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Results: 1 - 15 of 352
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Gourd, the program Hockey Night in Canada will continue to be broadcast free of charge by the CBC, without the need to subscribe to a cable service. Am I right?
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
Are you aware of the status of the negotiations with regard to Hockey Night in Canada?
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
You may recall that, in the quite intense discussions two years ago, my colleagues on the committee asserted that the fact that that program was broadcast free of charge in English Canada and not in Quebec was an unacceptable injustice.
Mr. Sauvageau, you no doubt remember those discussions.
Now, from what I understand from your remarks, you're happy for the rest of Canada. Nevertheless, Quebeckers who want to see their hockey on Saturday night will suddenly have to subscribe to a cable service. Is that correct?
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
I don't disagree, but I would like to know what the present situation is. Is Radio-Canada negotiating with RDS? Are you telling us that you have a contract, that it's over or that it's being negotiated?
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
And you have roughly 60 days to do so?
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
You say that the popularity of hockey has declined considerably in Quebec. I'm willing to believe that, but is it possible that's due to the fact that less and less hockey is being broadcast in French in Quebec? Isn't that becoming a circle? It's hard for me to believe that our young Quebeckers are no longer interested in hockey.
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
You can watch those games, but you still have to have access to cable.
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Ladies and gentlemen, to begin with, I'd like to talk to you about workers eligibility for EI benefits. I'd like to try to set the factual record straight. My colleague from the Bloc, Mr. Gagnon, spoke of 39%, whereas Ms. Vincent spoke of 88%. I have looked into this, especially since last week. Because last week we were given a report produced for the Canada Labour Congress by Statistics Canada. The department, for its part, told us that the 88% figure that it had arrived at came from Statistics Canada.
What's going on? How can the discrepancy be so great? There's something wrong, and I think it's due to the methods used. Of those who currently work at the department, but who could have the misfortune of losing their job tomorrow morning, 88% are eligible.
The Canada Labour Congress study includes everyone who has contributed but is not contributing for the time being. Included, for example, are students who currently cannot be in the labour market because they are at school. There are also two or three other categories. Personally, it seems clear to me that this is a comparison of apples and oranges. I find it very unfortunate for such figures to be spread around without at least explaining where they come from.
That said—
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Ms. Maxwell, you've painted a very interesting picture of what our country could look like over the coming years. You mentioned productivity and high wages. I would like you to explain to us how this could be accomplished.
I would, however, like to deal first with an issue that you mentioned yourself. The working poor, people who work a normal year and have children. Ms. Bradshaw, my colleague and Minister of Labour, is also as you know the minister responsible for homelessness, and she toured Canada. In several areas, she noticed that families were being housed in church basements.
These people work but they are not in a position to be able to pay rent, feed their children and dress them. On the other hand, I have a difficult time understanding how people who receive social assistance benefits are also entitled to dental care, glasses, and a series of other privileges for free. Good for them! I have nothing against it. Obviously, if people are receiving benefits it's because they are entitled to them, and that there are good reasons for it.
I personally wonder how we could help our working poor remain in the labour market. They could in fact be tempted to take another course. You see?
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Ladies and Gentlemen, you have all stated that certain aspects of the Employment Insurance Program are rather social programs and that they do not truly fit with what we normally mean by employment insurance measures. I am referring more specifically to parental leave, and other such things.
Mr. Woolford, you talk about a fixed rate for the coming years. Would you be in favour of the inclusion of programs such as parental leave? Do you believe it would be preferable to exclude such programs from employment insurance?
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
As I listened to you speak, it seemed to me that we should perhaps go back to using the term “unemployment insurance” instead of talking of “employment insurance”. In the end, that is the real issue.
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Chair, Mr. Taillon, in his presentation, talked about devolving to the provinces certain aspects of employment insurance or certain employment insurance programs, if I understood correctly. I would invite Mr. Taillon to explain this further. I would like to understand what he is getting at.
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
Like the training program, for example.
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
The training program which has already been...
View Yolande Thibeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
Which has already been devolved, with results that are perhaps not those we had been counting on. That is my opinion.
Results: 1 - 15 of 352 | Page: 1 of 24

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