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Results: 1 - 15 of 354
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
Thanks very much.
Thanks very much, Mr. Chair.
One of the questions I have for you, Ms. Nicol, given that I come from northern Saskatchewan, relates to the high levels of uranium that we have, especially in northern Saskatchewan. In northern Saskatchewan a lot of the first nations and Métis communities have high cancer rates. Now it could be radon, but regarding the communities themselves, you mentioned that you had done a study in northern Alberta, but have you guys looked at northern Saskatchewan? We have a lot of myths out there: it could be from the radon, it could be from the food, it could be from the smoking, it could be from a number of environmental factors. Have you looked into that?
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'd like to thank the witnesses for coming, and Gary, one of our colleagues, as well.
I'm really torn on this. For myself, when I was a kid, both my parents were Legion members. They both served in the air force. My father was a Legion president in Gibsons, British Columbia, then also in Slocan, where I still have Legion membership. My mom was the ladies auxiliary president as well. When the Legions were actually being built in the small communities of Slocan and Gibsons, I saw that they were paramount for the veterans. I remember as a five-year-old and six-year-old participating in Remembrance Day but also marching. My parents taught me how to march using the drum to lead the parade. A lot of my friends, through participating, got to know what actually transpired.
For myself, I joined the RCMP when I was 22 and served in the force for over 18 years. Being in the RCMP, I would attend the Remembrance Day ceremony. My detachment commander would ask members who would want to go, and I always wanted to go. I wanted to remember my family's contributions, my grandfathers', my brother's, in serving overseas. Having lived in British Columbia and Saskatchewan, where it is delegated not as a national stat but where everyone doesn't have to go to work, I don't look at it like that at all. I look at it as a day of remembrance.
Back on July 7, 2006, as detachment commander in Spiritwood, Saskatchewan, at 9:24 I faced the worst fear of any policeman's duty: a 10-33 call. It means an officer needs assistance. Shots were fired. Three of my members were shot and two passed away, right in my own detachment. Nothing is worse than having to go to a loved one's house, having to go to your neighbour's, an RCMP colleague's house, to tell them that their husband has just been shot.
So I'm really torn on this, because I look at it not as a holiday; I look at it as remembering, remembering those who fall. Whenever I give a speech, I talk about Marc Bourdages and Robin Cameron. These are the two members who fell and gave their lives trying to serve and protect Canadians in Canada. Police officers in Canada and people who wear the uniform and serve in the military know the risks. They know the challenges that face them if they do serve overseas. It's a well-known risk and everyone accepts that risk. If the Maker says it's your time to go, it's your time to go.
I'm listening to the Legion, to you, Steven, and you, Bradley, talking about the Legion. I remember as a kid going to the Legion meetings, going to the functions, going at Christmas and listening to the veterans talk about their participation overseas, going to Remembrance Days, and listening to the veterans there talk. The best knowledge we have is when the Legion opens its doors to the general public and they talk about what's going on, they talk about the challenges they faced or what they saw. It's one of the only times they ever talk, because it's their own environment. It's their own little community where they actually feel safe. They'll take a young child and bring them into a small room, and then the young child there will ask questions for everybody. I feel that at times that's probably the best way for some of the veterans actually to heal. I suffer from PTSD, but the more I talk about it the better I feel.
We talk about consultation. We talk about groups. You were talking in regard to Legions across the country. I belong to Branch 276 in Slocan, and I get a lot of mail. I get a lot of recommendations. I've never once seen any type of letter to the membership asking the membership what they feel or how they feel about a national holiday.
People say, “We stood up and we did this consultation.” Did you keep track of all the members who were asked? That's all I ask. That's probably the best way to go about it, by asking each Legion member or associate member how they feel about a national holiday. We hear about dollars and cents and how this is going to affect the economy. I don't think that's right. People put their lives in jeopardy and give up their lives to protect our country and other countries abroad. That's how I personally feel.
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
I have one question with regard to the membership. There's a difference between associate members, those who are the ones who haven't served, and regular members, who have served in the military or in the RCMP. How many people attended your annual general meeting? I'd just like to know those numbers. That's where the big difference can be. You're going to have people making decisions who haven't served, who don't understand the sacrifices that have taken place.
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
I thank the witnesses for coming in.
Allan, you mentioned in regard to the Indian Act how it's impeding development for first nations business opportunities on reserve. One of the things we mentioned, or what first nations have been doing or have been in partnership...was the First Nations Land Management Act, and how that's providing opportunities for businesses. You look at Osoyoos; you look at Westbank where they've moved away from that and we've seen them grow.
One of the things that Carol mentioned was in regard to first nations being able to draft their own legislation. Bill C-428, which I drafted, would allow first nations to develop their own band bylaws. Would that assist? That's one.
Two, in regard to first nations, also in my private member's bill, the Indian Act would actually be removed, and first nations could grow their own crops and sell them. How do you feel about that? Do you feel it would be beneficial?
I look at opportunities for first nations across Canada. They have different soils where things could be grown. You look in, say, Ontario where tobacco is being grown, for instance. You look in the Prairies where wheat, potatoes, corn, and anything like that can be grown for, say, alcohol production. Then you look at B.C., where they're actually growing grapes and making their own wine in Osoyoos. Could you elaborate further on that?
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
I'm glad our Chair remembered the format.
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, Minister, for attending.
Minister, I'm seeing that $38.2 million has been set aside for the Arctic research station. Can you tell me how this money is going to be spent for research and development, and how it is going to be formatted?
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
Could I maybe get some follow-up on that?
Is there any participation from any other countries in this program?
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
Minister, you mentioned the $8.2 million from the supplementary estimates that will go towards the implementation of the CHARS science and technology program.
Could you elaborate on that, please?
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
Yes, thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'd like to ask the witnesses here, with the old food mail program that was designed under the Liberals, is it correct at that time—
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
Let me finish, Mr. Chair.
Anyway, what I'm kind of curious—
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
Yes. I'll start with these programs: Nutrition North and the food mail program. Now, what program would be better? One where you actually get food or where you get a carburetor?
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
Yes. I came from a detachment where we had something tragic happen.
On the 10-metre rule, when I was going through training, we were trained that within that range if a person holding a knife or any type of weapon comes at you and you're carrying a sidearm, number one, your safety is going to be compromised and, two, the individuals you're trying to protect are also compromised.
But what I see in the pictures here is a lot of vessels, probably within more than a 10-metre range. Now, vessels can be used as weapons, to put it bluntly, and have been used as weapons. When you're on a vessel or on an ice floe, how do you guys feel when things escalate? Do you feel that your safety is in jeopardy? Have there been instances where officers have come close to putting their lives in jeopardy? Or have you experienced any losses?
View Rob Clarke Profile
CPC (SK)
I'm looking at the Farley Mowat boat here.
You talked about having licences and, from a law enforcement standpoint, individuals carrying side arms, or firearms. But I also look at the observers on their ships, one with a harpoon gun on the front of the bow. That's on slide number seven.
Have any of the fishers ever been threatened or felt threatened by one of those weapons, or have they ever been pointed at the fishers? This can escalate and things can happen within a millisecond of escalating, from just individuals out harvesting, to the point where, I hate to say it, shots are fired.
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