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Results: 1 - 15 of 72
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair. Earlier, we were discussing certain difficulties when it comes to translating information or sites from English into French. What about asking translation schools, where students are learning to become translators, to help with that? It would be much cheaper for the government to pay for the services of a translation school, where students could translate certain texts while learning about Parliament. It would spark their interest and allow them to make a real contribution by helping to develop communication tools.
Obviously, if you went with a private translation firm, you would have more qualified and more experienced translators, but as everyone knows, translation students are supervised by competent and experienced professors. I am certain we could save more money by using the services of a translation school rather than a private translation firm. In the private sector, which is more important: a high-quality product or the bottom line? It's not hard to figure out.
I would like to hear any ideas the three of you have to help us, as parliamentarians. I have been in Parliament for 18 years, but I also spent 14 years as a city councillor. We know that voter turnout in a municipal election is very low. And yet they are all taxpayers, people who want direct services. Voter turnout is even lower in school board elections. The same goes for provincial and federal elections. There are nevertheless 308 elected members in Canada.
I would like to know how we can educate and encourage the public to take an interest in elections. What can we do to engage voters and young people so that they are eager to vote? They might be anxious for the next election to get rid of the Conservatives!
An hon. member: Ha, ha!
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
This reminds me a bit of youth leaving rural areas. Young people leave the regions to go to attend college, university, or a vocational centre. Nowadays, families are smaller. So, parents follow their children once they retire, which is happening at an increasingly young age. They move to large centres in order to have better health care or be closer to their children. People are leaving the regions in droves. The low participation rate at elections is comparable to the youth migration.
I have nothing further, Mr. Chair. My NDP colleague has an excellent question to ask.
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
My question is about security and about items that are allowed through the checkpoint. Are the rules less strict now in 2011 than they were in 2006 and 2008?
In the document that we were given this morning, I can see that in 2006 and 2008, the following items were prohibited: ice skates, duct tape, metal handcuffs, tie wraps, that today are often used by security guards, even by police officers, and that are used instead of handcuffs at times.
According to this document, these items are currently allowed through the checkpoint with your boarding pass and passport, in other words these items are allowed on board. When a 20-strong hockey team boards a plane, there are 20 pairs of skates. If a team of 20 figure skaters board a plane, there are just as many skates on board.
I do not understand this because in Labrador City and in Wabush, I almost had to undergo a strip search because I had two lighters in my pants pocket. I had to take off my shoes, my socks, my shirt and my jacket. I only had my pants on when I went through because of two lighters in my pocket. That's number one.
Second, I would like to understand the percentage of individuals: does 1 individual out of 10 get searched, 2 out of 10, or 3 out of 20, regardless of why? If you are the 12th individual, you are the one who will be searched.
I will give you an example. I am not someone who takes a plane very often, but I do at times. At the checkpoint in Baie-Comeau, the same thing more or less happened to me. I had to take my shoes off, my jacket, go through four or five times, go out, come back, because of their security measures. Unfortunately, there were no men available to conduct a strip search; there were only two women that morning at the checkpoint. That is why I was not strip searched. I had to do everything at the checkpoint, I delayed everyone, and then the checkpoint officers apologized and told me that even though they had known me for a long time, even though they knew I was a member of Parliament, I was the individual assigned to a search. If that individual was the 10th individual, then that was me. It happened to be me. The 20th individual was also searched.
Why is that? If you have any doubts about people, I agree, and it makes me feel safer. When I board a plane, I feel safe because I know that there is a checkpoint and things are done properly. But 1 individual out of every 10? The 8th individual gets a free pass but the 10th individual does not, even though they do not have anything on them. They are just checked because according to the standards, the 10th individual has to be searched. If you happen to be number 10, then you are just about strip searched.
I was not strip searched in Baie-Comeau. I was told I would have had to go into the room, but because there were only two women, and because I am a man and there were no men there that morning... They apologized but they explained that this had happened because I was the 10th individual. I was told that. I was the number that had to be searched. I don't understand: because I had two lighters in my pocket—at the time I used to smoke—I was almost strip searched.
They go as far as removing toothpaste tubes. I have seen that at the checkpoint. And yet, 20 pairs of skates, duct tape, metal handcuffs and tie wrap are allowed on board. For goodness' sake!
It is rather difficult to understand this document. Has there been a relaxing of security in 2011, compared to 2006 and 2008? If so, I feel less safe.
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
It is not Transport Canada that issued this information this morning.
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, M. Chairman.
I asked questions of the witness who appeared prior to you, as to the list that was presented this morning. The list of items allowed on board was apparently much smaller in 2006 and 2008 compared to 2011. The previous witness did not seem to know what I was talking about. He simply said that it was not up to his agency to determine which items were allowed on board a plane or not.
I understand the need to strengthen security measures at checkpoints in airports, following terrorist attacks. When I am about to board a plane it reassures me to see how strict the rules are and to realize that I simply can't bring anything I like on board.
You cannot have two lighters or toothpaste larger than a certain size. However, we now are going to allow a hockey team to board a flight with 22 pairs of skates because there are 22 players. We will allow for duct tape on board because they need to tape their hockey sticks. They can bring scissors as well to cut the duct tape. They can carry the type of tie wraps often used by police officers as handcuffs or to tie people up. They can even carry metal handcuffs.
Well, what was prohibited in 2006 and 2008 is now allowed in 2011, something I do not find reassuring. It is not reassuring to passengers either, nor cabin crew. I'm wondering to what extent we intend to become more lenient. These types of items on planes may represent a danger.
I think Transport Canada is getting lax, allowing these items on board. Not only unions but members of the House of Commons should demand from Transport Canada that these items be prohibited on planes.
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
Further to our study on aviation safety and security, would you like to see our committee support the union's position as to the prohibition of certain items?
I personally would have preferred limiting the number of items allowed on board rather than loosening restrictions. Would you like us to recommend in our reports that these items not be allowed on board planes?
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you.
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
You mentioned a child who wanted to live with his grandmother. You said there was a problem because the judge did not understand the law. I would like to have more details about this. That will get me to my next question.
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
On page 5 of her report, the Auditor General says that First Nations children are overrepresented in youth protection institutions. According to the report:
At the end of March 2007, about 8,300 First Nations children ordinarily resident on reserves were in care. This represents a little over 5 percent of all children residing on reserves (almost eight times the proportion of children residing off reserves).
In your experience, what are the factors that contribute to the high number of First Nations children in care?
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
I have to say that I was late because of transportation problems. As I do not normally work on this file, I am not very familiar with the subject. Unfortunately, Mr. Lévesque who normally sits on the committee was not able to attend. I will therefore let my colleagues use my time since they have a better knowledge of these issues and regularly work on this committee.
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chairman, I hope that we won't have any problems with the technology and that in Chile there will also be translation from French into Spanish.
My question is in fact addressed to the witnesses from Chile. We know that the Parliament 2020 report has not yet been published. When do you think it will be published? How many witnesses were consulted in the preparation of that report? We know that any report contains recommendations. What recommendations do you think will be difficult to apply in the short term? What budget was put at your disposal for the implementation of the report's recommendations?
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
That is a very important question because...
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
In the United Kingdom, your report has already been published. You have already begun to work. You have already applied some of the recommendations. What budget were you given to implement the recommendations of the Parliament 2020 report in an effective way?
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, I am convinced that, should you so request it, you would obtain the unanimous consent of Committee members. In view of the fact that the allotted time for the first question on the agenda has already elapsed and that no additional registrations are allowed, we could at least hear the witnesses, parliamentarians already on the list, whether it is for 10, 15 or 5 minutes.
View Gérard Asselin Profile
BQ (QC)
Do you have unanimous consent?
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