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Results: 1 - 15 of 324
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
On my end, it's fine.
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
It works here too, Judy.
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you to all the presenters. That was excellent information.
Madam Chair, most of the questions I had were touched on by Ms. MacEwen, on the pandemic, and the environment and social justice.
I'm going to start with pandemic. To what extent could pandemic-related measures implemented by our government expose it to legal repercussions under ISDS provisions in Canada's international trade agreements, as we have many trade agreements that have this provision?
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Do any of the other witnesses want to chip in? No?
Because our government is big on environment and social justice policies, and we are signing those agreements, some have expressed concern, and you have expressed concerns as well, that ISDS provisions hamper environment and social justice policy by imposing some penalties on any country that attempts to regulate in the public interest.
Could you please give your thoughts on whether this may be the case when it comes to these issues and how the government can improve on it if we sign the agreement and we have a chapter on environment and social justice policies?
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
ISDS provisions are implemented in many of the trade agreements, as mentioned by Mr. Herman.
When I look from the other angle, if we do not have these ISDS provisions incorporated in those agreements, by not having that dispute settlement system with some of the trade agreements that we sign, the companies, particularly the Canadian companies, would face challenges if we do not have those provisions.
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Given the way the minister is doing all these reforms, if he continues to do them over the next few years, I might, if I ever decide to retire from politics, be able to write a book on him.
Minister, let's get back to Canada. Boston Consulting Group over the last little while has done a survey of 200,000 people across 190 nations. Canada has been the number one destination and the number one desirable place to come to work.
Minister, could you please tell us some of the reforms that you're bringing in to integrate our society and our economy through immigration?
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Madam Chair, I'm coming back to international students. When I've talked to them over the last few months, they have proved very happy and have greatly benefited from the support the Prime Minister has provided to international students through CERB and also through the immigration reforms brought in by the minister. They are very happy about some of the reforms that the minister brought forward.
Moving forward, even though the minister has mentioned some of the things he has done, my intention is for him to tell us about some of the innovations he is bringing in so that international student education here in Canada will be number one and a model for the world.
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
First of all, I want to thank the minister
Minister, I want to congratulate you on the express entry draw that has occurred. There were 27,232 workers invited to apply for PR. This is the first time this has happened since Pierre Elliott Trudeau did something like this. Congratulations to you and the Prime Minister.
How do you believe that this 75-point express entry—the lowest ever—will signal the beginning of this new immigration strategy and the new era of this government?
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Minister, you have done excellent work when it comes to spousal applications. Last year, you did 50,000, and you also have this on the urgency.... There is also another issue that I face and that many other MPs probably hear about every day. It's the parents and grandparents class.
Can you tell the committee today what you and the department are going to do when it comes to PGP this year?
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
On this International Women's Day, to you, the leadership of our deputy minister and all women across the globe, happy International Women's Day. Thank you for all the great work that women do in our society every day.
Madam Deputy Minister, I'm going to carry on with my friend on the other side Mr. Saroya's question about the New Delhi office. With the very little staff that it has—and our office is the busiest in Canada when it comes to immigration cases—it is doing a great job. I have no questions about the work it has done during the pandemic. Our office was very impressed with the work it did.
What are you going to do to meet the requirements it has when it comes to staff levels? All the FC1 spousal applications and the FC4 PGP applications are paper applications.
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Madam Deputy Minister, those 30,000 applications are the largest ever since 2006—
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
I had a very good question.
View Sukh Dhaliwal Profile
Lib. (BC)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Madam Chair, on this International Women's Day, I want to congratulate you and all women around the globe. Have a very happy Women's Day. I want to thank them for all the contributions they have made to our society and around the globe.
My question is going to Susan Yurkovich, who has done great work and has shown great leadership in British Columbia when it comes to the lumber industry. I'll just call you Susan. You were here during the last Parliament as well.
I have seen an enormous impact over the past many years. I'm sure Randeep will agree. Over 100 years ago, when the Sikh community came in, where they ended up was in small towns in the lumber industry. That's where the jobs were. Today, with a declining number of jobs, those small towns are becoming ghost towns. That had an effect over the years.
To come back to the WTO, we have 100,000 jobs, $13 billion in GDP, and $4 billion in taxes and fees. You mentioned there were two decisions that were made in favour of Canada—Lumber III and Lumber IV. How do those decisions address the economic impact that happened over the past many years?
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