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Results: 1 - 15 of 543
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
Thank you very much.
Well: you've got my attention very thoroughly. Thank you very much to our witnesses for being here with us.
Dr. Blank, you were talking about bioelectric medicine, if I heard that right, and the effect on cells. Cells are something I'm very interested in. Are you familiar with MENS therapy, microelectric neuromuscular stimulation?
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
It was popular for athletic injuries and so on, starting in about the nineties. Carl Lewis, Ben Johnson, and other sprinters of that era were using it for athletic injuries.
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
That's one experience using that. They're very low-frequency treatments. You're talking about 50 to 100 microamps. It's low amperage, microamperage, but it's also low frequency, like 0.4 to 0.7 hertz. Of course, when you have very low frequency, you have very long wavelengths, which seem to have a very profound physiological impact.
At any rate, you have my attention with what you're suggesting here about cellular impacts. I just want to read one short quote about MENS therapy, just off the Internet here:
In 1991, the German scientists Dr. Erwin Neher and Dr. Bert Sakmann shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their development of the patch-clamp technique that allows the detection of minute electrical currents in cell membranes. This method allowed the detection of 20 to 40 types of ion channels that allow positive or negatively charged ions into and out of the cells and confirmed that electrical activity is not limited to nerve and muscle tissue.
So now we're talking about what's going on in the cell. I think you raised something extremely important on what's going on in the cell. You would be familiar, from your work, with a lot of the interest today in apoptosis. There's a lot of interest in that in cancer therapy
Are you familiar with that term, sir?
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
Programmed cell death, exactly. It may be that in the body, with 80 trillion to 100 trillion cells, we have up to one million cells per second going through this process of cell destruction, programmed cell death, and recycling without damaging neighbouring cells. It's an amazing phenomenon. Of course there's a lot of interest in apoptosis, because in cancer research now, we find tumour cells are full of an anti-apoptotic protein of several types, and viruses are able to introduce this kind of anti-apoptotic protein. It's key to understanding what's going on in the cells.
Does any of your research indicate that in fact when cells are stressed—you mentioned stress proteins, the cell response to stress—the stress response includes triggers that may in fact induce apoptosis in the cells, which can in fact trigger tumours under the right condition?
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
You had my attention when you mentioned DNA. With the data that's compacted in that DNA structure, it's the most efficient information storage system we've identified anywhere in the universe so far. I want to ask you to go back to what you said—because maybe I missed something—about the CTCT sequence at about every 250 base pairs.
What was the implication? Were you implying that ELF frequencies can interact with the genome at some level and have a negative impact? Could you please expand on that?
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
Was there a particular reason that it was the CTCT, that particular—
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
Thank you for that. It's fascinating.
Meg Sears, you got all the men's attention, of course, when you mentioned sperm. I know that on TV there was a study on vasectomies, and for the men in the audience, as soon as they brought it up, all the men were caught simultaneously crossing their legs.
Voices: Oh, oh!
Mr. James Lunney: You mentioned brain tumours, especially in children. You mentioned salivary glands.
You mentioned the brassiere for 10 years. It would seem to me that you would have tremendous potential for disruption of cells when you have that device so close to your body. I'm trying to keep mine away from my body as much as possible here—
Voices: Oh, oh!
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
In my own experience, I can tell you that when I started to carry a cellphone on my waist, I thought a lot about where I was going to put it. I sure didn't want to put it anywhere near my heart.
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
I finally strapped it on next to the iliac crest. The kidneys might be exposed, but hopefully there's a little more shielding there. I can tell you that I felt a pain in my hip when I started to carry that thing 15 years ago, after I was elected, because I had never carried one before. Eventually that pain was shut down. I think that would be habituation.
After 10 years, that pain started to come back, so I've switched to the opposite side. I noticed that when I talked on a cellphone for more than a few minutes, I would get a pain in the temple. That causes me some concern.
That's just anecdotal, of course, but I think the information you're presenting here is a bit alarming, since you mentioned that the literature search ended in 2011—
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
—and I think both of you have alluded to research that has come up since.
This goes back to you, Dr. Blank. Can I ask you to please identify—
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
We welcome all of our witnesses to this committee. I want to say to all of you how much we appreciate your testimony today.
Thank you, Dr. Cline, for that interesting case history and the importance of a proper investigation and diagnosis.
Of course, I think you'd be interested to hear that it was Pure North S'Energy that brought up the problem of toxification through mercury amalgam, which is a big concern to many people in the integrated med world.
Allan and Mark, I appreciate that Pure North S'Energy has raised the issue of Vitamin D. I think several of you mentioned Vitamin D, and I hope to hear a little more from all of you on that. I have a motion before this committee to look into two of the four injustices that you mentioned, so I want to come back to that in just a minute.
The first thing I want to mention is that I really appreciated this tile. Not all of you would have seen this, but it's from InspireHealth. Dr. Wright, you have a great cartoon presentation here. You won't be able to see this, but it shows a very busy doctor sweating away and mopping the floor while the sink is overflowing, and no one is paying attention to turning the tap off. I think there is something in common there with the energy that we are spending trying to manage our health care expenses while often missing the root-cause issues.
What I want to suggest is that there is a lot of stress in medicine, and what I've noticed about the groups that are present here is that you are very happy and enthusiastic about what you are engaged in. There is a lot of stress for some of your doctors.
I want to start with InspireHealth and just say that your program seems to take the stress out of cancer therapy for the patients. They can always engage with somebody. We heard from Dr. Cline about the importance of building a relationship with the patient, telling their story back to them, making sure they are understood, but managing stress.
Your results and outcomes in managing the cancer patients, along with the traditional cancer therapy that is targeting the lesions being addressed, have the attention of the B.C. government and the BC Cancer Agency. Your outcomes are sufficiently significant for your patients. B.C. has good statistics and you have received attention.
You do outreach to remote areas. I want you to briefly explain to this group how that works, and the role of Vitamin D in the better outcomes that you're getting. If you would, please start there.
View James Lunney Profile
Ind. (BC)
Do you fly out to the region, meet with the people first, and then follow up through electronic means once you've established a relationship? Is that part of the program? I know you started that way.
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