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Results: 1 - 15 of 496
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. Thank you to all of you for being here.
I have two questions I'd like to focus on. Perhaps, Senator, you could address the first one and then the second one will be for all three of you.
Canada has concluded a free trade agreement with Cameroon. I think we are doing some good things there. I know that when I was in Cameroon three years ago, they were talking about 13 billion dollars' worth of private sector money coming into Cameroon, mostly in initiatives to build hydroelectric dams for electricity. Is there an opportunity for the private sector money that's going into countries all over Africa to be incented to participate in some malaria reduction program? Obviously there's a vested interest for them because they need a healthy workforce in order to be productive. Is there some mechanism that could be established there?
My second question is for all of you. You've noted the work we're doing in maternal, newborn, and child health. One of the initiatives is to get front-line health care workers out into the most rural and remote areas and provide care for the most vulnerable people. Being proactive, is there something we can do to help increase the ability of the health care system in a country, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, to be more robust?
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Chair, I stand corrected by my colleague. Apparently it's a FIPA that we've signed with Cameroon, a foreign investment promotion and protection agreement, but we are moving forward with trade agreements with Cameroon, and I believe there is great opportunity. I'm very pleasantly surprised to see that Cameroon is now advertising on our television stations, looking for investment coming in. It's exciting.
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Thanks to all of you for being here.
Ms. Dawson, it's nice to see you again. We talked about having a conversation when you were coming to Mississauga, but unfortunately we're still going to be in Ottawa, so that conversation isn't going to work. It's nice to have you here.
To the chief executive council, when you put your report together, I see you focused a great deal on skills and jobs. All of you have talked about regulatory issues, but in the conversation today we really haven't talked about jobs and how we find credential comparisons. We have the problem in Canada, for goodness' sake. We have provinces in which everybody has their own designation, and it's constitutional. I'm not sure how we get past that, but right now in Canada we have 447 different organizations that are credential-granting organizations. If you're a teacher in Ontario, you can't move to Manitoba and be a teacher in Manitoba without getting your licence in Manitoba.
First, what commentary do you have on this and how we approach it between the three countries? Are there areas where we could take one or two occupations and start chipping away at those, so that we can start some pan-North American recognition of skills in order to start more labour mobility between our countries?
I don't know who wants to start, but I simply put that out.
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you very much, Chair.
Thank you so much for being here.
Carlo, it's very nice to see you again at this committee. It's been a long time, but welcome back.
I was really pleased to hear you say, Mr. Wilson, that we can find the positive things we've worked on and start building on those. We recently had our Minister of Transport in Washington making an announcement with the administration down there on issues related to railway safety. That's been a long time coming. It's taken some disasters in North America that have really pushed us to this point. I think we're seeing some very positive movement on that—no pun intended—and it's really great to see that we have some agreement going on. The minister came back really buoyed with a positive attitude about the things we can work on. I think those are the kinds of things we need to focus on to say, “Look, we got this done as a North American continent; what's the next project?”
I'll make a comment on your own comments, Mr. Robertson, and then I'll ask for Carlo's commentary. Perhaps the other gentlemen can jump in afterwards.
Mr. Robertson, you spoke about how the United States needs to know from a security perspective that “we've got their back”—I think that was the phrase you used. The United States is exceedingly cautious now, even nearly a decade and a half after 9/11. Even Canadians now need a passport to get into the United States, something that we never had to do. It was almost a free border.
Carlo, I wonder if you could comment on this. Are there areas of expertise that Canada has that we could work with the Mexicans on in terms of the issues relating to security, which would perhaps move the dial on removing the visa requirement? What are the things we do really well that would be of assistance there?
Perhaps, gentlemen, you could both comment afterwards.
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
That's interesting.
Do I have more time?
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all of you for being here this morning. We apologize for the short change you got the other day when you got cancelled, but some things are beyond our control.
I really appreciate the comments that each of you made about collaboration. You talked about collaboration with governments, with UN agencies, and we just had a conversation about collaboration with UNICEF.
Mr. Wilkinson, you said:
Our partnership with the United Nations agencies, governments around the world, private sector lenders such as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and a wide range of other civil society organizations has opened the doors for collaboration in other areas of shared concern, such as those we are addressing here today.
One of the things we know is that the call for ODA has recently been $135 billion, and we know that in the future it's going to take trillions of dollars. That is the expectation to fulfill the development goals that we're looking at. One of the areas that has not been well explored for a long time is the collaboration with private sector.
Mr. Wilkinson, I wonder if you could speak a little bit about that. How have you found success in working with private sector? Are there areas where we can move forward with that to leverage knowledge and expertise and financing?
Ms. Kerby, I'll give you a little side note. My son-in-law, who did his doctorate in electrical engineering here in North America, is back in Ghana, his country of origin, and he is building solar fields north of Kumasi. The project is $150 million U.S. going into that country, creating jobs, creating prosperity, creating tax revenues for the government, but it's also creating sustainability. I wonder if each of you could speak to how we can harness this kind of an investment going into a country that will enable us to do more with our development dollars.
Mr. Wilkinson, perhaps you'd like to start.
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
May I say that the money that goes into their foundation, by and large, comes from contributions from Microsoft and its success?
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Do we have time for the other two?
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thanks to all of our witnesses for being here.
Ms. Wright, I will pose my first question to you. In your remarks, you talked about this treaty being signed and ratified by China, the U.K., and the UN. You asked what treaties are really worth if they can't be acted on. If the treaties are ignored, undone, or not implemented, what role does the rest of the world have in commenting on this situation?
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you for those comments.
I toss my second question to the gentlemen, and ask you if you would comment.
Mr. Lung, you said that Canada cannot really help us, as it would be seen as meddling, and the only answer is for Hong Kong to come up with an agreement.
Mr. Tiberghien, you talked about some of the issues where you think Canada could help.
We have an enormous diaspora from Hong Kong and mainland China. Is the diaspora, first of all, as positioned on this as we see in Hong Kong or in China? We have graduated an enormous number of mediators in our country. Is there room for Canada to be part of the bridge-building here? Can we have a role in starting some discussions that may nurture something down the road?
I just turn that to each of you for your comment.
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Saving face for both sides.
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Chair.
Thanks to our witnesses.
Some years ago a Hollywood movie came out, starring Tom Selleck, that was called High Road to China. I always remember one phrase that a gentleman in that movie said: the oxen are slow, but the earth is patient.
Perhaps that's exactly what China thought, from Beijing, that it was going to accomplish by just waiting this all out, and it didn't count on the explosion of technology and the influence or the exposure to western culture that has happened in the last 20 years.
Mr. Burton, you mentioned in your commentary that in 1998 Canada came forward with assistance after the declaration was signed, to help China discover or move towards some diplomatic or some more western thought in democracy. Could you tell us a little bit about what the objectives were? What did we accomplish, and is there anything there that we can go back to now in our discussions with China about human rights and what it agreed to do?
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Don't give up; don't give up.
I'd like to pose a question to our young people.
Ms. Eu, you spoke about the fact that you are not going to be able to run in another election. To you and to the students, do you fear any reprisals? Are there things that you would be able to tell this committee that you can't do, or you won't be allowed to do?
View Lois Brown Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Chair.
This kind of follows up on the question Mr. Garneau just asked. One of the areas that we really didn't touch on today is the whole aspect of the business community and where it sits on these issues. Are the business ties becoming closer between Hong Kong and the west, or are the ties for business becoming closer to mainland China? What kind of influence are they having on this debate?
That is for anyone who wants to take the question.
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