Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
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View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-13 11:11 [p.454]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this moment, my first time commanding the floor for a full statement, to thank the constituents of Carleton for re-electing me back to this place for a second time. This last campaign was an opportunity to reach out to countless residents. We knocked on 160,000 doors. In fact, we even had three visits from the Prime Minister to my riding. We were thinking about setting aside a nice condo so that he could have a place to stay every time he came.
I encourage all members of all parties to come and visit the historic riding of Carleton, once represented by the great John A. Macdonald, a great symbol of eastern Ontario's thriving mill towns back in the Victorian Age, but today among the most modern places in the world. The people there work hard. They build their communities and have a strong sense of neighbourliness and community effort. It is an honour to represent them. I thank them all and I wish everybody a very merry Christmas.
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-13 11:32 [p.458]
Mr. Speaker, I asked the finance minister to bring forward a fall economic update to respond to the 71,000 job losses in November. He said no. I asked the finance minister to bring in an action plan to help relieve the burden for the half of Canadians who are $200 away from insolvency. He said no, again. I asked him to take any action to salvage Canada's declining economy. He said no. We wanted more yes and we got more no.
When will the finance minister tell Canadians what he will do to get this economy back on track?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-13 11:33 [p.458]
Mr. Speaker, the Liberals talk about investment. The people who are out of work now would like to know how they can invest for their own future, the people who are $200 away from financial insolvency. There is a 13% increase in the number of Canadians who have claimed insolvency. All of these people are asking how they will not just invest, but actually pay their bills.
How can the government in good conscience go on Christmas vacation while so many are suffering so much?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-13 11:34 [p.458]
Mr. Speaker, some of the most frightening data to come out recently came out this week with regard to the seven-year high in non-mortgage credit defaults. In simple terms, that means people cannot pay their credit card bills. They are up to their eyeballs. They cannot pay their bills, so they are putting them on their credit card. Then they cannot pay the credit card bill. Then they cannot pay the interest. This problem compounds on top of itself.
We would expect the government to take urgent action to unleash our private sector to create jobs and relieve the burden of our workers. Why did it not do that just in time for Christmas?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-12 14:43 [p.408]
Mr. Speaker, we already know that Canada lost 71,000 jobs in November. As we also know, the rate of insolvency increased by 13%, and half of all Canadians are $200 away from insolvency. Now we are learning that the default rate for non-mortgage debt over recent months is the highest it has been in the last seven years.
Is the government creating the conditions for a made-in-Canada recession?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-12 14:44 [p.408]
Mr. Speaker, we already know that we lost 71,000 jobs last month and that there has been a 13% increase to a 10-year high in the number of people who have become insolvent. Now we know as well that the rate of Canadians defaulting on non-mortgage credit reached its highest third-quarter pace in seven years.
Is the government not creating the conditions for a made-in-Canada recession?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-12 14:45 [p.408]
Mr. Speaker, confidence is not what Equifax is expressing. Its vice-president said that there has been a “significant increase in consumer bankruptcies.” Therefore, now we have a seven-year high in third-quarter defaults on non-mortgage debt. We have a 10-year high in the number of people who have gone insolvent. Seventy-one thousand people are losing their jobs. The minister continues saying, “Don't worry, be happy”, while Canadians are falling behind and losing their jobs. Why are he and his government continuing to create the conditions for a made-in-Canada recession?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-11 14:57 [p.272]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is still stuck with the self-serving triumphant talking points as before. It is like he did not even notice that 71,000 people lost their jobs last month, that half of Canadians are less than $200 away from insolvency, that those insolvencies have reached decade-long highs.
Will the Prime Minister put aside his self-praise for just a moment and get out of the way so that Canadians can get back to work and get ahead?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-11 14:58 [p.272]
Mr. Speaker, if self-praise could build economies and create jobs, then we would not have lost 71,000 of those jobs last month. We would not have a higher unemployment rate than across the average of the G7. We would not have higher unemployment than the U.S., U.K., Germany and Japan. We would not have hundreds of thousands of people in energy, forestry and manufacturing who have lost their jobs.
Will the Prime Minister stop making rhetorical love to himself and get out of the way so Canadians can get back to work?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-10 14:56 [p.218]
Mr. Speaker, asked yesterday if he was worried about Canada's weak economy, the finance minister said that it was his job to worry and that he was not worried at all. Well, he should be worried.
Insolvencies have reached a 10-year high. Half of Canadians are $200 away from going insolvent. Our unemployment rate is above the G7 average, above the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan and Germany.
On this question of worry, is the finance minister going to look the 71,000 people who lost their jobs last month in the eye and tell them, “Don't worry, be happy”?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-10 14:57 [p.219]
Mr. Speaker, our unemployment rate is higher than the G7 average. The United States, the United Kingdom, Japan and Germany have lower unemployment rates than Canada. Here in Canada, we lost 71,000 jobs in November, and half of Canadians are $200 away from insolvency at the end of the month.
The minister can ignore these problems, but they continue to exist.
When will he face the facts?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-06 11:53 [p.46]
Mr. Speaker, last month, 71,000 Canadians went home, looked their families in the eye and said, “I lost my job”. Half of all Canadians are $200 away from insolvency, and the rate of insolvency is up 13% in just one year, a decade-old record. Government taxes and regulations have driven investment out, jobs down and the cost of living up.
When will the Liberals reverse course, get off the backs of Canadian workers and businesses and let our economy get back on track?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-06 11:54 [p.46]
Mr. Speaker, the minister was patting himself on the back. He should have spoken directly to the 71,000 Canadians who lost their jobs. Insolvency rates are the highest we have seen in a decade. Rates have increased by 13%.
When will the Minister of Finance get out of his dream world and face reality?
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2019-12-06 13:09 [p.57]
Mr. Speaker, I was told that the Bloc Québécois was a sovereignist party. That is why, for 15 long years, I was so surprised to hear the demands of the Bloc Québécois in this place. It calls for federal programs to help the media, federal programs for culture and more generous federal equalization programs. Now it is also demanding broader environmental programs, which are still federal programs. Those programs give the federal government the authority to get involved in the environmental decisions of the provinces, even outside Quebec.
I find it very interesting that this party is called the Bloc Québécois. It should be called the “Centralist Bloc”, because day after day it keeps calling for an increasingly large and costly federal government.
Will the leader of the Bloc Québécois therefore accept the new title that I am proposing, namely leader of the “Centralist Bloc”?
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