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Results: 1 - 15 of 34
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2021-03-26 12:02 [p.5363]
Madam Speaker, that is an important question. It is important to know that we respect the tradition of having families participate in fisheries. These new regulations being implemented on April 1 mean that a captain's log will have to record every individual who is active in fishing. It does not have to record individual family members who are not active in fishing.
If the member requires any further clarification for anybody else in their riding, I would be happy to follow up with him.
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2021-03-26 12:03 [p.5364]
Madam Speaker, our government supports a cautious approach to fisheries management, one that prioritizes the health and conservation of stocks. This season, conservation and protection's enforcement posture toward the practice of tubbing will be one of outreach and education, which means tubbing will occur this season.
At the same time, the Pacific region of DFO will engage with industry to discuss and discover possible solutions for the following season and beyond. We will work with stakeholders on this matter.
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-12-04 12:01 [p.2977]
Mr. Speaker, we understand how important the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation is to ensuring that harvesters and fishers can get their fish to market. We have made sure throughout this COVID crisis that we have had harvesters' backs, ensuring that the harvesters benefit applies to fishers and harvesters right across the country.
When it comes to the future of the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation, we will continue to work with indigenous nations and our provincial partners to ensure there is a solid future for fishers of freshwater fish.
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 19:24 [p.2369]
Mr. Chair, British Columbia is home to a significant number of recreational fishers who drive the economies of small coastal communities. In order to continue to thrive, they need access and opportunity to fish. Billions of dollars of economic activity depend on it and is at risk if we do not take action.
I had the opportunity recently to go out with a group of recreational fishers on Vancouver Island and talk about how we as a federal government can help. They fully recognize that there are stocks of concern and that we are having to make some very tough decisions to ensure that there are more fish in the water for the benefit of future generations. One solution they continue to raise with me and I know they have raised with the minister is a mark-selective fishery. The idea seems to have a lot of merit and can contribute significantly to providing greater access and opportunity while we work on longer-term restorative measures.
Could the minister take this opportunity to elaborate on what she and/or the department is doing to consider this idea and potentially implement it going forward and could she also provide any insight into any complicating factors that might have to be figured out prior to implementing such a fishery?
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 19:27 [p.2369]
Mr. Chair, British Columbia has many iconic species that call our coastal waters home, but none is more iconic or beloved than our southern resident killer whales. I have had an opportunity to work on our government's whale restoration program from various angles in DFO in science and in transport.
Could the minister update this committee on the measures our government is taking to make sure this species is better positioned to thrive and increase its populations going forward?
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 19:28 [p.2370]
Mr. Chair, the minister mentioned this in her speech. Many wild Pacific salmon populations are at historic lows. This is a species that is also iconic to British Columbia and is a part of our cultural identity. There is perhaps no other species in the country that demonstrates so easily how the health of our environment and the health of our economy go hand in hand.
I would like to know how much has been invested to support British Columbia's salmon populations and what projects the government is working on to return wild salmon stocks to levels of traditional abundance.
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 19:30 [p.2370]
Madam Chair, I know I have been very B.C. centric in my questions so far, and I am going to get a second chance later this evening. Perhaps I could ask the minister how important small craft harbours are to this country and to her personally.
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 20:02 [p.2375]
Madam Chair, I am thankful for the opportunity to contribute to today's discussion at this gathering of the committee of the whole. I have about nine or 10 minutes of comments and then I will proceed to questions at the end of my time.
As the minister has indicated, the funding we are seeking relates to our government's priorities of promoting economic opportunities for all Canadians, advancing reconciliation with indigenous people, strengthening environmental protections and making sure our waters are safe and navigable. Our government is focused on not just protecting the environment, but restoring it for the benefit of future generations.
We know that the foundation of a strong economy can only be built with a clean and thriving environment. In fact, there is no better demonstration of how the economy and the environment go hand in hand than our wild Pacific salmon.
Serving and restoring Pacific salmon and ensuring a stable and predictable fishery for all participants, both indigenous and non-indigenous, is a responsibility we take very seriously. In many rural and coastal communities, salmon fisheries are a real economic driver that generate jobs and opportunities for thousands of Canadians. Salmon fisheries are part of the cultural identity of the province of British Columbia and play a critical role in building coastal indigenous economies, enabling indigenous groups to develop improved capacity for self-governance and self-determination. To many of our indigenous communities, wild Pacific salmon are not just an economic opportunity, but a way of life that is an important, if not sacred, tradition.
Our government is committed to working with indigenous peoples to explore opportunities to further recognize rights and advance reconciliation in the context of fisheries, oceans, aquatic habitats and marine waterways. Canada's wild salmon policies speak to the importance of maintaining the biodiversity of these important stocks, as well as their significance to commercial and recreational fish harvesters, indigenous peoples and, really, all Canadians.
We have collaborated closely on the creation of a $142-million B.C. salmon restoration and innovation fund, a federal-provincial cost-shared program funded jointly with the Government of British Columbia. We have made an additional contribution of $5 million to the Pacific salmon endowment fund to support the Pacific Salmon Foundation, which is doing incredible work to restore wild Pacific salmon and its habitat.
We announced $15 million in additional annual funding to support stock assessments, wire tagging and catch monitoring. These investments contribute to our obligations under the Canada-U.S. Pacific Salmon Treaty and are targeted toward better managing west coast salmon fishing. We are investing $107 million to support the sustainability of Canada's major fish stocks through implementation of the renewed Fisheries Act. We have also invested significant resources in restoring natural passage on the Fraser River after the devastating Big Bar landslide, and we are committed to transitioning from open net-pen finfish aquaculture on the west coast of Canada.
We are making difficult decisions and important investments today to ensure that Pacific salmon are available for future generations. With many wild—
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 20:05 [p.2376]
Thank you, Madam Chair, for letting me know. My apologies to the interpreters.
We are making difficult decisions and important investments today to ensure that Pacific salmon are available for future generations. With many wild salmon stocks at historic lows, it is only with the dedication of all members of this chamber that we will be able to ensure that these populations are able to return to traditional levels of abundance.
Of course, wild salmon do not live in a bubble. They, like all of the ocean's creatures, are affected significantly by the cumulative effects of human activity. This means that we must fight not only for our salmon, but for biodiversity itself and for the health of the marine environment in its entirety. Ensuring a healthy ocean is essential for Canada's long-term economic prosperity and will play an important role as we build our economy following this global pandemic.
As fellow parliamentarians know, the United Nations has proclaimed a Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, beginning in 2021. Our government has pledged Canada's support, with major investments dedicated to the planning, promotion and coordination of activities related to this decade. Canada must be a leader in this space, as our nation has the longest coastline in the world.
Starting in 2015, as a nation, we had only protected less than 1% of our marine environment, which was completely unacceptable. We pledged to increase this to more than 10% by 2020. Thanks to the hard work of Canadians, we not only met this target but exceeded it. Canada has now protected approximately 14% of our marine environment, and we will get to 25% by 2025. This means that in 10 short years, we will have protected 25 times more ocean marine habitat than all governments before us since Confederation.
This is a significant achievement that all members of the House and all Canadians should be proud of. It is a major investment in the future of our country and the future of our planet. However, we intend to go further.
This summer, Canada joins the United Kingdom's Global Ocean Alliance to support the adoption of a global target of 30% marine conservation by 2030, which is anticipated to be a key pillar of next year's Convention on Biological Diversity's COP 15 meeting. We are also implementing the commitments we made during Canada's 2018 G7 presidency to shape international efforts to clean up the oceans, tackle oceans plastics and advance ocean observation.
We know that just like fighting climate change, protecting and restoring our ocean is an existential necessity. Canada needs to continue to take a leadership role on this and other global environmental issues. We will champion ocean science to help counter threats to ocean life and health, and we must advance a strategy to end illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. We do this not just for environmental necessity, but because growing the blue economy is a significant economic opportunity for the entire country.
New, sustainable technologies are going to present increasing opportunities to coastal communities. Our commitment to transition away from open net-pen fish farms on the west coast of this country speaks to that sustainable opportunity. British Columbians feel strongly about the health of our fish stocks, and they need to transition farms in a way that is workable, economically feasible and takes into account social impacts.
A change like this requires close collaboration with the Province of British Columbia, indigenous communities, industry and other stakeholders, and I am excited to help build this reasonable path. The timing of this transition is beneficial not only to our wild salmon stocks and marine biodiversity, but to opening our imaginations for what the future of aquaculture can look like in Canada.
Aquaculture goes far beyond salmon. I had the opportunity to visit an oyster farm in Prince Edward Island, which not only creates delicious oysters, but effectively cleans the oceans while doing it.
Companies and communities across Canada are already leading the world in aquaculture in areas that include fish, seaweed and shellfish. It is a core part of our blue economy growth strategy and strengthens the need for the legislative and economic certainty that a dedicated aquaculture act can provide, an act I expect we will be debating in the House in the next number of months. Such an act would bring clarity and transparency to Canadians as to how aquaculture will be managed in order to achieve responsible and sustainable growth.
Our waters provide immense opportunity, but I would regret it if I did not take some time to highlight the work of the men and women who patrol them, who respond to emergencies on them and who keep our economies moving through them despite thick ice and strong Canadian winters. Of course, I am referring to the brave men and women who serve in the Canadian Coast Guard.
Last year, our government announced the single-largest investment ever made to renew the Canadian Coast Guard fleet, with up to 18 new large ships, the construction of six new icebreakers and an additional $2 billion in investments for vessel life-extension maintenance and repair work for the existing fleet. These ships are being built through Canada's national shipbuilding strategy.
Our offshore fisheries science vessels were Canada's first-ever vessels purposely designed and built for vital offshore fisheries research science and monitoring. These vessels were constructed at Seaspan shipyards, a world leader in shipbuilding, whose facility happens to be in my own backyard. Many of my constituents are directly employed at Seaspan and my entire constituency, indeed the entire country, benefits from their world-class work.
We are ensuring that the Coast Guard has the safe, reliable and modern equipment needed to carry out important work, such as icebreaking operations, search and rescue, and environmental response, all while creating good jobs and economic opportunities that will extend across the country.
I value deeply the wealth of experience my fellow parliamentarians bring to the House. It is an honour to rise today and discuss some of the great work we are doing and even more so to express that we are doing this in collaboration with members on all sides of the House for the good of all Canadians and for the benefit, most important, of future generations.
As members know, Canada has the largest amount of coastline of any nation in the world. We are abundantly lucky to face three oceans, including the Pacific, the Atlantic and the Arctic. We know that despite them having different names, we all really share one giant ocean.
When the minister was first elected, Canada protected less than 1% of our oceans. Could the minister update us on how much is protected now and what the plan is for providing greater protections as we go forward?
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 20:14 [p.2377]
Madam Chair, the minister can add more to that if she would like, going forward.
We have heard many people speak to the importance of the green economy, when it comes to fighting climate change and growing our economy in a more sustainable way. The same opportunity is available with what the minister just mentioned, which is the blue economy. We know that if we do not make significant changes and take on ocean pollution, illegal and unregulated fishing and plastics, our future opportunity to grow our economy and to leverage Canada's tremendous natural assets will be, frankly, diminished.
Could the minister provide some insight into how she sees Canada's opportunity and role with regard to blue economy going forward?
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 20:16 [p.2378]
Madam Chair, does she have any thoughts about the record investments we have made in the Canadian Coast Guard?
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-24 20:17 [p.2378]
Madam Chair, I will use this very short time to thank all the members in the House today, as well as the minister, who are participating in this important debate. There is nothing more urgent in terms of things that need to be tackled than the protection and restoration of our oceans. If we do that as group, there will be abundant opportunities for future generations.
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-18 19:22 [p.2090]
Mr. Speaker, I had the opportunity to go out with recreational fishers a number of weeks ago. We talked about important issues like mark-selective fishing.
Pacific salmon stocks are declining, many to historic lows, particularly in the Fraser River. Over 50 Pacific salmon populations are being considered for potential listing under the Species at Risk Act or are pending assessment by COSEWIC. Fraser chinook are included on this list, with 12 of 13 Fraser River chinook populations assessed as at risk of extinction. Only one is healthy.
The 2019 state of the salmon report indicated that Pacific salmon are being negatively affected by a range of factors, including climate change and warming waters, habitat degradation, changes in land and water use, increasing intensity of contaminants, acute one-time events such as toxic spills and landslides, illegal and unregulated fishing, and international fishing pressures.
Air, ocean and freshwater temperatures have reached record highs in B.C. and the Yukon in recent years. This impacts snowfall and snowmelt, which keep the rivers cool and flowing. Increasing water temperatures, changes to river flow patterns, flash floods, increased erosion and landslides are all climate change impacts affecting the quality of precious river and lake salmon habitat.
In the short term, DFO has acted to substantially reduce fishing pressure on Fraser chinook stocks to reduce the risk of further declines and provide time for recovery measures, with longer time horizons to produce results. While these fishing measures have had significant impacts on first nations, recreational and commercial harvesters, they have been necessary to protect dwindling populations.
Short-term recovery efforts have been further challenged on the Fraser by the discovery of the massive Big Bar landslide in June 2019. The slide has significantly impacted natural salmon passage, and extraordinary efforts by DFO, the Province of B.C. and first nations have been required to support the passage of thousands of salmon past the slide. In addition, several new emergency hatchery-enhancement efforts are also under way to support impacted chinook populations.
Over the longer term, the challenges facing many Pacific salmon stocks on the Canadian west coast are complex and require a long-term transformative strategy. There are a number of initiatives currently under way. They include the wild salmon policy implementation plan, the coastal restoration fund, the B.C. salmon restoration and innovation fund, additional funding from the Pacific Salmon Foundation, implementation funding for the renewed Pacific Salmon Treaty and the renewed Fisheries Act. They all focus on sustaining and recovering wild salmon from a variety of directions, including habitat restoration and protection, science and research, and education and stewardship.
While these new federal investments will help to support recovery, we also need to work with first nations, other levels of government and fishers to support innovative approaches and support salmon recovery and resiliency so we can continue to enjoy the ecological, cultural, social and economic benefits of a healthy Pacific salmon population and work to increase the amount of access and opportunity available to British Columbians and British Columbia fishers.
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-18 19:28 [p.2091]
Mr. Speaker, our salmon are in crisis, and there are many factors causing this, which I outlined in my speech.
I believe that, like me, my colleague wants to see increased access and opportunity for our fishers. I also believe we both want to see a more sustainable and abundant fishery available for the benefit of future generations.
To get to that future, we need to make tough decisions today, and not just tact decisions. If the member wants to get serious about saving wild Pacific salmon, then he needs to ask why he and his party voted against the Fisheries Act, why they voted against the Oceans Act and why they voted against the $142-million B.C. salmon restoration and innovation fund. He must also ask why his party continues to either vote against measures that fight climate change or, worse, deny it is even a serious problem altogether.
The member's party has a record that is glaringly against wild Pacific salmon, and I would encourage him to work with our government and his party to change that record going forward.
View Terry Beech Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Terry Beech Profile
2020-11-17 18:31 [p.2036]
Madam Speaker, our government is committed not just to the protection of our southern resident killer whales, but to actively investing in restoring their populations.
This endangered species has cultural significance for indigenous people as well as for coastal communities in British Columbia, all British Columbians and people right across the country. Obviously it is completely unacceptable for any harm to come to our precious killer whales. It is important for British Columbians and all Canadians to understand the significant measures and investments we are making to restore this species and to improve their habitat.
With 74 individual southern resident killer whales remaining and a population that has declined, despite the recent addition of a new calf, it is more essential than ever that we work in collaboration with all stakeholders to recover the species. I had the opportunity to work directly with some of Canada and the United States' top experts in this field when we held our southern resident killer whales symposium only a couple years ago, and this has led to many strong initiatives.
For the last five years our government has taken unprecedented steps across many different ministries to aid in this recovery. This includes regulatory changes, such as those seen in the Fisheries Act and the Oceans Act, which have to date increased our total marine protected areas by more than 14 times since 2015.
Building on the $1.5-billion oceans protection plan and the $167.4-million whales initiative, our government has committed an additional $61.5 million to help deliver on further measures to protect and recover the southern resident killer whale. These investments contribute to additional research, monitoring and management measures to support the mitigation of the primary threats to the southern resident killer whales.
As well, in May 2020, the Government of Canada announced enhanced management measures to further support the protection and recovery of the southern resident killer whale. These management measures build on efforts from past years. They focus on increasing prey availability, reducing physical and acoustic disturbance and addressing contaminants through a variety of initiatives.
Measures introduced this year reflect advice from first nations, the southern resident killer whale technical working groups, the indigenous and multi-stakeholder advisory group and from public consultations. As a transboundary species, the need for cross-border collaboration is critical. The Government of Canada appreciates the ongoing close co-operation with the governments of the United States, Washington State and British Columbia. Through this co-operation, we have reinforced our commitment to work together to mitigate the threats to the survival and recovery of the southern resident killer whale and to maintain a long-term strategic plan for their recovery.
The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration led the review of the proposal by the United States Navy to conduct training and testing activities in their waters, from November 2020 to November 2027. Fisheries and Oceans Canada is engaged with our U.S. counterparts on this matter to ensure a common understanding of the planned activities and mitigation measures, with particular attention being paid to the southern resident killer whale.
NOAA has indicated an adaptive management component to the final rule that was issued and has demonstrated a willingness to work collaboratively on this file. This allows for the consideration of new information over the course of activities and the consideration of modifications of mitigation and monitoring measures. Our close partnership has proven successful in the past and it will remain important that we continue to work to help ensure that we both protect and restore this endangered and iconic species.
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