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Results: 1 - 15 of 217
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I want to start by thanking all of our witnesses today for sharing their experiences as victims with us. I know we've talked about retraumatization in the court process, but I think as members of the committee we also acknowledge that your appearing here today is also part of that. I trust and hope that you have supports in place for that retraumatization that's almost inevitable.
I don't think any of us who haven't experienced it directly can fully understand the weight that comes with that, but I do want to thank all of you for trying to take that experience and turn it into something positive and turn it into positive change. I know from some of the victims I've dealt with that one of the things that's helped them move forward is trying to make sure that people don't experience the same thing they did.
My thanks here are really very sincere.
One of the suggestions we've heard already in this study is that we should move from victims having to request information to a system where information is delivered mandatorily. Some people have said there would be problems with that and that some victims might not appreciate it.
I'll start with Ms. Gold, just for practical reasons here for a second.
Do you think there's any problem, from the victim's point of view, with a mandatory notification?
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
I'll ask the same question of Ms. Kaulius. I'm just trying to get it on the record here. I think I know your answers, but because some people have raised those concerns, I'd like to hear from victims organizations how they feel about a mandatory program of information.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Mrs. Lucier, would you have a similar attitude toward mandatory information?
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
I think you've just given us a very important insight into where some of those possible objections came from.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
I thank you for that.
One of the other things we've heard, and we heard again today, is the necessity of mental health supports. Sometimes we get a response and people say, “These are available to victims just like they are for anyone else”, and so I would like to ask about your experience. I'm not saying we don't need special services, because I would support those, but I'm trying to debunk the view that it's easy for victims to go to get mental health supports elsewhere.
I'll start maybe in reverse order.
Mrs. Lucier.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
I'm sorry that it took a past trauma to get you assistance for the current one. That's probably too often the story.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Ms. Kaulius, can I ask the same of you?
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you very much. I'm out of time.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Again, I want to thank the witnesses for sharing personal stories with us today and reliving those traumas.
I'm going to do something unfashionable as an MP and say that I learned a couple of things again today. I'm shocked to find that victims of impaired drivers are excluded from victim services in many cases. I've worked in the criminal justice system a long time, but mostly at the federal level, and I understand that it's largely provincial.
I wonder if, Mr. Sullivan, you have any suggestion or if there is anything we could do at the federal level to try to tackle that exclusion.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Thanks for that important suggestion.
Ms. Coyle, I think you brought an important perspective to the table on victims in pointing out that there's not always a hard line, particularly when it comes to women offenders, between victims and perpetrators.
I just wonder if you could tell us whether you feel there's any consideration given in the court system to women offenders who have been previously victimized, or is this viewed as irrelevant in those criminal proceedings?
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
When you're talking about their not being available in the Prairies, is there a particular problem or reason that the Gladue reports aren't available where they might be most needed?
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Again, I'm in the business of being shocked today, unfortunately. I think the committee will need to address that.
You talked about the release of women offenders, many of whom have been victimized previously. You talked about some of the unintended consequences of the way parole operates for those women. Can you tell us a little more about that?
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you for that.
In women's federal institutions in the preparation for release at end of a sentence or preparation for parole, would you say attention is being given to the previous victimization as part of that preparation or not?
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank all three witnesses for appearing today, not just for appearing here but for the work they do each and every day on behalf of victims. I don't think we acknowledge the amount of work that's done with the slender resources available in this country, and I think that's important.
I heard a few things today I would like to ask about, but I don't think they're questions for our witnesses, because all three of them talked about the need for mandatory information sharing with victims. All three witnesses have talked about the need for legal remedies and the need for adequate resourcing. I don't think those are questions for our three witnesses. They are questions, first of all, for us as a committee and, second, for the government.
I also want to say that probably every member of this committee has raised with the government the need to fill the position of the federal ombudsman for victims of crime in a timely manner, and we're well beyond the timely manner. We wait, as do victims, for this job to be filled.
I have three questions I want to ask.
First, I'll ask Dr. Roebuck a question as the academic, and I always confess to being a recovering academic.
Do we have any idea of the reach of victims services now? In other words, of all the victims we have in the system, how many victims get any kind of services? Is there any way for us to judge the size of that problem?
Results: 1 - 15 of 217 | Page: 1 of 15

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