Hansard
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 249
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Deputy Prime Minister has answered that question. We have no reliable information proving that the United States is conducting activities in Canada that are in breach of Canadian or international law.
As I myself said in this House, if we find out that Canadian territory is being used in contravention of Canadian or international law, we will of course raise the issue with the United States. Canada expects its territory, including its air space, not to be used by foreign governments for activities that are in breach of Canadian or international law.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the minister has answered this question very clearly.
We have no reliable information to support the suspicions the Bloc Québécois is trying to stir up once again. There is no reliable information to confirm that Canadian air space was used in breach of Canadian or international law.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, do I take it that the opposition is congratulating the government for having made this agreement in principle that has been reached for the transfer of the federal hopper car fleet to the Farmer Rail Car Coalition for a total of $205 million? I think this is good news for Saskatchewan farmers and the western farmers.
I think the opposition should be acknowledging that after much effort on the part of this government we have finally delivered something that is going to be very important with the sale of these hopper cars for our western farmers.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I will certainly bring the member's question to the attention of my colleague, the Minister of Transport. I understand that he already made it quite clear that there have been no negotiations with Northwest Bulk Terminals, no agreement has been reached, and the government has not committed to any purchase price for Ridley Terminals. The request for proposal process resulted in--
Mr. Jay Hill: That's the point. You're dithering.
Hon. Pierre Pettigrew: Well, I will make sure that my colleague, the Minister of Transport, is seized of the very important situation there and he will certainly act.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, if the Bloc has specific information, it should bring it to the attention of the public.
The Deputy Prime Minister was very clear. She said that there was no reliable information concerning any flight that would have been in violation of Canadian and international law. Now that specific flights have been brought to our attention, I am confident that she will do her job, as always.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Transport and the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness will certainly have an opportunity to look into this matter again and to determine whether the information from the Bloc is relevant and how it might have been useful.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, this morning, together with my colleagues responsible for international cooperation, and the Francophonie, and with our special advisor to Haiti, we have announced a new contribution of $33 million for Haiti. This contribution will be used essentially to support projects aimed at security sector reform, social and economic reconstruction, reconciliation and the resumption of the democratic process.
We are also proud to work with the many organizations in Canada and with the Haitian diaspora that will see these projects through.
Canada will support Haitians as long as it takes.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, we appreciate the Bloc Québécois members' humour this morning. It is a change from their usual bad mood.
Transport Canada intends to take the necessary steps to ensure that Canadian National completes the bridge repairs in accordance with its obligations and commitments in this regard.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Deputy Prime Minister has been very clear. We have no reliable information, nor any reason that would lead us to believe that the aircraft that landed at St. John's was anything other than a private plane. If we were to learn that the U.S. was indeed using Canadian territory for those purposes, we would obviously raise the issue with the appropriate American authorities.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, first, I think the opposition should acknowledge the leadership that this government has been playing at the United Nations. For the third year in a row we have been winning this resolution on the human rights abuse by Iran. This was an extraordinary achievement by our government last week at the United Nations.
On the nuclear issue, we have absolutely condemned the words of the Prime Minister of Iran on the wiping out of Israel. We have rejected that. We have condemned it. We are working with our allies, the United States and the European Union. I am one who believes that soon we will have to take Iran to the Security Council over this nuclear issue.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), I am pleased to table, in both official languages, the first annual report of the Global Partnership Program.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I have the greatest respect for each of the former premiers of Quebec, even those rejected by the PQ and the one they booed the other evening.
Political life is so demanding that anyone who devotes himself to it deserves our admiration. I am very sorry to think I may have hurt the feelings of one of them. I was referring to the losing speeches by the PQ—their speeches in defeat—when I passed comment on the tributes being paid one after the other, the other night. I certainly do not think that the people who held such office were losers.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, if there is one government that has taken responsibility for supply management it is the Liberal government, which established the system. We want to go to Hong Kong. My colleagues, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and the Minister for International Trade, have just said we intend to protect farmers in Quebec and supply management throughout Canada.
And this is the party that wants to overturn the government and weaken our colleagues who want to go and negotiate matters of agriculture and supply management. They are more concerned about their totally partisan issues than about defending agriculture, just when we are going to Hong Kong to defend a strong Canada.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, I am very pleased that my colleague, the Minister of Defence, proposed this evening's debate here in this House. I am grateful to him for allowing me to speak so soon even though he was the one who proposed this very important debate.
I am addressing the House today to speak about the remarkable work Canada has accomplished in Afghanistan.
Our country plays a leading role in the international action to help Afghanistan become a stable, democratic, self-sufficient state that respects human rights and that will never harbour terrorists again. Achieving this objective is essential to maintaining peace and international security, and to bringing about a secure and prosperous future for the people of Afghanistan. Afghanistan, which is recovering after more than 20 years of conflict and drought, remains one of the poorest countries in the world, a major source of narcotics and therefore a fragile state. Canada provides an essential contribution to this country.
In order to optimize our intervention in Afghanistan, we must adopt a strategic approach based on the unparalleled added value Canada can offer. Our commitment in Afghanistan is a concrete manifestation of the international policy statement that calls for a government-wide approach based on pursuing our strategic interests abroad.
Canada's commitment in Afghanistan is based on specialized knowledge and the contributions of various federal departments and agencies, such as Foreign Affairs, National Defence, CIDA and the RCMP, or what we call the three ds, meaning diplomacy, defence and development assistance, in a coordinated and integrated manner.
With regard to our diplomatic commitment, which I will focus on—my colleagues from National Defence and Development will follow—Canada opened an embassy in Kabul in September 2003.
This embassy provides the diplomatic presence needed to ensure effective support for Canadian defence and development efforts in close collaboration with our Afghan partners and the international community. Canadian diplomats elsewhere are also working to support the work being done in Afghanistan, particularly at NATO and the United Nations, and through the G8.
Thanks to recent provincial and parliamentary elections, Afghanistan has fulfilled the initial requirements of its democratic transition as set out by the Afghans and the international community, when they met in Bonn in 2001. Other achievements. within the framework of the Bonn process, include the adoption of a constitution and presidential elections.
Canada has been a key supporter of the transition to democracy in Afghanistan. The resources deployed at all levels of government in support of the recent elections there are clear evidence of this. The contribution comprised financial support, the sending of election observers, and assistance to the Afghans in maintaining security throughout the electoral process from the beginning right through to election day.
By declaring themselves as candidates, a decision liable to put them in danger, by going to the polls despite the risk to their safety, by speaking out in favour of reform, the Afghans have shown their support for change.
Democracy has now taken root in Afghanistan and is starting to bear fruit, particularly in establishing the people's confidence and pride in their own country.
Canada's efforts have helped Afghanistan achieve real results in other areas as well, in particular in reforming the security sector. The demilitarization agenda is critical to stability in Afghanistan. The successful completion of the first two phases of the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration program in Afghanistan this past July saw some 63,000 former combatants lay down their arms.
Canada has played an important role in this process, fostering political support through diplomatic channels, the second largest donor, disbursing close to $21 million in support of the program and providing a secure environment for former combatants to disarm.
We remain committed to the final phase of the process, reintegration, and we will continue to work with the United Nations and our international partners to ensure its successful completion.
Canada was instrumental in the establishment of a highly successful heavy weapons cantonment process in Afghanistan, the same weapons that were used to destroy much of the country. Our top military officials, working closely with the Canadian embassy in Kabul, helped to create the momentum and will for a program that many thought was impossible. Thanks to Canadian efforts, over 10,000 tanks, heavy artillery and other weapons are now safely secured.
Afghanistan is one of the most mine affected countries in the world, with over 800 victims per year. In 2003, Afghanistan acceded to the Ottawa Convention on Landmines. Canada is a lead donor in mine action, having contributed approximately $47 million to mine action assistance in Afghanistan since 1989. These funds have helped to clear 10 million to 15 million mines in Afghanistan.
There is no question that important progress has been made. Afghanistan is on the road to recovery. The challenge now is to ensure momentum continues. We will work with Afghanistan and our international partners to consolidate and build on the achievements of the last four years.
An example of this is the recent deployment of Canada's provincial reconstruction team to Kandahar. In order to respond to the multifaceted and complex nature of reinforcing the authority and building the capacity of the Afghan government in Kandahar, the provincial reconstruction team brings together Canadian Forces personnel, civilian police, diplomats and aid workers in an innovative and integrated Canadian effort of the three Ds of diplomacy, defence and development.
With the provincial reconstruction team and the February 2006 deployment of a 1,500 strong task force and brigade headquarters, Canada has positioned itself to play a leadership role in southern Afghanistan and provide an enabling environment for Afghanistan's institutional and economic development.
In order to effectively approach outstanding challenges, the first step is to recognize and empower Afghan leadership. This requires a commitment to take the necessary steps to ensure that Afghan authorities have the capacity to carry out their required functions. We support an intensified focus on institution building and emphasize the need to ensure that international community efforts result in systemic changes. It is only by building lasting capacity that we can ensure that our investment lasts long beyond our engagement.
Canada has emphasized the need to deal with the recalcitrant commanders who continue to challenge the authority of the central government by adhering to illicit pursuits. These non-compliant power brokers must be made aware that there are consequences to their actions. Their continued involvement with narcotics, illegal armed groups and human rights violations must be addressed. Without a commitment to take decisive action against those who most overtly defy the rule of law, they will continue to subvert our best efforts and contribute to instability.
We have continued to stress the necessity of a global view if past injustices in Afghanistan are to be put behind us. Any government needs the trust of all its citizens. The inclusion of those responsible for serious offences in the past against either Afghan law or international law would cast doubt on the government's credibility. Although the process of addressing past wrongs will no doubt be fraught with emotion, as is the case with any post-conflict situation, this political sensitivity can be mitigated by a process that is transparent, objective and founded in law.
Canada supports the work being done at this time by the Afghan authorities, in close collaboration with the Afghan human rights commission, with a view to drafting a national transitional justice strategy.
I must say how very pleased I am to take part in this evening's very important debate on Canada's role in Afghanistan.
View Pierre Pettigrew Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, that is a very important question and I appreciate it. I am sure my colleague, the Minister of National Defence, when he addresses the House a little later, will certainly provide further information.
As a government, it is very clear that we would not have embarked on such an important mission if we were putting the lives of our Canadian citizens at risk in a way that is not absolutely necessary. Yes, of course, lives are at risk in the military but obviously we want to ensure we put all the chances on our side. This is something the Minister of National Defence has looked into personally when we were going through the decision making process in the government.
It was a very important priority for the Minister of National Defence and the government in general to ensure that we were sending our Canadian soldiers with the appropriate training and equipment to do the best possible job. I do not think General Hillier would have accepted any such risk either if he had not been confident that we were taking the appropriate actions before sending our Canadian soldiers there.
Results: 1 - 15 of 249 | Page: 1 of 17

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data