Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 14 of 14
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Chair, I will be splitting my time with the member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan.
I have three quick questions for the Minister of Finance.
First, when will the government release the budget? Second, will it release a revised fiscal and economic update? Third, if so, when will it do that?
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Chair, this pandemic may push certain provinces into bankruptcy. What planning is the government undertaking in the event a province needs support?
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Chair, food processors have been asked to maintain current staff levels to ensure Canada's food supply. Apparently, CFIA recently decided to reduce hours for inspectors in response to COVID-19. This is reducing food processing capacity. Will the government do something about this situation?
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I want to draw to the attention of this House a concern of mine. Part 18 of this proposed bill would give the minister of employment and social services the power to change a law. The minister could amend, add to or remove provisions of a law simply by getting the consent of the finance minister and the Treasury Board president and issuing an order. This is unprecedented, and it could very well be unconstitutional.
To be clear, part 18 of this bill would allow a minister to bypass Parliament and amend a law by order. While I support the parts of this bill that would aid Canadians in this crisis, I cannot support part 18, and therefore I cannot support this bill.
I am wondering if the member could comment.
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, Mayor Rick Bonnette of Halton Hills and Mayor Gord Krantz of Milton, as well as mayors and representatives from across Halton region, are in Ottawa today to voice their opposition to the proposed truck-rail hub in Milton, Ontario. A federal review panel said that this project will likely have a significant adverse impact on air quality and human health.
Can the Liberal government update the House on its position on this project?
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, we are only a week away from widespread heating propane shortages. Hundreds of thousands of people could be without heat. People could freeze. Pipes will burst and homes will be damaged.
Now, the blockade at Tyendinaga appears to be coming down, but the unrest continues. Will the Minister of Public Safety commit to working with his provincial counterparts to see new general directives issued to law enforcement, by him at the federal level and by his provincial counterparts at the provincial level, to ensure that any future blockades of critical infrastructure are taken down in a more timely manner?
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, last week a review panel released its environmental assessment of CN's proposed truck-rail hub in Milton. The panel said this project will likely have a significant adverse impact on human health and air quality. It is now up to cabinet.
Halton Region opposes this project. Regional chair and former Liberal MP Gary Carr opposes this project. The people of Halton oppose this project.
Will the Liberal government, including the two Liberal cabinet ministers from Halton, tell the people of Halton its position on this project?
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication, are guaranteed fundamental freedoms under section 2 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. They are the foundation of a free and democratic society.
Last week, the BTLR panel submitted its report to government. Many of the recommendations are so shocking that the government must immediately take a clear and unequivocal stand against them. Saying it will not regulate news content or news organizations is not good enough.
The recommendations propose that the government regulate all commercial content on the Internet, both domestic and foreign. If adopted, these recommendations could lead to the largest regulation and restriction of free speech in Canadian history.
The Liberal government must make it clear that the report's recommendations on regulating and licensing Internet content are dead on arrival.
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, the government says our democracy is threatened by foreign interference, but it looks like the bigger threat could be from the government.
The Liberals violated the Shawcross doctrine. They put Unifor on the media bailout fund. They introduced Bill C-76, limiting ads and free speech before elections. They tried controlling the House in Motion No. 6. They rigged the rules for their own benefit in the leaders' debates. Their Internet report is proposing what could be the largest restriction on free speech in Canadian history.
Last week, we found out the Liberals spent $430,000 of public money on partisan social media in the last election. Who is the bigger threat to Canadian democracy?
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, on January 27, just three days ago, the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada released the review panel's report on CN's proposed truck-rail hub in Milton. The panel determined that this project is likely to have a significant and adverse environmental impact on air quality and human health in the Halton region. It is now in front of the federal cabinet for a review and decision. The review panel recognized this project will have a negative environmental impact. The region of Halton has concluded this project will negatively impact the communities of Burlington, Oakville, Milton and Halton Hills. Most importantly, the people of Halton have voiced their strong opposition to this project.
I am calling on the Liberal government and Liberal members from Halton region to do the right thing, protect the environment and listen to the people of Halton region.
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, 75 years ago, soldiers from Winnipeg and Quebec City fought to defend the people of Hong Kong, including my father. Hundreds of Canadian soldiers were killed in the Battle of Hong Kong. Some 300,000 Canadians live in Hong Kong today, and millions of people are marching in the streets for their freedom.
Will the government take a firmer, stronger and clearer position on Hong Kong?
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the good people of Wellington—Halton Hills for returning me to the House to represent them, and I hope I am able to work as hard as I can to represent their interests and their concerns here on the floor of the House of Commons.
I support the motion, and I encourage all members of the House to do so, because things have changed with China. In the last year, we have seen the detention of the two Michaels, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. We have seen an increasingly hostile and aggressive government in Beijing that has put trade sanctions on the export of Canadian beef, pork and canola to China. We have seen a Chinese ambassador to Canada accuse the Canadian government of being white supremacists. That is just here in Canada.
Internationally, we have seen China intimidate and export its suppression of free speech and human rights by using economic blackmail. We have seen how they handled the issue when the Houston Rockets general manager spoke out on Hong Kong, or when a video game maker, Blizzard, encountered a gamer who expressed his views on the issue of Hong Kong.
We have seen what they have done with productions like South Park, which made a satire of the policies in China, and we have seen what they have done more recently with big business in this country, when they threatened Air Canada because it would list Taipei as being in Taiwan rather than as being part of mainland China. They are taking an increasingly aggressive and hostile stance and using economic blackmail to export values that run contrary to the values this country is based on, such as the rule of law, human rights, free expression and so many of the things that we cherish here in this country.
They have been acting belligerently in the South China Sea, in the construction of new islands to extend their sphere of sovereignty and in failing to recognize the treaty to which they are a party, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, to which they are a signatory, as is Canada, and under which process of the United Nations their territorial claims in the South China Sea were denied, yet they fail to acknowledge those rulings.
More broadly, as a Christian, I feel quite strongly that people of all faiths should be able to enjoy religious liberty, whether they are Jews, Sikhs, Hindus, Muslims or people of any particular religious faith. In recent months, information has come to light about the shocking concentration camps of Uighurs in western China. It is now being reported that up to one million Uighurs are in concentration camps. I use that term deliberately, because that is what they are. They are camps that are housing families and individuals separated under austere and harsh conditions, and they are using torture techniques to deprogram them and to reprogram them as the Chinese state sees fit.
As a western country that 75 years ago fought on the beaches of Normandy, that fought for the liberation of Europe against the tyranny of totalitarianism and Nazism, we cannot stand silently by, when, because of this information, we are witness to the largest human rights abuse taking place today on this planet. That is no longer speculation; it is an incontrovertible fact. There are satellite images of these camps. There is now well-documented evidence from people who have fled, and we now know that up to one million Uighurs are in these concentration camps. We cannot ignore that fact any longer.
That is why we need, as a country, a new approach and why the Government of Canada needs to take a look at the Canada-China relationship, why it needs to reset the relationship and why a parliamentary committee, a legislative committee of Parliament, should be established to take a look at resetting this relationship.
It is clear from the government's actions in the last year that it is not interested in resetting the relationship. In fact, reading through the tea leaves of the government's actions, it is clear that it wants to continue business as usual. It is clear in the appointment of the Minister of Foreign Affairs; it is clear in the appointment of the Minister of International Trade; and it is clear in the appointment of Ambassador Dominic Barton. All three of those appointments are pro-business appointments that the pro-China business lobby wants. That is a strong signal to Canadians and to the world that the Canadian government believes that we can continue as usual and that the events of the last year or so have not made a difference in its view on how to deal with China.
I could not disagree more strongly. That is why we need a special legislative committee of this House, which is not under the authority of the executive branch of government, to take a look at this relationship, to call expert witnesses, in camera and in public, and to come forward with a report for the floor of this House to consider a reset in that relationship.
I will finish by saying that the Chinese government needs to understand that the approach it has been taking with Canada, and with countries like Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom, is not working. In fact, recent polls show that a majority of Canadians are opposed to having Huawei build Canada's 5G network. The Pew Research Center in the United States has done polling of China's neighbouring countries and found negative and declining favourability ratings for China in Southeast Asia. It finds the same results here in North America and in Europe, and the European Union has listed China as a systemic rival.
All this bellicosity and belligerence on the part of China is not working, but it seems to me that the current government in this country is completely naive and oblivious to this changing reality. That is why we need a committee independent of the PMO and the executive branch of government to study these issues and to take a serious look at resetting this relationship with a view to considering decoupling our relationship with China and reorienting Canada away from China and that part of the Pacific, toward parts of the world that not only share our values but have large economies that we can broaden and deepen trade ties with.
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I think a lot has changed, setting aside the issue of the two Canadians detained in China. What has changed is that China has increasingly used economic blackmail, whether with respect to the National Basketball Association and the general manager of the Houston Rockets, or with respect to video game manufacturers or producers of Hollywood content, or with respect to Air Canada, which was threatened by China when it listed Taipei as being in Taiwan on the signboards at Pearson airport. China has done other things in this country. It has clearly attacked Canadian farmers on the issue of pork, beef and canola. Since 2012, it has acted in an increasingly belligerent manner toward its neighbours in Southeast Asia. It has embarked, at a cutthroat pace, on building a blue-water navy.
Most important, we did not know in 2012 that up to a million Uighurs were in concentration camps. There is a systemic campaign by Beijing to wipe out the Uighurs in western China in a genocidal manner, and I use that term deliberately because it is systematic and it is comprehensive. That truly—
View Michael Chong Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I would say this in response to the economic concerns that have been voiced by many about our relationship with China. More important than economic concerns are the principles and values on which this country is founded, principles such as democracy, human rights and the rule of law. Those are the very principles we risk undermining and doing away with if we continue to focus on the economic consequences of taking a reset and decoupling in our China relationship.
In the long run, our future prosperity will be assured if we get those three foundational principles of this country right and continue to defend them.
Results: 1 - 14 of 14

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data