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Results: 1 - 15 of 173
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Speaker, I have had a lot of phone calls and emails to my office. People are very concerned about what the government is doing.
I have a two-part question. First, if clause 4.1 were put back in the legislation, it would still be a flawed bill but would it be okay? Second, at this point, would the hon. member agree that the government should probably just put it aside, take its time and bring it back, whether in the fall or after another election?
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Speaker, I duly note my colleague's remarks, but when he suggests that it is only the Conservatives who are opposed and that we are not modern, I would like to point out that there were some very significant witnesses who came to the hearings and testified against this bill. The government originally put in a very important clause, proposed section 4.1, for a reason. To be quite frank, I have never heard any clear rationale as to why it was removed, from anyone, including the minister.
My question is quite simple: Will my colleague vote for the reinsertion of proposed section 4.1 into the legislation?
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, I also would like to thank my colleague for a very powerful speech.
This morning at the indigenous affairs committee, we had an hour when we listened to the commissioners and we did not ask questions. It was very powerful testimony. There were a few things that bring me some concern.
One was when Commissioner Wilson said that we have not acted with the attention, urgency and resources that are needed. Commissioner Littlechild talked about call to action 81 being stuck. They made it clear they believe this should not be a partisan issue, that there have been successive governments that have perhaps made mistakes and have done wrong.
Today, the NDP members put forward a motion. It is an important motion. It is not perfect, but it is their effort to move things forward. I would certainly like to hear my colleague indicate that she will be happy to support the motion.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, I was in committee this morning when we heard from the commissioners. It was very powerful testimony. There was a few things that the member brought up in her speech that were particularly concerning.
Certainly, when they indicated that the attention, urgency and resources needed to be made available, the comparison was made to COVID and how quickly the government responded to the COVID crisis. That is what she described there being a lack of. It was also important that she indicated successive governments share the blame and that this is a non-partisan issue.
I come to the House today to speak to a motion that I think is important for us to move forward with, and I would appreciate any further comments my colleague might have about the testimony she heard today.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, in 2015, when the current government was elected, it committed to all 94 calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Sections 71 to 76 are very specific about “Missing Children and Burial Information”. Given the horrific discovery of the remains of 215 children at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, will the minister commit to full financial support and other necessary supports for a thorough investigation, not only there but at all former residential schools in Canada?
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, with the tragic news out of Kamloops, it is clear that many indigenous Canadians and residential school survivors are being forced to relive their trauma. As Chief Casimir said, “We see you, we love you and we believe you.” We need to ensure that supports are available as they come to terms with these latest findings, as well as their own truth and trauma.
In addition to the support hotline, will the minister commit to requested mental health support?
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, one a point of order, I am looking for some clarification. I have always been aware that we cannot speak of the presence or absence of a specific member, but I did not think that this extended to empty benches. I guess you are saying that it does extend to empty benches.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Chair, the government has indicated that $33.8 million have been made available with respect to calls to action 71 to 76, but $27.1 million still remains, so it is mostly unspent.
If we want to facilitate moving forward on those calls to action, does the member have any awareness as to what the problem is? Has the process become encumbered? Clearly some financial resources have been set aside for that purpose.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Chair, again, I appreciate my colleague's speech. We are all rocked by the tragic and horrific discovery of 215 children in the mass burial.
I know that for calls to action 71 to 76, there were significant dollars allocated for moving forward. There is, I believe, about $27 million remaining. Would the minister commit to supporting Tk’emlúps te Secwe̓pemc in the forensic work that needs to be done, and making sure that the dollars flow in a timely way so that the people can move forward on this important path?
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Chair, I will be splitting my time.
Tonight we have heard some very difficult and heartfelt speeches. We heard a common theme from the Prime Minister and many others and it is about listening to the communities.
We have a short time frame for speaking tonight, so I thought the most important thing I could do tonight would be to share with the House and Canadians what the communities are saying, what their message is and what their requests are. In a conversation with Kukpi7 Casimir today, we talked about what I should say on her behalf and her community's behalf. She also has an official news release, and this is a direct quote:
As the last logs go on our sacred fire, I want to extend my heartfelt gratitude for the outpouring of support to our community. Thank you for helping us bring to light such hard truths that came from the preliminary findings regarding the unmarked burial sites of Kamloops Indian Residential School students so that we may begin the process of honouring the lost loved ones who are in our caretaking. We love, honour, and respect these children, their families, and communities.
To the Prime Minister of Canada and all federal parties, we acknowledge your gestures, but as a community who is burdened with the legacy of a federally mandated Indian Residential School, Canada must face ownership and accountability to Tk'emlups te Secwepemc as well as all communities and families.
We have heard from many survivors from our own community and beyond. They are finally being heard after so many years of silence and disbelief about the deaths of children in the residential schools. No words are sufficient to express the comfort and love we wish to extend to survivors and intergenerational survivors. We see you, we love you, and we believe you. We are thankful to the many who are working hard with us to ensure supports are there as you come to terms with these latest findings as well as your own truths and traumas.
For further important context, we also direct everyone's attention to the report, “Where are the children buried?”, by Dr. Scott Hamilton, which states:
This report addresses the question where deceased Indian Residential School...students are buried. This is difficult to answer because of the varying circumstances of death and burial, coupled with the generally sparse information about Residential School cemeteries. It requires a historic understanding of school operations that contextualizes the patterns underlying death and burial.
Chief Casimir further stated:
We ask all Canadians to reacquaint themselves with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Final Report and Calls to Action – upholding the heavy lifting already done by the survivors, intergenerational survivors, and the TRC. In addition, to show your solidarity, we encourage you to wear an orange shirt and start conversations with your neighbours....
She also had many specific requests to respect the jurisdiction, including their cultural laws and traditions. She daid that they must be respected and that they must be in control of all aspects of the next step. She talked about calls to action 71 to 76 and how critical they are.
The AFN has only seen moderate progress on this particular report card. The calls to action are really important and there has been moderate progress. We also heard that there have only been a few million dollars spent out of the $33 million that has been put aside.
I do not think any Canadian has not been terribly ashamed, which is an important word to use. There are 215 innocent children in unmarked burial sites at one residential school, and there were 139 schools. This is a shame and a failure. It is our burden to carry, and we must start to ease the heavy load that has been carried by indigenous people for far too long.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Chair, this community made the very specific request that they needed to be in charge of this process. They needed their cultural traditions and laws respected, and they had to determine the path forward. The government needed to be there as a partner, in terms of support.
Clearly, I think we all recognize that sometimes governments get overly bureaucratic with how they proceed with moving forward. We have to be sensitive, and we have to take the lead from the communities. This community is providing enormous leadership, and they have an enormous burden in terms of taking care of these lost children. We need to support them.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Chair, the Tk’emlúps te Secwe̓pemc have been leaders for many, many years in terms of how they have moved forward. To be quite frank, the federal government has gotten in the way of their progress, whether that has been economic or in other ways.
We do need to, as we have said tonight, make it real. Let us respect the jurisdiction. Let us provide the support they need. We are very proud of something called the Kamloops amendment. We are very proud of the work at the First Nations Taxation Commission, the economic development they have done, and the partnerships they have made in terms of how we move forward together. We need to continue that and really stay out of their way, but be supportive in terms of what needs to be done.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Chair, it was about three years ago that Parliament passed a motion asking for a papal apology and, much to our disappointment, that has not happened. We know that there have been other apologies that have been given.
I do join my colleague in calling for this apology. It is part of the healing. It is part of the closure, and it is another important call to action.
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Chair, my colleague is an experienced parliamentarian. Will he commit tonight to doing everything he can to make sure that as communities, whether Tk'emlúps or the other 139 or 138 communities, are ready to move forward, the dollars flow in a way that is responsive and does not get bogged down in bureaucratic red tape? In some cases, the communities are ready to move forward.
Does he commit tonight to doing what he can to facilitate things moving forward?
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Speaker, yesterday, Kúkpi7 Rosanne Casimir of the Tk'emlúps First Nation revealed that the remains of 215 children had been found buried on the site of the former residential school in Kamloops, B.C. Today, our community mourns along with those who suffered this terrible loss and alongside all survivors of the horrific residential school system, who are undoubtedly forced to remember their trauma upon hearing the news. There is nothing more painful in life than losing a child.
My heart breaks today, thinking of all the loving parents who never saw their children return home and who were never granted the dignity of knowing what happened. This tragedy is yet another reminder of the important work done by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and how much more work true reconciliation requires. Chief Casimir and the leadership of the Tk'emlúps community have taken on the heavy burden of caring for these lost children.
Finally, to those who love these children, know that I, the Kamloops community and the whole of Canada mourn with them. Their loss will never be forgotten.
Results: 1 - 15 of 173 | Page: 1 of 12

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