Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 318
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-06-19 10:18 [p.15335]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague across the way for his speech.
Something about the government's attitude toward this subject really bothers me. They are acting as though mechanisms to ensure public safety were not already in place. Specifically, I would like to talk about the Parole Board of Canada. Its mandate gives it the power to refuse parole when public safety is at risk, and victims have opportunities to have their say.
My question for my colleague across the way is therefore a simple one. What tools would his bill create that the Parole Board of Canada does not already have? I do not see what this bill adds.
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-06-19 11:11 [p.15343]
Mr. Speaker, as this parliamentary session winds down, let me tell you about the injustice one of my constituents is facing.
The son of a soldier, Edney Charbonneau joined our armed forces himself. After eight years of service, he became a federal government customs officer and investigator. He obtained a very high security clearance.
For his service he received commendations from Prime Minister Martin and Prime Minister Chrétien. Unfortunately, now that he has reached retirement age, Mr. Charbonneau cannot get his old age pension. Why not? He is not a recognized Canadian citizen. When his father was deployed to England during World War II, he married a British woman. Mr. Charbonneau, the child of that union, arrived in Canada at the age of two months.
Regardless of the circumstances—worthy of a novel in themselves—that led to this injustice, this man spent his entire life in Canada and paid all his taxes like a good citizen. Mr. Charbonneau deserves his old age pension, and this government should remove all the obstacles in recognition of his life's work.
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-06-19 12:15 [p.15355]
Mr. Speaker, as members of their committee on rights and humanity, a number of students at De Rochebelle high school expressed their disapproval of the continued involvement of child soldiers in several armed conflicts around the world.
Consequently, they wanted to speak out against the abysmal psychological and physical condition of these children and raise public awareness about this issue.
To that end, they prepared a petition, which they circulated this spring. They collected 346 signatures. I am pleased to present this petition on their behalf.
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-06-17 17:52 [p.15238]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech.
What I found really interesting about his speech was the way he put the bill into context. All of a sudden, at the last minute, the government decided that the Senate bill is urgent.
I would like to remind everyone that in 2010 the President of the Treasury Board, who was then the minister of industry, started a discussion about a digital economy strategy, a public consultation that never saw the light of day and that never produced any results. I think that when a bill like this comes from the Senate, that is pretty simplistic.
Given the growing importance of the digital economy and our digital lives, broadly speaking, does my colleague not think that we should simply drop this bill and rethink government regulations relating to the digital world?
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-06-15 15:01 [p.15069]
Mr. Speaker, the people of Lévis are still waiting for the government to take action on the short-term renewal of our fleet of supply ships. Hundreds of jobs are at stake here.
The Davie shipyard submitted a credible proposal to the government, but the Conservatives keep refusing to follow through. Time is of the essence. In the meantime, the delays keep piling up, and I should point out that the navy really needs these ships.
Will the government stop postponing its decision and finally make one?
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-06-05 11:43 [p.14647]
Mr. Speaker, decades of negligence by the Conservative and Liberal governments have led to a $172-billion deficit in municipal infrastructure. That is not trivial. Our cities, such as Quebec City, need investment in order to improve the quality of life of their citizens. The best example is the Quebec Bridge, a file that has been dragging on for far too long.
By increasing transfers, in a stable and predictable way, the NDP is committed to being a reliable partner to our cities.
Why do the Conservatives keep ignoring the real needs of our cities?
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-29 10:17 [p.14332]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for her speech. She talked a lot about marking as a tool that could help us, probably because it could help with prevention. However, it is difficult to obtain.
I wonder if she could comment further on what other elements, besides marking, could help us be able to trace firearms and give our police forces the most effective means to combat crime.
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-29 11:43 [p.14347]
Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' disastrous management of military procurement is having a major impact on our navy.
It will be years before the new ships are ready. The Davie Shipyard proposed a solution to meet our needs in the short term, but it has still not heard back from the government about it. Now, the government is telling us that it needs more time.
Can the government explain the reason for this delay, which is jeopardizing hundreds of jobs and putting our country in a difficult position?
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-27 15:04 [p.14224]
Mr. Speaker, the Quebec Bridge has been added to the list of the top 10 endangered places in Canada. How appalling. The Conservatives have been in power for 10 years and are leaving Quebec City with a heritage bridge that is in critical condition.
The NDP came up with a real solution to get CN moving. Will the government finally listen to reason and support my bill?
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-27 16:18 [p.14236]
Mr. Speaker, the bill is obviously a step in the right direction. It could, however, be improved, which is what a debate is for.
In light of the new products being transported by train, for example, more volatile products that the companies themselves struggle to categorize, does my colleague opposite think that the existing minimum levels are high enough? If not, what does he suggest?
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-27 16:22 [p.14236]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to get back to what the member said earlier in response to my first question. He spoke about insurance for small companies. However, a small company was involved in the incident in Lac-Mégantic, unfortunately. It is clear that what is currently in the bill would not be enough to cover another incident of that scope, which I certainly hope never happens.
Would the member be prepared to look at increasing the minimum amount of insurance in light of what we already know?
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-26 16:33 [p.14194]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to begin by quoting Albert Einstein: “Coincidence is God's way of remaining anonymous.” Although he said many things, we do not often hear that quotation.
I found that quotation very appropriate, because today is one of those rare times when we talk about science in this House. I want to congratulate the member for Kingston and the Islands for moving this motion because it is something we rarely talk about, but something that is so important in today's society, that it would be a serious mistake to ignore it.
The current government policy on science focuses strictly on innovation. This approach reduces the importance of science as a tool for development in a broader sense, because if it cannot be immediately useful, the Conservatives take no real interest in it.
Furthermore, the motion addresses the muzzling of scientists. As many people have pointed out today, we need to differentiate between the sharing of knowledge and public policy. Everyone knows that public policy is the realm of politicians and that sharing knowledge falls to scientists. It is therefore crucial that we trust the ethics of scientists to make that distinction.
If what scientists say ever becomes embarrassing, a responsible government should take that opportunity to improve whatever needs to be improved for the common good. We can use those instances to improve our society.
In my riding we have a university and a high tech park. The scientific research continuum is very important to Louis-Hébert. Aside from the education sector, obviously, the continuum starts with basic research. That is where it all starts. Then, there is applied research, commercialization—meaning publicizing it—knowledge transfer and innovation.
That is why there is a high tech park associated with Laval University. A number of good ideas made it through all of these steps, and as a result we have some value-added industries with a strong focus on science in the Quebec City high tech park.
Innovation is the end of a process. It is not a beginning or an end in itself. Innovation must go through all of the steps I mentioned. If we make innovation an end in itself, I worry that we are making Canada less competitive over the long term. It shows a lack of foresight of the development of our society and of our ability, as a country, to compete with other high-tech countries.
In 2012, Yves Gingras, a professor at the Université du Québec à Montréal, wrote an article entitled “From Science Policies to Innovation Strategies”. In this very short but informative article, Mr. Gingras illustrated how governments' science policies have changed over time.
For example, from the 1960s to the 1980s, the government had science policies, but in the 1980s and 1990s, during economic crises, for example, the government's policies gradually moved towards technology and, now, innovation.
The objective of the article was to illustrate how we went from a desire to produce knowledge, in the broad sense, that the various spheres of society could use, to more specific applications of existing knowledge.
By all accounts, this has a fundamental impact on our perception of government operations, programs and what gets subsidized. Université Laval is in my riding. I am told that although the government is increasing funding, money that goes to basic and applied research is drying up. In fact, certain areas involving innovation are being heavily subsidized instead. No effort is being spared. Abandoning basic and applied research will allow for short-term gain, but will be costly in the long run.
Limiting scientific research and innovation is tremendously short-sighted. There are two opposing ideas in the debate we are having today. We have not really put a name to it. On one hand, the government is proposing a knowledge-based economy. The policies on innovation attest to that. On the other hand, we would like to go back to a knowledge-based society, a society where knowledge and expertise are disseminated and shared in every part of society, including the economic sector. It is more encompassing. It is important to see how these two concepts compete when it comes to economic policies and proposals.
We cannot envision a society without being able to make the distinction between the two. I much prefer a society based on knowledge, where every aspect of society has access to knowledge and where this knowledge is shared as broadly as possible. Obviously, that does not mean we must not invest in a knowledge-based economy. However, we must not make it an end in itself.
What is important in our society today is to have the ability to generate, disseminate, share and use knowledge. We need to look beyond the almighty economy. Of course, we need money to live on. We need all that and that is what is most important, but if we still want to be on the cutting edge in 5, 10 or 20 years, it is important and fundamental to be able to consider science, scientific research, communication and the dissemination of information as key elements. In 2001, Quebec had a science policy that took all of those factors into account. That made it possible to develop a consistent set of policies that encompassed every aspect of knowledge development. Finally, we need to trust in science and the ethics of scientists. We will be better off for it.
In closing, I would like to quote a 19th century Algerian, Abd el-Kader, who said:
Good and sound knowledge means understanding in such a way that one can see the difference between telling the truth and telling lies in speech, between truth and falsehood in beliefs, between beauty and ugliness in actions.
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-26 16:45 [p.14195]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for his question.
Had he listened carefully to my speech, he would have understood that I am most definitely not opposed to the use of knowledge. Once again, what I said was that government policies have resulted in a significant shift in funding. Right now the government is making massive investments in innovation. That is an official government policy, and I believe that my colleague would agree with that.
In my riding, people doing basic and applied research say that there is a lot less money for their work and that they have to reconsider the purpose of their research. That is unfortunate and dangerous for our society.
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-26 16:46 [p.14195]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for his question.
In my speech I praised the transfer of knowledge and the dissemination of knowledge. I do not have direct experience in the specific area that the member mentioned. However, it is important to establish and retain a philosophy concerning science and its use, both within and outside the public service.
Today, as we know, the use of knowledge and innovation are fundamental elements of change. However, these statements are based on certain elements. We must develop new knowledge, and that is why basic and applied research in universities, for example, is important for future development efforts in Canada.
View Denis Blanchette Profile
NDP (QC)
View Denis Blanchette Profile
2015-05-15 10:42 [p.13993]
Mr. Speaker, I am not surprised by the parliamentary secretary's speech. I must admit, he is rather consistent. However, we obviously do not agree, especially when it comes to sick leave. I think it is despicable that this government is attacking its own employees for political reasons, to achieve a budget surplus.
I would like to him to clarify what he is thinking. On one hand, he is threatening employees with cuts through this bill, on the other hand, he is talking about negotiating when the employees have a gun to their heads.
In his speech, is the parliamentary secretary saying that he is prepared to suspend the sick leave measures in the bill in order to leave room for negotiations?
Results: 1 - 15 of 318 | Page: 1 of 22

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data