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Results: 1 - 15 of 84
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for all of the work that he does for Canadian Heritage and for artists, and I want to tell him loud and clear that our artists should all be treated fairly and equitably, whether they speak English or French.
That is a principle that should be respected by everyone, period.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I plan to be clear, as I was just moments ago, and repeat that our artists should all be treated the same, whether they speak English or French. That is a principle that should be respected by everyone.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, it is with sadness that I rise today as Minister of Canadian Heritage to pay tribute to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.
It is in difficult times, such as times of mourning, that we connect with our fundamental humanity, that we feel that sense of solidarity, that we remember we belong to a community. That has been clear in recent days as people around the world have shared memories and paid tribute, and the people of this country are no exception.
Queen Elizabeth II has been an inspiring figure for Canada throughout her life. She has been there every day, for almost half of our country's existence. During the 70 years of her reign and during her 23 visits to our country, 22 of which were as Queen, she visited all regions of Canada. She went from east to west and from north to south to meet and listen to Canadians. She said that she felt at home with us, and that she shared the pride of our achievements. In defining moments, the moments of joy but also of sadness, she was there. She was always there with us.
She was present for some of our country's signal moments, including Expo 67, which many say put Montreal on the map. In 1970, she attended the centennial celebration of Manitoba's and the Northwest Territories' entry into the Canadian Confederation. The Queen was at British Columbia's centennial in 1971 and at Prince Edward Island's in 1973.
She was with us for the 15th Commonwealth Games in Victoria in 1994. This was the first time athletes with a disability were able to compete in the games. She also came to visit the newly added territory of Nunavut to meet the vibrant communities in the north.
The Queen proclaimed our national flag and established our honour system. In 2007, she helped reopen the Canadian National Vimy Memorial. In 2010, she marked the centennial of the Royal Canadian Navy in Halifax.
I could go on for quite some time, but these few examples show the strength of her commitment and her longevity in public service. She was a stable presence for our country in a world changed by war and human tragedy. With her extraordinary sense of service and tremendous sensitivity, she stood by us and Canadians in challenging times and times of celebration.
In her life, many who knew her well said that she was very funny. We even got a sense of that recently when we all joined her in a good laugh as she had tea with Paddington Bear for her Platinum Jubilee.
As a patron to more than 15 Canadian charities, she helped build a better society by promoting education, health, child welfare, the arts, military service and so much more.
Until the very end of her life, she was committed to the well-being of our communities. Just a week ago, she offered her condolences to the victims of the horrific attacks that occurred in Saskatchewan and to all those who lost loved ones during that tragedy.
She embodied the values of solidarity, unity and generosity that we as Canadians share and pass on to our children and grandchildren.
In recent years, as a people, we have stood with the Queen in her difficult moments, including the passing of His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh, whom she called her “strength”.
This week, we are grieving together. Let us therefore take the time to pay tribute to her. I encourage people to visit the commemorative website in honour of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. All Canadians are invited to sign the book of condolences, which can also be done online. Yesterday, more than 45,000 Canadians had already shared their memories and expressed their condolences to the royal family. It is deeply touching to see so many messages from people from all over the country, from all walks of life, people who have different beliefs but who remember this queen, who was a friend and unconditional ally to Canada.
In recognition of the significant relationship between Her Majesty and Canada, and to shine a light on her service and contributions, many buildings and landmarks are now illuminated in royal blue from sunset to midnight. As well, Canadian flags will be flown at half-mast on Government of Canada buildings at home and abroad, including the Peace Tower, until sunset on September 19.
On the day of Her Majesty's funeral in London, a national ceremony of commemoration will take place here in Canada, in Ottawa, and broadcast live on television and social media. People in our capital region will be able to gather along the route of the memorial parade just prior to the actual ceremony. This national day of mourning will provide an opportunity for all Canadians, from coast to coast to coast, to reflect on her accomplishments, her love of our country, her warmth and her grace.
All details about the national commemorative ceremony can be found online. I encourage people to consult the Canadian Heritage website.
We will very much miss the Queen's reassuring presence and unique smile as well as her leadership and kindness. She embodied the values of constancy, stability and compassion, which will forever be etched in our country's history, and I have no doubt that Her Majesty's example will inspire our new sovereign, King Charles III, in his commitment to our nation.
Finally, I would like to present my most sincere condolences to the royal family and reiterate that Canada will always remember the dedication and affection Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II showed our nation.
May she rest in peace.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, that is a great question and was far better than any of the questions from the opposition. I congratulate my colleague on the excellent, or even extraordinary, work he is doing. I am happy to hear that the opposition appreciates him.
Our G7 allies are very interested in what Canada is doing in matters of culture and democracy, especially with respect to Bill C‑18, which would require that the web giants compensate Canadian journalists. Countries around the world are experiencing the same problem. The web giants use our journalists' content and often do not compensate them. This needs to change and we will make these changes with our allies.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, if my colleague wants to see squabbling, he should just look at the official opposition benches. They are having a hard time getting along.
The more serious issue is what they are doing while the government is working to solve the problems and challenges that Canadians are facing. The Conservatives are spending their time filibustering. Filibustering is the first thing they think about when they wake up in the morning and the last think they think about when they go to bed at night. How do they spend their time in between? They filibuster.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, everyone knows that the Conservatives, when they wake up in the morning, think about filibustering. When they go bed at night, they think about filibustering. What do they do in between? They filibuster. That is what they do.
The Conservatives have abandoned the creators. They have abandoned our artists. They have abandoned our culture.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I think the Conservatives should support this bill because this bill is about creators, and it is going to help them because Conservatives are very creative with the truth.
If Conservatives read the bill, they would know it is about online platforms contributing to our culture. If they have a problem with that, it is a shame.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, one of the benefits of the conversation with the Conservatives is that we heard one of the best jokes of the year when they said that they cared about culture. It was really funny. That was a hell of a secret meeting, when the room was full of Conservatives and staff and others. That was very, very secret. The problem is that they kept filibustering. My colleague who just spoke filibustered for four hours. When I was sitting there ready to answer questions, she spoke for four hours. I had to go and could not speak. Luckily, I could come back and explain our position, but the position is clear. We are there for Canadians, for our artists and for our culture and we are not abandoning them.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, for once the Bloc Québécois is saying why they are really here. They are in Ottawa only to prepare for sovereignty. That is what they have always said. It is their entire raison d'être, while everyone else is here to try to advance society, Quebec and Canada together.
There is something sad about putting immigration at the heart of the debate, because immigration is about men, women and children coming here for a better life. The Bloc members want to play partisan politics with this, which is sad.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, let us talk about representation. Yesterday, we heard a troubling revelation at committee. An organization dedicated to opposing Bill C-11 admitted that it was paid by YouTube and TikTok, but they claimed to represent exactly that, digital creators, saying they were grassroots. That is called astroturfing. Of course, this was never revealed before, and it raises serious questions. Did the Conservatives know this when they invited that organization?
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, we are standing up for them, as we are standing up for other cultural workers, for producers, for actors, and for our technicians, which is something the Conservatives cannot do. They cannot say they are going to support Bill C-11 because it is important to tell their stories, because it is important for music, or because it is important for television. They never said that, and they never will.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I have been clear on this since day one: The platforms have obligations, but the users do not.
Platforms are in; users are out.
It has been extremely clear since the beginning.
However, there is one thing I am wondering about. I respect my colleague very much. He comes from Quebec and knows how important Bill C‑11 is, yet he refuses to support the government in its efforts to defend Quebec's culture and the French fact in television production and in music.
I am both surprised at my colleague and disappointed in him.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Speaker, let us put things in context.
If we look at what has been actually happening in our country, we see that over 450 news outlets have closed their doors in the last 15 years, and 64 or 65 in the last two years. Does that have an impact? It has a huge impact on our democracy. Our democracy is not becoming stronger; it is becoming weaker because of that. Things are changing. Things are evolving extremely quickly, and what professional news media outlets are doing has value, and the web giants have to recognize that there is a value and that it is normal that they contribute.
I am very surprised that my Conservative friends have a problem with that, because they even said in the last campaign that this is what we should do. There is an agreement, almost a consensus, that we have to act and that we have to act now. The Conservatives have been stalling debate in this House. They did it with Bill C-8 and Bill C-11. They like to stall things. If they do not want to come here to work, then they should move aside and we will do the work.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Speaker, with all due respect, I would tell my colleague that the bill she is referring to is the former Bill C‑10, which is now Bill C‑11.
Today we are talking about a different bill, Bill C‑18, on which we are generally working quite well with my Bloc Québécois colleagues, and in particular the member for Drummond, who is the Bloc Québécois's heritage critic and who works very hard and very diligently on everything that he does, including as a member of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.
I thank the Bloc Québécois for highlighting the freedom of the press and for emphasizing that the media must be independent and that print media must be strong and autonomous. That is precisely the purpose of Bill C‑18, which would enable the media to not only survive but also succeed. The bill would also ensure that the media is strong not only in major cities, but also in the regions. We are talking about media in all forms, big, small, print, radio or television.
Together, all these forms of media help strengthen our democracy. Journalists representing these media outlets ask us tough questions here, questions that we sometimes do not want to answer, but it is our job to do so. That is why we need to ensure that these media outlets survive and grow even stronger in the future.
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Speaker, my colleague's question highlights what the Conservatives have been doing for weeks and months in trying to jam the work of Parliament in the chamber and in committees. Who benefits from that? No one does. The Conservatives think that they benefit from it, but Canadians do not benefit from what they are doing now.
Now we are talking about Bill C-18, which is fundamental for a strong, free, independent press. I said before that 450 media outlets have closed their doors in the last 15 years, and 64 or 65 have closed in the last two years. This makes our democracy weaker, not stronger.
We have to reinforce it. We have to be able to answer the tough questions, and I want to thank NDP members who are taking this extremely seriously in committees, in their ridings and in meeting with the media. They are bringing back good feedback. They want to collaborate, which is the difference between them and the Conservatives. The NDP wants to collaborate, but they do not.
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