Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 24
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, through you, I want to say how good it is to see the minister looking as robust as he does. It is a real pleasure to have him back in full fighting form. Parliament as a whole, and the government, can certainly use his services as I believe he is the longest-serving parliamentarian in cabinet.
I want to ask a question on the issue of non-traditional voting locations and accessible voting requirements. Long-term care facilities frequently have the best accessibility. In some small villages these are the only accessible locations. The Human Rights Commission has required that certain accessibility criteria be met in order to allow voting to take place.
Would it be possible to have slightly less accessible locations in some cases for voting under this legislation? If so, would the government contemplate allowing such a thing to make sure it is possible for people to vote, especially in smaller locations?
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr Speaker, yesterday’s anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz is iconic in the struggle against anti-Semitism. Tomorrow is the fourth anniversary of the shooting at the Centre Culturel Islamique de Québec, equally iconic of our opposition to Islamophobia. The two hatreds are two sides of the same coin.
Therefore, yesterday it was appropriate to say “never again” on behalf of all victims of anti-religious hatred, regardless of their faith. Likewise, tomorrow the best way to show solidarity with Canada’s Muslims is to pledge ourselves to oppose anti-religious violence, regardless of the target.
To deprive the simplistic ideologies of group identity and group hatred of oxygen, we must never, even in the name of sympathy, single out the victim groups as the existential “other”. They are us. Yesterday, there was a sense that we were all Jews. Tomorrow, there will be a sense that we are all Muslims. Every day, we are all family.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I want to inform the discussion you are going to have. I am very glad you are doing this, because you are right. The rule, the convention or the practice really has been fuzzy in the past.
We are dealing with a situation regarding the Bloc Québécois masks in particular, but also the mask of my colleague from Alberta. Nobody would know this was a problem if the member had not raised it, because these people were not in the camera shot.
A relevant precedent to take into account here is the practice regarding how one is dressed in the House of Commons. The expectation that one will wear a tie and be in business attire is important when one is speaking. It seems to me there is a clear distinction between when one is speaking, or in the camera shot, and when one is not. That is a relevant precedent to take into account as you form your decision.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker,
T’was the Christmas of COVIDAnd interest was keen, In our nation receiving Its promised vaccine. The stockings were spaced by the chimney with care Though half of the family couldn’t be there, The children were snuggled (but sad) in their beds Cancelled trips to see Santa Claus still in their heads. Mama in her 'kerchief and I in my mask Had just hunkered down for the winter-long task, Of reading each book from Homer to Seneca While awaiting a booster from AstraZeneca. But we can’t let the wait crush our spirits by inches Or transform us into a nation of Grinches, Let’s reach out to each other, the tall and the small Like the Grinch, let our hearts grow three sizes—that’s all. Christmas came to the Whos without ribbons and tags It came, just the same without boxes and bags, By reindeer or by Zoom, it can come to us too Merry Christmas to all, merry Christmas to you.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, in case the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands is listening, I loved her S.O. 31 about the night before Christmas and I encourage her to listen to mine tomorrow.
I am presenting a petition on the same subject the member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan presented. It is with regard to Uighurs in China. The petitioners request the Parliament of Canada to take two actions: first, to formally recognize they have been and are being subject to an ongoing genocide and, second, to use Magnitsky act sanctions on Chinese officials involved in this genocide.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I know my colleague has been following the debate. I saw her on the screen earlier, so she would have heard everything. One of the arguments that has come up in the course of the debate was a suggestion from the government benches that the bill is being introduced in order to comply with court-ordered rules regarding maintaining the constitutionality of our law. Moreover, the Minister of Justice and Attorney General was opposed to the previous MAID legislation because it failed to do this.
With regard to the various amendments that were put forward by the Conservative Party, is it the case that any of these suggested amendments would have had the effect of causing the new legislation to not be compliant with the Constitution, or is it the member's view that the legislation nevertheless would have been fully compliant if amended as suggested by the Conservatives?
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, today is the 20th anniversary of my first election. I will not say that it gives me pleasure, but it seems fitting and appropriate that I am once again returning to a subject that I addressed in my very first address to the House 20 years ago, which at the time was human rights in China and the treatment of Falun Gong.
This is a petition signed by many Canadians on the subject of a piece of legislation currently before the Senate that would deal with the issue of organ harvesting where organs are taken involuntarily, that is to say by people who have been forced into confinement and had organs removed, often with fatal results. This takes place in China and has been done to victimize many Falun Gong practitioners. Testimony was given before the human rights committee when I was the chair by imminent human rights experts, David Kilgour and David Matas, on this subject.
The petitioners ask that Bill S-204, currently before the Senate, be expedited. This bill would amend the Criminal Code and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, to make sure that Canadians are prohibited from travelling abroad in order to benefit from organs that have been removed without consent from their human donors, and also to render it inadmissible for Canada to admit any permanent resident or foreign national who has participated in the trade of involuntarily donated human organs.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, this petition is close to my heart because I am a member of the international human rights subcommittee.
The petitioners request that Bill S-204 be moved through the Senate and then to the House as quickly as possible. The goal of that piece of legislation is to amend the Criminal Code and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act to prohibit Canadians from travelling abroad in order to acquire human organs that have been removed without consent and to track down any financial transactions that take place as a result of such travel.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I am presenting two petitions today.
The first petition regards the situation of the Uighurs in China and calls on the House to recognize this as a genocide, something I note the Subcommittee on International Human Rights did recently.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, the second petition is on the subject of sex-selective abortion. The one thing that has not been mentioned by the previous speakers on this topic is the fact that sex-selective abortions are inevitably of female unborn babies or fetuses.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, the tragic death of Robert Dziekanski, tasered by RCMP officers in the Vancouver airport, was caught on video. The result was a media sensation and a commitment to install defibrillators wherever the police use tasers. However, when the very same RCMP officers arrive at someone's house as first responders, they are not equipped with defibrillators.
It is a statistical fact that upwards of 300 lives would be saved every year if each RCMP cruiser were issued a defibrillator, but those heart attack deaths, one a day on average, are not televised, so the media and, therefore, the government do not seem to care. When only visible deaths are taken seriously, Stalin's horrible maxim becomes a truism: one death is a tragedy; a million deaths are just a statistic.
The government could save 300 lives next year with a simple order to the RCMP to put a defibrillator in every cruiser. Surely now is the time to act.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I too am rising on the issue of the ongoing genocide in East Turkestan or Xinjiang province. Three million Chinese Uighurs are being imprisoned in concentration camps, rounded up, taken away from their families in what is clearly an act of genocide.
The petitioners point out that Canada must act against this by using the Magnitsky act. We cannot just do this against small countries; we must take a stand against great countries as well. Being a great power is no excuse to get away with something as horrible as what is going on in Xinjiang, East Turkestan, right now.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, under normal circumstances, Commons committees have the power to summon witnesses or to send for documents, but the Liberal chair of the health committee has ruled that right now, when his committee needs these powers the most, these powers have been taken away under the terms of the special order adopted on April 11 in this House.
Given this interpretation, will the government amend the special order it is imposing today to allow all currently sitting committees, including the health committee, to have the full powers they normally enjoy?
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Chair, on February 26, the Standing Committee on Health passed a motion stating the following:
That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(1)(a), the committee order all documents, including briefing notes, memos and emails from senior officials, prepared for the Minister of Health, Minister of Transport, Minister of Public Safety, Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Minister of National Defence regarding the outbreak of the coronavirus, no later than March 15, 2020; that matters of Cabinet confidence and national security be excluded from the request; and that any redactions to protect the privacy of Canadian citizens and permanent residents whose names and personal information may be included in the documents, as well as public servants who have been providing assistance on this matter, be made by the Office of the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel of the House of Commons.
The documents were provided, but they were redacted by the government in advance. As a result, the Parliamentary counsel has written to complain about this action.
Will the government reverse its course and allow the parliamentary counsel law clerk to do the redactions, rather than redacting proactively?
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Chair, they were not so busy that they could not busy themselves with redacting the documents, a task that in the committee's motion was to be left specifically to Parliamentary counsel.
I ask again: Will the government submit the same documents unredacted so that Parliamentary counsel can make those decisions, as is appropriate under the privileges of the House?
Results: 1 - 15 of 24 | Page: 1 of 2

1
2
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data