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Results: 1 - 15 of 1798
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I have a brief question, and you may have covered it with “wilfully”. When Ms. Bergeron was talking she was explaining about a case in the United States where it sounds like the dog was intimidated until it was no longer able to be a service animal. I wonder, with this legislation—it says, “without lawful excuse, kills, maims, wounds, poisons or injures”—if in your view the word “injure” would include where the animal was not physically injured, but terrified into no longer being able to perform its duties?
Mr. Kaye or Staff Sergeant Carriere.
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
I think that part of the test may be, once charges are actually laid, to see if that's going to....
Staff Sergeant Carriere, did you have anything to add to that?
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
I want to thank Mr. Leef for coming before the committee.
I want to echo Mr. McKay's statement. Certainly the NDP was prepared to fast-track the bill. I would argue that with six months left at the time of that sitting in Parliament, there was a good chance of having that bill passed. I think it's a bit disingenuous for the member to indicate that the committee is master of its own fate and can do something with this study, when we're fully aware that we have roughly 11 sitting weeks and in that period of time a number of justice bills are going to be coming before the committee, and so the committee will have limited ability to conduct the study you're suggesting.
However, I want to turn to this for a moment. I have been around since 2004, so like Mr. McKay, I've been around long enough to see things come and go here. Back in 2005, Mr. Szabo presented a bill before the House of Commons which ended up at the health committee. His bill was about labelling of alcoholic beverages. We did an extensive study at that committee. Unfortunately, his bill was killed by a vote of 11 to 1. I was the only person who supported his bill on that committee. The net result was that the committee agreed to kill Mr. Szabo's bill but immediately move forward on a national strategy for FASD.
Now I want to turn to 2006. You seem to indicate that the 2006 study needs to be dusted off and updated because so much has changed. Well, just let me read a couple of the recommendations, and I would argue that any change in the science or new information would not have impacted on these recommendations, if anybody had chosen to act on them.
There are things like:
that Health Canada lead and coordinate both the national and federal perspectives of the FASD action plan
—I don't think you need new information to update that one—
that the FASD action plan be complementary to provincial and territorial initiatives
—I'm pretty sure that, if we had an action plan, we would have been doing that in the last 10 years—
that Health Canada include the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch in its work on the FASD action plan
—and so on. I won't read all of the recommendations, but I would suggest that we would be far further ahead in this country if we had acted on that health committee report instead of waiting nine years for a study that isn't going to result in anything because the House is going to adjourn in June.
One of the key pieces of this recommendation was:
that Health Canada ensure that federal departments—
—which would include Justice and Corrections and any other department—
—and agencies responsible for specific client groups immediately begin to collect and make publicly available data on the incidence and prevalence of FASD within their respective populations.
Can you tell me how many recommendations from that health committee have been implemented since 2006?
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Excuse me, Mr. Leef. In this process, did you actually look at the health report to see how many of those recommendations had been implemented when you undertook your bill?
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
I'm a very practical, pragmatic person, so if I were in charge of the universe, what I would suggest is that the committee, first of all, look at any of the studies that have been done—and there are a number of them. I would take a look at what recommendations were made and what had been implemented, and I would take a look at any gaps in those implementations and why they hadn't been implemented. If we wanted to shorten up this study, that's exactly what we would do. It wouldn't require travel to Yukon, because we already have this study. We already have very critical key recommendations that we could move on that would make a difference for people with FASD and their families.
Did you have a chance to talk to Mr. Sapers, the correctional investigator? He has indicated that he suspects many offenders in segregation probably have FASD. However, the Correctional Service of Canada has limited ability to diagnose mental illness, which would include FASD, and we know that there is no reliable data on the number of federal prisoners who have FASD. Did you talk to Mr. Sapers?
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Again, I hate to come back to the 2006 report, but that was one of the specific things in the report, that the FASD action plan be complementary to provincial and territorial initiatives, which one would presume would include speaking to the provincial and territorial initiative. If we had acted on this back in 2006, we wouldn't need to be having this conversation today.
I think it's unfortunate. A number of people have pointed out the ramifications of not dealing with FASD, whether it's social, educational, health, correctional services, not to mention the lost opportunities for people to become productive members of their communities. I just think it's unfortunate that we're here nine years later still having this discussion, with very little action.
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair. I thank the witnesses for coming.
In your presentation, there are a couple of points I want to have clarified. You mentioned the leasing process. We know that this can be a cumbersome and time-consuming process. Can you tell me what the department itself has done to streamline that leasing process? It does seem that's where it does get hung up.
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
With regard to the FNLMA, I think you're well aware that the interest is far greater than current capacity. What is being done to allow and support more first nations to come under the FNLMA? You cited the KPMG study. I think the committee looked at that a year or so ago. The results are quite positive. What's happening in order to ramp that up?
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Thanks, Mr. Chair.
Ms. Beagan Flood, I want to come back to the point you made that there is nothing to prevent us as parliamentarians from setting a code of conduct predicated upon the Canadian Human Rights Act's discriminatory provisions. Correct?
With regard to freedom of speech, I would actually argue there is some responsibility around freedom of speech. It's not just a right around freedom of speech. There's a responsibility. I'm reminded of conflict resolution programs, mediation programs, that talk about being hard on the problem and soft on the people. So I take your point that we could actually talk about freedom of speech with the limits, which you outlined very ably, about conduct that demeans, belittles, and so forth.
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Yes, because I would argue that most of us are intelligent, capable people, and if we can't make our point without harassing somebody either sexually or otherwise, then probably we should seek another job.
Mr. Heard, I want to turn to you for one second. You indicated that one of the challenges we have is that in the current configuration, without changes, it's parliamentarians who are going to sanction another member if it ends up at procedure and house affairs or in the House of Commons with a report. Can you see any other way around that given our current context?
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
I'll put this to both of you. One of our big challenges is with regard to confidentiality. For many complainants, our political careers are on the line once we go public. That's what happens to us. The experience of women, generally speaking, is that once we go public, we are judged as being guilty. That's what happens. I wonder if either of you could comment on another way to approach confidentiality.
Perhaps I can start with you, Ms. Beagan Flood.
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Heard, do you have a brief comment because I want to turn it over to my colleague for a quick question?
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Heard, you talked about a fair and transparent process. Are there a couple of key elements that need to be in place for that to be deemed a fair, transparent process?
View Jean Crowder Profile
NDP (BC)
Yes, we've raised concerns about having the whips involved as well.
I'm pretty sure I'm out of time.
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