreal for that match. The passion they showed for those players, many of whom were Latin American, was palpable.
    I could go on and on about the contributions of Latin Americans to the sport and to the beautiful game. One need only think of the Spaniards, their European championships in 2008 and 2012, and their victory in Mondial 2010. We think of Cristiano Ronaldo and the Portuguese victory in 2016. There is Lionel Messi, from Argentina. As a specific fan of No. 10 for the Argentinian squad and for FC Barcelona, of course I need to recognize the significant contributions of Messi. The list of contributions of Latin Americans to athleticism, culture, and academics goes on and on.
    Over the years, Latin American communities have brought their rich and vibrant culture to our country. Several Spanish-language newspapers, magazines, and newsletters are published in Canada, such as the Toronto-based El Popular. Theatre presentations, poetry recitals, and art exhibitions are common in larger communities, such as those across the city of Toronto, including Parkdale—High Park, where we have a strong and vibrant Latin American community. Indeed, dance and music groups are active throughout Canada and throughout our urban centres. Latin American writers, poets, painters, singers, chefs, and journalists have become well known in Canada.
    I would be remiss not to mention the reference that was made to the chief government whip and the contributions of Latin American culture to the fine art of dance. I, too, appreciate the finer aspects of Latin American dance. It is with great pride that I declare that I, in fact, met my wife at a salsa class, so clearly Latin American culture brings people together. This August, we will have been married for 13 years.
    Different groups, associations, and festivals promote and share Latin American culture in major Canadian cities, such as Toronto, which has been recognized as the most multicultural city on the planet. For example, Latin American-Canadian Art Projects is a Toronto-based not-for-profit arts organization dedicated to the implementation of arts projects, promoting Latin American art in Canada with an emphasis on artistic excellence.

  (1840)  

[Translation]

    The Confédération des associations latino-américaines de Québec, a not-for-profit organization, supports members of the Latin American community in the Québec City area and organizes various cultural activities. I could name many other examples in other parts of the country. Canada is recognized worldwide for its successful approach to multiculturalism. We are succeeding culturally, politically, and economically because of our diversity.

[English]

    Let me reinforce the fact that Canada's multicultural heritage and identity are more than just a commitment to welcoming diverse people from around the world. It is a commitment to the principles of equality and freedom, grounded in human rights and enshrined in the Canadian Constitution and the Multiculturalism Act. That act's predecessor was the adoption of multiculturalism policy by Pierre Elliott Trudeau in 1971, a gesture whose statutory manifestation, the Multiculturalism Act, is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. What better year to declare October Latin American heritage month in Canada to celebrate that community and its vast contributions in Canada toward diversity, which is truly our greatest strength.
     [Member spoke in Spanish]
    [English]
    Madam Speaker, this is yet another opportunity to talk about Latin American heritage month and Bill S-218. Let me acknowledge again the support this bill has received from all sides of the House since it arrived here from the Senate.
    This legislation essentially recognizes the many significant contributions to Canada's social, economic, cultural, and political fabric made by Canada's dynamic Latin American community. As I have done on every occasion I have spoken to the bill, I would like to again remind colleagues and those watching on CPAC tonight that this legislation, carefully fashioned by our late colleague, the hon. Senator Tobias Enverga, will I am sure stand as a notable element of his political legacy.
    In a moment I will speak of my admiration and unrestrained support for the bill, but first I would like to read just a couple of paragraphs from a speech delivered by Senator Enverga when he spoke at second reading in the other place.
    He reminded his colleague that he came to Canada from the Philippines and that he was one of many people now in the Senate who were fortunate enough to be welcomed to Parliament, and to be able to contribute to society. Senator Tobias Enverga pointed out that, “Few countries in the world are as open and accepting to people who come from other countries to settle and make a new life for themselves.” He said, “The Canadian policy of multiculturalism is a great success when it comes to allowing for, and celebrating, the various cultural backgrounds and languages we have”, and share.
    The Senator referenced other heritage months that moved him to propose one for Canadians of Latin American descent. He talked about the importance of Black History Month, proclaimed in 1995, and about Asian Heritage Month. He anticipated Italian Heritage Month and Portuguese Heritage Month, both passed into law just last year, and this year we celebrated Jewish Heritage Month.
    Before I get to the bill he created, the process and legislation before us today, I will provide a little background on this great Canadian.
    Tobias “Jun” Enverga was respected by all for his kindness, warm sense of humour, and his unparalleled work ethic. He was a family man, self-described as surrounded by four lovely women, his daughters Reeza, Rocel, and Rystle, and his wife Rosemer. He was a tireless advocate for people with disabilities. Tobias served as a Catholic School Board trustee in Toronto for years and became known in the Toronto region for launching the Philippine Canadian Charitable Foundation and its fantastic annual Pinoy festival and trade show, which, by the way, is next Saturday at the Toronto Convention Centre. Senator Enverga was also co-chair of the Canada-Philippines Interparliamentary Group, and inaugurated the annual Filipino independence day flag raising on Parliament Hill, which I am sure many members of the House will attend on Monday morning.
    During his years at the Senate, Senator Enverga was a member of several standing committees. He participated in a variety of important studies on issues ranging from first nations northern housing to maritime search and rescue operations. Also, and this is very important to remember, Senator Enverga was an executive member of the ParlAmericas group. He invested his energy in forging closer ties with parliamentarians from across Latin America, helping them to strengthen democracy and governance in their countries through political dialogue and parliamentary co-operation. It was his work with ParlAmericas that moved him to propose the bill before us today.
    As we know all too well, Senator Enverga passed away Thursday, November 16, while on parliamentary business in Colombia. Despite his tragic and untimely passing, Senator Enverga's Latin American heritage month bill lives on. It was passed in the other place a couple of weeks later and sent to us in the House.

  (1845)  

    Some of my colleagues in the House may remember that Senator Enverga introduced a bill in the 41st Parliament, Bill S-228, to create a Hispanic heritage month, matching such designations by the Province of Ontario and the City of Toronto. However, that bill was lost on the Order Paper in the election of 2015.
     Senator Enverga, after further consultation with members of the public, reconsidered the reintroduction of that legislation and decided instead to change the focus in this bill to “Latin American”, as a geographic and linguistic community, which adds not only the Lusophone and Francophone communities, but also those of the indigenous peoples of the Latin American region. This was not a snap decision. Senator Enverga pondered long and deeply the issues of self-identification of the diverse Latin American community in Canada. He became convinced that a Latin American heritage month would better enhance our understanding of the complexities involved and believed this act would better respect the spirit of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act of 1988.
     Latin America is of our hemisphere. The region is generally understood to consist of the entire continent of South America, all of Central America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean whose peoples speak a Romance language or have a Romance language among their various official languages.
     For the purposes of this bill, Senator Enverga envisioned the widest possible interpretation so Bill S-218 would cover those who identified as Spanish and Portuguese speakers from South America and Central America, as well as those whose heritage was of the Francophone and Hispanic Caribbean Islands.
     Using that broad and inclusive measure, we can see that Canadians of Latin American origin can be found far and wide across our great country from coast to coast to coast. In the absence of absolute census numbers covering that broad, and I think members would agree somewhat imprecise measure, we might estimate a possible demographic well above half a million men, women and children.
     What we do know is that the Latin American community is one of the fastest-growing cultural groups in Canada today. Statistics Canada reports that between 1996 and 2001, for example, the number of individuals reporting Latin American origins rose by 32%, at a time when the overall Canadian population grew by only 4%.
    With respect to actual numbers, the demographers can only estimate that between 600,000 and 1.2 million Latin Americans, again from the broadest possible measure, live among us. These numbers are particularly interesting, given there was only a small Latin American population in Canada before the 1960s. It was in the sixties and seventies that we recorded the first significant migration of Latin Americans to Canada. Unfortunately, in too many cases, their motivation was to escape social and economic turmoil, dictatorships, conflict, and most recently another wave, fleeing Venezuela's corrupt and repressive regimes under, first, Hugo Chavez, and now the brutal Nicolas Maduro. These Latin Americans represented significant loss to the countries they left, but they have been a boon to Canada.
    I could speak to the virtues of supporting Bill S-218, a bill to bring Latin American Heritage Month to Canada, but I must stop there. I move:
    That, when the order for consideration of Bill S-218, an Act respecting Latin American Heritage Month is next called, the time provided for the consideration of any remaining stage of the bill be extended, pursuant to Standing Order 98(3), by a period not exceeding five consecutive hours.

  (1850)  

[Translation]

    All those in favour of the motion will please rise.
    And 20 or more members having risen:

[English]

    The Assistant Deputy Speaker (Mrs. Carol Hughes): More than 20 members having risen the motion is adopted.

    (Motion agreed to)

    Resuming debate, the hon. parliamentary secretary to the government House leader.
    Madam Speaker, it is a pleasure to speak about the legislation before us, for two reasons. One of the strong messages that our Prime Minister sends to all regions of our country is how proud we are of Canada's diversity and all the benefits that are derived from it. No matter where we go in Canada, we see a great number of people with such diversity and appreciation for what we are as a nation. We are a multicultural nation with a great sense of pride in our diversity.
    Before I comment on the legislation, I want to speak about Senator Enverga. I knew Senator Enverga in my capacity as a co-chair. He and I were co-chairs of the Philippines-Canada Friendship Group, and we were able to accomplish a great deal. In fact, shortly after the friendship group was formed, Senator Enverga was appointed to the Senate. Shortly after being appointed to the Senate, he and I had the opportunity to meet and talk about the Philippines. He had values that many of us share, a passion and love for the Philippines and the desire for a healthier relationship between Canada and the Philippines.
     My friend across the way referred to another issue that Senator Enverga was behind, and that was the flag-raising ceremony. In fact, this Monday, at 11 o'clock on the steps of Parliament, there will be a flag-raising ceremony, and I suspect there will be a few tributes to Senator Enverga.
    As the current chair of the Philippines-Canada Friendship Group, I would be wrong not to mention that we will see all members of the House, members of the Filipino community, and others participating in that activity. Then at one o'clock in the Commonwealth Room, special guests will be talking about the importance of the very special and unique relationship between Canada and the Philippines. I invite all members to participate.
    That said, we are having a wonderful debate on a very important community, and no one more is more engaged than the government whip, who is full of passion for anything Latino. The government whip is a very proud individual and has worn the Philippines' colours on his shoulders on many different occasions. Others in the chamber have also made reference to the Latino factor that the government whip carries with him wherever he goes.
    I will now get back to diversity. As the Prime Minister has often said, diversity is one of Canada's greatest strengths, and we need to celebrate that. Recognizing Latin America heritage month in the month of October would do all sorts of wonderful things. It would provide members in the House, members in the other place, and anyone who has an interest in promoting the contributions of Latin America and the countries that make up Latin America with the opportunity to share that wealth of culture, whether it is festivities, clothing, foods, their hard-working attitude, or the many contributions made by our Latin American community. It is a community that continues to grow in great numbers in Canada today, and I believe that community will continue to grow.
    Focusing on Winnipeg, I am a big advocate of Folklorama, a two-week celebration of Canada's diversity. There will be performances in a number of pavilions. It is worth noting that it is not easy for these pavilions, because they are open seven days a week and run by volunteers. There will be all sorts of cultural displays, dances, food, and an overall super-fantastic time. One gets to explore the world by participating in Folklorama.

  (1855)  

     I did a quick guided tour of the Folklorama website while I was listening to my colleagues across the way. Members will be very happy to hear that there are four easily identifiable pavilions, and I will share some of the comments.
    For example, the website shows the Brazilian Pavilion, and says:
     Come out and see our high energy show! Live music coupled with live entertainment will take you on a tour of Brasil. Relax in air-conditioned comfort as you sample the tasty cuisine and cultural beverages of Brasil. Cachaça cocktails and Brazilian beer will have you feeling like you are a heartbeat away from the amazing Brazilian beaches, while our nonalcoholic drinks will refresh your taste buds. The fun never stops and you can enjoy yourself late into the night during our Friday late night party! For Saturday, there might not be a late night party, but don't worry we will be holding a late night show!
    However, this is not the only Latin American pavilion. We have two solid weeks. In the first week, we will have two pavilions from Latin America, and the following week two demonstrations on Latin America. For example, the website shows the Chilean Pavilion, and says:
    Head into the warm embrace of the Chilean people as you experience food, drink, and dances from the various regions of Chile, including the north-central, south and Easter Island...Enjoy the lively Latin stylings of our own “QUIDEL” dance group, as well as long-time performers, Chile Lucha y Canta. Be sure to try a Chilean favourite–borgoña, a drink made with cold red wine and strawberries. Then dance the night away at our late night parties on Friday and Saturday, complete with live music from local band Descarga Latina!
    Folklorama is a celebration that takes place every year in Winnipeg, and will get 200,000 visits. It encompasses a large number of volunteers. This is why I think it is important that we have these heritage months. People should be proud of their heritage and their homeland countries. When we see the celebrations of people from countries all over the world, we are the better for it.
    I mentioned two of the four pavilions. However, the hours dedicated to this are not just to put together a pavilion during Folklorama, but also for other activities virtually year round. We have young people engaged in their culture and the heritage of their homeland and are sharing it with others year round. This is why, when I think of having a Latin America heritage month, it is more than just an opportunity for MPs and senators to go out and promote, but, more importantly, it is for all individuals to have an opportunity to explore all the things they can do in the month of October.
    For example, if one is a school teacher in a junior high or high school, it provides an opportunity to recognize the contributions of Latin America. October would be the month recognized by Parliament as Latin American heritage month, and teachers could take advantage of it by organizing a lunch program or after-school program and invite community members out. It is a wonderful thing that can really promote what makes Canada great.
     This is our diversity, and we need to be proud of our heritage. Our Canadian heritage is made up of people from countries around the world. I, for one, am a very proud Canadian.

  (1900)  

    Madam Speaker, I am very happy to rise today in support of this bill.
    [Member spoke in Spanish]
    [English]
    It is great to be here tonight. I am certainly very much a lover of Latin America, having spent much time there and really having grown to love not only the region but the Latin American people as well. It is a rich culture that I enjoy very much.
    I am fortunate to have had the opportunity to travel with my family to different countries in Latin America when I was growing up. However, how I really got to know Latin America as a diplomat in the Canadian foreign service. I was very fortunate to have postings across Latin America. I had a posting in Buenos Aires, a very beautiful city in Argentina. It is truly like the Paris of the south. During that time I had a lovely apartment in a region called Recoleta. I had a lovely opportunity to take tango lessons and to view the beautiful museums there. I should add that I am a fan of Evita Perón, so it was very good to get to know one of my political idols during that period of time as well.
    I went on to become the chargé d'affaires in El Salvador, in San Salvador, for two years. What a beautiful nation it is, in terms of the volcanoes, the beaches, the ruins. I very much got to know and love the people, despite the many challenges there: the gang violence, the drug trafficking. These are very challenging things, but I felt very proud of the work I was doing as a Canadian diplomat to combat these things. I sat through many earthquakes, measuring four or six on the Richter scale. It is very uncomfortable and unnerving, but something that we became accustomed to living in Latin America.
    I was also very fortunate to serve for one year as a policy adviser to the member for Thornhill, who of course is a major part of this bill here today. We had an incredible experience as a team working with Canadians in relation to Latin America. We have some very fond memories together. I remember in 2009 going to Honduras in an effort to negotiate the end of a coup with the Organization of American States at the time. I remember flying there and being whisked through what was a very high-security environment at the time. We really were in lockdown as we worked on behalf of Canada, but also for the Latin American people, to try to help them go down the path of democracy. That is something I have always welcomed, with the previous Harper government. I follow Jason Kenney in my riding, but certainly there were others. There were John Baird and Prime Minister Harper himself, who were very big supporters of democracy in the Americas. I was very pleased to serve under the former minister of state for the Americas in this capacity. It truly was an honour and a privilege.
    I have always enjoyed the warmth of the Latin American people. They are incredibly chaleureux. They will always welcome people into their home, be it with a pupusa in El Salvador or a wonderful steak and a nice malbec in Argentina. They are very warm people, and yet I also appreciate the formality in Latin America. Latin America is a place where history and culture are very important, and institutions that are very important for Conservatives such as the family, the church, and these things. I have always felt a very strong affinity for this region and its people.

  (1905)  

    Of course, I am very sad to say that there are certainly some challenges faced in the Americas. They are no stranger to oppressive regimes, having lived under several dictators. I think, for example, of Pinochet in Chile who was in power for years. As well, in El Salvador, where I served, they struggled with civil war. I was very fortunate to be there in 2007, celebrating the 15-year end of the El Salvadoran civil war. That was something very special during my time there. I am very fortunate to have had these incredible experiences.
    Unfortunately, we are still seeing lingering problems with democracy in Latin America to this day. I remember, during my time in the minister of state of the Americas office, monitoring ALBA and the Bolivarians.
    Very recently we have seen the terrible happenings in Venezuela with the oppressive regime there, and the elections, which of course are not at all valid by our democratic standards. They certainly causes concern for us as Canadians. More recently, Nicaragua is getting to a point that is very concerning, which I hope the government will speak out on, as they have with Venezuela.
    That is a big part of what this bill is about, supporting the ideas of democracy, justice, free markets, all of these principles that we, in the Harper government, supported so very strongly and will continue to support and promote, not only in Latin America but around the world as well.
    I do have some concerns about the historic actions of the government, in particular the words of condolence by the Prime Minister at the death of Castro, which to me, unfortunately, seems to speak of support for a communist regime. I know that as a Conservative government, we were always in absolute support of the dissidents.
    As a policy adviser, I continually looked for ways for us to be a mediator. Indeed, 2008 to 2009 was a very exciting time to work with the minister of state for the Americas because it was during the Obama era and we were looking at the Helms-Burton Act being re-opened and at both missions being re-evaluated. We were looking at visitation rights for Latin American people in America being revisited too.
    The relationship between Canada and the Americas always been very dear to me. I will say again that the principles that Conservatives stand for as the official opposition are democracy, justice, the rule of law, and free markets. We will continue to support these things in Latin America. We would encourage the government to do the same, as well.
    I would be remiss if I did not recognize all the wonderful new Canadians that Latin America has given to us. I am very fortunate to have many of them, both in my riding of Calgary Midnapore, as well as the city of Calgary. These new Canadians from Latin America have been a major force in the oil and gas sector. Latin America really has given us some of their best and brightest, in terms of engineers, geophysicists, and these types. I have a statistic here that as of 2016, Latin Americans in Canada numbered close to half a million, or some 447,000.
    In conclusion, I would just like to say that I love Latin America, I love Canada, and I see no reason why we should not all support a Latin American heritage month.

  (1910)  

    [Member spoke in Spanish]
    The time provided for the consideration of private members' business has now expired, and the item is dropped to the bottom of the order of precedence on the Order Paper.

Government Orders

[Government Orders]

[English]

Impact Assessment Act

Bill C-69—Time Allocation Motion  

    That in relation to Bill C-69, An Act to enact the Impact Assessment Act and the Canadian Energy Regulator Act, to amend the Navigation Protection Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, not more than five further hours shall be allotted to the consideration of the report stage and five hours shall be allotted to the consideration at third reading stage of the said bill; and
    That, at the expiry of the five hours provided for the consideration of report stage and at the expiry of the five hours provided for the consideration of the third reading stage of the said Bill, any proceedings before the House shall be interrupted, if required for the purpose of this Order, and in turn every question necessary for the disposal of the said stage of the Bill then under consideration shall be put forthwith and successively without further debate or amendment.

  (1915)  

[Translation]

    Pursuant to Standing Order 67.1, there will now be a 30-minute question period.

[English]

    I invite hon. members who may wish to participate in asking questions to rise in their place so that the Chair has some measure of the number of members who wish to participate in the 30-minute question period.
    We will ask hon. members to keep their interventions to about one minute, and similarly the minister responding to keep responses to approximately one minute. As members know, during this 30-minute question time, favour is generally given to opposition members, but certainly not to the exclusion of members who sit on the government side.
    Mr. Speaker, as a member of the environment committee who has been involved in the discussion and debate on Bill C-69, I have never been so appalled in my entire life at how bad this particular bill is.
    For example, Chris Bloomer, the president of the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association, likened Canada's regulatory environment to a toxic regulatory environment.
    Recently Don Lowry, past president and CEO of Epcor Utilities, wrote a piece in the Edmonton Journal on June 5:
Investor flight from energy sector is a national embarrassment
Over the last few years, a thicket of regulatory approvals and processes, both provincial and federal, have crept into place, effectively suffocating through delay and denial anything getting timely approval.
    As someone with an environmental background who has worked in pipeline assessments, I can assure the minister that every single pipeline in Canada is built to the highest environmental standards.
    Why is the minister piling unnecessary regulations on the Canadian energy sector and denying Canadians the economic opportunity that they need to build this country?
    Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. member and all members of the committee for their very thorough review of Bill C-69 and the many thoughtful amendments.
    The committee heard from over 80 witnesses and reviewed over 150 submissions over two months, and the quality and scope of the amendments speak to the rigour with which they reviewed the bill. I am very pleased to say our government is supporting these amendments.
    We need to do better. Canadians elected us because they wanted to make sure we demonstrated that the environment and the economy go hand in hand. With Bill C-69, we knew we needed to rebuild trust that was sorely lacking because of the Conservatives' actions in gutting our environmental assessment process, so I am very pleased that we have come together and are going to be able to rebuild trust, because it is so critical that we get good projects going ahead after a thorough environmental assessment.