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Results: 1 - 15 of 789
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My question is for Mr. Ferguson. It is a little more general.
This is not the first report you submit to us on matters pertaining to first nations. Very unfortunately, these reports tell us time and again that first nations don't have all of the services they might expect. Promises made are hardly, if ever, kept.
In Canada, in terms of services, would it be that there is one set of criteria for Canadians and another for first nations? In fact, given the number of reports tabled in recent years indicating that first nations still have poor quality services, the question arises. Are there two standards for the public service? If not, how do you explain that once again a report is indicating that first nations are not receiving what they should?
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Mr. Ferguson, in point 4.4, you talk about social determinants as one of the essential aspects that harm the health of first nations' members the most. You talk specifically about overcrowded housing, high rates of unemployment and problems with access to drinking water. The problems mean that first nations currently have a considerably lower life expectancy than the general Canadian population. Statistics Canada data indicate that these problems are very serious and that, unfortunately, with the very significant population growth of first nations, they are worsening rather than resolving themselves.
You told us about coordination among the different stakeholders. Since prevention and public health are important aspects of access to health care, I would like to know if, in terms of coordination, the department is making an effort to resolve problems that aggravate the health of first nations individuals, for example the lack of access to drinking water, overcrowded housing and poor follow-up for psychological care, which results in very high suicide rates.
Are efforts really being made to address these problems? I won't even get into problems with food, which are significant all over Canada.
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Perron, on page 3 of your presentation, you indicate an 88% compliance rate for controlled substances. I did a bit of medical law during my internship and if the non-compliance rate was close to 1%, the Order of Pharmacists of Quebec would intervene. You say that the non-compliance rate is 24 times higher than what is accepted in a hospital. I wouldn't be pleased with that.
Can you explain to me how your service came to distribute such a high rate, 12%, of non-compliant medications? That is really huge. That is between 24 and 36 times higher than what is acceptable in a hospital in Montreal or Toronto.
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
The overall compliance rate for your service is 46%. That kind of percentage won't get you a degree. Even 65% won't get you the kind of degree that you would want to boast about.
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
We've been talking about administering care, but in health care, there's also the aspect of prevention. I don't know if you if you read the documents from the Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay concerning nutrition problems in Canada. Unfortunately, there are people who are dying because they don't have decent drinking water, because they don't have healthy food to eat, and because there is no follow-up for major psychological care. People are really dying. These people can't wait five years.
There needs to be a change in attitudes, because we can't function this way. You can't ask us to look elsewhere when people are dying.
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Excuse me, but there is a problem here. Everything you're saying is all well and good. But as concerns the problem and the solution, if you look at this situation from a statistical point of view, you can see that the situation is getting worse. It is not improving. This is a major problem. We are able to prove statistically that communities are in danger. What will it take for the situation to improve even a little bit? I'm not talking about stabilizing things, but improving things. We can't go backwards.
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My thanks to the witnesses for appearing.
My first question is very short.
We have noted that you have fairly substantial resources in terms of the budget. In terms of human resources, do you have enough quality computer scientists to handle all the management duties? Or do you have to use subcontractors, who assess the work of other subcontractors?
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Very well.
We have also received other information, if you will, that your officers in charge of receiving people do not always have an interface that enables them to intercept criminals coming into Canada, even if they have previously committed offences in Canada. That is apparently directly related to a problem with implementing a computer and information-sharing system.
First, is that a major issue?
Second, if there is a problem, will it be resolved very quickly?
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
We are happy to learn that the problem will be taken care of very quickly, but there is also the capitalization issue. We see in your five-year plan that you have considerable funding, which is not being fully utilized.
Does that lead to an increased backlog in some of your programs that are already behind? Given that you have the money you need, it is difficult to understand why you are not using it to address the observed shortcomings and backlogs.
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
As for my last question, you have already set the stage by talking about interdependence.
In Canada, we are governed by rights that protect personal information. In those conditions, how will you manage your entire network and the interdependence situation so that the law would always be enforced properly?
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Normand, you said earlier that some programs might be co-managed and others were managed exclusively by you. Everything is overseen by a committee. Will the committee be able to ensure that the architecture of the entire IT network is interactive? Will we end up with a silo monster? Or will we have something with enough computer gateways to be able to support a secure network?
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Of course, unfortunate situations have to be taken into account. A lady complained about being assaulted by someone who never should have entered Canada. We heard about a woman with mental health problems who was refused access to an airplane because her medical records had been transferred to foreign authorities without her permission. You will tell me things like that happen only occasionally, but these are the types of incidents that must be avoided.
Will the system you are currently developing manage to do that? I know that haste makes waste, but we still have to get results within a reasonable timeframe. Are you headed toward that?
This question is for you and for the Auditor General. Are we headed toward a system that will be truly satisfactory?
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I thank the witnesses for having come here to meet with us.
Mr. Marsland, on page 1 of the report you say something very important about tax exemptions, reports, deductions and credits. The purpose of all of these tax expenditures is quite well-defined in the report entitledTax Expenditures and Evaluations 2013 and what it says on flow-through shares.
I read and analyzed that document. I would like to draw your attention to page 51, where it says that the $1.4 billion yearly amount generated by these activities particularly benefits the high-income people who invest in flow-through shares.
Regarding that measure overall, not only do you not say whether this $1.4 billion amount could be financed in some other way than through flow-through shares—your report does not talk about that—but you say that the rich are the ones who mostly benefit from that tax deduction, which poses a problem.
I have a question on this. Tax measures have as their objective the reduction, so to speak, of wealth inequality. With these measures, the opposite is being achieved. And that is in fact noted on page 1 of the document provided by the Parliamentary Budget Officer who says this: “Over time, as inequality has increased, and as various tax and transfers have been added or removed, their impact on inequality has also changed.”
We have noted that since 1980—with a peak in 1991 and another in 2000— financial iniquity has only increased and continues to grow. Why do you not intervene to improve that situation rather than making it worse through your decisions?
View Alain Giguère Profile
NDP (QC)
If the objective is that important, explain one thing to me.
In theory, Registered Education Savings Plans were supposed to increase the number of university students. However, Canada Revenue Agency studies indicate that this is a total flop, that the plan has not increased the number of students in our universities, and that the people who benefit from it would in any case have paid for their children's higher education. However, this measure is renewed year after year, to the point where the objective of increasing the number of university students has been totally lost. It is simply a legal tax avoidance measure.
If the objective has absolutely not been reached according to your own analyses, why are you maintaining a measure that in fact increases financial iniquity?
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