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Frescoes

Frescoes

The style of the office of the Leader of the Opposition is inspired by the mid-seventeenth century English Renaissance. The architectural features and ornaments of that period are reflected in the oak woodwork, the planked wooden floor, the chimneypiece and the decorative plaster ceiling - all complemented by unique wall frescoes.

When designing the room, architect John A. Pearson was keen to ensure that its interior decoration echoed its function. He thus opted to use scenes of knighthood resembling those found in Renaissance chateaux, and involved the new Leader of the Opposition, W.L Mackenzie King, in selecting the thematic scenes. From Mackenzie King's diary, we learn that the room's frescoes were meant to reflect different aspects of the role of the Opposition, and the qualities needed in its leader.

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