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Results: 1 - 15 of 1845
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you very much, Ms. Campbell and Mr. Lametti, for being with us today.
I want to thank you, Ms. Campbell, as you've already done this twice before. This is the third time and I want to sincerely thank you on behalf of all Canadians for the work you and your committee members have done in all three different iterations of these committee processes. Once again it has led to an excellent nomination, of Mr. Kasirer, so thank you for that work.
I'd like to talk a bit more about the timing of the application phase for people who want to be considered for the position. I know that after the first one, which produced Justice Rowe, there was some discussion about the process being too short—I think it was only 22 days—and then for Justice Martin's appointment in 2017, I think it was 63 days.
You've talked a little about some recommendations that you think could be made to encourage more people to be ready to apply when the time comes. This time around there were 30 days. Do you think that was sufficient?
Are there any other recommendations you would like to give the committee so that we could perhaps recommend to the government, going forward, a process in which there is enough time for the people who may wish to be considered to get their applications together?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Okay. Thank you very much for that.
I know this time around it was a bit of a unique process, given the fact that it was filling one of the Quebec seats, so there was an advisory board set up for Quebec. As you mentioned, the Supreme Court Act recognizes that there are to be at least three seats from Quebec, given the uniqueness of the civil law jurisdiction.
Were there any differences in the criteria in the minds of the members of the committee in putting forward names for the Quebec seat, and were there any different questions in the questionnaire this time, as opposed to the previous two that you did?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
Minister Lametti, I want to ask you the following, because you touched on the qualifications of Mr. Kasirer. I agree with you that he's an excellent appointment.
You talked about collegiality and temperament, and obviously in reviewing Mr. Kasirer's application it's clear that he has the legal mind and ability to do this job and has been widely regarded as an excellent choice. His collegiality will also be an asset that he'll bring to the bench. Can you talk a little about why it is so important for a justice of the Supreme Court of Canada to have that collegiality and the temperament that is appropriate, along with the legal skill and mind that he has?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all the witnesses for joining us today.
I heard a number of excellent points made, and I'd like to start with you, Mr. Berry. I wanted to bring this study forward and I know we're at the end of the parliamentary session, so we're unlikely to be able to provide a report, but having this evidence on the record is important.
I want to go through a couple of the things that you mentioned. First is the adequacy of the number of fisheries officers.
I've learned in my time as member of Parliament for West Nova the amount of work that we're asking the fisheries officers to do, the ground that they have to cover and the number of fishing enterprises that they are responsible for monitoring. I know that our government has put in $50 million and will be hiring an additional 100 DFO officers for all of Canada. That's a good start, but we're obviously not going to see the impact for a little while on the ground, and there needs to be more done.
What can you say, Mr. Berry, about the adequacy of the number of officers and of the equipment they have? I know that you mentioned that they need more boats and all of that for patrolling LFAs 33, 34 and 35 all around southwestern Nova Scotia.
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you for that.
I want to move to another thing you mentioned in your presentation and that I had jotted down before today's meeting. It is that the penalties have to be not just the cost of doing business. I think you're spot-on there.
In the lobster industry in particular, we see that the growth of that industry in southwestern Nova Scotia and across Atlantic Canada has been a boon to the local economy. It's been doing extremely well. We have to make sure that conservation is top of mind when we're talking about enforcement, but I wonder, since the lobster industry has been doing so well in southwestern Nova Scotia, if the fines and penalties imposed for breaching the Fisheries Act have not commensurately gone up and that it is becoming just the cost of doing business. Would you agree with that?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
I know that repeat offenders—
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Yes. For repeat offenders, that is factored in when a judge is imposing a sentence. Repeat offenders are supposed to be getting higher fines, but you're saying that it's still not enough.
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Because my time is limited, I want to turn to the issue of illegal product and the black market, which is a real problem, particularly in the lobster industry. I know you touched on this issue. A black market obviously suppresses the value of the legally and responsibly caught product. It operates in an unregulated market.
I think you raised a really important point, which is that we don't know what those landings are because it's an untracked and unregulated market. We can't even judge its impact on conservation, which has to be the paramount consideration for government. Ensuring this fishery is sustainable for the long term is paramount.
Would you agree that all of those factors mean that it's super-important that we actually get our hands around the black market issue?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Great. Thanks a lot, Mr. Berry.
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Chair. Thank you to all of our guests for being with us today. I really appreciate your presentations and your thoughts on this issue.
I can't stress enough, and I'm sure everyone around this table would agree, that whatever we can do to minimize the impact on victims and their families being re-traumatized is of utmost concern.
Mr. Goldstein, I understand that the charter issue you're raising is that it may lead to charges of second degree murder perhaps receiving harsher penalties then a first degree murder charge would.
Is that basically the idea behind the charter challenge?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Okay.
You also talked about the fact that it would inevitably or likely lead to Crowns contemplating more complicated indictments in order to perhaps pass the test that Bill C-266 considers in order to have the possibility of a higher parole ineligibility period.
Would having more complicated indictments before the courts have an impact on court delays?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Would it be possible that those court delays, given the Jordan decision, could result in matters actually being disposed of before a conviction could be entered?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
Okay.
Can you talk a little bit, any of you, about the frequency with which parole hearings happen now? If somebody is convicted and has no eligibility for parole for 25 years, I assume that they would have the ability to have a parole hearing at that stage. How often do they happen after that?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
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