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Results: 1 - 15 of 2537
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
I have a point of order.
Without challenging the chair at this point, I would like to point out to my colleague across the way, with all due respect, it is a well-known fact—I know when I was chairing the health committee—there are often times when a minister can't appear because of scheduling issues. Today we're talking about Bill C-21 and to be relevant we need to stick to that particular topic and not go off on all these rabbit trails.
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I have to say, Minister, it's just amazing. This is a problem that has presented itself in many businesses, and we know that $22 million in administration has been reduced and an estimated 290,000 hours. That's phenomenal. We've talked about the one-for-one concept, but our government has put in many other mechanisms that cut down on red tape. Could you perhaps talk about some of those as well?
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Quite clearly, Bill C-36 is the first bill we've ever had in Canadian Parliament that is compassionate towards the victims of prostitution and human trafficking, and for the first time, money is there to help them exit.
In Canada, or in any other country, children are the perpetrators’ prime targets. Why? Because they get a higher price. All the components around this bill support and are really well aware of the victimization of the prostitutes and trafficked people. That's the whole essence of this bill. That, and the targeting of the johns and pimps, criminalizing the johns and pimps for buying sex.
It's a great step forward, one that I think this committee can be extremely proud of. I commend Madam Boivin for talking about victimization because that's precisely what Bill C-36 is aimed at preventing. It will also prevent pimps and the johns having the opportunity to help prostitutes solicit in front of schools. In actual fact, in many cases that I've personally worked on, children have been solicited in school, on school grounds. There have even been narcs put in the school itself to look for the vulnerable people so that the traffickers could traffic them. I had an incredible case, out of Edmonton, of a young girl trafficked to Toronto just from that. She was a victim. But she was forced into prostitution from the school itself.
It is a very wise, balanced move for this bill to say, very specifically, that schoolyards and places where children are, are just off limits. Nobody can do that. It's not harming the prostitutes at all. In fact, very few police forces today arrest prostitutes because they recognize them as victims. They ask them to move along.
As MP Dechert, the parliamentary secretary, said, children have a right to their innocence and they have a right not to be targeted by the johns. Johns don't care. They don't ask how old a person is. And they do target the younger ones, the younger-looking ones.
I think that this is a well-balanced way. The argument that it's victimizing the prostitutes is absolutely absurd. For the first time, this whole bill, and the essence of this whole bill, recognizes the tragedy these victims go through.
In closing, I think we have to be very mindful that we don't want anything like this around our schools. It's just not something that we want to happen. Having the provision where we single-out places specifically where children are is a very wise and balanced move for the Canadian public.
This is a very well written, well-balanced bill, in both these regards.
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you. I want to thank all the members of this committee for coming today and all our guests today for your input.
Mr. McConaghy, it's nice to see you. You've done so much good work with Ratanak and the Willie Pickton file. It's a great honour to have you here.
When you listen today.... I have a question and I'll try to frame it. The Bedford case gave us a year to respond. We don't send it back to the Supreme Court of Canada. The Supreme Court of Canada said Parliament must come back with a decision before December 19, with a response. Bill C-36 came about and when we're asking.... We heard so many voices of survivors, so many. The survivors came in and bravely sat in these chairs and talked about what happened to them behind closed doors. They told us that Bill C-36 was very important. Why? Because the buying of sex was going to be put in place and they had something that could bring them out in the open to be able to defend themselves because now the perpetrators were targeted.
It was a compassionate bill. For the first time in Canadian history, Canada produced a compassionate bill that looked at what was happening to the victims of human trafficking and of prostitution, which are really one and the same, because often.... We heard at this committee that there are no people under 18 who are trafficked or prostituted. In fact, when we listened to the survivors, all of them started underage and things progressed.
When we look at this whole thing, there is an urgency for Canada and an urgency for all parliamentarians to understand what's going on and to get busy and do the job instead of dragging their feet and letting it fall under the bus. We've talked about this law and that law, and the other thing. Human trafficking laws and mandatory minimums came in June 2010. It is now July 2014. That's four years ago. Following that was another law on human trafficking in 2012, and there was one in 2005. So the laws on human trafficking are new. So what do we have? We have a police force that has done a remarkable job on human trafficking. If you google human trafficking, it comes up all the time. Canada, I think, has done a remarkable job at finding out what's going on. Our government has done that; found out what has gone on behind closed doors. Now the voices of the survivors are out there.
Brian, you've had a lot of experience in this. You know what you're talking about and I want to talk to you about police training. What we've heard here in the committee is that the police sometimes think the victims should be arrested and sometimes think the victims shouldn't be arrested. They're all well-meaning because they all want to take care of the victims. But I've also heard from some of the victims. Some of the victims have said, “Well, you know when they arrest me they bargain with me. Turn over the goods and then I'll get you out of harm's way.” If they don't, they don't take them out of harm's way. That's the reality of what I've heard from the victims.
My son is a police officer. I love the police. I'll do anything for the police but I find that disturbing.
The other thing is that police are saying, “You know, if we don't have some laws, somewhere along the way, we have no tools.” I find that disturbing.
Could you talk a little bit about police training and could you talk a little bit about the realities on the street? Because we have to get this show on the road.
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
One minute left only, Brian, so I have to talk fast. Sorry about that.
We have heard over and over again that the paradigm has changed in this country, that suddenly it's from prostitution and human trafficking being the country's oldest profession to the oldest oppression, and we need to have exit strategies for victims to get out.
You've had a lot of experience with victims of human trafficking and the exit strategies that are needed. Can you talk about those a little bit?
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you so much.
Hello, Kate, how are you? I didn't know you were going to be in Glasgow. My goodness, I'm so glad you are there and thank you for joining us. Thank you to all of the panellists for joining us.
I'm going to be asking questions of three or four different people as quickly as I can, as the time is very short.
Kate, we've been working in Edmonton for a long time and you're talking about provincial and municipal monitoring and evaluation. You are very supportive of Bill C-36. You've come across with some recommendations.
One thing you talked about is to evaluate how things are going after the bill, hopefully, is passed. Can you expand on that further?
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Adjust themselves.
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
You're saying this evaluation is an extremely good point.
It's so nice to see you again.
Glendyne, it's wonderful that you're there and to see all the great work that you're doing.
You talked about our needing to protect the most vulnerable. You talked about the preamble.
I'm so proud of that preamble. For the first time, it's recognizing victims and the kinds of deplorable situations they're in. I love defending dignity because it's such a good way to describe....
Could you talk a little bit more about how important the preamble is and how it's changing, or will change, the paradigm here in Canada?
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
That's really a first in Canada.
Marina, you are beautiful. Servants Anonymous is an amazing organization. Thank you for all that you're doing to give care to women and children. It's so good to hear your voice again.
Marina, you talked about comprehensive services and the fact that Bill C-36 is a very necessary first step and a first in Canada. You talked about the fact that we should be proud that Canadians and members of Parliament are doing something concrete now: first, targeting the johns and the pimps and making sure they are held accountable for the violence against women and children; and second, the acknowledgement of the plight of the victims, what it's really like. It's not Canada's oldest profession; it's Canada's oldest profession.
Marina, could you talk a little bit about at least three of the services, which I know you do so well at Servants Anonymous, that could be part of this $20 million? Talk a little bit, as Diane Redsky did yesterday, about the partnerships. The federal government can't do it all. There has to be partnerships between the province, municipality, and federal government. Could you address some of these issues, Marina?
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you so much. I know we have limited time so I'm going to be very clear and concise, hopefully.
Jay—I'm sorry, I never knew you as Jared—do you want me to call you Jared or Jay?
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Jay and Michelle, thank you for everything that you're doing across Canada and thank you to all of the witnesses for your very profound explanations of what your beliefs are today.
You have talked an awful lot, Jay and Michelle, about across the world. I remember, years ago, when we were talking about this whole thing and you set out to do this film and find out what the real goods were. You've just finished a tour across Canada.
Can you very briefly explain to the committee what you found out about human trafficking across Canada in light of the fact that some people still believe there is no human trafficking in Canada?
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you, Jay. I know you could go through an awful lot more. Watching the film, maybe you can say a few things about that.
By the way, the real test in your marriage is not going across country. The real test in your marriage is living in that trailer in the middle of the woods. That's a real test of your marriage.
Deborah, it is so nice to talk to you today. Our conversations over the years have been so beneficial, but I want to ask you something because you've been an RCMP officer. You've been on the streets. Why in the world are some of the police telling us that they have to have the ability to arrest for the good of the victims? Because that's what you're seeing reflected in the bill....
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you very much.
Keira and Hilla, you've been amazing over the years. I've just loved partnering with you in so many ways, and you are in the real world, on the ground.
For the committee today, what is the most important message this committee has to get, because you deal with trafficking victims every day of the week? That's for either one of you.
View Joy Smith Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you.
Alice and Suzanne, what can I say to you two? You're amazing.
I have a question that I need to ask you because in Vancouver, in B.C., and even across this country, women of colour, Asian women, and aboriginal women have a disproportionate visibility in prostitution and human trafficking. Now, you made some comments about what could protect these women the minute they come off the plane, the minute they hit the ground. We've talked about how some come off the plane and are immediately put into brothels.
Could you please repeat that for us? You touched on it a little bit in your presentation. Could you repeat that, please, for the committee?
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