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Results: 1 - 15 of 1306
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Not as well as Mr. Volpe, but thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, everyone, for being here today.
I am going to pick up on the auto theme based on the number of auto parts jobs that are based in my riding and rely on a strong auto sector, of course.
I want to take a step back. When President Trump threatened to rip up NAFTA, that was an existential threat, I think, to the auto industry. I'm not sure, Mr. Volpe, if you want to elaborate on that. Mr. Adams, you can too, because I think we needed to put the new deal in that context.
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Adams, do you want to comment?
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Based on that, how important were the auto side letters to remove that threat from the industry and then when it comes to investment flows?
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
I'm pressed for time, so I want to get in one more question, if I can.
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
That's perfect.
Mr. Volpe, I think you were on the record as saying this achievement in the automotive sector benefits Canada immediately and directly. It's going to result in more investment, more volume purchases from existing investment, and underpins the kinds of jobs we want in this country. You elaborated on that. Right now you're saying we don't have the capacity to fully leverage this deal. Are you confident the investment will flow to get us to that capacity?
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I would like to welcome Chief Bellegarde and all the other witnesses.
My question is for Ms. Drouin.
Can you explain to the committee members why cultural industries are important to the Canadian economy and how crucial the cultural exemption is?
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Chief Bellegarde, again, thank you for being here.
I'm also on the government operations committee, and we did a study on the procurement system. We specifically looked at the capacity, capability and opportunities for indigenous businesses to partake in the RFP and procurement process in Canada. The report hasn't been tabled yet, although it might have been tabled this week. Suffice it to say, there's much more work that needs to be done on the government side to make sure we can capitalize on that opportunity.
Do you see this trade deal as a way of tapping into those indigenous businesses that were able to tap into that capacity? We met with a slew of them, very talented people, who just want to participate in the process. Is this a way of helping push that along?
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, Minister, and thank you to your team for being here today.
I'm going to talk a bit about Coast Guard ships to start off.
I think the average age of a ship is older than everybody around this committee table, except for maybe the chair.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Anyway, suffice it to say that they're nearing the end of their service life.
I want to know what the plan is to ensure that the Coast Guard is well equipped to continue to do the important work that Canadians rely on, now and well into the future.
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you for that.
On the national shipbuilding strategy in general, what steps are in place to avoid any unnecessary production gaps, which, of course, slow down delivery and can effectively cost Canadians the jobs this shipbuilding strategy is supposed to create? What measures are in place to keep these production gaps to a minimum?
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Thank you to all of the witnesses for being here today and for taking part in this important study.
There is so much to go through, but I'll try to get through as much of it as I can.
To our friends from the Boys and Girls Clubs, that was a great presentation. Thank you very much for that. It was nice to learn about some of the programming you're doing.
I want to learn a little more about the Bounce Back League. I think you said it's in three areas now. Are there plans to scale it up? What is the plan on that; what was the impetus, and how does someone become involved in it?
View Kyle Peterson Profile
Lib. (ON)
Yes, it's great to hear that. Part of the impetus for my bringing the motion to the floor was to make the connection between mental health and physical activity, and I think that program has highlighted that brilliantly. Keep up the good work with that. It's great to hear that those success stories are happening, so thank you for that.
The Canadian School Boards Association and Physical and Health Education Canada will intertwine on these questions.
It's clear that without a robust school program as one of the systems to ensure physical activity in youth, we're not going to get anywhere country-wide.
I'm not alarmed, because I was already aware of the numbers, but it's a bit disheartening to hear about the percentage of children who are getting the recommended 60 minutes a day.
I know that in Ontario, which is where I happen to be from, there are schools that don't teach phys. ed. every day, for sure. I think that's almost the norm rather than the exception, especially for the younger ones, as far as I am aware.
I'm wondering whether Physical and Health Education Canada has a position on what the appropriate implementation should be in the schools. Does the Canadian School Boards Association have a similar position? If it's different, what is the difference? What would be the recommendation for daily activity?
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