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Results: 1 - 15 of 355
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Chair.
Thank you very much to our witnesses for being here today.
I'd like to maybe put this out to everyone, but Mr. Jacobson, you told me to be easy on you so I'm going to be. But it's something with me, as I come from a very agricultural area—the COOL process. The U.S. always talks about freer trade and seems to put non-tariff blocks into processes. COOL not only hurt a lot of Canadian producers but also it closed a lot of American processing plants that used Canadian beef and Canadian pork.
Four times this has gone to the WTO, and the WTO has ruled in favour of Canada and said that the COOL labelling system is wrong or goes against our treaty. It seems the only thing we can do is to impose tariffs. It's the only way you can come around something like that. We're talking about getting rid of tariffs. Some of these things happen.
I think back to when BSE hit. I was only elected for 10 days when BSE hit, so I've been with it for roughly 12 years. Back then when finally our beef was cleared scientifically as being safe, R-CALF, in the western states, put up a protest and that lasted for anywhere between four or six years, I think, before we got the market open to some cuts of beef.
How do we correct some of these things when they're negotiated and then they're adjudicated and found wrong, but the United States never wants to go back on it?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
How would you envision that Canada, the U.S., and Mexico standardize their customs operations, given existing differences among all three countries? I know it's been talked about—NEXUS and advance.... Is that primarily the best way?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you very much to our witnesses here this morning.
I'm a Shriner, and I understand that we aren't quite as focused around the world as you are, even though we are international.
I know that you have to have a focus area, and in our case that has been crippled and burned children. We have a cut-off at 18 years, but if someone is under our care through that time—they've been hurt or under care at a younger age than 18—as they get older, they aren't kicked out of the program, but go right through it. So I totally understand that.
One thing I see from all of you this morning is that you do specialize in focus areas, and rather than try to spread your resources over every problem that's out there, you focus on those problems.
As a government, we also have kind of learned that a wee bit, in that we have focus countries. Rather than try to fix everything around the world, we're trying to focus on, I think, roughly 10 countries for some of those types of things. So I congratulate you on that. I think it's about realizing that, if you put more into a pool, you might be able to eradicate polio or you might be able to eradicate tetanus. I appreciate that.
What lessons are to be learned from Rotary's efforts to eradicate the polio virus? How can we transmit this knowledge to eradicating or curbing other preventable illnesses?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Would you like to comment on that?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, and thank you to our witnesses here today. I heard Mr. Garneau say that he's been enlightened. I have also been.
Mr. Lung, how concerned is Beijing about alienating youth in Hong Kong?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
We've heard different versions of what might be done, but how would you envision a political compromise regarding election of Hong Kong's administration? Is there room to compromise, and what nomination process might Beijing tolerate that respects the preferences of Hong Kongers?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you.
Ms. Wright, you've written that Hong Kong's inability to govern itself was set in motion by policies under British rule. Given how long gradualism has been the norm in Hong Kong's government, how long would it take to achieve full democracy? Is it impossible under current circumstances?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you.
Thank you so much for your testimony here today. It's been very enlightening to me. I watched intently during the protests that went on earlier in the year, and it seemed that they were on the news every day. The media looked after things pretty well. That was the only way I could get to know what was going on.
Has the media left you? It's kind of gone away. It's not the most important issue, it seems, for the media anymore. Or am I not reading the right stuff? Where's the media?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
I know this might be a little off topic, but I look at Hong Kong and I look at Singapore and I also read that Taiwan seems to be continuing on reuniting with mainland China. Might they also suffer the fate that any agreement reached will not be followed?
It's great to come up with agreements, and everyone signs on. I look at Ukraine and Russia and what has happened there. I think probably those people who sat down 17 years ago and signed the agreement on Hong Kong with regard to how it would be handled had good intentions.
Do you see any way we can make sure that those things are followed?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Wong, what level of support is there within the student community in mainland China with regard to universal suffrage and human rights demands in Hong Kong? Have student organizations—
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
I mean mainland China's student support for you folks in Hong Kong; your students. Or do they know anything about it?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Chair.
Again following on Mr. Garneau's question, I'd like to follow up a wee bit.
I know that rule of law adds viability to communities. You've mentioned skilled professionals. I come from Perth—Wellington, and the Stratford Theatre is in my riding. You may know that it is part of an initiative with a theatre company in Suchitoto, El Salvador. There was a real problem with gangs and lawlessness there and the cause of a lot of this was that youth didn't have employment; they didn't have anything to do. So the Stratford Theatre with various groups, including the town of Suchitoto.... I think Cuso is part of that. Am I right?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
It is a very strong partner. They didn't only start an acting group. They started a theatre company that required electricians, props people, seamstresses to make costumes, actors, and the whole realm, lighting and so on. What they do once a year—not only once a year but at various times—is send people there from the theatre for a month or two to teach some of these trades. What happens is that the people then go ahead and run the company. They've earned the skills and they've learned the skills, so maybe they will go out into the community and start their own businesses and become entrepreneurs, and someone else takes that.
I think this program has helped to reduce the gangs in the area and has helped bring the rule of law to that area. Could you speak to that, please?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you.
Mr. Stevenson, would you be able to explain how the Howard Buffett Foundation improves conditions in countries that are on the verge of conflict? Have there been any success stories where an investment went a long way to preventing a conflict?
View Gary Schellenberger Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you.
First of all, Mr. Morley, you have spoken about making sure Haiti does not fall off the world's radar. I know we've talked a lot about Africa today. What is happening in Haiti specifically at the moment in terms of international development initiatives, and what still needs to be done?
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