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Tuesday, March 23, 2021 (No. 74)

Orders of the Day

Government Orders

Business of Supply

September 23, 2020 — The President of the Treasury Board — Consideration of the business of supply.
Supply period ending March 26, 2021 — maximum of seven allotted days, pursuant to Standing Order 81(10)(a).

Opposition Motion — Deferred recorded division
March 22, 2021 — Deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Singh (Burnaby South), seconded by Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), — That, given that,
(i) during the first wave, 82% of COVID deaths in Canada happened in long-term care, the highest proportion in the OECD,
(ii) there have been over 12,000 long-term care resident and worker deaths in Canada since the beginning of the pandemic,
(iii) residents and workers in for-profit long-term care homes have a higher risk of infection and death than those in non-profit homes,
the House call upon the government to ensure that national standards for long-term care which are currently being developed fully remove profit from the sector, including by:
(a) immediately bringing Revera, a for-profit long-term care operator owned by a federal agency, under public ownership;
(b) transitioning all for-profit care to not-for-profit hands by 2030;
(c) working with provinces and territories to stop licensing any new for-profit care facilities, and making sure that measures are in place to keep all existing beds open during the transition; and
(d) investing an additional $5 billion over the next four years in long-term care, with funding tied to respect for the principles of the Canada Health Act, to boost the number of non-profit homes.
Recorded division — deferred until Tuesday, March 23, 2021, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions, pursuant to Order made Monday, January 25, 2021.

Tuesday, March 23, 2021 — sixth allotted day.
Opposition Motion
March 18, 2021 — Ms. Rempel Garner (Calgary Nose Hill) — That, given that,
(i) COVID-19 restrictions have had serious economic and mental health impacts on Canadians,
(ii) COVID-19 restrictions have been advised by the federal government, including specifically by the Prime Minister on three separate occasions in November of 2020, as temporary measures to alleviate pressure on the public healthcare system,
(iii) public health tools, such as rapid tests, shared data on how COVID-19 spreads and vaccines, have not been positioned as permanent solutions to replace COVID-19 restrictions by the federal government, including in areas of federal competency like air travel and border restrictions,
(iv) the President of the United States and the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom have both released public plans for economic reopening, while Canadian officials have not yet given Canadians clarity on when regular economic and social life will be able to resume,
the House call on the government to table within 20 calendar days, following the adoption of this motion, a clear data-driven plan to support safely, gradually and permanently lifting COVID-19 restrictions.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Cumming (Edmonton Centre), Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) and Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — March 18, 2021
Voting — not later than 15 minutes before the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders, pursuant to Standing Order 81(16).

Thursday, March 25, 2021 — seventh and final allotted day.

Opposition Motions
September 23, 2020 — Mr. Fortin (Rivière-du-Nord) — That the House call for an official apology from the Prime Minister for the enactment, on October 16, 1970, of the War Measures Act and the use of military force against the people of Quebec by the Government of Canada in order to arrest without cause, and then incarcerate without charge, close to 500 innocent Quebeckers.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Therrien (La Prairie) — September 23, 2020

September 23, 2020 — Mr. Thériault (Montcalm) — That the House call on the government to unconditionally increase the Canada Health Transfer so that it represents 35% of the health care spending of Quebec and the provinces for the current year, and to index this transfer to maintain this ratio, in keeping with the request from the premiers of Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Therrien (La Prairie) — September 23, 2020

September 23, 2020 — Ms. Chabot (Thérèse-De Blainville) — That the House recognize that French is the official language of Quebec and its common language; and that it call on the government to promise not to obstruct the application of the Charter of the French Language, R.S.Q., c. C-11, in Quebec to businesses under federal jurisdiction.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Therrien (La Prairie) — September 23, 2020

October 15, 2020 — Mr. Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills) — That the House:
(a) recognize that the People’s Republic of China’s decision to impose a national security law on Hong Kong is a violation of the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration, which guarantees Hong Kong a high degree of autonomy in the “one country, two systems” framework, and which guarantees the people of Hong Kong rights and freedoms, including those of the person, of speech, of the press, of assembly, of association, of travel, of movement, of correspondence, of strike, of choice of occupation, of academic research and of religious belief; and
(b) call on the government to work with Canada’s allies to immediately impose sanctions, such as Magnitsky sanctions as per the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act, on officials responsible for the violations of this international treaty.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — October 15, 2020

October 15, 2020 — Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) — That the House call on the government to ban Huawei from Canada’s 5G network.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — October 15, 2020

October 20, 2020 — Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) — That the House call on the government to make a decision on Huawei’s involvement in Canada’s 5G network within 30 days of the adoption of this motion.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — October 20, 2020

October 30, 2020 — Mr. Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George) — That, given that the alarming rate of suicide in Canada constitutes a national health crisis, the House call on the government to take immediate action to establish a national suicide prevention hotline that consolidates all suicide crisis numbers into one easy to remember three-digit (988) hotline that is accessible to all Canadians.
Notice also received from:
Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — October 30, 2020

October 30, 2020 — Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — That, given that the pandemic has had devastating consequences on Canadian workers and businesses, especially in the restaurant, hospitality and tourism sectors, the House call on the government to: (a) immediately pause the audits of small businesses that received the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy until at least June 2021; (b) immediately introduce legislation to enact promised extensions and amendments to support programs; and (c) provide additional flexibility in the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy, and other support programs.
Notice also received from:
Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — October 30, 2020

November 3, 2020 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — That:
(a) the House recognize that,
(i) it is a prerogative of the Crown to dissolve Parliament at its pleasure,
(ii) the confidence convention is an important cornerstone of the Canadian political system,
(iii) the confidence convention has never been clearly codified and this has sometimes led to confusion among members and the general public as to the nature and significance of certain votes,
(iv) governments have sometimes abused the confidence convention to reinforce party discipline or influence the outcome of a vote that is not explicitly a matter of confidence or that would not be considered a matter of confidence by convention;
(b) in the opinion of the House,
(i) the House itself, not the Prime Minister, should be the final authority as to whether the government of the day enjoys the confidence of the House,
(ii) the means by which the House may pronounce itself on a question of confidence should be explicit, clear and predictable so that all members know well in advance when the confidence of the House will be tested,
(iii) once the House has determined such means in its Standing Orders or in legislation, the government should not seek to circumvent the process established by the House by declaring a vote to be a matter of confidence if the rules of the House would not otherwise designate that vote as a matter of confidence, and any attempt to do so may constitute a contempt of Parliament,
(iv) a question of confidence is a serious matter and should not be used as a pretext for dilatory tactics by either side of the House;
(c) effective Monday, January 25, 2021, the Standing Orders be amended as follows:
(i) by adding, after Standing Order 53.1, the following new standing order:
“53.2(1) The government must enjoy the confidence of the House of Commons. The House may express its confidence, or lack thereof, in the government by adopting a confidence motion in one of the following forms: (i) “That the House has lost confidence in the government”; (ii) “That the House has confidence in the government”.
(2)(a) Notice of a confidence motion pursuant to section (1) of this standing order shall meet the requirements of Standing Order 54, provided that four sitting days shall be given prior to the motion being placed on the Order Paper. Such notice shall be signed by the sponsor and 20 other members representing more than one of the recognized parties.
(b) Notwithstanding Standing Order 18, the House may pronounce itself on the motions listed in section (1) of this standing order more than once.
(c) Only one confidence motion pursuant to section (1) of this standing order: (i) may be placed on notice in each supply period; (ii) shall be sponsored or signed by the same member of the House in a session of a Parliament.
(3) At the expiry of the notice period pursuant to section (2) of this standing order, an order of the day for the consideration of a confidence motion shall be placed on the Order Paper, be considered at the next sitting of the House and take precedence over all other business of the House, with the exception of a debate on a privilege motion.
(4) When the order of the day on a confidence motion is called, it must stand as the first order of the day. The confidence motion is deemed to have been moved and seconded and shall not be subject to any amendment.
(5) Private Members’ Business shall be suspended on a day any such motion is debated.
(6) No dilatory motion shall be allowed during debate on a confidence motion pursuant to section (1) of this standing order and the provisions of Standing Orders 62 and 63 shall be suspended.
(7) The proceedings on the order of the day on a confidence motion proposed thereto shall not exceed one sitting day.
(8) No member shall speak for more than 20 minutes at a time in the debate on a confidence motion. Following the speech of each member, a period not exceeding 10 minutes shall be made available, if required, to allow members to ask questions and comment briefly on matters relevant to the speech and to allow responses thereto. Any period of debate of 20 minutes may be divided in two pursuant to the provisions of Standing Order 43(2).
(9) When no further member rises to speak, or at the ordinary hour of daily adjournment, whichever is earlier, the Speaker shall interrupt the proceedings and the question shall be put and forthwith disposed of, notwithstanding Standing Order 45.
(10) Any matter of confidence so designated beyond those provided for in Standing Orders 50(8), 53.2(1), 81(18)(e), and 84(6)(b) may be called to the attention of the Chair and the member may ask that the matter be referred to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. As the case may be, the Speaker shall automatically refer the matter to the said committee.”,
(ii) in Standing Order 45(6)(a), by adding, after the words “An exception to this rule is”, the following: “the division on a confidence motion pursuant to Standing Order 53.2(9) and”,
(iii) by adding, after Standing Order 50(7), the following: “(8) If the main motion is defeated, the government has lost the confidence of the House.”,
(iv) by adding, after Standing Order 67(1)(p), the following: “(q) for the consideration of a confidence motion”,
(v) in Standing Order 81(13), by adding the following: “Opposition motions cannot contain explicitly worded expressions of confidence in the government.”,
(vi) by adding, after Standing Order 81(18)(d), the following: “(e) After having disposed of any opposed item, if the motion to concur in the main estimates is defeated, the government has lost the confidence of the House.”,
(vii) by renumbering Standing Order 84(6) as Standing Order 84(6)(a),
(viii) by adding, after Standing Order 84(6)(a), the following: “(b) If the main motion is defeated, the government has lost the confidence of the House.”,
(ix) in Standing Order 99(1), by adding, after “52(14),”, the following: “53.2(5),”; and
(d) the Clerk of the House be authorized to make any required editorial and consequential alterations to the Standing Orders, including to the marginal notes, as well as such changes to the Order Paper and Notice Paper, as may be required.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — November 3, 2020

November 3, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, given that since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Canadian billionaires are $37 billion richer while the most vulnerable are struggling, the House call upon the government to put in place a new one percent tax on wealth over $20 million and an excess profit tax on big corporations that have been profiteering from the pandemic.

November 3, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, given that over 80% of COVID-19 deaths in Canada have occurred in long-term care facilities and that seniors living in for-profit homes are four times more likely to become infected and die from the virus than seniors living in non-profit homes, the House call on the government to take the profit out of long-term care, by: (a) building a strong system of public and non-profit run facilities for the future; and (b) bringing long-term care homes owned by the government, including Revera, into public operation so that seniors in these facilities can receive a proper standard of living and of care.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — November 3, 2020

November 3, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, given that the Garderie Tunney’s Daycare has been forced to close as a result of the government’s decision to increase its rent, a decision that puts 21 people out of work and leaves dozens of families searching for other child care options, the House call upon the government to immediately reverse its decision to increase the rent charged to this daycare, and to put in place a quality, affordable publicly funded child care program, including: (a) investing an additional $20 billion over four years to build this system, as well as $2 billion in emergency funding to follow through on the motion passed in the House on August 12, 2020; (b) committing $10 million right away to an affordable child care action fund and creating a national child care secretariat to develop the government’s role and to collaborate with the provinces and territories on initiatives such as a workforce strategy and improved data sharing and research; and (c) bringing in legislation modeled on the Canada Health Act to enshrine this commitment in law and to set out the principles, conditions, and requirements for federal transfer payments to provinces, and Quebec's right to opt out with compensation.
Notice also received from:
Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe) — November 3, 2020

November 3, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, given that: (a) Canadians in every community are experiencing an opioid overdose crisis of epidemic proportions; (b) the current COVID-19 pandemic is exacerbating the health impacts and death toll by increasing isolation and the toxic illegal drug supply; (c) pharmaceutical companies should be held responsible for the negative impacts of their products and their misrepresentations and omissions concerning opioids in particular; (d) the federal and state governments in the United States have pursued legal cases against opioid manufacturers for misrepresenting and minimizing the dangers that opioids present, resulting in some $23 billion in damage awards and settlements; (e) the government has not yet joined certain provinces that have launched lawsuits against opioid manufacturers; and (f) there is a systemic shortage of affordable and publicly funded addiction treatment facilities and programs in Canada, the House call on the government to instruct the Department of Justice to launch a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers in Canada or to join the lawsuits currently filed by certain provinces to hold opioid manufacturers legally responsible for the consequences of their products and for any malfeasance or unlawful acts in marketing these products, and to use any funds recovered by the awarding of damages or settlements to create publicly funded addiction treatment facilities and programs in every province and territory.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — November 3, 2020

November 3, 2020 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, given that: (a) oral health is a crucial part of Canadians’ overall health; (b) over 12 million Canadians have no dental insurance, with millions more with partial or sub-standard coverage; (c) inattention to oral health leads to serious medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes complications and premature birth; and (d) the Parliamentary Budget Officer recently estimated that the federal government could ensure that every Canadian with an annual individual or family income under the median figure of $70,000 gets the dental care they need for an annual cost of $1.4 billion, not including the potential savings that such dental care would accrue to our healthcare system through the avoidance of complications due to neglect, the House call on the government to implement a plan to deliver comprehensive dental care to all Canadians who do not have dental insurance and who have annual individual or family incomes under $70,000 as a first step toward ensuring universal dental care coverage for all.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — November 3, 2020

November 12, 2020 — Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) — That, in light of the increasing unaffordability of housing and recent issues involving the arrest of individuals connected to gang activity and illegal gambling across Canada, the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security be instructed to undertake a study on the prevalence and effects of money laundering in the Canadian economy, and that this study evaluate, review and examine:
(a) the purchases of real estate, mortgages and other financial products, investments or instruments, and the impact of these practices on housing affordability, real estate development and tax evasion;
(b) the involvement of criminal enterprises, affiliations or organizations across Canada;
(c) the efforts of the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada and Canada Mortgage Housing Corporation in tracking information for the purposes of reporting to, and cooperating with, the relevant law enforcement authorities, or provincial regulators, regarding any illegal or suspicious financial activity related to the above;
(d) the efforts of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in investigating, including joint investigations with other Canadian police services and with international law enforcement organizations, regarding money laundering and any other connected criminal activities related to money laundering operations;
provided that,
(e) the study begin no later than seven days following the adoption of this motion; and
(f) the committee present its findings to the House within 90 days of the adoption of this motion.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Vis (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon), Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — November 12, 2020

November 12, 2020 — Mr. McLean (Calgary Centre) — That the House call on the government to make the completion of Keystone XL a top priority in bilateral relations with the incoming administration of the United States.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills), Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — November 12, 2020

November 12, 2020 — Mr. Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska) — That, given that:
(a) the Commissioner of Official Languages concluded in his 2020 annual report that the language rights of Canadians “are not being respected for three reasons:
(i) federal institutions are not complying with the Official Languages Act;
(ii) the current Official Languages Act is outdated and needs to be modernized; and
(iii) the government is not doing enough to promote linguistic duality”; and
(b) the Commissioner of Official Languages also concluded that the obvious lack of bilingual services jeopardizes the public safety of Canadians in the context of the pandemic, thus making immediate action even more urgent;
the House call on the government to commit to introducing a bill to reform and modernize the Official Languages Act before the end of 2020.
Notice also received from:
Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — November 12, 2020

December 1, 2020 — Ms. Rood (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex) — That, given that,
(i) the government has not done enough to support Canada's farmers and processors, who have struggled under significant price volatility, non-tariff barriers, and drastic impacts of COVID-19,
(ii) the recent announcement of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) and the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) compensation schedule for dairy farmers provided for no compensation to dairy, egg and poultry processors who have also suffered significant losses and play a critical role in Canada's food supply chains,
the House call on the government to:
(a) respect the promise made to dairy, egg and poultry processors under supply management affected by the last three major trade agreements by promptly disclosing the details of the financial compensation to be paid to them under the CETA and the CPTPP;
(b) promptly clarify details of the investment and promotion programs promised for egg and poultry farmers;
(c) accelerate negotiations for the compensation of supply-managed farmers and processors under the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA);
(d) work with the United States government to eliminate the global limits on powdered milk exports under CUSMA and ensure that imports of milk, eggs and poultry meet our quality standards;
(e) modernize and improve the business risk management programs;
(f) request that the Competition Bureau investigate abusive pricing practices and concentration in the grocery industry; and
(g) defend Canada's trade interests and resolve outstanding trade barriers with the European Union, South Korea and other countries affecting our beef and pork producers, canola farmers, grain growers and food manufacturers.
Notice also received from:
Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — December 1, 2020

December 1, 2020 — Mrs. McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo) — That, given that,
(i) all Canadians should have access to safe and clean drinking water, housing, education, health care and other critical services,
(ii) increased participation of Indigenous peoples in Canada's economy is the key to closing significant socioeconomic gaps and creating long-term prosperity on and off reserve,
the House call on the government to:
(a) engage with provinces, territories, and Indigenous communities to develop a co-ordinated, effective, and best-practices approach to resource revenue sharing for Indigenous communities; and
(b) update this House within 90 days of the adoption of this motion.
Notice also received from:
Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — December 1, 2020

December 1, 2020 — Mrs. Stubbs (Lakeland) — That, in light of the increasing unaffordability of housing and recent issues involving the arrest of individuals connected to gang activity and illegal gambling across Canada, the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security be instructed to undertake a study on the prevalence and effects of money laundering in the Canadian economy, and that this study evaluate, review and examine:
(a) the purchase of real estate, mortgages and other financial products, investments or instruments, and the impact of these practices on housing affordability, real estate development and tax evasion;
(b) the involvement of criminal enterprises, affiliations or organizations across Canada;
(c) the involvement of politically exposed persons, particularly with respect to the Iranian and Chinese regimes;
(d) the efforts of the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada and the Canada Mortgage Housing Corporation in tracking information for the purposes of reporting to, and co-operating with, the relevant law enforcement authorities or provincial regulators regarding any illegal or suspicious financial activity related to the above;
(e) the efforts of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in investigating, including joint investigations with other Canadian police services and with international law enforcement organizations, regarding money laundering and any other connected criminal activities related to money laundering operations;
provided that,
(f) the study begin no later than seven days following the adoption of this motion; and
(g) the committee present its findings to the House within 90 days of the adoption of this motion.
Notice also received from:
Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — December 1, 2020

December 4, 2020 — Mr. Barrett (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes) — That the House:
(a) take note of the Commissioner of Lobbying's recent revelation that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is currently seized with 11 investigations under the Lobbying Act, including three that she has referred since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic;
(b) recall the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s “Trudeau II Report“, which stated that he was denied access to relevant evidence and was, therefore, “unable to fully discharge the investigatory duties conferred upon me”; and
(c) call upon the Prime Minister and the government to provide all possible assistance, including necessary waivers of solicitor-client privilege and cabinet confidence, to the RCMP, other police agencies and officers of Parliament that have investigated or who are actively investigating any matters pertaining to COVID-19 pandemic support measures.
Notice also received from:
Mr. O'Toole (Durham) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — December 4, 2020

December 4, 2020 — Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — That, in the opinion of the House, the provisions of Bill C-14, An Act to implement certain provisions of the economic statement tabled in Parliament on November 30, 2020 and other measures, respecting children’s benefits should be enacted as quickly as possible, and:
(a) notwithstanding any standing order or usual practice of the House,
(i) Bill C-14 shall be divided into two bills:
(A) Bill C-14A, An Act to implement certain provisions of the economic statement tabled in Parliament on November 30, 2020 and other measures,
(B) Bill C-14B, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (Canada Child Benefit) and to make a related amendment to the Children’s Special Allowances Act,
(ii) Bill C-14B shall be composed of Clauses 2, 3 and 5 of Bill C-14, as it is presently composed,
(iii) Bill C-14A shall be composed of the remaining provisions of Bill C-14,
(iv) Bills C-14A and C-14B shall each be reprinted and possess the status on the Order Paper that Bill C-14 had prior to the adoption of this order,
(v) the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel shall be authorized to make any technical changes or corrections as may be necessary to give effect to this motion; and
(b) the House call upon the government to take the necessary steps to secure passage of Bill C-14B through the House before its scheduled adjournment on Friday, December 11, 2020.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — December 4, 2020

January 25, 2021 — Mr. O’Toole (Durham) — That, given the provisions of Bill C-14, An Act to implement certain provisions of the economic statement tabled in Parliament on November 30, 2020 and other measures, respecting children's benefits should be enacted as quickly as possible, notwithstanding any standing order, special order or usual practice of the House, Bill C-14 be divided into two bills:
(a) (i) Bill C-14A, An Act to implement certain provisions of the economic statement tabled in Parliament on November 30, 2020 and other measures, shall be composed of all parts of Bill C-14 except clauses 2, 3 and 5, (ii) Bill C-14B, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (Canada Child Benefit) and to make a related amendment to the Children's Special Allowances Act, shall consist of clauses 2, 3 and 5 of Bill C-14;
(b) Bills C-14A and C-14B shall each be reprinted and possess the status on the Order Paper that Bill C-14 had prior to the adoption of this order;
(c) the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel shall be authorized to make any technical changes or corrections as may be necessary to give effect to this motion; and
(d) the House call upon the government to take the necessary steps to secure passage of Bill C-14B through the House as soon as possible.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Poilievre (Carleton) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — January 25, 2021

February 2, 2021 — Mr. O’Toole (Durham) — That, given that the Line 5 pipeline,
(i) is a project of critical importance that provides vital energy infrastructure from Western Canada, through the United States, and into Ontario and Quebec,
(ii) represents thousands of jobs for Ontarians, Quebecers and Western Canadians, jobs desperately needed for our economic recovery following the pandemic,
(iii) is essential for keeping the lights and heat on for thousands of people in Ontario and Quebec,
(iv) represents a critical source of fuel for numerous farming and industrial communities,
(v) provides all the jet fuel for Toronto's Pearson International Airport, Canada's largest airport,
(vi) provides essential fuel to Ontario and Quebec in a more economical, safe and environmentally sustainable manner than other forms of transit,
(vii) is critical to securing our energy security and economic future,
the House call on the government to:
(a) affirm its unequivocal support for the Line 5; and
(b) use every tool at its disposal to demand that the Transit Pipelines Treaty be respected by the United States and that the Biden administration allow for the continued construction of the Line 5 pipeline.
Notice also received from:
Mr. McLean (Calgary Centre) and Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — February 2, 2021

February 2, 2021 — Mr. O’Toole (Durham) — That, given the current controversy relating to the departure of the former governor general, the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates be instructed to undertake a review of the merits of the current consultation process to appoint a governor general and the arrangement for pay, pensions and benefits provided to governors general and former governors general.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable), Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) and Ms. Gladu (Sarnia—Lambton) — February 2, 2021

February 16, 2021 — Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — That an order of the House do issue for a copy of all contracts, or purchase agreements, between the government and any entity regarding the procurement of the vaccine manufactured for immunization against the SARS-CoV2 virus, commonly known as COVID-19.
Notice also received from:
Ms. Rempel Garner (Calgary Nose Hill) and Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles) — February 16, 2021

February 23, 2021 — Mr. Fortin (Rivière-du-Nord) — That the House reiterate that democracy is incompatible with monarchy and ask the government to initiate a process to amend the Canadian Constitution, involving Quebec, the provincial legislative assemblies and the Senate, to abolish the links between Canada and the British monarchy in order to become a republic.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Blanchet (Beloeil—Chambly) and Mr. Therrien (La Prairie) — February 23, 2021

February 23, 2021 — Mrs. Vignola (Beauport—Limoilou) — That an order of the House do issue for the production of all the supply contracts with all the suppliers of doses of vaccines to Canada and the minutes of the expert advice provided by the COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Blanchet (Beloeil—Chambly) and Mr. Therrien (La Prairie) — February 23, 2021

February 23, 2021 — Mr. Lemire (Abitibi—Témiscamingue) — That, given that Canada’s vaccine production capacity should not be dependent on foreign countries, the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology be instructed to undertake a study on the government’s efforts to develop a vaccine locally and to improve Canada’s production capacity; that the Prime Minister, the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, the Minister of Health, the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, and the Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry be invited to appear before the committee; and that the committee report its findings to the House.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Simard (Jonquière), Mr. Blanchet (Beloeil—Chambly) and Mr. Therrien (La Prairie) — February 23, 2021

February 23, 2021 — Mr. Fortin (Rivière-du-Nord) — That, given the need to ensure the separation of powers, particularly between the executive and judiciary and that the government should set up a committee to study the framework of a non-partisan process, with all the parties represented, to appoint judges in order to protect the impartiality of the judicial selection process, the House appoint a special committee with the mandate to hold hearings in order to study the framework of a non-partisan judicial appointment process, provided that:
(a) the committee be composed of 12 members, of which six shall be from the government party, four shall be from the official opposition, one shall be from the Bloc Québécois, and one shall be from the New Democratic Party;
(b) the members shall be named by their respective whip by depositing with the Clerk of the House the list of their members to serve on the committee no later than Wednesday, March 10, 2021;
(c) membership substitutions be permitted, if required, in the manner provided for in Standing Order 114(2);
(d) changes to the membership of the committee shall be effective immediately after notification by the relevant whip has been filed with the Clerk of the House;
(e) the Clerk of the House shall convene an organization meeting of the committee on Thursday, March 11, 2021;
(f) the committee be chaired by a member of the government party and, notwithstanding Standing Order 106(2), there shall be one vice-chair from each of the other recognized parties;
(g) quorum of the committee be as provided for in Standing Order 118 and that the Chair be authorized to hold meetings to receive evidence and to have that evidence printed when a quorum is not present, provided that at least four members are present, including one member of the opposition and one member of the government party;
(h) the committee be granted all of the powers of a standing committee, as provided in the Standing Orders, provided that the provisions of Standing Order 106(4) shall also extend to the committee;
(i) the committee have the power to authorize video and audio broadcasting of any or all of its proceedings; and
(j) the provisions of the order adopted on Monday, January 25, 2021, authorizing virtual and hybrid committee proceedings, shall continue to apply to the committee and any of its subcommittees until Sunday, September 19, 2021.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Blanchet (Beloeil—Chambly) and Mr. Therrien (La Prairie) — February 23, 2021

March 4, 2021 — Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — That the House call on the government to include in the next federal budget measures to help workers and their families struggling the most in the current economic downturn by:
(a) introducing sector-specific measures to support workers in the highly impacted hospitality, tourism and charitable sectors; and
(b) improving support programs, including lending supports, for small and medium businesses to be accessible within 30 days of the passage of this motion to prevent a wave of bankruptcies and layoffs.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Fast (Abbotsford), Mr. Cumming (Edmonton Centre), Mr. Baldinelli (Niagara Falls), Mr. Lawrence (Northumberland—Peterborough South), Mrs. Kusie (Calgary Midnapore) and Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — March 4, 2021

March 4, 2021 — Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should cancel the planned $49 million payment to the China-controlled Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank outlined in the Main Estimates 2021-22, and use those funds to begin supporting Canadian charities, a sector that has been ignored by the government in their pandemic response.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills) and Mr. Lawrence (Northumberland—Peterborough South) — March 4, 2021

March 4, 2021 — Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — That, given that Canada has the highest unemployment rate in the G7 despite spending the most per capita, the House, in relation to Canada's COVID-19 Economic Response Plan, call upon the government to table, in one comprehensive report on the same day as the next federal budget:
(a) a list of each support program, and for each, the maximum dollar amount available to applicants, the eligibility criteria, uptake rates, the number of jobs saved and lost, and the number of bankruptcies, insolvencies and permanent business closures experienced by recipients of such support; and
(b) the same information to be provided for the other G7 nations.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Fast (Abbotsford) and Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — March 4, 2021

March 4, 2021 — Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — That, given,
(i) the recent number of investigations into senior members of the Canadian Armed Forces, including allegations that the Minister of National Defence was aware of misconduct and did not actively pursue or investigate claims raised,
(ii) that six years ago, the Deschamps report recommended that a third party, independent of the chain of command be instituted to handle claims of sexual misconduct in the armed forces, but the government has done nothing to act on this recommendation, leaving members of the armed forces, particularly women, vulnerable to potential abuse,
(iii) that a number of allied nations have an independent entity who is responsible for oversight of the operations and programs of their defence departments,
the House call on the government to:
(a) order a service-wide independent investigation into sexual misconduct in the military;
(b) suspend all general and flag officer promotions and salary increases until this investigation is complete;
(c) ensure future complaints are made to an external independent body outside the chain of command; and
(d) establish the National Defence and Canadian Armed Forces Ombudsman as an independent officer of Parliament.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman) and Ms. Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill) — March 4, 2021

March 9, 2021 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That, given that,
(i) during the first wave, 82% of COVID deaths in Canada happened in long-term care, the highest proportion in the OECD,
(ii) there have been over 12,000 long-term care resident and worker deaths in Canada since the beginning of the pandemic,
(iii) residents and workers in for-profit long-term care homes have a higher risk of infection and death than those in non-profit homes,
the House call upon the government to ensure that national standards for long-term care which are currently being developed fully remove profit from the sector.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Singh (Burnaby South) and Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — March 9, 2021

March 9, 2021 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That the House:
(a) recognize that successive Liberal and Conservative governments have eroded our national domestic vaccine and medicine production capacity, including by the privatization of domestic research and manufacturing facilities, such as Connaught Labs, and that this erosion has impacted the ability of the government to mount a robust mass vaccination campaign to combat COVID-19; and
(b) call upon the government to:
(i) establish a publicly owned Crown corporation aimed at producing vaccines and critical drugs for Canadians dealing with COVID-19 and possible future public health crises,
(ii) put this publicly owned facility in place immediately so that the vaccines it produces can be incorporated into the government’s COVID-19 vaccination plans.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Singh (Burnaby South) and Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — March 9, 2021

March 9, 2021 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — That the House call upon the government to take further steps to support small businesses in dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, including by:
(a) extending the Wage Subsidy Program (WSP) until the end of the pandemic;
(b) increasing the WSP to 85% through the end of summer 2021 and enabling access to the 90% Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy top-up for businesses impacted by limitations on mass gatherings and travel restrictions;
(c) improving access to the rent subsidy and business loan program, including extending them until the end of the pandemic and ensuring Indigenous businesses can access them through Aboriginal financial institutions;
(d) ensuring small business start-ups that started at or since the beginning of the pandemic can access emergency supports;
(e) capping credit card transaction fees, which siphon money away from small businesses and consumers towards billionaire banks and credit card companies;
(f) putting in place a hiring bonus to pay the employer portion of employment insurance and Canada Pension Plan for new or rehired staff; and
(g) establishing a hotline for small businesses to call to receive assistance in applying for government supports.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Singh (Burnaby South) and Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — March 9, 2021

March 11, 2021 — Mr. Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis) — That, given the alarming conclusions in the November 17, 2020, report of the Parliamentary Budget Officer entitled “Fiscal Analysis of the Joint Support Ship program and the MV Asterix“, and the findings and recommendations of the Auditor General's February 25, 2021, report to Parliament, the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates be instructed to conduct a study of the cost overruns and timelines of the National Shipbuilding Strategy and to evaluate the importance of granting the polar icebreaker to the Canadian Coast Guard as soon as possible to protect Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles) — March 11, 2021

March 18, 2021 — Mr. Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman) — That, given that,
(i) the recent number of investigations into senior members of the Canadian Armed Forces, including an admission by the Minister of National Defence that he was aware of misconduct and did not actively pursue or investigate claims raised,
(ii) a number of victims' rights organizations, academics and others have taken considerable issue with the actions of the Minister of National Defence and his handling of this matter,
(iii) that six years ago, the Deschamps report recommended that a third party, independent of the chain of command be instituted to handle claims of sexual misconduct in the armed forces, but the government has done nothing to act on this recommendation, leaving members of the armed forces, particularly women, vulnerable to potential abuse,
(iv) that a number of allied nations have an independent entity who is responsible for oversight of the operations and programs of their defence department,
the House call on the government to:
(a) order a service-wide independent investigation into sexual misconduct in the military;
(b) suspend all general and flag officer promotions and salary increases until this investigation is completed;
(c) ensure future complaints are made to an external independent body outside the chain of command; and
(d) establish the National Defence and Canadian Armed Forces Ombudsman as an independent officer of Parliament.
Notice also received from:
Ms. Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill), Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) and Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — March 18, 2021

March 18, 2021 — Mr. Barrett (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes) — That, given that,
(i) the Trudeau Report and the Trudeau II Report established that the Prime Minister was found by the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner to have committed five breaches of the Conflict of Interest Act,
(ii) the Prime Minister is again under investigation for having contravened the act concerning his and his family's close financial ties to the Kielburgers' WE organization which was given an untendered $543 million contribution agreement,
in the opinion of the House, the commissioner should be empowered to recommend or impose stronger sanctions in cases of repeat violations of the Conflict of Interest Act and the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) and Mr. O'Toole (Durham) — March 18, 2021
Supplementary Estimates (C)
March 11, 2021 — The President of the Treasury Board — Consideration of a motion to concur in the Supplementary Estimates (C) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2021.
Text of motion — see “Business of Supply” in today’s Notice Paper.
Voting — not later than 15 minutes before the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders, pursuant to Standing Order 81(17).
Interim Supply
March 11, 2021 — The President of the Treasury Board — Consideration of a motion to concur in interim supply.
Text of motion — see “Business of Supply” in today's Notice Paper.
Voting — not later than 15 minutes before the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders, pursuant to Standing Order 81(17).

Ways and Means

Government Bills (Commons)

C-2 — September 24, 2020 — The Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities of Bill C-2, An Act relating to economic recovery in response to COVID-19.
Royal recommendation — notice given Thursday, September 24, 2020, by the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons.
C-5 — November 25, 2020 — The Minister of Canadian Heritage Consideration at report stage of Bill C-5, An Act to amend the Bills of Exchange Act, the Interpretation Act and the Canada Labour Code (National Day for Truth and Reconciliation), as reported by the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage without amendment.
Committee report — presented on Wednesday, November 25, 2020, Sessional Paper No. 8510-432-25.
C-6 — December 11, 2020 — The Minister of Justice — Consideration at report stage of Bill C-6, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (conversion therapy), as reported by the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights with amendments.
Committee report — presented on Friday, December 11, 2020, Sessional Paper No. 8510-432-50.
C-8 — February 5, 2021 — The Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship — Consideration at report stage of Bill C-8, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's call to action number 94), as reported by the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs without amendment.
Committee report — presented on Friday, February 5, 2021, Sessional Paper No. 8510-432-57.
C-11R — November 24, 2020 — Resuming consideration of the motion of Mr. Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry), seconded by Ms. Bibeau (Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food), — That Bill C-11, An Act to enact the Consumer Privacy Protection Act and the Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act and to make consequential and related amendments to other Acts, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics.
C-12R — March 10, 2021 — Resuming consideration of the motion of Mr. Wilkinson (Minister of Environment and Climate Change), seconded by Mr. Guilbeault (Minister of Canadian Heritage), — That Bill C-12, An Act respecting transparency and accountability in Canada's efforts to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by the year 2050, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development.
C-13 — November 26, 2020 — The Minister of Justice — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-13, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (single event sport betting).
Statement by Speaker regarding the rule of anticipation — February 18, 2021 (See Debates).
Motion may not be moved, pursuant to the statement made by the Speaker on Thursday, February 18, 2021.
C-15 — February 17, 2021 — Resuming consideration of the motion of Mr. Lametti (Minister of Justice), seconded by Ms. Bibeau (Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food), — That Bill C-15, An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs.
C-19 — March 8, 2021 — Resuming consideration of the motion of Mr. LeBlanc (President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada), seconded by Ms. Anand (Minister of Public Services and Procurement), — That Bill C-19, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (COVID-19 response), be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.
C-20 — February 3, 2021 — The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Finance of Bill C-20, An Act to amend the Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payments Act.
Royal recommendation — notice given Wednesday, February 3, 2021, by the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons.
C-21 — February 26, 2021 — Resuming consideration of the motion of Mr. Blair (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness), seconded by Mrs. Fortier (Minister of Middle Class Prosperity and Associate Minister of Finance), — That Bill C-21, An Act to amend certain Acts and to make certain consequential amendments (firearms), be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.
C-22 — February 18, 2021 — The Minister of Justice — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-22, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.
C-23 — February 24, 2021 — The Minister of Justice — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights of Bill C-23, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Identification of Criminals Act and to make related amendments to other Acts (COVID-19 response and other measures).

Government Bills (Senate)

S-2 — February 25, 2021 — The Minister of Foreign Affairs — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development of Bill S-2, An Act to amend the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act.
S-3 — February 25, 2021 — The Minister of Natural Resources — Second reading and reference to the Standing Committee on Natural Resources of Bill S-3, An Act to amend the Offshore Health and Safety Act.

Government Business

No. 3 — December 11, 2020 — Resuming consideration of the motion of Mr. Barrett (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes), seconded by Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent), — That the report of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner entitled “Maloney Report”, tabled on Thursday, November 19, 2020, be concurred in.
Debate — 48 minutes remaining, pursuant to section 28(11) of the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons.
Voting — not later than the expiry of the time provided for debate.

R Recommended by the Governor General