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Results: 1 - 15 of 41
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2021-06-17 11:31 [p.8644]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the hon. minister why he thinks that systemic cultural change is so important for the Canadian Armed Forces.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2021-06-08 10:43 [p.8069]
Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian NATO Parliamentary Association respecting its participation at the 19th Annual Parliamentary Transatlantic Forum in Washington, D.C., United States of America, from December 9 to 11, 2019.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Surrey Centre.
I am grateful for the opportunity to rise in the House to speak to the motion before us today.
The Public Health Agency of Canada's National Microbiology Laboratory is known around the world for its scientific excellence and contributions to global health. The Public Health Agency of Canada engages in important research collaborations to advance science in order to improve public health here at home and abroad.
As we have learned over the last 16 months, pathogens that have the ability to transmit broadly can quickly reshape society on a global scale. Working closely as an international community is an essential part of the global public health ecosystem trying to keep us all safe.
A simple example of multinational collaboration can be found at the outset of this current pandemic. Chinese researchers openly published the SARS-CoV-2 sequence on January 11, 2020. This allowed National Microbiology Laboratory scientists to generate a functional, first-generation assay, which is a type of analysis or test for things like potency, in just five days. This was well ahead of the first SARS-CoV-2 case arriving in Canada.
While this did not stop SARS-CoV-2 from having a devastating impact on our society both domestically and globally, it would have been impossible to identify the first Canadian cases without this assay. This means that initial transmission chains would have gone unnoticed, and the devastation of that first wave would have been magnified. This multilateral co-operation helped partners around the world to develop tests to identify the virus much earlier than if each country had to identify the sequence independently.
Collaborating with laboratories outside of Canada is critical to advancing public health research and science aimed at improving public health on a global scale, including research into infectious diseases. As an institution with global partnerships, the National Microbiology Laboratory looks to open science and collaboration as a central tenet of its work while recognizing the need to balance open collaboration with a need for agreements that dictate the terms of each collaboration when appropriate.
Collaborations can include working together on a common research agenda, such as the World Health Organization R&D Blueprint. It could be about sharing pathogens through the Global Health Security Action Group Laboratory Network and others, collaborating on developing medical countermeasures and sharing critical surveillance data.
The National Microbiology Laboratory shares samples with other public health laboratories in a safe, responsible and transparent fashion to advance public health research. Sharing samples and information is carried out routinely within the scientific community as part of fostering a robust, global health agenda and to enable scientific advancements regarding high-consequence pathogens with potentially significant societal consequences.
The maximum containment laboratory has a long-standing, international reputation for security in the sharing of materials for the purpose of advancing scientific knowledge. Given the National Microbiology Laboratory's standing as a World Health Organization collaborating partner for viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, as well as its knowledge on regulations and standards for these types of transfers, the laboratory in Winnipeg is often asked to share its material.
It is the laboratory's objective to foster global co-operation rather than enable a monopoly of research on any given disease. In addition, the National Microbiology Laboratory's policies ensure that samples are only sent to reputable labs that meet the appropriate federal laboratory requirements. All transfers follow strict protocols and have the proper security protocols in place.
Furthermore, for close to 20 years, the National Microbiology Laboratory has been offering mobile diagnostic laboratory support. Working alongside the World Health Organization and Médecins Sans Frontières, the laboratory has supported missions to contain high-consequence pathogen outbreaks. Timely diagnostic capabilities located close to the outbreak zone have proven to be the most efficient way to mitigate further outbreak spread.
The National Microbiology Laboratory has demonstrated that international collaborations can lead to fruitful discoveries. Through the knowledge learned in part during deployments in the support of outbreak control, the laboratory was able to advance the development of an Ebola vaccine, which played an instrumental role in stemming the recent Ebola outbreaks in Guinea and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Through discoveries such as this vaccine, Canada takes a leadership role as a global citizen using our knowledge to support the world well beyond our borders.
The National Microbiology Laboratory is also involved in providing training to international laboratory professionals, and has previously trained scientists from many countries, including the United Kingdom, when it was developing its own level 4 program. The lab routinely engages the international community, through established scientific networks such as the global health security action group laboratory network, the alliance of North American public health laboratory networks, the Caribbean Public Health Laboratory Network and the Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network. Engaging with the international community through networks like these, the National Microbiology Laboratory is always seeking to find opportunities to enhance its connections to support its programs, all of which are ultimately in service of improving the health of Canadians.
With the current international focus on SARS-CoV-2, the National Microbiology Laboratory has been leveraging these fora to understand how other countries are meeting the laboratory and research challenges of this virus. As we have seen with the variants that have emerged around the world, the threat of COVID-19 to the health of Canadians continues to evolve. Working with the international community to increase our understanding of these emerging unknown variants has been critical to help Canada stay on top of the science related to SARS-CoV-2.
The National Microbiology Laboratory has also been collaborating with partners to securely share information and best practices on testing and sequencing and on how other countries have used available information to improve forecasting and modelling tools. These international resources and partnerships have been critical in the Public Health Agency of Canada's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
I would like to finish by reaffirming that the pandemic has clearly demonstrated that no country can single-handedly fend off highly infectious diseases. Canada must continue to collaborate internationally as a means not just to protect ourselves from the disease, but also to help protect citizens around the world. That can be done while respecting security requirements, including national security, and the protection of classified and sensitive information. The ability to continue this work must be safeguarded, and we have the mechanisms in place to do just that.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, I have heard that before. However, in January 2020, I was at a high-technology round table meeting and we were briefed then that GPHIN was up and operating and had identified a cluster of activity of concern in Wuhan, China. That was in January 2020. To my knowledge and based on what I was briefed, and this was not particularly a health issue but was about technology as a whole, at that time they were briefing that GPHIN had identified something in China in late 2019.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, my hon. colleague's question is a good one, and there is no easy answer. After spending 31 years in the military and having held secret and top secret security clearances, I know how important it is to safeguard national security and how to do the work that needs to be done and still protect national security and the classified information out there. That is the concern, along with trying to find a balance.
That is what we have tried to do with the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. It is about having a place to take that kind of classified information to people who have the security clearance to deal with it. That is the balance we need to find.
That is a very good question.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, I do not have the answer to your last question, but you're right that there are always risks. It would be easier if we could just do everything by ourselves and we did not have to work with anybody else, but that is not how the world works right now. We have to take the risks into account when we are designing collaboration.
However, you are right. It is not always easy and it needs to be done very carefully.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2021-05-03 14:22 [p.6524]
Mr. Speaker, I respect the work of all my colleagues on all committees, and I take my responsibilities as chair of the national defence committee very seriously. I have worked hard to serve the members of the committee in an unbiased way. This should be about improving the lives of the women and men of CAF. It should be about respecting and supporting survivors and those impacted by this abominable behaviour. It should be about preventing more abuse and trauma. The committee is developing recommendations for the government to this end, and the committee will be meeting later this week.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2021-05-03 14:46 [p.6528]
Yes, please, Mr. Speaker.
I would like to assure my colleague that the defence committee will be meeting at its normal time this coming Friday at one o'clock.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2021-05-03 14:59 [p.6531]
Mr. Speaker, I want to assure the hon. member that I respect all the work being done by all colleagues in all committees. Really, this should be about improving the lives of the women and men in the Canadian Forces. It should be about supporting the survivors and those impacted by this abominable behaviour, and it should be about preventing further abuse. The committee will continue its work in coming up with recommendations for the government, and the committee will meet on Friday at its regular time.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2021-04-20 14:06 [p.5861]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to share with members the success that Kanata—Carleton has achieved with the Canada summer jobs program.
I am pleased to announce that $2.1 million in funding was approved, creating 618 jobs at 123 organizations, charities and businesses. From technology to organic farming to summer camps, it is this diversity that makes Kanata—Carleton such an amazing place to live and do business.
I thank everyone from all the businesses and organizations who showed incredible determination, commitment and creativity when presented with the challenges of COVID-19. They have supported and served their community, and the people of Kanata—Carleton have been there to support them in return. Shopping local is a win-win.
Together we can all succeed in spite of these challenging times. Their leadership and teamwork matters greatly, and I thank them all.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2021-03-25 15:16 [p.5273]
Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions amongst the parties, and if you seek it, I hope you will find unanimous consent for the following motion.
I move:
That the House:
(a) mourn the lives of the seven women who lost their lives to heinous acts of femicide in Quebec in the past few months;
(b) mourn the lives of all women and gender-diverse people across Canada who have lost their lives to intimate partner violence and gender-based violence;
(c) continue to support the survivors of gender-based violence;
(d) acknowledge the incredibly alarming increase in gender-based violence across the country;
(e) condemn gender-based violence in all its forms;
(f) work with the government to accelerate investments in shelters and transition housing, and support the advancement of a National Action Plan on Gender-Based Violence;
(g) call on all Canadians to do more to fight and raise awareness on gender-based violence; and
(h) take-note of the alarming increase of gender-based violence in Canada;
and that a take-note debate on this topic be held later today, pursuant to Standing Order 53.1, and that, notwithstanding any standing order, special order or usual practice of the House, members rising to speak during the debate may indicate to the Chair that they will be dividing their time with another member; no quorum calls, dilatory motions or requests for unanimous consent shall be received by the Chair.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2021-03-11 14:11 [p.4909]
Mr. Speaker, as we mark one year since the beginning of this pandemic, I stand today in the House to express my gratitude to the constituents of Kanata—Carleton and to all Canadians from coast to coast to coast for their dedication to their country and to each other.
Although this last year has been a most difficult period in the lives of many Canadians, we also have been witness to some amazing innovation as well as heartwarming gestures of generosity and support. Seeing these shining examples during a dark time helps all of us get through another day.
With warmer weather and millions of vaccines on the way, there are many reasons to be optimistic, but we have to remember those we have lost, those who are still suffering and those who have made sacrifices to help Canadians get through this together.
That is what the people of Kanata—Carleton and Canadians do and, together, we will continue the work of helping our neighbours, our families and our communities.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2020-11-03 13:46 [p.1610]
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time today with the member for Winnipeg North
I am happy to participate in the debate on the Conservative motion from the member for Calgary Rocky Ridge. I am heartened to hear the calls for collaborative effort and working together. That is absolutely key.
I am going to talk a little about what our different regional development agencies will be doing to support small and medium-sized enterprises from coast to coast to coast, which is just one of the layers of support out there for small businesses.
In six different specific regions of the country, agencies work closely with businesses and innovators to fuel economic growth that creates those well-paying, middle-class jobs for Canadians. They apply a place-based, location-based lens to the overall direction of the government, as outlined in the innovation and skills plan, to advance and diversify regional economies and help communities thrive.
Let me talk a bit about each RDA, or each regional development agency, and why their mandates are specific to the needs of the regions they serve and why this is so important when it comes to confronting the challenges brought about this pandemic.
ACOA, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, will help businesses become more competitive, innovative and productive.
In Quebec we have Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, or CED. It guides Quebec businesses and the province’s regions toward the economy of tomorrow.
In the north, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, or CanNor, helps to develop a diversified, sustainable and dynamic economy across Canada's three territories.
Ontario is covered by two separate RDAs. The Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario, or FedDev, provides programs and services to support innovation and economic growth in southern Ontario, while the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario, or FedNor, supports businesses and community partners to build a stronger northern Ontario.
Then there is the regional development agency that serves the west. Western Economic Diversification Canada promotes the development and diversification of western Canada's economy and advances the interests of the west in national economic policy, programs and projects.
We do understand that the path to economic prosperity varies from region to region. Strong regional economies are essential for Canada’s success and its sustainability.
Strong regional economies are essential for Canada’s success and its sustainability.
That is why our regional development agencies are there to help businesses and innovators grow, succeed and create good jobs for Canadians.
RDA programs provide funds to companies, not-for-profits and communities. The idea is to foster the right environment to enable businesses to grow and entrepreneurs and innovators to start businesses and then have them succeed. This creates an ideal condition for the development of strong, dynamic and inclusive regional economies throughout the country. That is exactly what we need.
We support regional innovation ecosystems and help businesses scale-up. Even during these times, some businesses are scaling up. Some businesses were in a position to take advantage of the challenges out there and have overcome it. We want to help them.
The rest of the world is looking at the kinds of solutions that we in Canada can actually create, and we are helping those companies do just that. We provide financial assistance. We bring together key players. We have talked about collaborative efforts and how we connect all the people who need to be on the same page to help people move forward together.
We are going to have the kind of growth strategies that eliminate the regional gaps. We want everyone in Canada to be able to thrive, to make it through these challenging, unprecedented times and be in a position that will allow us to come back gangbusters once the worst of this is over.
A good example of the approach we are taking by helping SMEs is what we are doing through this economic epidemic. We are taking a regionally based approach and delivering what is called the regional relief and recovery fund program. We believe we need a layered approach and those at the local and regional levels are going to be the ones who understand where the support is most desperately needed.
We have invested over $1.5 billion nationally in this one program for regional economic development and it has seen an incredible take-up. Demand has been especially high in western Canada. This result has been a lifeline to more than 12,000 businesses, which have protected 95,000 jobs, 20,000 jobs in western Canada alone.
Looking at just Alberta, Western Economic Diversification Canada has provided $96 million in relief to over 1,700 small and medium-sized enterprises in that province and has helped protect more than 6,900 jobs. On all accounts, this is by far the highest volume of activity for the regional relief and recovery fund of any province in western Canada and, indeed, one of the highest across the country on a per capital basis. The numbers do tell an important story. The immediate impact is that this funding is ensuring Alberta keeps firms operating and helps them retain their workers, and the government takes immense pride in that.
Another important part of the regional relief and recovery fund is the response in rural communities, delivered through our partners at Community Futures organizations. Another Alberta example is that over 800 loan applications have been approved through Community Futures, translating to more than 3,600 jobs protected in rural Alberta. I am really pleased to say that nearly 60% of that support has been directed to under-represented communities, including women-owned, youth-owned and indigenous-owned businesses.
We have helped dozens of small businesses, even in the member's hometown. This is through direct and indirect support.
Here is a case in point. The University of Calgary is using a $250,000 regional relief and recovery fund contribution from Western Diversification. It is using it to enable Creative Destruction Lab-Rockies to help businesses mitigate the impacts of the pandemic and access capital to adapt their business models and develop innovative COVID-19 solutions.
We have the talent, the skills and what it takes to help businesses. The world is looking for solutions, and it is looking at us. For every one of the 95,000 jobs that has been preserved across Canada through this one program, we have saved many more, and who knows where those people would be tomorrow.
The RDAs are delivering other creative programs to support business people who are under-represented. Our message to companies and communities in regions across Canada is clear. We are here for them now and we will get through this together.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2020-11-03 13:56 [p.1611]
Mr. Speaker, it is a very challenging situation; there is no doubt about it in my mind. CRA is an arm's length kind of agency. We want it to do its work independently, and we think it is important that sometimes CRA can be supportive and helpful.
We could probably say to the CRA to try to be supportive and helpful instead of onerous, as the member suggested, but there are businesses out there that could use that kind of expertise to make sure they are on the path they really want to be on. I understand the feeling behind the motion. There is a way of making sure the work the CRA does is indeed helpful.
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Karen McCrimmon Profile
2020-11-03 13:58 [p.1612]
Mr. Speaker, this is one of those times when we have to say that we need to get control of the virus. We need to conquer the pandemic and give people the confidence to go out and frequent restaurants. This is absolutely key. People need to go to restaurants and feel safe, and travel and feel safe. That has to be our first priority. If we can get control of the pandemic and protect people's lives, then we can protect their livelihoods. We tried to take a layered approach to help as many people as we possibly could.
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