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Results: 1 - 15 of 32
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
In my 14 years in the House of Commons, this is the first time I've ever been on this committee, so you'll have to forgive a few of my questions. This is totally new to me.
First, on the whole concept of risk management, can you explain to a layman here some of the very concrete things that can go wrong if you don't do your risk management right?
I'll start with the National Capital Commission, because apparently you didn't do your risk management right, according to the Auditor General, once upon a time. What could have gone wrong, and maybe what did go wrong, because you didn't have your risk management done right once upon a time?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Give me an example of something you would do now that would be more “out there”, as opposed to being afraid to do it before. I really know almost nothing about how you do your operations—I read a little bit about 24 Sussex Drive or Rideau Hall. I'm very much like an ordinary citizen coming here. Two hours before this meeting, I didn't even know I was going to be here. So very much in a practical sense, what do you mean? Give me some practical illustration that I can deal with.
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Is there anything from the Auditor General's Office, before I go to my next question?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair...Madam Chair. It's been a while. I haven't been on committee for three years...two years.
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
As I was noting, even though I'm a veteran member of Parliament, I haven't been sitting on a committee for a few years. I am here as a substitute for a regular member, so I'm slowly learning about this bill, and I have to say, from what I've learned today, that the real impact of this bill would be on some shipments of slack wax and not much more, because unless I've got this really wrong, unless there's a northern gateway project or a pipeline built, there are not really any significant shipments in the area that are going to be impacted.
I'll direct this to the gentleman from Prince Rupert, and if anyone else wants to answer, please do.
Am I the only one who's looking at this and thinking the practical impacts of this bill really say this is a solution in search of a problem? There doesn't seem to be anything being banned except maybe potentially slack wax, which I don't think is a major environmental problem. Spills of slack wax just aren't huge.
Am I missing something? If there's no pipeline built, why are we so worried about this legislation? Could anyone answer that question for me? Does the gentleman from Prince Rupert want to respond?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Without a pipeline, could this impact rail shipments? Generally we think of fuels and liquids as being shipped by pipeline, but some are shipped by rail. Could this have an economic impact on shipping by rail? I don't know what products could be shipped or exported by rail in the Prince Rupert area, but is that a potential economic impact?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay. You're saying that this could have a real impact there.
Ms. Spahlinger, you said earlier in your remarks that one of the potential results of this legislation is that it could make it more risky to do business in Canada. You said that as part of your presentation, and then you moved on.
Could you elaborate, and give examples of how this would make things more risky? Would it make it more risky for your sort of business? Would it make it more risky for other sorts of business? Talk to a politician who.... I was a geophysicist, but I wasn't in the corporate world. How will this impact making business decisions for your company and others?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
You touched in your response on something I was going to ask everyone about. You talked about the scientific basis of this.
Be it in the regulatory aspects of this bill or in the legislative aspects of this bill, do you think it would be wise to have some sort of objective scientific definition of how products are included?
Again, I'm new to the committee, and the first time I really looked at the bill was today. From what the witnesses have said today, I'm getting the impression that you don't know what the objective criteria were for including the various products in it. I'll take a response both from the port authorities and from the people here at the table.
Have you thought about what you would like for a scientific objective or where we could look to find amendments that would fit those criteria?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's good to be back on a committee on which I've sat for 10 years over my time in the House of Commons.
I'm curious about a couple of things you didn't mention, so I'll go there. MPMO, the major projects management office, has been a major initiative of Natural Resources Canada and has an absolutely critical role in working with natural resource mining projects at a certain level. I was curious to know if you can give any updates as to any evaluations of the office program and any new initiatives that have been coming out of the MPMO.
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Fair enough.
I'm going to ask about GEM. Is someone able to answer if I ask a question about the latest initiatives with the GEM program? What's the latest on that program?
Funding is continuing to go ahead. We're into phase two. Again, most recent evaluations of results, programming, any updates that you can give would be useful as it's also another major initiative.
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
I have another question.
Flow-through shares were extended for one year in the federal budget. One of the issues I've been hearing about from the industry is that one-year extensions make it a bit hard to plan for future exploration years. I know the finance minister is the better person to answer this question, but is there any thinking as to how this could be more closely worked with, with the industry, to get rid of uncertainty, and what other things can be done to encourage junior exploration?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Fair enough on that one.
I have a broader question, then. When we look at this industry, a lot of people see it as merely a bunch of rocks on the ground; you dig them up, and you go sell those rocks. If you haven't worked in the industry, that's where it is. There is an immense human capital that goes into this in Canada and Australia. Essentially, the frontier of the British Empire tends to be at the lead of this.
Has Natural Resources Canada been involved or done any sort of look—and, again, this would overlap with other departments—as far as the needs for the industry going forward with human capital, a skilled labour force are concerned? Some of these skills are very transferable, but some, like geologists, geophysicists, specific mining skills, are not.
Is Natural Resources Canada working on or involved in that in any way, shape, or form, as far as looking forward to our industry is concerned?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
Specifically, in that regard—and I asked in the broader industry—someone once told me that the Natural Resources department—and I don't know if this includes the geological survey of Canada or not, but it might—is actually the highest educated, as far as level of education, of all the departments in the government. I don't know if that's true or not.
Your ministry and the geological survey of Canada are also important elements of this. Internally, as far as a government department and the geological survey goes, are you looking at plans to ensure your internal needs are met, as far as this industry going forward is concerned, for human capital needs?
View Brad Trost Profile
CPC (SK)
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