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Results: 1 - 15 of 1148
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
I would like to preface my remarks by pointing out that the incident we are discussing today falls entirely within the parameters of the study we began in January on cybersecurity and financial crime.
As suggested by my fellow Liberal members, I put forward a motion that we study the issue. That shows how deeply concerned we are about cybersecurity in financial institutions. I'm delighted that Mr. Scheer commended our efforts in relation to the study. He fully supports my motion, and I'm glad that his party is joining the Liberal Party in its efforts to address the issue of cybersecurity in financial institutions, so thank you.
Mr. Flynn, I think it's important to speak to Canadians today to help people manage their expectations when something as serious as identity theft occurs.
The public wants the police to conduct a criminal investigation. Generally, people want something done about the loss of their personal information. They want their identity to be restored, without having to worry that five, 10 or 15 years down the road, they will once again be targeted. In terms of a criminal investigation, what are people's expectations?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
It's very hard for people to understand just how difficult it is to prove that you are the person you say you are. How are people supposed to prove their identity? It's extremely challenging when three different people are out there using the same name and social insurance number.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
To a certain extent, the criminal investigation is a way to ensure justice is served, provided that it leads to the perpetrators being nabbed, the evidence being used to successfully prosecute them and their being punished, mainly sent to prison.
That said, data on the black market represent virtual assets, ones that aren't housed in a physical location. Data can be located in many places. I'm not trying to alarm people, but it's important for them to understand that, even if the perpetrators are arrested, it doesn't necessarily mean that their data are no longer vulnerable and their identity can be restored.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Boucher, your centre provides advice to other organizations. How can a business protect itself from its own staff? What advice do you have for businesses in that regard?
As we saw this winter, there is every reason to believe that banks, financial institutions and financial service companies have the best possible technology to protect their data from outside threats. What concerns us are threats from the inside. I don't think any software out there can protect against that risk. How do you advise organizations to safeguard against the human element when it comes to fraud?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
I'd like to revisit the issue of a unique identifier.
Other models exist. On other committees, we've talked about the popular Estonian model, I believe. It's a system that's in line with our discussions on open banking. All the information is centralized and people can access it using a unique identification number.
At the end of the day, no matter what you call it, a social insurance number is a unique identification number, so it's important to understand the system's limitations. It's all well and good to have the ultimate ultra-modern system, but if a single unique identifier is assigned to an individual, the information will always be vulnerable if someone gets a hold of it.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
Does your centre manage its employees' personal information itself?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
How do you protect against an employee who wakes up in a foul mood one day and decides to help the other side?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
Is your approach used elsewhere in the market? Has another organization established a culture of security similar to yours?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Boucher.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
Welcome, Mr. Brun, Mr. Cormier and Mr. Berthiaume. Thank you for participating in this exercise. Your presence is greatly appreciated.
Mr. Cormier, I'll start by reassuring you that, last January or even earlier, the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security and the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics began to address issues related to the unique identifier. We looked at models from abroad, including Estonia's model, which raises a number of other issues.
Before I ask you some more practical questions, I want to point out that the unique identifier is one of the cybersecurity issues. When someone gets their hands on the unique identifier, we'll be faced with the same issue.
I'm pleased to hear that you're offering protection to all your members. However, financial institutions tend to charge their clients to protect the clients' data from identity theft. The financial institutions themselves make the offer. Do you have the same philosophy?
To have my salary deposited into my bank account and to make transactions, automatic withdrawals and Interac payments, I must give my name, address and social insurance number to the institution that I'm dealing with. However, I must use a third party to protect this information. Why do I need to rely on someone other than the entity to which I give the information?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
There are two issues involved in what I consider the temporary solution of dealing with a third party. You're asking people to deal with a third party to protect their personal information. Two years ago, this third party was also the victim of hacking. We conducted a study on the matter here.
How liable would you be if your clients' personal information were hacked from the entity that you trust, such as Equifax?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
Identity theft is unique in that the data is active and will always remain on the market, unless the person using it dies. The data is virtually present all over the world. It can be used on the black market after 24 hours, as in cases of debit or credit card fraud.
The identity theft issue isn't about the security of the client's data at their own financial institution. I'm sure that your systems are up to date in terms of protection from external hacking and that you're fulfilling your responsibility to your clients by meeting the expectations of Quebecers and Canadians. If an issue arises in the account, you'll reimburse the criminally misappropriated money.
The identity theft issue is as follows. Let's say that a person goes to a bank tomorrow morning. The person says that his name is Guy Cormier and that he needs a mortgage to purchase a house. The mortgage would be at the other bank and not at Desjardins.
Identity theft causes damage in other areas. One example is the real estate flips in Saint-Lambert, in the South Shore, where people took out fake mortgages under fake identities. There were a baker's dozen, and that was only in Quebec. After that, it will be Canada and Europe. Identity theft has an impact, and it isn't limited to the Desjardins Group financial system.
The protection that you're offering is appreciated and necessary. However, if I may say so, the protection is limited to the client's financial situation within their institution.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Minister Goodale, as you know, I started my career as a customs officer. The threshold for tolerance or interpretation when it comes to people entering Canada varies depending on whether the people are visitors or residents returning to Canada.
My colleague Mr. Dubé talked about protecting employees. Of course, you need an external perspective to determine the merits of a complaint filed by someone who believes that their rights have been violated. It seems that the bill contains measures that enable the commission to accept or reject a complaint based on its content.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
People coming back into Canada, residents and visitors, don't have the same threshold for how they'd like to be treated, considering the nature of their complaints. The committee can analyze the grounds of those complaints and whether they make sense or not. With regard to protecting the officers, as Mr. Dubé said, this bill also looks at something to protect officers and employees from frivolous complaints.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
Chances are that the committee will come to a conclusion that might not be accepted by the agency itself. Who has the final decision on the conclusion provided by the committee should it go against the interpretation of the agency?
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