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Results: 1 - 15 of 96
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Messieurs, welcome. I've been back in politics for three years now, and frankly, this is the first time I've heard about this Norway business. Even when I was a member of the federal cabinet for two years I never heard of it. I don't know where this is coming from. I guess someone in the Lester B. Pearson Building must be very excited about it.
I don't know if you guys have heard about it.
A voice: No.
Hon. Jean Lapierre: It's very good we came down here to hear about this.
Surprisingly, you didn't talk about Korea at all. Everywhere else, people are very nervous about Korea. In the shipbuilding industry, aren't they players? Aren't they a force to be reckoned with?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
From listening to your presentation, especially on the offshore, I understand that you're nervous about Norway. But are you asking us to be more protectionist? Or does the regime we have now, with the 25% tariff, seem to be sufficient?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
I'd like to come back to jobs in the manufacturing sector. Mr. Irving, I have to tell you that I know about jobs staying here. My father was a mechanic for Irving Oil all his life in the Magdalen Islands. The importance of a job I can understand. When we hear people from the rest of the country speaking of manufacturing in Canada, they talk about 250,000 jobs being lost. In this part of the world, what are the prospects in manufacturing? Do we have the same job losses, or has it been steady as in your own company? Regarding the manufacturing aspect of your company, what are the prospects for the future?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Should we as the Government of Canada have some type of industrial policy by sector? Right now we're saying let's have a free market and everything, but we see jobs going. With the competition from India, Brazil, and China, obviously it's going to get worse. We don't seem to have an industrial policy at all, frankly. Do you think we should look at that sector by sector, instead of having an overall policy?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
Thank you for being here on short notice.
First, Madam Janega, frankly, I was very impressed by the letter from your association. The fact that you could get all those signatures on one piece of paper shows that those recommendations are really tied to what we have heard at this committee in the last few months. It's impressive to be able to get all those people, not that they all have egos, but they all have different interests. I'm sure that will have some influence.
I'm a fan of the gateway strategy, and I would like to hear more about what's going on in the Atlantic gateway, because obviously the Pacific gateway has been confirmed and the money is there. Has anything moved on the Atlantic gateway, or are we still at the concept level?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
Mr. Cirtwill, I was surprised by your statement that immigration is not the solution. When we talk about the Quebec measures to increase the birth rate, the only group in Quebec society that has an increased birth rate is the immigrants.
I happen to believe it's part of the solution; it's not the only solution. But how else are we going to provide for the number of people we need in such a huge country? I don't see any measures that could transform that except opening our doors to immigration. Other than that, I don't see how we're going to fight the aging population. Where are we going to get people who are going to help us keep our niveau de vie?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
I was listening to your statements on having fewer public servants and having those people useful in the private sector and all of that. You know, all administrations are probably hoping to have fewer public servants. It would be very hard to take the ones we have now and make them competitive tomorrow. They have a security that the private sector doesn't give.
So with those challenges now, what are the measures we could take, other than opening the doors to immigration, that could change this? The fundamental changes you're asking for are for the next generation, in my opinion.
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Welcome, minister.
In the past 10 months, you've gone hot and cold on aerospace. You've managed to create total insecurity in the field. An article published in The Gazette this morning was entitled, “Maintain aerospace funding, feds urged: TPC subsidies at risk.” The source of the article was Concordia University.
Sector stakeholders don't know what direction you're taking and wonder whether you know yourself. Ten months later, where does aerospace policy stand, more particularly at Technology Partnership Canada?
Ten months is longer than nine months: you should already have come up with something!
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Obviously the program is transparent. Since you've been here, there's been a void, and a void is transparent. You tell me about a new contract. It's easy to have a new contract when no one signed it.
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Will the program terminate on December 31? You're talking about a few months. You don't have any right to abandon this system, which is the backbone of the Montreal economy.
Next Wednesday, you'll be speaking before the Chamber of Commerce. Are you at least going to announce something, or are you going to stick to verbiage and studies that are so biased that you're bent over?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
And I want to go back to this matter of the $13 billion.
What tangible guarantees have you secured? You contend in your speech that you'll have 100 percent benefits.
Let's talk about the real benefits from research and development, technology and so on. Can you provide us with black and white tangible guarantees as regards benefits? I'm not talking about the benefits from grocery shopping done here and there, but about the real research and development benefits.
What percentage is guaranteed for Quebec, which has 60 percent of the industry?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
First, I'm going to address the issue of tourism. We know that Chinese tourists are among the most likely to come to Canada, because of their number and their attraction to our country.
Could you tell me whether negotiations concerning the status of preferred destination, which had been started with China, have been successful? Are those negotiations ongoing? We've put a lot of hope in this project. It was one of the components of the Pacific Gateway Strategy. Where do the negotiations stand?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
Is your move to Vancouver now complete? Are you settled there and working there?
View Jean Lapierre Profile
Lib. (QC)
There's a kind of contradiction, because one of the arguments concerned the opening up to Asia, whereas the negotiations aren't advanced. I imagine there's less political will, because both sides seemed to be sticking to their positions, no? The purpose of your openness to the Pacific and the rest of that was to help us attract more tourists. I saw both as two fingers of one hand.
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