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Results: 1 - 15 of 103
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I'm honoured to be here at this committee. I spent a number of years on such a committee. As a matter of fact, when we speak about what happened back in 2013, I was at that table. Of course, we were in the process of going through truth and reconciliation and the development of all the things that were important to our indigenous friends.
I spent some time in the territories and had a chance to meet with quite a few business leaders. That's really where I want to take my comments. I've seen what goes on. I have seen the leadership that we have in our northern communities. I have said to so many people that if you want to have a really good CEO to run your companies, you would find a lot of them in any one of our northern territories.
When the minister was mentioning concerns about our colonialist past, somehow I feel we haven't got past that. Just last week, when we were dealing with natural resources, we had Calvin Helin in. One of the books he has penned is Dances with Dependency. I made sure that everyone who ever came into my office read that, just to make sure that we understood what our responsibility was.
I've listened to quite a few ministers over the last couple of days, and every one of them is saying that our only focus is how we are going to mitigate climate change. How are we going to stop the concerns that exist? We seem to forget that in a lot of our indigenous communities, the strength of those communities is their knowledge and ability to manage the resources that are there. They are looking for that opportunity to manage their resources. As Mr. Helin said, we seem be back into a position of eco-colonialism, where we have governments saying, “I think we know exactly what you need, and because of that, here's how we're going to dole out the options and the opportunities for you.”
How are we ever going to get to the stage where we really give them that opportunity to bring their expertise to the table?
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Perhaps I didn't make myself clear. There are aboriginal communities that want to get involved in the oil and gas industry. They want to make sure the knowledge they have gained over decades of working in that industry is being advanced. They realize, because they, too, as I mentioned, are experts in the field, that what we have in Canada is the highest quality and highest level of environmentalism in the world. They are asking, as many are, why we aren't selling that technology around the world if we really want to make a difference.
I was in England for an OSCE meeting this summer. We were talking about food security, energy security and security because of what was happening in Ukraine. We are starting to see what the problems are when people go too far with their ecological plans. If we just continue saying to the indigenous people, “Well, we know what's best, and we're going to make sure you have all the money you need, as long as you follow the plans that we have,” I really think is a mistake.
That's why I wanted to make sure we understood it. When you say that you had a whole bunch of money there so they could follow this plan that you have, that's great, but that's not what they're all saying. I'm just wondering whether there is a recognition somewhere in the departments that it's the case.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much.
Mr. Chair, you and I attended OSCE meetings in the U.K. this summer, where food security, energy security and Russia's invasion of Ukraine were uppermost in the minds of the parliamentarians who were there.
Mr. Minister, although European politicians might have disagreed on the solutions, certainly the urgency was never questioned. To that end, my question relates to Canada's ability to engage globally in the quest to get ethically produced hydrocarbons to countries that are desperately seeking our natural resources.
It does seem as though we have more or less said that we won't worry about oil and gas, but we will take a push on some of the new technologies. Of course, since we've handcuffed ourselves, I don't think we have much of a choice.
There's also that nagging question of whether the Prime Minister and your ministry now recognize the business case for LNG to Europe and Asia. I know that was one thing that had been stated. There was no push-back from your government when the Biden administration arbitrarily cancelled Keystone XL, but now, of course, U.S. refineries are being filled with Venezuelan crude.
I'm trying to find out where you think Canada fits into this. I've read your mandate letter. I was on the environment committee before this, and I don't really see much difference between the mandate letter for environment and the mandate letter for natural resources. Perhaps I'll have to go to the industry mandate letter to see whether or not there's something that speaks to the actual strengths we have in the country.
Could you comment on where you feel we are at this point in time and how we're going to become the global player that we so proudly have been for decades?
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Of course, we have been. That's my point. We have been leading the globe for decades as far as environmental impact is concerned and have been making sure that we are the least impactful in the world.
You mentioned concerns about U.S. policy, but we just heard earlier—I think it was you who said this—about the dozens of LNG projects we see in the U.S. We have cancelled so many and they are able to get them going, so I don't quite see how this U.S. regulatory regime has been causing us these major issues.
The other thing is the United States Department of Defense's initiative to invest in Canada's critical minerals seems to be a bit of a head-scratcher on the sovereignty front. If this suggestion had materialized during the previous administration, perhaps it wouldn't have been quite as well received.
Do you really believe that is positive for us, or are they the only game in town after we scare away other investors?
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
I would like to speak to you about—
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. To the officials, thank you for being here.
The first question I have is one that I asked the minister. It is about heavy oil and Venezuelan oil. I'm unsure whether the minister said I was inaccurate.
What are the measurements for Venezuelan heavy crude versus Canadian heavy crude? That's what I was talking about. Do you have those numbers?
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you. I know that I was chastised by the minister, but I wanted to make that particular point.
One of the concerns that I have is this. Of course, there's money that has been set aside for indigenous discussions and so on in the supplementaries. Sadly, one thing we see is that many of our investors, who are the indigenous people of Canada, are just hitting their stride as far as engagement in oil and gas is concerned. That's where their history is. In the last 20 or 30 years, there's been amazing work done in that area. Whether it's oil and gas or whether it's mining in the territories, there are some amazing businesspeople and they're looking at opportunities, but it seems as though it's only going to be an opportunity if they follow the path of this government. That, I think, is perhaps a bit of a concern.
My concern is about the stranded assets that we might be anticipating as billions of dollars get put into projects and then, all of a sudden, the rug gets pulled out from under them.
I'll speak to indigenous companies. What do you see as a backstop for some of these indigenous companies that find that, after all of the efforts they've put in, there is no longer a market because we have chosen to go in a different direction?
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Last week, I believe, we had Calvin Helin here, who is certainly a great advocate for his community. Basically, what he indicated was that they're tired of the eco-colonialism that is going on and different groups saying, “We know what is best for you. We're going to be there to help you. We're going to make sure you do it the right way, which is our way.” However, their expertise is saying, “Let's move forward. We know this is a global problem. We know this is a global concern. We are there with the skills to move it forward.”
There's always this other story that comes back to say, “Maybe we'll sell TMX to some indigenous group.” Unless you're going to sell it for $21 billion or whatever it happens to be when the final sum is there, there's going to be another group that says, “You just got through subsidizing this enterprise that has now bought TMX.” There's never an end, and that's the problem any time there is a government that decides it's going to get engaged in major projects like this. I'm concerned about what the future will be.
To go back to what I mentioned earlier to the minister, we see what is happening in Europe. We can always talk about how, yes, they would like to have some hydrogen and they would like to see us progress. The fact that we've cut ourselves off at the knees and we're not there to help them now...you can't undo that.
The Europeans' industry is falling apart. There are farmers who are being told, if they have three greenhouses, to pick which one they're going to keep. That's going to encourage a lot of difficult decisions—
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much. I appreciate your time.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I'm really happy to be back here at the industry committee. I think the people I recognize the best are the clerk and the analysts, but it's certainly nice to be able to discuss this.
In the meantime, I've been at the environment, natural resources and international trade committees, and I think some of the discussions that we have here certainly tie into what we've been looking at.
In the analysis that we were given by Mavennet, I noticed a digital passport for a barrel of oil that indicates where it comes from and all of that type of thing, and I think that's so critical in this discussion. Where do these things originate? What is the final use of that barrel, and when that product is used, where do those molecules go? I think that's the whole thing that we're trying to analyze here.
I think it's important, but here's the point that I want to delve into. There are the environmental impacts and human rights—if we just take a look at energy. All of these sorts of things are great. We talk about how we can then sell our product—if people would appreciate what we do—around the world, and people would see how we manage the environment, how we deal with greenhouse gases, all of the achievements that we have. We'd have something to sell. However, once it gets mixed into the big pot where all the oil is, how do we know that our oil is contributing what we want it to contribute? So, if you're taking oil out of some African country and you're mixing that in, how are you ever going to get them to commit to participation in this particular type of project?
Perhaps, Mr. Mandic, you could talk about that. We can say what we want about what we have and where we're going to sell it, but if the rest of the world sits back and says, “Well, we're not going to do that; we don't want to commit ourselves”, how are we going to make that work for us?
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Well, we say that. In Canada, we do some amazing things, and we can all go through how the lists of the products that we have and the things that we're going to sell around the world are great, but we somehow seem to demonize that. We're always fighting that. There's always this political to and fro. People are saying, “Well, environmentally, we want to ensure this”, so you go buy stuff from someplace else where they don't care.
That's the point I'm getting at. If we take a look at authoritarian governments, there's no help in human rights. They're protecting their oil and gas industries, which are then being sold off before any of that money is ever shared with their countrymen. These are the sorts of things they do, and I'm just asking how we ever get to that stage where that blockchain becomes a benefit. You know, I'm kind of talking about the same thing.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
With that same thing, eventually our companies are going to go someplace else because they can't make it here. Everyone is looking at a pen, but just looking at the phone, you look at battery production and all of the other things that are associated with this, and if you don't know where it's coming from...and then you say, that's okay, I just bought a phone, but where did you buy it from?
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
I think this is the advantage that blockchain has and I think that's really a critical aspect of this.
Is my time just about over?
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