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Results: 1 - 14 of 14
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2021-01-27 14:17 [p.3627]
Mr. Speaker, in past years, I have risen in the House and invited all members of Parliament to join me in Sault Ste. Marie for Bon Soo, our annual winter celebration.
This year, however, the 58th Bon Soo Winter Carnival will be transformed from a predominantly outdoor event to an online virtual event. Make no mistake about it: Bon Soo is on. This year, with a click of the keyboard, everyone can join us for one of Canada's best winter carnivals. This year, we will not be gathering to watch fireworks or shooting down the ice bum slides or braving a polar-bear dip, but the spirit of Bon Soo is as strong as ever with online contests, games and more scheduled for February 5 to 15.
Reinventing a winter carnival has been a challenge for our awesome organizers and volunteers, but I am proud to see the essence of Bon Soo, the celebration of winter and northern Ontario, continues to thrive even in the middle of a pandemic. Happy Bon Soo, everybody.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2021-01-27 14:29 [p.3629]
Mr. Speaker, I have a point of clarification. I was wearing a tie under the sweater with a coat over it, as in the past. I think if you looked closely, you could see the top of it.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-12-08 14:10 [p.3146]
Mr. Speaker, this past Saturday, Lisa and I were very saddened to learn of the passing of our dear friend, the Hon. Ron Irwin.
At the local level, he served as a school trustee, city councillor and mayor. In 1980, Ron was first elected as the Liberal member of Parliament for Sault Ste. Marie and served as parliamentary secretary to then justice minister, Jean Chrétien. Ron was elected again for a second term in 1993 and served as the minister of Indian affairs and northern development.
Irwin was invested into the Order of Canada and was a recipient of the Queen's jubilee medal. I had the honour to present him with a Canada 150 pin for his exceptional public service career, spanning over 35 years. Ron served not only our community but our nation with strong conviction and persevering efforts. He served as Canada's ambassador to Ireland and as a consul general in Boston.
I was blessed to have Ron as a friend and a supporter. Nobody campaigned like Ron. Rest in peace, dear friend.
Lisa and I offer our condolences to his wife Marg, his family and his so many friends. I thank him on behalf of all constituents of Sault Ste. Marie for his years of service.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-11-27 11:53 [p.2624]
Madam Speaker, the minister has put in place the regional relief and recovery fund, a $1.5-billion fund that is enabling many businesses, including those working in the hospitality industry, to get the help they need. In particular, in Quebec it has been very effective.
I would invite the member, if he has any particular cases, to contact me or the other parliamentary secretaries so we can work on a solution together.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-11-27 11:54 [p.2624]
Madam Speaker, we have been there from the get-go for the tourism industry through our wage subsidy, which has been extended into next year; our relief as it relates to rent; and the regional relief and recovery fund, a $1.5-billion fund for the tourism industry that thousands of workers and thousands of businesses across Canada are accessing.
We are going to continue to be there as long as we need and continue to support our very important tourism industry from coast to coast to coast.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-11-02 19:37 [p.1574]
Madam Speaker, I am happy to respond to comments made earlier by the member for Kenora regarding repayable funding provided to Skritswap in 2019 by the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario.
Right from the get-go, let me make one thing very clear to set the mind of the member opposite at ease.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
This federal contribution is a loan, not a “no strings attached” grant. Whatever money has gone to Skritswap, it has been with the very clear condition that if a company fails to meet its goal of growing business in northern Ontario, it will need to pay back the funds in full.
We invested in Skritswap because our government understands the importance of investing in northern Ontario to create good jobs and grow the economy. FedNor has long been a key partner for entrepreneurs in northern Ontario, and they work with businesses and entrepreneurs to build stronger communities.
We have seen this, loud and clear, throughout the COVID pandemic. Through our regional recovery and relief fund, RRF, FedNor has supported more than 130 organizations with more than $23 million. Through this funding, we have directly supported more than 1,800 jobs. Further, these grants have gone to organizations that show the diversity of our region.
As of October 15, 33 RRF recipients are women-owned or -operated, 16 are indigenous businesses, 43 are tourism businesses and 112 are located in rural areas. The same goes for FedNor-funded Community Futures organizations. To date, we have provided more than $22 million to nearly 650 organizations, and directly supported more than 1,500 jobs here. Of these Community Futures clients, 247 are women-owned and -operated, 44 are indigenous business, 224 are tourism businesses and all 645 are in rural areas.
These are important numbers, because they show, time and again, that our government is there for businesses in northern Ontario, in all these ridings, when those businesses have needed help.
I will also note that it is strange that the Conservative Party is focused on this in particular. For whatever reason, Conservatives have decided to dust off a story that was initially reported in the summer of 2019 and to which we have consistently said that the money will be repaid if the company fails to meet its goal of creating jobs in northern Ontario. They may not be proud of the work that FedNor does and they may want to discourage other women entrepreneurs from entering the tech field in northern Ontario, but we are proud to be helping entrepreneurs create jobs in my riding of Sault Ste. Marie and across northern Ontario.
I would also like to take a moment to talk about the company, Skritswap, because it is clear the Conservatives would like to muddy the waters. Since 2015, the company has received attention for its work on artificial intelligence. It has attracted venture capital, not just from FedNor but from angel investors in Canada and the United States. It has done this while headquartering in Sault Ste. Marie.
Contrary to what the Conservatives claim, Skritswap reports having no employees located outside of Canada, let alone in California. It has four permanent employees, two in northern Ontario and two located in southern Ontario. On top of that, it has created 16 temporary skilled contract jobs across Canada since the pandemic began. The company understands that any jobs created from the FedNor funding need to be created in northern Ontario, or else the company will have to repay it all in full.
Of course, Skritswap faces the challenges of how to recruit and retain talent in northern Ontario. We understand that many entrepreneurs across northern Canada face the same challenges. That is why our government is supporting immigration to rural Canada through programs like the rural and northern immigration pilot, which is helping entrepreneurs and employers find the talent they need to compete and which will help our rural communities prosper.
The reality is that these companies are exactly the type of business that northern Ontario and Canada need. These are the jobs of the future. To support these job creators, we must continue to work to address the skills gap in the region and to invest in entrepreneurs. We are proud of how FedNor is working with the Sault Ste. Marie Innovation Centre, Algoma University and Sault College to identify good opportunities. We are proud to be a government—
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-11-02 19:42 [p.1575]
Madam Speaker, again, we thank the member opposite for his concern.
However, we need to remember the facts. As we have said consistently, this money came with the condition that if the promised jobs are not created in northern Ontario, then the loan needs to be repaid. We have made that clear to the company, and the company has informed FedNor on several occasions that it understands this condition.
We made this money available because we are committed to supporting entrepreneurs in northern Ontario. We do that by continuing to invest in Canadian entrepreneurs and business to ensure they have the funding they need to benefit from cutting-edge opportunities and to help them provide opportunities in northern Ontario, to forge rewarding, high-paying careers in emerging high-tech fields.
This funding was available even before COVID-19, and we have continued to support these vital sectors of the economy since the pandemic began.
I can assure the member that we will continue to be there, to grow northern Ontario's economy and create good jobs in the region after the pandemic is over.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-10-01 16:19 [p.441]
Madam Speaker, I will be splitting my time with the member for Kitchener Centre today.
I am pleased to provide an address on the 150th Speech from the Throne today to MPs in the House of Commons, those participating virtually, the Canadian people and in particular my fantastic constituents watching in the great riding of Sault Ste. Marie. It is located in the centre of Canada at the heart of the Great Lakes, on the border of the United States, in the traditional territory of the Ojibwa people of Garden River and Batchawana, as well as of the Métis people.
I want to begin by recognizing and thanking our front-line and essential workers who are looking after our health and safety, putting food on our tables and making sure our economy's supply chains continue to operate. This includes my wife, Lisa, who is a health care worker, so thanks to my wife as well.
This is my first time to address the House virtually. I would also like to thank my staff who have been working with me around the clock, seven days a week, looking after the good people of the Soo during these unprecedented times. I also want to give a shout out to all my family, friends and supporters who have been supporting me as I work to help Canadians. They are my rock. They are my everything.
To overcome the significant challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic poses for all of us, we need all levels of government, every sector of our economy and indeed every Canadian to act in solidarity and work together. We have been in lockstep in our fight against COVID-19 in the Soo since the beginning. The people of Sault Ste. Marie have been unwavering in their commitment to each other and looking out for their families, friends and neighbours. It has been an honour working with Mayor Provenzano and his council; Chief Sayers, Chief Rickard and their councils; MPs and MPPs from all parties and the Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce, local labour groups, and various private and public-sector businesses and organizations. #WeAreInThisTogether
I have been told that our health unit has some of the lowest numbers of COVID cases in Ontario, a testament to that mantra. I am confident that the vigilance and sacrifice of individuals and communities across Canada, coupled with the expertise and diligence of medical professionals working hard on a vaccine and caring for patients, will see Canada through this challenging time.
Our approach to beating this pandemic and the impacts it has had on our economy is centred on four pillars that were outlined recently in the Speech from the Throne. First, we are working to protect the health of Canadians, particularly the most vulnerable. To help protect seniors, we will work with parliamentarians on Criminal Code amendments to penalize those who neglect the seniors under their care. We are going to work with provinces and territories to set new national standards for long-term care so that seniors get the best support possible.
We are going to take additional actions to help people stay in their homes longer. We are also going to increase old age security, once a senior turns age 75, and boost the Canada pension plan survivor benefits. We are going to ensure, as well, that our health care system serves Canadians even better. We are going to ensure that everyone has access to a family doctor or a primary care team, expand capacity of delivery for virtual health care, continue to address the opioid epidemic and further increase access to mental health care.
We are going to accelerate to achieve national universal pharmacare through a rare disease strategy to help Canadian families save money on high cost drugs, and establish a national formulary to keep drug prices low. Working with the provinces and territories, we will move forward without delay, bringing forward a new disability inclusion plan to help Canadians with disabilities gain access to programs and benefits. This plan is also going to be welcome. We are also building a plan to end chronic homelessness for good in Canada. As such, I was pleased to announce recently two affordable housing initiatives in the Soo, which repurpose two old schools.
Our second pillar basically says we have Canadians' backs. That expression seems to have been coined at the gates of Algoma Steel here in Sault Ste. Marie, when the Prime Minister was here speaking to steelworkers. We fought really hard against the two American tariffs on steel and aluminum, and won. That was our mantra: We have your back. Now it is a rallying cry for all workers in Canada during these unprecedented times.
I was pleased to see a commitment of creating one million jobs in the Speech from the Throne, and we will get there by using a number of tools in our economic toolbox. Extremely important tools in that box are the regional economic development agencies like FedNor, which I proudly serve as parliamentary secretary. From the get-go, our RDAs have been there for communities, businesses and organizations from coast to coast to coast.
We introduced the regional relief and recovery fund, an almost $1 billion fund, to help those who need that extra help. In Northern Ontario that fund was split between FedNor and Community Futures development corporations, and I have been proud to announce a number of supports on behalf of the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages (FedNor) that go hand in glove with the funding from the CFDCs. These are supporting communities, small businesses, tourism, agriculture, IT, indigenous, manufacturing and green initiatives all across Northern Ontario, from areas of Kenora, Thunder Bay, Elliot Lake, Sudbury, Timmins, North Bay, Parry Sound and, of course, Sault Ste. Marie.
We are going to create direct investments in the social sector and infrastructure, immediately train and skill up workers, and create incentives for employers to hire and retain workers. We are going to extend the Canada emergency wage subsidy through to next summer, so workers can remain on payrolls. We are going to create jobs for young Canadians by significantly scaling up the youth employment strategy. We are strengthening the middle class and will continue building long-term competitiveness with clean growth.
This is great news for Sault Ste. Marie, as when I was on city council I seconded a resolution declaring us the alternative energy capital of North America. That is why I was very pleased to see that we are launching a new fund to attract investments in making zero-emission products and cutting the corporate tax rate in half for those companies to create jobs and make Canada a world leader in clean technology.
We are immediately bringing forward a plan to exceed Canada's 2030 climate goals, and we are going to legislate Canada's goals of net-zero emissions by 2050. We are creating thousands of jobs retrofitting homes and buildings, which cuts energy costs for Canadians, families and businesses. We are going to invest in reducing the impact of climate-related disasters like floods and wildfires to make communities safer and more resilient. We are helping deliver more transit and active transit options, and we are going to create a new Canada water agency to keep our water safe, clean and well managed and continue to grow Canada's ocean economy.
Finally, we will accomplish this while we advance gender equality, fight systemic racism and injustices, work toward reconciliation with indigenous people, protect the environment, welcome immigrants and uphold our two official languages.
In my riding we have been doing some really amazing things as we work toward reconciliation, in a nation-to-nation way, these past years. We worked with the survivors of the residential school at Algoma University to build the Anishinaabek Discovery Centre in support of taking back Shingwauk Hall, but more work is ahead of us and we are committed to that. I want to acknowledge the work that the African Caribbean Canadian Association of Northern Ontario is doing here in the Soo, along with its allies in fighting systemic racism.
To support the social and political gains that women and gender-diverse Canadians have fought so hard to secure, our government is creating an action plan for women in the economy, to help more women get back into the workforce. To ensure this plan is guided by a feminist, intersectional response, it will be led by a team of experts whose diverse voices will ensure that we build back our economy in a more inclusive way.
The pandemic has likewise brought to light the need for affordable child care. Parents are needing to work fewer hours or are quitting their jobs entirely to take care of their kids. That is a challenge. That is why we will be making a significant, long-term, sustained investment to create a Canada-wide early learning and child care system. We will also be subsidizing before- and after-school program costs to ensure no family is left behind.
Canada and the world continue to face the ongoing threat of this global pandemic. Throughout this challenging year, Canadians have proven to be resilient. Our country's success is because of its people. We are neighbours helping neighbours, small businesses supporting communities, armed forces protecting our most vulnerable and front-line workers keeping our families healthy and safe. From the very beginning, we have worked hard to keep everyone safe and healthy and ensured Canadians had the support they needed to get through this crisis. We immediately took action with historic programs like the CERB and Canada's emergency wage subsidy to help Canadians pay their bills and help businesses keep workers on the payroll.
We are also working with the provinces and territories to help Canadians, including by providing funding for communities, public transit, secure child care spaces and personal protective equipment. In this challenging time, we are there for Canadians, and as we look toward the future, we will continue to protect the health of Canadians and do what it takes to support Canadians through this crisis.
Together, we will work to build a Canada that is more resilient, healthier and safer, a Canada that is more fair and inclusive and one that is clean and competitive. We will do what it takes to protect—
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-10-01 16:30 [p.443]
Madam Speaker, I can say, first of all, that our hearts in Sault Ste. Marie are with the people of Quebec as the second wave of this pandemic is hitting various places in Canada, in particular, in Quebec and Ontario. We are going to be there to support all Canadians from coast to coast to coast and we will continue to work with members to make sure that they are supported. The cost of inaction would be enormous.
Canada has done a significant job in supporting Canadians and, quite frankly, I think that we have done a better job than a lot of other countries because of the supports and the quick action that we have taken.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-10-01 16:32 [p.443]
Madam Speaker, I do not know if my microphone was working correctly, but I think many people heard me speak about the supports for seniors, people facing the challenge of homelessness and youth. There were a number of things in the Speech from the Throne that I touched on regarding people in very challenging situations who this pandemic has hit hard and that the supports we have made have been substantial.
As it relates to the environment, I touched on a number of initiatives that are going to help, including hitting the 2050 and 2030 goals that will achieve what we need to make a better future for not only our youth but everyone. I would ask the member to please review the tape and she will hear my points in depth.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-10-01 16:34 [p.443]
Madam Speaker, I have supported Tenaris tubes and the hundreds of workers. I have worked with both the union and management. We invested $16 million in Tenaris tubes to continue its good work and support it. I look forward to continuing to work with Tenaris. Fighting those American 232 tariffs absolutely helped the company 100%, so yes we are there for them.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2020-02-07 11:16 [p.1085]
Madam Speaker, like many communities across Canada, my riding of Sault Ste. Marie celebrates the winter season with an annual celebration.
This year, the 57th Bon Soo Winter Carnival takes place from January 31 to February 9. There are more activities added every year, and it is truly a carnival with something for everyone. Organizations from across the riding come together to offer unique experiences, such as the Bon Soo Mario Kart Super Smash Tournament, the Sault College Annual Pow Wow, snowshoeing at the Indian Friendship Centre, the Torch Light Skate and, for the truly brave, the polar bear swim, often emulated but never copied fully.
Bon Soo is a labour of love for countless volunteers, community organizations and sponsors.
Madam Speaker, I know you know the winters in northern Ontario can be a challenge in February. Saultites warm themselves up during this time of year, and I would like to invite all in this House to join us in Sault Ste. Marie at Bon Soo.
View Terry Sheehan Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Terry Sheehan Profile
2019-12-11 15:36 [p.278]
Mr. Speaker, congratulations on your recent victory. Since I have the floor, I would also like to thank the good people of Sault Ste. Marie for returning me to the House. It is a great honour and privilege.
Pursuant to Standing Order 34(1) I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, a report of the Canada-China Legislative Association and the Canada-Japan Interparliamentary Group respecting their participation at the 40th general assembly of the ASEAN Inter-Parliamentary Assembly, held in Bangkok, Thailand, from August 25-30.
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