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Results: 1 - 15 of 314
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I am a mother and a grandmother and I truly am honoured to be in this place. I feel I have a duty and a responsibility to represent my constituents and all Canadians. I come here with honesty and integrity. I listened to the member across the way talk about people heckling in a place where we could hear a pin drop.
It is dishonest and it is misleading. I ask if the member opposite is proud of the remarks she just made.
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the recent passing of Rotarian Bill Patchett, a tireless and compassionate philanthropist and humanitarian in my riding of Northumberland—Peterborough South.
Bill's was a life that touched so many in ways both big and small. He helped to raise millions of dollars locally, provincially, nationally and internationally for a wide variety of causes. Bill was a true self-made man, from hardscrabble beginnings to greatness. He never forgot what it means to struggle, what it means to feel vulnerable, what it means to go without. He channelled early adversity into incredible personal success. In doing so, he brought those gifts we take from the hard times to good times and used them to help every day in any way he could.
I would not be here today without the support of Bill and his loving wife Delphine. I wish words could accurately describe the positive impact Bill Patchett made on this world. We are all humbled by his legacy. Again, I can only say thanks.
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I want to respond to a comment my colleague from Kitchener—Conestoga made that apparently there had been no discussion about climate change in three and a half years and that it appeared we had to use the word emergency in order for anyone to pay attention. I am very pleased he now recognizes that climate change is indeed a problem. I thank him very much for saying that.
My hon. colleague from Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie talked about insurance. I come from a rural riding, as my former colleague did. All the municipalities within it have declared climate change an emergency in their work. One of the reasons they have done this is because of the insurance costs. We live in Lake Ontario and all the water up here is coming down.
The Governor of the Bank of Canada just put out his report today. He said that the insured damage to property and infrastructure averaged about $1.7 billion per year between 2008 and 2017, which is eight and a half times higher than the annual average of $200 million from 1983 to 1992.
Where does the hon. member think that $1.7 billion will come from? As the insurance companies are paying out that money, I assume they are going to want to recover those costs.
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, it has been more than a year since the party opposite promised a climate plan, and it still has not been delivered. Frankly, Canadians and the environment cannot wait.
Instead, Conservatives are busy misleading Canadians by refusing to provide them with information on money that is rightfully theirs. Rather than spending their time misleading Canadians about our plan, the Conservatives should spend their time coming up with a plan to fight climate change.
Could the Prime Minister please update the House on the actions our government is taking to fight climate change and grow the economy?
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, our government knows that it will take a bold, ambitious and inventive new vision to address the challenges we face today. Indeed, the urgency of action on climate change is clear, especially in Canada's northern and remote communities. We see the effects of this every single day. We know that reducing our reliance on diesel power generation will play a key role in the transition to a greener future.
Could the minister update the House on investments our government is making to reduce our reliance on diesel in off-grid and remote communities?
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the Canadian Nuclear Association conference taking place in Ottawa.
Nuclear power plants have been producing clean, emissions-free electricity in Canada since the early 1960s and now produce about 15% of Canada's electricity and 60% in the province of Ontario.
Today, Canada is an international tier 1 nuclear supplier, recognized for some of the newest innovation in design, life-saving isotopes, hydrogen as a clean power source and small modular reactors, recognizing their potential for, among other things, addressing climate change and supplying unlimited clean power to rural and remote communities.
Members of the CNA, like Cameco Fuel Manufacturing in my riding of Northumberland—Peterborough South, are at the cutting edge of technology and innovation and lead the way in promoting this critical sector of the Canadian economy.
I have been privileged to work with the CNA over the last few years. Its advocacy in the commitment to a course of excellence do us all proud.
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, my hon. colleague reiterated a number of things my hon. colleague from Kingston and the Islands said, including the importance of this bill. It sounds to me as though we all agree on that.
One thing my colleague from Kingston and the Islands said was that for decades and decades, successive governments have not moved this forward. If we all agree on the importance of this, if this bill has the flexibility to deal with the uniqueness of indigenous languages, if it includes an office of a commissioner of indigenous languages, and if B.C., in 2007, as you mentioned, was in jeopardy of losing its indigenous languages, I would ask my colleague across the aisle, with due respect, if not now, when?
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, the pulp and paper industry has changed dramatically over the past two decades.
Between 1990 and 2012, the industry has led the way in reducing pollution by more than 60%. The industry will play a key role in fighting pollution, driving innovation, creating jobs and advancing indigenous reconciliation.
While stressing the importance of the future of Canadian industry, can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources give us an update on the pulp and paper industry?
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, as parliamentarians, better seniors care is something we are all dedicated to. Today we are joined by the Canadian Association for Long Term Care. Since 2002, this association has been working hard to advocate for publicly funded health care services for seniors and has been sharing information, best practices and evidence in order to improve the quality of care for residents in long-term care, no matter where they may live.
The CEO, Daniel Fontaine, and members of the association are currently out meeting with parliamentarians to raise awareness of their pre-budget submission and the launch of the #BecauseYouCare campaign, which is calling on all members of this House to visit a care home in their ridings during the week of February 10 to 16. This evening the association is holding a reception from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in room 752, 131 Queen Street. I am proud to be sponsoring this event, and I encourage all members to attend and hear about the exciting work this association is doing to advance seniors care in Canada.
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I very much support my colleague's remarks.
We have heard a lot about deficits and we cannot forget that in nine years, Stephen Harper added $160 billion to Canada's debt when we had the lowest growth since the 1930s, and in addition to that deficit, he left a huge infrastructure deficit, as my colleague mentioned. As the minister announced today in question period, there are over 4,000 infrastructure projects under way in this country. My riding happens to have two of them, in waste-water treatment, one just completed and the other under way, worth $2 million. It is allowing businesses like Danby and Weston to grow and expand and allowing rural communities to grow.
I would like the member to respond to the infrastructure deficit and the opportunities that we are providing communities by answering that deficit.
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I am on the finance committee now, and I very much enjoyed the member's remarks regarding intellectual property, because it is something we are talking a lot about. He talked about the IP collective with respect to the sharing of IP. It was certainly a struggle for small businesses to be able to afford to go through the process.
Can the member talk a bit about the opportunities for small businesses to be able to expand with respect to IP?
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, the Williams Treaties First Nations have been fighting in court for more than 25 years to redress injustices involving compensation, land and harvesting rights dating back to 1923. Our government understands that negotiation, rather than litigation, is the best way to right historical wrongs and settle past grievances. Out-of-court negotiations began in March 2017.
Can the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations update the House on the efforts made by our government to accelerate reconciliation with the Williams Treaties First Nations?
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, as we know, today General Motors announced that it would be shutting down its assembly facility in Oshawa, affecting thousands of women and men in Oshawa and southern Ontario, including in my riding of Northumberland—Peterborough South. As a member of the surrounding region, I was personally deeply disappointed to hear today's announcement by GM. I want to assure my neighbours in Oshawa and the surrounding communities that our government is prepared to take action to assist those affected.
I know the automotive industry is a major contributor to the Canadian economy, employing over 500,000 people in direct and indirect jobs and contributing $18 billion to our GDP. For decades, the Government of Canada has worked closely with the automotive sector and it is heartbreaking to know that thousands of people will be affected by the decision of GM to stop operations in Oshawa. Our government is committed to ensuring we do everything we can to alleviate the concern that many Canadians, particularly my friends and neighbours in Oshawa, are feeling right now, and we continue to support good middle-class jobs for Canadians.
As a government, we are committed to assisting those who have been directly affected by today's decision and will deliver the benefits that employees are entitled to with the quality of service they deserve. There is a suite of services available which can be deployed quickly to support workers. Those in Oshawa and all Canadians should know that our government is working closely with our provincial and municipal partners to explore every option available for affected employees.
We recognize that this decision not only impacts those employed at GM's Oshawa facility, but also the thousands of people across southern Ontario who work for many of the suppliers to the Oshawa facility. In recognizing that this decision will have impacts on communities across the province, we are continuing to monitor the situation and are examining all options to not just help affected employees but businesses as well.
Employment insurance can provide temporary income support to Canadians when they have lost their job through no fault of their own while they look for work or indeed upgrade their skills. Additionally, Service Canada has an online job bank that lists available positions, labour market information, career exploration and resumé building. These programs work hand in hand with available labour market information that will help affected workers find information about occupations as well as labour market trends and outlooks. While these are established programs, they will be available to those currently affected in Oshawa and we will be examining all other options to ensure that all affected workers will be supported.
I would like to mention at this time, Mr. Speaker, that I will be splitting my time with the wonderful member for Vaughan—Woodbridge.
In addition to what our government is providing, the Ontario government has various programs and service offerings available to workers and employees who have been directly affected by the closing of GM Oshawa. The provincial second career program supports unemployed laid-off individuals with skills training to help them find employment in occupations that are in demand. The sector partnerships planning grant supports the development of partnerships and strategies that will identify workforce needs among industry employers and develop employment and training solutions that meet the needs of employers, job seekers and workers.
Our government provides programs to support not only the employees but the businesses as well. Since we formed government, total investments in the automotive sector have exceeded $5.6 billion, showing the strength of Canada's automotive environment and the strength of our world-leading talent. Our government has been a steadfast partner of the automotive industry and our strategic innovation fund has been an excellent example of that mutual relationship, providing support to large, small and medium-sized businesses across Canada to be more innovative and competitive.
The strategic innovation fund is just one part of our larger innovation and skills plan announced in budget 2017, which is positioning Canada as a leader in the global economy, with commitments to support digital innovation and invest in clean technology. Our government is taking concrete action to ensure that Canada is the location of choice to build the cars of the future by making investments in foundational research, such as our budget 2018 announcement of $925 million through Canada's granting councils. This money will support cutting-edge research across Canada.
Our government will continue to invest in autonomous and zero emission research and development at our leading facilities, universities, colleges and research labs.
While we are deeply disappointed in today's decision of GM, we want Canadians to know that every option is on the table to help those affected. We will continue to work closely with the province and municipality to monitor the situation and provide support as necessary.
Canada has a long and proud history of automotive manufacturing and the steps our government is taking will ensure that we are the location of choice to build the car of the future. Our government will continue to strengthen Canada's economy in order to remain competitive in the global market. We will do everything we can to support those affected by today's decision.
On a personal note, for over 40 years, I have lived 30 minutes from GM in Oshawa. My first job when we moved to the area was with a company that was part of its supply chain. Everyone knew someone or many someones who worked at General Motors.
General Motors is and has been an integral part of the fabric of the community of Oshawa and surrounding area. I know this is a day that we are all very truly sad has come.
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, the member's information is a little out of date. What was Davidson Rubber, a supply company to GM, became Collins & Aikman, but it did not close. In fact, it just received money in the last couple of years from the provincial government and some from the federal government, and are looking at hiring 100 more people. Its contracts are actually with Chrysler, so while we certainly have had a downturn in the supply chain, there has been innovation and new technologies that we and the former provincial government have been able to support to in fact increase jobs.
However, he is absolutely right. I have members in my riding who are worried. I just received a couple of notes from friends who have children working at that plant, and they are worried about their futures.
One of the things I talked about in my speech was the opportunity for skills training and retraining. There are a lot of very talented skilled trades workers and employees at that General Motors plant in Oshawa, and certainly, as a government, we will be doing everything we can to make sure they have all the skills they need to transition into other jobs that will be available.
View Kim Rudd Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, the supply chain is alive and well, certainly in the member's riding. I know, because I have visited.
He mentioned the hockey analogy of our going to where the puck is, which is very appropriate. It is what the work integrated learning and the opportunities for skills acquisition are all about. It was clear as I read the release from General Motors, in which it talks about the other plants in the U.S. and other countries, that this is about global restructuring. Unfortunately, it happens more than we would like to see it happen, but the reality is that out this will come opportunities, and we will be there every step of the way to help those employees and businesses realize those opportunities.
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