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Results: 1 - 15 of 416
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-19 12:14 [p.15355]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to present petitions from dozens of people from the great riding of Nickel Belt.
They are calling on the Government of Canada to work collaboratively with the Province of Ontario to defend and strengthen public health care for northerners, including reducing prescription drug costs, expanding public coverage for essential medication, focusing on disease prevention, and putting patients' needs first.
Since this is the last time that I will be rising in the House for this session, I want to thank the people of Nickel Belt for the last seven years. I look forward to the next four years.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-18 10:19 [p.15257]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to present a petition signed by dozens of people in my riding from Alban, Sturgeon Falls, Garson and Blezard Valley. They are calling on the Government of Canada to work actively with the Province of Ontario to maintain and strengthen the public health care system for northerners, specifically through the following measures: investments in better long-term and palliative home care programs in northern Ontario and the creation of a mental health and suicide prevention strategy.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-18 14:49 [p.15295]
Mr. Speaker, provincial ministers responsible for the Canadian Francophonie are meeting in Toronto this week to talk about francophone immigration. Immigration is a major issue for the future of Canada's francophone communities. The roadmap money is fine, but we need programs tailored to francophones.
Will the minister promise to work with the provinces and the communities to develop a real strategy for francophone immigration?
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-17 16:48 [p.15225]
Mr. Speaker, I am quite proud to present dozens of petitions from northerners asking the Government of Canada to work collaboratively with the provinces to defend and strengthen public health care for northerners, including investing in better home care, long-term care, and palliative care in northern Ontario, and to implement a strategy for mental health and suicide prevention.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-12 10:17 [p.14999]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Beaches—East York for his wonderful speech on this matter. I would appreciate it if the member for Beaches—East York could tell us a bit about the amendments that were suggested by the NDP at committee, which were rejected.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-12 11:03 [p.15005]
Mr. Speaker, I rise in tribute to all the volunteers who do so much to keep our communities vibrant. I particularly want to acknowledge the hard work of individuals in the west end of Nickel Belt.
Those are the people responsible for events like the fantastic Canada Day celebrations held at the Northern Ontario Railroad Museum in Capreol, the blueberry pancake breakfast in Skead, Capreol Days in August, the Spudsbury Potato Festival in Blezard Valley, the Cavalcade of Colours in Onaping Falls, and the 40th annual Valley East Days.
These events give visitors to Nickel Belt an opportunity to see how northern hospitality is second to none.
I would like to pay tribute to Gary Michalak and Maurice Berthiaume, the extraordinary volunteers who are organizing the Café-Heritage Festival that will be held on September 18 and 19, in Azilda, as well as the 400th Festival Champlain, which celebrates Franco-Ontarian history, this Saturday in Bell Park.
I am sure all members will join me in saluting all the volunteers who keep our communities thriving.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-12 12:11 [p.15018]
Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions to present today.
The first is from hundreds of people in my community of Capreol. They call on the Government of Canada to instruct Canada Post to maintain, expand, and improve postal service and cease any proposal to reduce hours and diminish service to the residents and businesses of Capreol.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-12 12:12 [p.15018]
Mr. Speaker, the second petition is also from dozens of people in the Nickel Belt. They call on the government to support northerners in our universal health care system and ensure that every citizen of northern Ontario has access to the same high-quality services wherever they live and regardless of financial circumstances.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-10 15:04 [p.14876]
Mr. Speaker, the government needs to stop claiming all is well with official languages.
Francophones in Winnipeg, Miramichi and Kirkland Lake, Ontario, will lose access to postal services in French. Not only is Canada Post unable to deliver the mail, but it is now turning its back on francophones.
Does the minister have a plan to stop the erosion of French-language services across Canada?
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-09 14:00 [p.14804]
Mr. Speaker, I rise in tribute to the volunteers who make our communities strong and unique. I particularly want to acknowledge the hard work of the individuals who do this type of great work in and around West Nipissing. It is volunteers that make seniors suppers a success and showcase the compassionate and caring nature of our communities.
It really takes a small army of volunteers to organize events such as the River Country & Bluegrass Gathering, the River & Sky Camping and Music Festival, the St. Charles Fishing Derby, the West Nipissing Rock and Rib Fest, the Sturgeon Falls Music Festival and the St-Jean-Baptiste Day celebrations all around the region.
These events allow visitors a chance to see our unique and engaging culture, which blossoms in the summer months.
I also want to pay special tribute to super-volunteer Charlie Lang, who organizes so many of these events, including the famous Sturgeon Falls Fiddle Festival. I am sure all members will join me in saluting Charlie and all the volunteers who keep our communities thriving.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-06-08 21:01 [p.14751]
Mr. Speaker, I agree with the member. It was a great speech. I and the member are both from northern Ontario.
Today the list of offending senators was released. On that list are 15 Conservatives and 15 Liberals. Unfortunately, the Liberal from northern Ontario is in second place on the list, having misspent over $131,000. Unfortunately Rod Zimmer spent $176,000. She was in second place, followed in third place by another Liberal who was followed in fourth place by another Liberal.
Could my colleague from northern Ontario, the member for Timmins—James Bay, comment more on Senator Charette-Poulin from northern Ontario and how the people of northern Ontario have been betrayed?
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-05-27 15:18 [p.14227]
Mr. Speaker, it certainly is an honour for me to rise in the House to present this petition from northerners who support our universal health care system. They want to ensure that every citizen of northern Ontario has access to the same high-quality service, wherever they live and regardless of their financial circumstances.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-05-27 19:04 [p.14254]
Mr. Speaker, I am always humbled by the privilege of standing in the House to represent the people of Nickel Belt. On this motion, on this issue of a national dementia strategy, I realize I stand to represent not only the people of Nickel Belt but also the millions of Canadians who are demanding a credible, real, national dementia strategy.
What is at play here is self-evident to many Canadians. This motion perfectly captures the Conservatives' politics, which have been on display here in Parliament time and again on issues vital to Canadians. This motion is more a child of spin and politics than a commitment to the leadership we are looking for. It gives the appearance of doing something to really help Canadians while staying the course on their own priorities.
Members will know that this motion appeared out of the blue a week before debate on my bill, which proposed a real, credible, national dementia strategy. It was a plan that would be anchored in a law, with leadership mandated from Ottawa. Canadians clearly wanted that.
The minister indicated that while initially opposed to the legislation, she had a change of mind. I believe the change of mind had something to do with the dozens of petitions being tabled in the House in support of a national dementia plan, the hundreds of municipal resolutions backing Bill C-356, and the growing number of provincial governments seeing the value of leadership from Ottawa that still respected provincial jurisdiction.
Canadians changed the government's mind. During many discussions with the minister and her representatives, we on this side of the House accepted all the amendments proposed to address their reservations. However, in the end, the government showed its true colours and abandoned its leadership and any legislative measure that it would be required to implement. This government's ideology and practice is to disregard authentic national strategies containing real measures that make things easier for Canadians.
This brings me to the vote held on May 6. Despite the fact that the government is now opposed to the bill and even though it has a majority in the House, the bill was defeated by one vote, 139 to 140. The media first talked about the confusion at the time of the vote. One Conservative member voted twice before withdrawing his support for the bill. Let me quickly say that the vote of 140 to 139 is a sharp reminder of the importance of every member's vote. Yes, bills can be passed or defeated by a single vote. The Conservatives have also heard about what their vote means since that night.
However, the vote was also a clear reminder of how we need to listen to the will of Canadians. Nine members of the Conservative caucus did so, voting for the legislation. I have recognized their votes in public comments. There were nine government MPs who joined our party and other parties to support real help for the 747,000 people now dealing with Alzheimer's or related dementia disease, plus the millions of people caught up in providing care and health services.
This motion cleverly includes so many elements from my bill and what is needed for a genuine national strategy, but this motion will not here and now help any of the people who are so in need of help.
This motion recognizes the important research initiatives that we on this side of the House enthusiastically applaud. It recognizes the federal-provincial discussions under way, while deploring the fact that they are painfully slow. The motion includes many of the basic elements of a strategy, but it makes no commitment to accomplish what that it sets out.
The real problem of the motion before us not being as binding as legislation is that, in the words of my colleague the member for Victoria, it risks being a “feel-good, do-nothing motion”. I will say more about motions versus legislation later, but in terms of recognizing what Canadians really need from the current government, we need to hear what they said in the wake of the defeat of Bill C-356 by one vote. Some of what they said, I cannot repeat. “Shame” and “disgrace” were some of the more polite words.
The Canadian Medical Association lamented the lost opportunity. Dr. Chris Simpson, president of the CMA, said:
The defeat of Private Member's Bill C-356 Wednesday night represents a lost opportunity to make lasting progress in the serious and growing problem of dementia in Canada. We remain one of the few industrialized countries to be without a national dementia strategy.
... Bill C-356 would have called on the government to set up a national dementia strategy. Canada would have been able to get to work making sure the health care system has the right resources to deal with this problem before it becomes overwhelming.
However, a national strategy would involve all levels of government and introduce benchmarks, standards of care as well as timeframes. It would also give other levels of government and stakeholders a forum to point out the need for resources. Instead of a series of ad hoc initiatives, a national strategy is a long-term solution for a problem that will be with us for a long time.
Canadians want a real national strategy enshrined in law. That is what we have heard from municipalities, doctors, people with dementia, their caregivers, the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, other religious leaders, CARP and other seniors' organizations, unions and many others.
The motion moved in the House reproduces, almost word for word, many of the provisions in Bill C-356. There is heavy emphasis on research, something we have always considered essential to any strategy. That is something that will only contribute to other aspects of a well thought-out strategy.
However, when we unpack this motion, and all its phrases, again we see that it will stay the course on what Ottawa has been doing, slowly and with so few results. There will be research. There will be discussions with the provinces. There is a nod to sharing of best practices and reports to the public, but with no real accountability or timelines.
There is little evidence of a comprehensive plan that also provides for early diagnosis and treatment. I do not see the continuum of care for people to remain at home and in the community, which is critical as our scarce acute care beds have many people who do not need to be in hospitals.
A real credible national dementia strategy would also now help those overwhelmed in the dementia workforce. For example, the motion mentions support for caregivers, but nothing about how and when. What resources will be given to these people now?
We on this side know the difference of a motion versus legislation. In another Parliament, we saw the passing of Mr. Broadbent's motion to end child poverty by the year 2000. It was unanimous. There was good will on all sides, but we know what happened with that motion. What will happen to this motion when there is no will of governments to follow up with real action and leadership.
We are reaching the end of this Parliament next month. We or others representing our parties will all have to face the voters in our ridings. Organizations like the Canadian Medical Association, CARP and others are advising voters to remember their MP or party votes on dementia. We are pleased on this side for having done our part in education, advocacy and building the momentum for a genuine national dementia strategy. There is no turning back.
Through Bill C-356 and our debate on this motion, Canadians will not be fooled by words any longer. They want a national dementia strategy to actually show up in their community to help their loved ones, their neighbours, their work colleagues, now. Canadians will not stomach more press releases, motions, promises or explaining of votes.
I will support this motion because I like mom, apple pie and everything that is said in Motion No. 575. Speaking of mom, the story of my mom and my family connected me to the millions of Canadians struggling with this health care crisis that dementia represents. She was a straight shooter. She would figure out fact from fiction about what the government says it does or will do.
We on this side are committed to continue the real work required to make this happen. I look forward to the new government in Alberta being part of that work. I look forward to a new government in Ottawa, a government led by my leader, that will lead on this file. Canadians deserve better than what we have.
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-05-15 10:30 [p.13991]
Mr. Speaker, I congratulate my colleague from La Pointe-de-l'Île on a very good speech. My colleague serves the people of La Pointe-de-l'Île very well.
In her speech, she mentioned the Gogama derailment, which could have been very dangerous had it occurred two kilometres farther west. That would have put it right in downtown Gogama. It could have been another Lac-Mégantic. There was another derailment 40 kilometres from Gogama three weeks earlier.
Can the member tell us what the Minister of Transport is doing about rail transport's poor performance?
View Claude Gravelle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Claude Gravelle Profile
2015-05-13 15:38 [p.13846]
Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions I would like to present today.
The first one is from many communities in Nickel Belt, including Warren, St. Charles, Field, Val Caron, and Hanmer, and it calls on Canadians to support their public health care system. The petitioners want to ensure that every Canadian has access to the same high-quality health care services wherever they live.
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