Interventions in Committee
 
 
 
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View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to everyone who is presenting here today.
I'm looking at the program expenditures, and I find some of them relatively small in light of some of the concerns that have surfaced, especially in the indigenous policy.
I represent a riding in the Northwest Territories that is over half indigenous, and we have a real challenge in achieving a healthy economy. We need to tackle several big issues to do that. We need more transportation infrastructure to lower the costs. Industry is telling us that, and the chamber of commerce is telling us that.
We also all know that we need to sort out land tenure and self-governance issues with the indigenous governments. Some of them have been going on for a long time.
During the time the Liberal government was in place, they weren't very kind to the indigenous population. They gutted the regulatory process, and we're trying to put it back together. The indigenous government support funding was certainly cut, to a point where it was almost impossible for the band councils to function.
It didn't stop there. The departments were also cut severely, in terms of having a reduction in their negotiators, so we ended up negotiating maybe one day a month, if that. Pretty much every negotiating table for land claims and every negotiating table for self-government came to a halt. In 2015, when I was campaigning, we had zero tables working.
I see that changing now, but the need for.... Reinvestment seems to be slow. You talked about an increase in volume when we talk about the capacity for indigenous policy.
I'm just curious where this money is going. Is it going to the department, for resources within the department, or is it going to indigenous governments to help them bolster their resources and try to get resolution at some of these tables?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Oh, no. I thought I said the Conservative government, but I—
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I'll clarify that. I meant the 10 years that the Conservative government—
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Well, that explains the small number, then. I think we're now, in the NWT alone, up to 14 tables of negotiation.
I do have one more question on the carbon pollution pricing system. It's under consideration in the Northwest Territories. The Northwest Territories has its own carbon pricing plan. We're probably the only jurisdiction where members of the government are pushing back, because they don't feel the plan put forward by the cabinet of the government of the Northwest Territories is strong enough. They want to bolster it. I don't know of anybody else who's doing that.
I was curious about the $1.6 million, because throughout our discussions, I assumed everything was supposed to be cost-neutral, yet we have a cost. Maybe somebody could explain it.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I'm not clear what the vote is actually on. What is the wording?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chair, I appreciate his concern, but I want to reassure the member that it was clear to me what I was voting on, so he doesn't have to worry about it.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Amendment NDP-4 refers to the sufficiency of resources allocated to Canada Border Services Agency. I think we all agree that CBSA has a tremendous role to play, but I'd like to point out that in April 2018, the government announced over $30 million over five years and $6.8 million per year on an ongoing basis to strengthen trade enforcement, and most of that money will be going to the CBSA to beef up its enforcement and investigative capacity.
That translates to 40 new jobs, a 50% increase in the number of employees fully dedicated to trade remedy investigations and compliance. The government has made the investment and will continue to review the appropriate allocation of resources.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to the presenters here today.
I don't have any steel producers in my riding, so the issue of steel and the production of steel is really something I'm quickly learning about. I'm glad that we're all on the same page on this bill, because it makes it easier for me.
My questions are probably going to be fairly basic for you. As you were doing your presentations, I had a million questions in my head. As you will see, on certain things I will ask why, or what does that mean?
This is for anyone here who wants to talk about it. A couple of people talked about overcapacity and mentioned that it was a real threat, and somebody said there was a “global overcapacity”. What does that mean? Can you tell me, in terms that I can understand, what that really means and why it is such a threat?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Could you tell me whether the problem is that the demand for steel has gone down or that the production has gone up so significantly?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
It was mentioned here that Bill C-101 is the first step. When I come back in two years, I'm going to be dealing with further steps. Could you explain again what the expectation there is? I didn't really understand that.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
That will be when I come back in two years.
Voices: Oh, oh!
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