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Notice Paper

No. 37

Monday, May 25, 2020

11:00 a.m.


Introduction of Government Bills

Introduction of Private Members' Bills

Notices of Motions (Routine Proceedings)

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Lehoux (Beauce) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Lehoux (Beauce) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Lehoux (Beauce) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Lobb (Huron—Bruce) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Lobb (Huron—Bruce) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Lobb (Huron—Bruce) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Van Popta (Langley—Aldergrove) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Van Popta (Langley—Aldergrove) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Van Popta (Langley—Aldergrove) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Barlow (Foothills) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Barlow (Foothills) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Barlow (Foothills) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mrs. Gray (Kelowna—Lake Country) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mrs. Gray (Kelowna—Lake Country) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mrs. Gray (Kelowna—Lake Country) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Maguire (Brandon—Souris) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Maguire (Brandon—Souris) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Maguire (Brandon—Souris) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. McLean (Calgary Centre) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. McLean (Calgary Centre) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. McLean (Calgary Centre) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Hoback (Prince Albert) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Hoback (Prince Albert) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Hoback (Prince Albert) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Ms. Sahota (Calgary Skyview) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Ms. Sahota (Calgary Skyview) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Ms. Sahota (Calgary Skyview) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Rodriguez (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) — That, in accordance with subsection 3(1) of the Auditor General Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. A-17, and pursuant to Standing Order 111.1, this House approve the appointment of Karen Hogan as Auditor General of Canada for a term of 10 years.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Poilievre (Carleton) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Poilievre (Carleton) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Poilievre (Carleton) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

 

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — That the first report of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations, presented on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan) — That the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, presented on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, be concurred in.

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan) — That the first report of the Standing Committee on Finance, presented on Friday, February 28, 2020, be concurred in.

Questions

Q-4672 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George) — With regard to government stockpiles of personal protective equipment (PPE): (a) what was the specific volume of PPE supplies in the stockpile as of February 1, 2020, broken down by item; (b) how many supplies of PPE were, destroyed, disposed of, or otherwise removed from the stockpile between January 1, 2016 to March 1, 2020; (c) what are the details of all instances in (b), including the (i) date, (ii) number of items removed, broken down by type of item, (iii) reason for removal; and (d) what are the details of each time items were added to the stockpile between January 1, 2016 to March 1, 2020, including the (i) date, (ii) items added, (iii) volume, (iv) financial value?
Q-4682 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Cumming (Edmonton Centre) — With regard to personal protective equipment (PPE) purchased since January 1, 2020: (a) how many items of PPE have been purchased; (b) what was the price of each item at the time of purchase, broken down by (i) date of purchase, (ii) item, (iii) the total amount of each type of PPE per transaction?
Q-4692 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Cumming (Edmonton Centre) — With regard to contaminated swabs and faulty or rejected N95 masks purchased by Public Services and Procurement Canada: (a) which suppliers provided these items; and (b) since January 1, 2016, what other purchases have been made by the government from these suppliers broken down by (i) date of purchase, (ii) item or service purchased, (iii) number of units of item or service purchased per transaction?
Q-4702 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Cumming (Edmonton Centre) — With regard to procurement of personal protective equipment (PPE) since January 1, 2020: (a) how many Advance Contract Award Notices (ACANs) relating to PPE have been posted; (b) for the ACANs in (a), (i) how many bidders were there for each notice, (ii) who were the bidders for each notice; and (c) who won each contract?
Q-4712 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — With regard to preparation and response to COVID-19: (a) which provinces and territories have signed the Multi-Lateral Information Sharing Agreement (MLISA), and on what dates were each of their signatures provided; (b) which provinces and territories have declined to sign the MLISA, on what dates were each of their refusals provided, and what objections did each raise to signing; (c) which provinces and territories have withdrawn from the MLISA since signing it, and on what dates were their withdrawals effective; (d) is the MLISA currently in force, and, if not, why not; (e) which provinces and territories have signed the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Memorandum of Understanding on the Sharing of Information During a Public Health Emergency (Sharing MOU), and on what dates were each of their signatures provided; (f) which provinces and territories have declined to sign the Sharing MOU, and on what dates were their refusals provided; (g) which provinces and territories have withdrawn from the Sharing MOU since signing it, and on what dates were their withdrawals effective; (h) is the Sharing MOU currently in force, and, if not, why not; (i) which provinces and territories are using the Public Health Agency of Canada’s (PHAC) COVID-19 Case Report Form; (j) what percentage of known COVID-19 cases in Canada were reported to the PHAC using its COVID-19 Case Report Form versus other means; (k) when the PHAC’s COVID-19 Case Report Form instructs to "report cases electronically using secure methods or fax”, which secure methods does the PHAC utilize, and which methods are used, broken down by provinces and territories; (l) what percentage of known COVID-19 cases reported to the PHAC were reported using fax or paper; (m) how many full-time equivalents does the PHAC employ or have on contract to enter COVID-19 case reports received by fax or paper into electronic means; (n) what is the shortest, longest, and average delay that the PHAC experiences when a COVID-19 case report is received by fax or paper before it is entered into electronic means; (o) what is the reason for the discrepancy between the total number of cases of COVID-19 reported by the Government of Canada on its “Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Outbreak update” website, and the smaller number of cases with specific epidemiological data on the website entitled “Detailed confirmed cases of coronavirus disease”; (p) what are the factors that contribute to the delay between the reporting of the “episode date” of a COVID-19 case and the “date [the] case was last updated”, with reference to the data referred to in (o); (q) which provinces and territories have objected to the public disclosure of their detailed COVID-19 case data, as on the “Detailed confirmed cases of coronavirus disease” website, and for each province and territory, what are the details or summary of their objection; (r) why, in developing its COVID-19 Case Report Form, did the PHAC choose not to collect the ethnicity or race of individuals, as done in other jurisdictions; (s) why has the government never used its powers under section 15 of the Public Health Agency of Canada Act to better collect and analyze COVID-19 case data held by the provinces; (t) why has the PHAC not yet published an epidemiological model of COVID-19 that includes a scientifically detailed public disclosure of the modelling methodology, computer code, and input parameters; (u) what are the reasons that the PHAC does not publish a daily COVID-19 model that includes up-to-date estimates of the effective reproductive number (R), such as that produced by Norway, in its model of May 8, 2020; (v) what is the value, duration, objectives and deliverables of the contract issued by the Government of Canada to Blue Dot for the modelling of COVID-19, announced by the Prime Minister on March 23, 2020; (w) which other individuals or companies has the Government of Canada contracted for the modelling of COVID-19, and, for each contract, what is the (i) value, (ii) duration, (iii) objectives, (iv) deliverables; (x) do any of the contracts for COVID-19 limit the freedom of the contractors to disclose the information, methodology, or findings of their models as confidential, and, if so, which contracts are so affected, and what are the terms of the confidentiality; (y) what is the total amount of federal spending on the Panorama public health and vaccination data system since its launch; (z) which provinces and territories utilize Panorama’s disease outbreak management and communicable disease case management modules for reporting COVID-19 information to the federal government; (aa) to what extent does the federal government have access to COVID-19 outbreak and case data contained within the Panorama system and what are the reasons for the lack of access to data, if any; (bb) what steps has the federal government taken to ensure that, when data exists, it will have access to COVID-19 vaccination data contained within the Panorama system; (cc) to what extent does the Panorama system meet the data collection and reporting goals of the federal government’s report entitled “Learning from SARS – Renewal of Public Health in Canada”; and (dd) has an audit of the Panorama system been completed and, if so, what are the details of the audit’s findings, including when it was done, by whom it was conducted, and the standards by which it was measured?
Q-472 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — With regard to preparation and response to COVID-19: (a) what are the reasons for the decision of the National Research Council (NRC) to grant a non-exclusive licence to the biotechnology company CanSino to utilize a modified cell line invented by the NRC; (b) under the licence referred to in (a), what compensation, consideration, or other reciprocal arrangements did the NRC receive or agree to from CanSino; (c) under the licence referred to in (a), did the NRC obtain from CanSino or others an agreement that the Government of Canada could receive or make use of any resulting COVID-19 vaccine, and, if so, what are the details of those agreements, including the cost and other compensation or consideration; (d) if the answer to (c) is negative, what are the reasons for the lack of such an agreement; (e) if there are costs to the NRC, or any other Government of Canada entity, payable to CanSino or any other entity, resulting from the provision or licence of a COVID-19 vaccine to the Government of Canada further to the licence referred to in (a), what are the details of those costs, and what are the reasons for agreeing to those costs; (f) under the licence referred to in (a), did the NRC obtain from CanSino or others an agreement that CanSino would furnish any resulting COVID-19 vaccine to developing countries on a not-for-profit basis, and, if not, what are the reasons; (g) what is the total amount of direct or indirect funding that has been provided by the Government of Canada to Gilead Sciences, Inc. for the research, development, manufacture, or clinical trials of remdesivir; (h) what is the total value of any funding, tax incentives or credits, or other arrangements made with Gilead Sciences, Inc. with regard to its Canadian manufacturing or research and development facilities, including to retrofit or build new Gilead facilities to scale-up production capacity, including the (i) amounts, (ii) dates, (iii) specific uses of those funds; (i) what are the details of each grant from the Government of Canada, or a related agency, made to any academic institution to conduct research on remdesivir, including the (i) value, (ii) recipients, (iii) dates, (iv) terms of each grant; (j) was any research and development on remdesivir conducted directly by the Government of Canada or any public servants or federal agencies, and, if so, (i) what is the budget of each research project, (ii) who conducted it, (iii) on what date; (k) does the Government of Canada own any patents on remdesivir or has the government licensed any patents on remdesivir and, if so, which patents and patent applications, including their numbers, and what are the details of any licensing agreements, including (i) to whom or from whom the licences were issued, (ii) on what dates, (iii) the terms of the licences; (l) has the Government of Canada secured or negotiated access to remdesivir, should it receive regulatory approval from Health Canada, and, if so, what price has been negotiated per treatment; (m) further to the Prime Minister’s announcement on April 7, 2020, that Canada would purchase up to 30,000 ventilators, how many ventilators has the Government of Canada ordered, on what date, from which supplier, at what price per ventilator, which models and manufacturers, and how many have been received by the federal government and each province; (n) for each type of ventilator ordered by the federal government, are they capable of providing mechanical ventilation as described by the ARDSnet protocol by, for example, controlling and limiting respiratory rate, tidal volume, peak pressures, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP), and fraction of inhaled oxygen (FiO2); (o) which sources or officials, broken down by name or, if names will not be disclosed, by job title or position, provided technical advice related to the selection of ventilator models, modes, and capabilities in the context of COVID-19; (p) since 2016, what funds, broken down by year, were allocated to the National Emergency Strategic Stockpile (NESS) of personal protective equipment, how much of those funds allocated were not spent, if any, and, if applicable, for what reasons were those funds not spent; (q) as of January 1, 2020, February 1, 2020, March 1, 2020, and March 15, 2020, what quantities of personal protective equipment were in the NESS inventory, broken down by (i) masks, (ii) N95 respirators, (iii) gloves, (iv) other personal protective equipment; and (r) who at the Public Health Agency of Canada is presently responsible for stock rotation of the NESS inventory, and on what date was that individual tasked with that function?
Q-473 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston) — With regard to preparation and response to COVID-19: (a) why did the Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) state that the risk of COVID-19 to Canadians was “low”, following cabinet’s approval on February 17, 2020, of the statement that "the introduction or spread of [COVID-19] would pose an imminent and severe risk to public health in Canada”; (b) which officials, broken down by name or, if names will not be disclosed, by job title or position, drafted or approved the talking points for the CPHO that reads “the level of risk within Canada [...] remains low”, and which is contained in the Annotated Agenda for the federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) health ministers’ special call on novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) of February 3, 2020; (c) which officials, broken down by name or, if names will not be disclosed, by job title or position, participated in formulating the conclusion of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) risk assessment in (b), and what professional credentials or higher education, and in which subjects, do each of these officials possess; (d) which officials, broken down by name or, if names will not be disclosed, by job title or position, drafted or approved the “Responsive, if asked [...]” talking points for the CPHO that are contained in the Annotated Agenda for the FPT health ministers’ special call on 2019-nCoV of February 10, 2020; (e) on which dates has the Minister of Health or her officials furnished advice or direction on the talking points of the CPHO, and what was the guidance or direction, in summary, in each case; (f) with respect to the role of the CPHO as an official advisor to the World Health Organization's (WHO) emergency committee regarding the outbreak of the 2019-nCoV, did the CPHO expressly recommend during the Emergency Committee meetings of January 22 and 23, 2020, that the WHO should immediately declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern and, if not, why not; (g) with respect to the role of the CPHO as an official advisor to the WHO as noted in (f), did the WHO request the CPHO to agree to any form of confidentiality or non-disclosure, and, if so, did she agree in writing or otherwise; (h) on which dates did the government give notification to the WHO of COVID-19 and communicate information about the outbreak, as required under Articles 6 and 7 of the International Health Regulations, and what are the details of each such communication; (i) why did the PHAC refuse to support or collaborate in a research grant application to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research in which Professor Amir Attaran was to be a co-investigator, and only agree to participate once informed that Professor Attaran voluntarily removed his name from the application; (j) if the research grant application referred to in (i) is successful, does the government object to Professor Amir Attaran participating as a co-investigator and, if so, what are the reasons for the objection; (k) which officials, broken down by name or, if names will not be disclosed, by job title or position, ghost wrote, co-wrote, edited, or otherwise contributed to article by the Prime Minister entitled "Canada's vision for global health and gender equality” that appeared in The Lancet on April 28, 2018; (l) which of the contributors to the article referred to in (k) filed an author statement or International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) form with The Lancet, and what contributions or conflicts of interest did each disclose therein; (m) further to the article referred to in (k), did the Prime Minister file an author statement or ICMJE form with The Lancet and, if so, what contribution did he disclose, and what contributions or conflicts of interest did he disclose therein; (n) how much money was spent by the government in the researching, writing, and promotion of the article referred to in (k); and (o) further to the article referred to in (k), for what reasons was pandemic preparedness, or an analogous topic, not included?
Q-474 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Barrett (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes) — With regard to the investigation into the leak of the Statistics Canada data relating to the April jobs numbers: (a) have ministerial staff been ordered to fully cooperate with the investigation, and, if not, why not; (b) who is conducting the investigation; (c) has the leak been referred to the RCMP, and, if not, why not; and (d) what is the full list of individuals outside of Statistics Canada who had access to the data prior to it being publicly released?
Q-4752 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Barlow (Foothills) — With regard to farm income loss as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic: (a) has Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada or Farm Credit Canada conducted an analysis on projected farm income loss as a result of the pandemic; and (b) what is the projected loss, broken down by agricultural sector?
Q-4762 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — With regard to physical distancing and other safety measures for ministerial vehicles and chauffeurs during the COVID-19 pandemic: (a) what specific measures have been put in place to ensure the safety of drivers, including whether (i) ministers are required to wear masks in the vehicles, (ii) there is an occupancy limit to the vehicles, (iii) specific seats within the vehicles may not be used, (iv) there is a prohibition on others, including ministerial exempt staff, riding in the vehicles, (v) any other measures have been made to limit close physical contact between drivers and ministers; (b) on what date was each measure listed in (a), (i) put into place, (ii) amended, (iii) rescinded; and (c) have any ministers required their drivers to drive outside of the National Capital Region since March 13, 2020, and, if so, what are the details of each trip, including (i) date of trip, (ii) destination, (iii) purpose of trip, (iv) number of occupants in the vehicle, (v) whether a minister was in the vehicle, (vi) specific safety precautions taken?
Q-4772 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre) — With regard to the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF), since the creation of the program: (a) how many businesses have applied for the LEEFF; (b) how many businesses have been eligible; (c) how many applications from businesses have been denied; (d) of the applications that were denied, how many were from (i) businesses convicted of tax evasion, (ii) businesses convicted of abusive tax avoidance, (iii) companies that have subsidiaries in tax havens; (e) have applications from companies under investigation in connection with the Panama Papers and Paradise Papers been accepted; and (f) what is the current total cost of the LEEFF’s expenses, broken down by economic sector?
Q-4782 — May 21, 2020 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and tax havens: (a) what is the CRA's definition of tax haven; and (b) which jurisdictions have been identified as tax havens according to the CRA's definition?
Q-4792 — May 21, 2020 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — With regard to the activities of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) under Part XVI of the Income Tax Act since November 2015, broken down by fiscal year and natural person, trust and corporation: (a) how many audits have been conducted; (b) how many notices of assessment have been issued by the CRA; and (c) what is the total amount recovered to date by the CRA?
Q-4802 — May 21, 2020 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — With regards to Veterans Affairs Canada, broken down by year for the most recent ten fiscal years for which data is available: (a) what was the number of disability benefit applications received; (b) of the applications in (a), how many were (i) rejected (ii) approved (iii) appealed (iv) rejected upon appeal (v) approved upon appeal; (c) what was the average wait time for a decision; (d) what was the median wait time for a decision; (e) what was the ratio of veteran to Case Manager at the end of each fiscal year; (f) what was the number of applications awaiting a decision at the end of each fiscal year; and (g) what was the number of veterans awaiting a decision at the end of each fiscal year?
Q-4812 — May 21, 2020 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — With regard to Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC): (a) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, what was the total number of overtime hours worked, further broken down by job title, including National 1st Level Appeals Officer, National 2nd Level Appeals Officer, Case Manager, Veterans Service Agent and Disability Adjudicator; (b) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, what was the average number of overtime hours worked, further broken down by (i) job title, including National 1st Level Appeals Officer, National 2nd Level Appeals Officer, Case Manager, Veterans Service Agent and Disability Adjudicator, (ii) directorate; (c) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, what was the total cost of overtime, further broken down by (i) job title, including National 1st Level Appeals Officer, National 2nd Level Appeals Officer, Case Manager, Veterans Service Agent and Disability Adjudicator, (ii) directorate; (d) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, what was the total number of disability benefit claims, further broken down by (i) new claims, (ii) claims awaiting a decision, (iii) approved claims, (iv) denied claims, (v) appealed claims; (e) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, how many new disability benefit claims were transferred to a different Veterans Affairs Canada office than that which conducted the intake; (f) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, what was the number of (i) Case Managers, (ii) Veterans Service Agents; (g) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, excluding standard vacation and paid sick leave, how many Case Managers took a leave of absence, and what was the average length of a leave of absence; (h) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, accounting for all leaves of absence, excluding standard vacation and paid sick leave, how many full-time equivalent Case Managers were present and working, and what was the Case Manager to veteran ratio; (i) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, how many veterans were disengaged from their Case Manager; (j) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, what was the highest number of cases assigned to an individual Case Manager; (k) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, how many veterans were on a waitlist for a Case Manager; (l) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC offices, including nationally, for work usually done by regularly employed Case Managers and Veteran Service Agents, (i) how many contracts were awarded, (ii) what was the duration of each contract, (iii) what was the value of each contract; (m) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by VAC offices, what were the service standard results; (n) what is the mechanism for tracking the transfer of cases between Case Managers when a Case Manager takes a leave of absence, excluding standard vacation and paid sick leave; (o) what is the department’s current method for calculating the Case Manager to veteran ratio; (p) what are the department’s quality assurance measures for Case Managers and how do they change based on the number of cases a Case Manager has at that time; (q) during the last five fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month, how many individuals were hired by the department; (r) how many of the individuals in (q) remained employed after their 12-month probation period came to an end; (s) of the individuals in (q) who did not remain employed beyond the probation period, how many did not have their contracts extended by the department; (t) does the department track the reasons for which employees are not kept beyond the probation period, and, if so, respecting the privacy of individual employees, what are the reasons for which employees were not kept beyond the probation period; (u) for the individuals in (q) who chose not to remain at any time throughout the 12 months, were exit interviews conducted, and, if so, respecting the privacy of individual employees, what were the reasons, broken down by VAC offices; (v) during the last five fiscal years for which data is available, broken down by month, how many Canadian Armed Forces service veterans were hired by the department; (w) of the veterans in (v), how many remained employed after their 12-month probation period came to an end; (x) of the veterans in (v) who are no longer employed by the department, (i) how many did not have their employment contracts extended by the department, (ii) how many were rejected on probation; (y) if the department track the reasons for which employees are not kept beyond the probation period, respecting the privacy of individual veteran employees, what are the reasons for which veteran employees are not kept beyond the probation period; (z) for the veterans in (v) who chose not to remain at any time throughout the 12 months, were exit interviews conducted, and, if so, respecting the privacy of individual veteran employees, what were the reasons for their leaving, broken down by VAC offices; (aa) during the last five fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month, how many employees have quit their jobs at VAC; and (bb) for the employees in (aa) who quit their job, were exit interviews conducted, and, if so, respecting the privacy of individual employees, what were the reasons, broken down by VAC offices?
Q-4822 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and tax havens: Does the CRA consider the Cayman Islands and Barbados to be tax havens?
Q-4832 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — With regard to tax information exchange agreement signed between Canada and Cayman Islands, since entry into force of the agreement and broken down by fiscal year: (a) how many times has the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) obtained information from Cayman Islands; (b) how many times has the CRA released information to Cayman Islands; (c) how much tax examinations abroad was conducted by CRA in Cayman Islands; (d) how many CRA enquiries have been denied by the Cayman Islands; (e) how many audits have been conducted by the CRA; (f) how many notices of assessment have been issued by the CRA; and (g) what is the total amount recovered by the CRA?
Q-4842 — May 21, 2020 — Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford) — With regard to amendments to the Canada Grain Regulations (SOR/2020-63), enacted through the passage of Bill C-4, An Act to implement the Agreement between Canada, the United States of America and the United Mexican States, which amended the Canada Grain Act through an expedited process, bypassing the normal Canada Gazette I posting and public comment period, and were posted on Canada Gazette, Part II, Volume 154, Number 9: (a) what are the details of all meetings, round tables, teleconference calls, town halls, and other means of consultation, in regard to grain, held during CUSMA/NAFTA 2.0 negotiations, including the (i) dates, (ii) locations, (iii) agendas, (iv) minutes, (v) attendee and invitee lists, including government officials and agriculture sector stakeholders, and their organizational affiliations; (b) for the meetings referred to in (a), what are the details of (i) published notices, (ii) reports, including where and when they were published; (c) what are the details of all stakeholder views expressed during these consultations, including minority positions, which were communicated to inform the Government of Canada negotiating position, along with the names and positions of the officials to whom these stakeholder views were communicated; (d) what are the details of all engagement activities with grain sector stakeholders following the CUSMA announcement where the impacts of the agreement, potential legislative and regulatory amendments, and implementation plans were discussed, as well as the reports flowing from these engagement activities that informed the drafting of Bill C-4 amendments to the Canada Grain Act, including the (i) dates, (ii) locations, (iii) agendas, (iv) minutes, (v) attendees, including from the Canada Grain Commission and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada officials and agriculture sector stakeholders, and their organizational affiliations; (e) who made the decision to have “minimal” consultation on the regulatory changes and an explanation of their rationale for the decision when, as the regulatory analysis document says, the amendments are consequential; and (f) what is the definition of the industry referred to when “industry-led” is used in regard to integrating the Delivery Declaration Form and its implementation into the existing grain delivery structure, particularly whether farmers are included among the leadership of the industry?

Notices of Motions for the Production of Papers

Business of Supply

Opposition Motions
May 21, 2020 — Mr. Scheer (Regina—Qu'Appelle) — That the House recognize that its deliberations during the COVID-19 pandemic have been to the benefit of Canadians, recall that the House has previously sat during wars, pandemics, economic depressions and national unity challenges, and, therefore, declares itself to be an "essential service"; and, in preparation for a resumption of its regular sitting schedule, call upon the whips of the recognized parties and authorize the Speaker, with the agreement of those whips, to continue to respect health guidelines for physical distancing and determine: (a) a maximum number of members present in the Chamber, with the objective of accommodating approximately 50 members simultaneously (subject to adjustment if public health guidance changes); (b) a manner of voting; and (c) a mechanism whereby all standing and special committees may hold virtual meetings while exercising the same powers they possess at physical meetings in Ottawa.
Notice also received from:
Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar), Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope) and Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — May 21, 2020

May 21, 2020 — Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar) — That, notwithstanding any standing order, special order or usual practice of the House:
(a) until Monday, September 21, 2020, the application of Standing Order 17 be suspended;
(b) until Monday, September 21, 2020, the Standing Orders be amended as follows: (i) in Standing Order 26(2), by replacing the word “15” with “five”, (ii) in Standing Order 53(4), by replacing the word “10” with “five”, (iii) in Standing Order 56.1(3), by replacing the word “25” with “five”;
(c) until Monday, September 21, 2020, the Speaker may, to ensure physical distancing, regulate the presence of members within the chamber, provided that at least 23 members of the government party, 18 members of the official opposition, five members of the Bloc Québécois, four members of the New Democratic Party and one member who is not a member of a recognized party may be present at any given time;
(d) until Monday, September 21, 2020, the Speaker may, with the agreement of the whips of the recognized parties, modify any procedure, practice or standing order related to the taking of recorded divisions, for the purpose of respecting public health guidance concerning physical distancing, including (i) the number of members required to demand the taking of a recorded division, (ii) the length of time the bells are sounded to call in the members, (iii) the time when members may vote, (iv) the method by which members may indicate their votes, (v) the location within, or adjacent to, the chamber where members may indicate their votes, (vi) the timing and means by which each member’s vote is announced within the chamber, (vii) the requirement for members to be present in the chamber from the reading of the question until the declaration of the result, provided that any modifications shall be announced by the Speaker to the House before they apply;
(e) until Monday, September 21, 2020, standing, special and legislative committees are authorized to hold virtual meetings where members may attend and witnesses shall participate remotely by video or teleconference, provided that (i) committee members attending by video or teleconference shall be counted for the purposes of quorum, (ii) requests pursuant to Standing Order 106(4) may be submitted to the clerk of the committee by e-mail, (iii) notices of membership substitutions pursuant to Standing Order 114(2) may be filed with the clerk of the committee by e-mail;
(f) until Monday, September 21, 2020, priority for the use of House resources shall be given to committee meetings in the following order: (i) meetings of the Standing Committee on Health, (ii) meetings of the Standing Committee on Finance, (iii) meetings which are specified by the agreement of the whips of the recognized parties, (iv) all other meetings, in the order in which the meetings are convened;
(g) until Monday, September 21, 2020, any return, report or other paper to be presented to or laid before the House pursuant to any statute, standing order or other order of the House, any petition certified by the Clerk of Petitions and presented pursuant to Standing Order 36, and any committee report presented to the House, may be deposited or presented electronically when the House is sitting or, when it is adjourned, under the provisions of Standing Order 32(1);
(h) the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs be instructed to study (i) the implementation of paragraphs (a) to (g) of this order, for the purposes of recommending whether to renew their application for a further defined period of time, beyond Monday, September 21, 2020, (ii) the use of non-virtual alternatives to allow for greater physical participation by members, provided that the committee present a report no later than Friday, September 11, 2020, and any such report may be deposited electronically with the Clerk of the House, whenever it is ready, and be deemed to have been duly presented to the House on that date;
(i) the motion to ratify the appointment of Karen Hogan to the position of Auditor General of Canada, if not already disposed of, be deemed proposed and the question be put forthwith, without debate or amendment, immediately following the adoption of this order;
(j) for greater certainty, the following provisions remain in effect: (i) paragraphs (m) and (o) of the order adopted on Friday, March 13, 2020, (ii) paragraphs (i), (j), (l) and (m) of the order adopted on Tuesday, March 24, 2020, provided that, (A) in paragraph (i), all the words after the words “provided that,” be replaced with the following: “at any time the House stands adjourned pursuant to Standing Order 28(2), until Monday, September 21, 2020, if the committee is not satisfied with how the government is exercising its powers under the act, it may adopt a motion to report this to the House by depositing a report with the Clerk of the House which shall be deemed to be duly presented to the House on that day;”, (B) in paragraph (l), the words “the resumption of regular sittings of the House pursuant to paragraph (e) of (f) of this order” be replaced with the words “the present sitting”; and
(k) in the event of the Speaker being unable to act for any purpose required by this order, owing to illness or other cause, the Deputy Speaker or either of the Assistant Deputy Speakers shall act in the Speaker’s stead for any such purpose.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Scheer (Regina—Qu'Appelle), Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope) and Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — May 21, 2020

May 21, 2020 — Mr. Uppal (Edmonton Mill Woods) — That the House call on the Auditor General of Canada to audit all federal programs associated with Canada's COVID-19 response and to complete all previously-scheduled audits and all audits requested by the House; and call on the government to provide the Office of the Auditor General all the funding it needs to carry out these audits and any other work it deems appropriate.
Notice also received from:
Mr. Poilievre (Carleton), Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar), Mr. Scheer (Regina—Qu'Appelle), Mr. Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope) and Mr. Nater (Perth—Wellington) — May 21, 2020

Government Business

Private Members' Notices of Motions


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