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Results: 1 - 15 of 129
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
First of all, I'd like to thank all the witnesses with us today. They've made some great and very enriching speeches.
Dr. Rouleau, you piqued my curiosity when you talked about artificial intelligence. I understood that there's a connection between artificial intelligence and everything that happens in the brain. I'd like you to explain what artificial intelligence technology we'll be able to use to treat diseases that originate in the brain.
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
What's the connection between neuroscience and robots that can diagnose diseases related to fairly intricate surgeries? What developments widely applied in health care could be even more widespread one day through medical technologies? Could such technologies be considered an ambitious program in Canada?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
Now's your chance to tell us whether our government is investing enough in artificial intelligence: Could we do better in this area?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
Dr. Michaud, you've talked a lot about light therapy, which has been an incredible revolution in terms of treatment. Is there any connection between light therapy and cancer prevention or detection?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
That's great. Thank you.
Dr. Bell, you talked about the importance of cancer detection. A hematoma is a clue for detecting the presence of cancer, but there are no such clues for some types of cancer.
Has your research allowed you to make advances in cancer detection in the absence of a hematoma that would be detected pre-treatment by x-ray or nuclear medicine?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
I will come back in the next round to ask my question.
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Dr. Michaud and Dr. Bell, I'm coming back to you because what you have to say is compelling. We were talking about detecting metastases, where there were none, and how to detect them. You were on a roll and we interrupted you.
How can we use research and development? How can we help you fund these technologies?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
We know there are all sorts of food preservatives. Could artificial intelligence also process data about what people eat, where their food comes from, and what dietary patterns could influence cancer? With AI, could some of the data help you?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
You're really making me think. It goes back a long way. It's very complex.
I represent the rural community and our farmers. We're in the process of reinventing fertilizer products. We learned that some of these products were more harmful to our health than others, and that contact with these fertilizer products was having an impact on animals and our food, in turn. It goes way back in the food chain. We're talking about an upswing of certain cancers that could be due to what we're eating.
Could you go so far as to work with our farmers and those who work on the food chain?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Okay.
Dr. Rouleau, you've talked a lot about high-level cooperation. You also mentioned that, unlike other fields, you are recruiting some people from the United States.
What's inspiring the most talented people from the United States to join you in your field? It certainly isn't our cold winters. You must be attracting them with something.
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
I only have 20 or 30 seconds left. Because you are the leading light in several fields of nuclear science, I'd like to ask you if you intend to work aggressively on actinium for the future treatment of cancer?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Could the witness send us his reply in writing? I'd like to know more about actinium.
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Good evening. Thank you all for being here.
Thanks, everyone.
I will ask my question in French.
A number of things you said piqued my curiosity, so much so that I set aside almost all of the questions I was going to ask because now I have new ones.
Mr. Banerjee, you talked a lot about infectious diseases. In my riding, we had a situation involving chronic wasting disease, and thousands of animals had to be killed just as a precaution, because the science couldn't show whether an animal was infected or not.
You mentioned a number of extrinsic factors that may be driving the transmission of pathogens from bats or other animals.
Has your research shown that artificial intelligence could play an important role if we had more specific data in the face of situations like the one in my riding?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
Do you use that data in your research?
How could the government support those types of projects so that they become moonshots?
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you for the answer.
I have a question for you, Mr. Singh.
I was quite inspired when you spoke about credibility, imagination and inspirational moonshots. You talked a lot about how we could improve the way we farm.
Recently, the government established living laboratories involving farmers. They will carry out research activities on the soil to support reduced fertilizer use and nitrogen fixation. The idea is to find ways to farm differently to benefit human health.
Could there be more government programs to support new ways of farming?
Results: 1 - 15 of 129 | Page: 1 of 9

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