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Notice Paper

No. 288

Monday, April 30, 2018

11:00 a.m.


Introduction of Government Bills

April 27, 2018 — The Minister of Democratic Institutions — Bill entitled “An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other Acts and to make certain consequential amendments”.
Recommendation
(Pursuant to Standing Order 79(2))
Her Excellency the Governor General recommends to the House of Commons the appropriation of public revenue under the circumstances, in the manner and for the purposes set out in a measure entitled “An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other Acts and to make certain consequential amendments”.

Introduction of Private Members' Bills

Notices of Motions (Routine Proceedings)

Questions

Q-17202 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to government advertisements (ads) launched on Facebook since January 1, 2016: (a) how many ads have been launched by month and what were the corresponding campaigns for each (ie. employment insurance, citizenship services, tax credits, grants, etc.); (b) how long was each ad active for online; (c) what were the insights for each ad launched, including (i) how many people were reached by each ad, (ii) what percentage of women and men were reached by each ad, (iii) what were the age group ranges used for each ad, (iv) what were the federal, provincial, or municipal regions targeted by each ad, (v) were specific interests, pages, or likes included in the targeting of the ads, broken down by ad; and (d) who in the department or Minister’s office receives or has access to the data gathered in the insights of these ads?
Q-17212 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to the Canada 150 hockey rink on Parliament Hill: (a) what were the total costs associated with the "Canada 150 Rink" Twitter account; (b) how many full-time equivalents managed the rink Twitter account; and (c) were the costs associated with the rink Twitter account included in the 8.1 million dollars amount associated with the rink's costs?
Q-17222 — April 27, 2018 — Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar) — With regard to individuals who have crossed the border illegally and are currently being housed in accommodations being paid for, funded, or operated by the government: (a) what is the current number of individuals in such accommodations; (b) what is the breakdown of (a) by city and province; (c) what is the list of facilities, such as stadiums or hotels where large groups of individuals (more than 100) are being accommodated; (d) for each location in (c), what is the number of individuals housed at each location; and (e) what is the projected total expenditures on such accommodations for the 2018 calendar year?
Q-17232 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou) — With regard to each contracts granted by any department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity, since October 26, 2016, to The Gandalf Group or any of its partners, what are: (a) the vendors' names; (b) the contracts' reference and file numbers; (c) the dates of the contracts; (d) the descriptions of the services provided; (e) the delivery dates; (f) the original contracts' values; (g) the final contracts' values, if different from the original contracts' values; and (h) the details of any research, polling, or advice provided to the government as a result of such contracts?
Q-17242 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency: (a) how many individuals have been falsely or accidentally declared deceased by the Agency when they were actually alive, since January 1, 2016; (b) what was the average time between when the CRA declared an individual dead and when the mistake was corrected; and (c) what was the average time it took the CRA to fully pay the lost benefits that it owed individuals who were falsely declared dead by the CRA, from the day that the CRA was first notified of their mistake?
Q-17252 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. McCauley (Edmonton West) — With regard to costs associated with the Canada Infrastructure Bank to date: (a) what are the total costs of managing the Bank, broken down by (i) leases, (ii) salaries of full-time equivalents and corresponding job classifications, (iii) operating expenses; (b) how many projects have applied for funding through the Bank; (c) of the projects in (b), how many have been approved; and (d) how many projects assigned through the Bank have begun operations, broken down by region?
Q-17262 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. Viersen (Peace River—Westlock) — With regard to expenditures related to accommodations, including operational and other expenses at such locations, for individuals who illegally or irregularly crossed the border: (a) what is the total of all expenditures in 2017; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) vendor, (ii) date, (iii) amount, (iv) description of goods or services provided, (v) file number?
Q-17272 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill) — With regard to renovation, redesign and re-furnishing of Ministers’ or Deputy Ministers’ offices since April 1, 2016: (a) what is the total cost of any spending on renovating, redesigning, and re-furnishing for each ministerial office, broken down by (i) total cost, (ii) moving services, (iii) renovating services, (iv) painting, (v) flooring, (vi) furniture, (vii) appliances, (viii) art installation, (ix) all other expenditures; and (b) what is the total cost of any spending on renovating, redesigning, and re-furnishing for each Deputy Minister’s office, broken down by (i) total cost, (ii) moving services, (iii) renovating services, (iv) painting, (v) flooring, (vi) furniture, (vii) appliances, (viii) art installation, (ix) all other expenditures?
Q-17282 — April 27, 2018 — Ms. Sansoucy (Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot) — With regard to the statement by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue during the adjournment proceedings of April 17, 2018, that “In 2015-16, the EI program received more than 365,000 sickness benefit claims, and paid out over $1.5 billion for this type of benefit. On average, recipients claimed 10 weeks of benefits of the maximum entitlement of 15 weeks. This shows that, in the majority of cases, the available coverage is sufficient”: (a) how many people applied to use the benefit for each calendar year between 2004 and 2017; (b) how many people received the benefit for each calendar year between 2004 and 2017; (c) how many people claimed 10 weeks of benefits out of the maximum entitlement of 15 weeks in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017; (d) how many people claimed 15 weeks of benefits in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017; (e) how many people claimed 14 weeks of benefits in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017; (f) how many people claimed 13 weeks of benefits in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017; (g) how many people claimed 12 weeks of benefits in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017; and (h) how many people claimed 11 weeks of benefits in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017?

Notices of Motions for the Production of Papers

Business of Supply

Opposition Motions
April 27, 2018 — Mr. Poilievre (Carleton) — That, given the Liberal government made a specific campaign promise to Canadians that "government data and information should be open by default, in formats that are modern and easy to use", the House hereby order that all documents be produced in their original and uncensored form indicating how much the federal carbon tax proposed in Budget 2018 will cost Canadian families in order to put an end to the carbon tax cover-up.
Notice also received from:
Ms. Bergen (Portage—Lisgar) — April 27, 2018

Government Business

Private Members' Notices of Motions

M-178 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie) — That the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage be instructed to undertake a study on implementing a National Legal Holiday under the federal Holidays Act, as Prime Ministers' Day, to honour the work, the sacrifice and the service of past and present Canadian Prime Ministers and their contribution to our great nation; and that the Committee report back to the House within ten months of the adoption of this motion.
M-179 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie) — That in the opinion of the House, the government should recognize the contributions of the steel industry in Canadian society as a provider of meaningful employment, a force for innovation and a cornerstone of our economy, by declaring September 17 of every year as National Steel Day.
M-180 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie) — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should: (a) acknowledge the need for a National Procurement Strategy which favours procuring products made with Canadian steel, thus resulting in a smaller carbon footprint; (b) recognize the low-carbon production of Canadian steel as the best option for Canadian Procurement Services projects and purchases, when carbon dioxide emissions are taken into account; and (c) inform Canadian consumers of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of buying products made from Canadian steel versus foreign and imported steel.
M-181 — April 27, 2018 — Mr. Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie) — That the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities be instructed to undertake a study of precarious employment in Canada and be mandated to (i) develop a definition of precarious employment, (ii) identify the role that precarious employment plays in the economy and in the federally-regulated private sector and the impact it has on the lives of individual Canadians; and that the Committee present its final report seven months after the adoption of this motion.

Private Members' Business

M-157 — November 21, 2017 — Mr. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac) — That the House recognize the importance that Visitability can have for Canadians of all ages and abilities, and particularly persons with a physical disability, aging individuals, seniors and their families, in Canada, by: (a) emphasizing the efforts of companies, contractors and builders who are already applying the principles of Visitability in their new constructions; (b) encouraging the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities to address the topic of Visitability in the accessibility legislation to be introduced in the House; and (c) inviting the federal government to address the subject of Visitability with its provincial and territorial partners in upcoming Federal, Provincial and Territorial discussions.
Pursuant to Standing Order 86(3), jointly seconded by:
Ms. May (Saanich—Gulf Islands) — April 18, 2018
Mr. Serré (Nickel Belt), Mr. Tootoo (Nunavut) and Mr. Bagnell (Yukon) — April 19, 2018
Mr. Easter (Malpeque) — April 23, 2018
Ms. Mihychuk (Kildonan—St. Paul) — April 24, 2018
Mrs. Lockhart (Fundy Royal) — April 25, 2018
Mr. Long (Saint John—Rothesay) — April 26, 2018
Mr. DeCourcey (Fredericton), Ms. Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth) and Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay) — April 27, 2018

2 Response requested within 45 days