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Results: 1 - 15 of 45
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-10-18 11:08
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Good morning, committee members. Thank you for making time to hear presentations from MPs this morning.
First of all, there's a little handout that you're going to get. There are four key points that I want to raise as part of my contribution this morning.
First, I think the hybrid Parliament has been a success. It came together rather quickly in a very difficult time. Like most changes you make, there were some growing pains, and while we went through some of those growing pains, I'm sure there are other ways that we can improve upon the system as well.
I want to make sure that it is not lost on people that there has been a shift in this country since 2020. In ridings like mine, it has really been felt in my capacity to do my job. Let me walk you through it.
First of all, you have a map that shows the entirety of my riding. It's a small population of 30,000 people in a geographic area of 300,000 square kilometres. That is not small. If you were to take the island of Newfoundland and the provinces of Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, they would all fit in my riding. That's an area served by 31 MPs; my area is served by one MP, which is me. Populations vary, of course, as you know.
How do I get to my riding? That's what I want to talk about as part of my presentation. You can see how large it is. It borders on Quebec in two areas and goes way up north towards Nunavut. How do you get there? There are four distinct regions. Forty per cent of my riding is isolated, with fly-in and fly-out communities only. The rest of it I can access by road once I'm on the ground. Road access from one community to the community furthest away that I can drive to is over 1,200 kilometres. It's not a short drive.
To give you an idea, I very rarely leave here on a Friday, because it's impossible for me to get to my riding before Saturday, and then I have to leave on Sunday to come back. The hybrid Parliament was the first opportunity I had to be there on a Friday: to arrive through St. John's on Friday morning, get online, do my House duty and do my votes—whatever the case was—and then have the rest of the day in my riding. I was able to do that sometimes on Monday.
Now, with the flight schedule, we were having a seven-day-a-week schedule from Air Canada, so I could go to Halifax and go into Goose Bay, go to St. John's overnight and the next day go into Goose Bay or go into Blanc-Sablon on the Quebec side to go to that part of my riding. It is very complicated, because it is very spread out and not connected. Then, on the other days, I go to western Labrador on this side of the Quebec border, so I overnight in Montreal, I take an early flight at 5:30 a.m. and I get there by mid-afternoon on Friday.
That's just to give you an example, because there is an argument that says, “You knew what you were signing on for.” Well, when I signed on, there were two airlines seven days a week. Today, I have one—and that's down to three days a week—and a single airline going into most communities, sometimes if at all. That has made it very difficult.
I have four very important points and I'm happy to discuss them later if anyone has questions.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-10-18 11:43
Thank you very much, MP Blaney.
First of all, much of what I had there has been raised by my colleagues. I, too, unfortunately, have lost a child.
During COVID-19 I lost my brother, so I know how important it was for me to have access to hybrid Parliament so I could be with my family and with his kids at that time as well. I really felt if that option wasn't there for me, my privileges as an MP would have been compromised as well, because it gave me that added opportunity to still be able to participate in Parliament and to support my family, and to have them support me at a time when I needed it.
I'm also a cancer survivor. I went through cancer in politics and I went through other major surgical procedures—as I heard Carol talk about. A number of our colleagues have. I listened to Jean this morning. It's absolutely heartbreaking to hear her story.
One thing that I think hybrid allows us to do is to continue to participate and have input, even if it's at a distance. It might not be the preferred option. Like you, I love being with my colleagues. I love being in the House of Commons, being in person for committees, but realistically we have lives that sometimes do not allow us to do the things we really want to do, but we can still participate. Hybrid allows us the opportunity.
I really believe the question for the committee should be how we incorporate a hybrid model going forward. When does it come into play? How does it support MPs? I don't think it should be a question of whether we use it or whether we don't use it. I think the question is how we use it to strengthen Parliament.
The largest corporations in the world today are being run with people's boxes on the screen. I'm not suggesting everything we do as lawmakers in Canada can be done over a computer screen, but if we can run a corporation that way, surely we can accommodate a member of Parliament who has had a child, who has family issues, who is suffering through disease and medical treatments or who has lost a loved one in their lives. Surely we can accommodate them through temporary circumstances where they require that support. That is something we can all do without compromising our responsibility as legislators or our responsibility to our constituents. I think the question needs to change to start with.
Other than that, as parliamentarians we have an opportunity to lead a new standard of how Parliament works in Canada, using new technologies and using the tools we have available to us. We're not the only Parliament in the world that is going to be looking at models like this, but we've tested a model. It seems to have worked. How do we take what we've done and incorporate it going forward as a new practice?
I think we can set a standard just by what we've been through in two years to show the rest of the world how parliaments can be diversified. In doing so, we're going to attract better people to politics. I believe there's nothing wrong with the people we have now, but we all know how hard it is to get someone to run for office these days. That's a serious point. We're all—
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-10-18 11:57
Thank you, MP Fergus. I appreciate the question.
When you live in a northern riding like I do—and Rachel and some of the others at the table, and many in the House of Commons—when we sign up to be a parliamentarian, we know the distances. What happens is that there are factors that change that impact our work. That's what's happening in my case, right now, with the shift in airlines and the lack of transportation capacity to get between there and Ottawa.
When I look at my schedule, other than the constituency weeks, I don't get to go to my riding on the weekends. In order to do my parliamentary duties here, I can't be in my constituency on the weekends. It's physically impossible, based on the airline schedules and how I have to travel to get there and get back. I need that extra day in order to be able to do that. Is that an extenuating circumstance? I don't know. However, if there were a hybrid option, I could at least opt for that option one or two days out of a month, so that I would get that weekend to go back to my riding.
I see hybrid as an option for MPs who are really going through challenging and difficult circumstances. We're all human beings. We're all going to face those things in our lives, cases and stories like those everyone heard here today.
You go all over the country. Employers today are looking at how they can make a better workplace environment for their employees, how they can make a better situation for them and their families, and get good productivity out of them on the job. We need to be doing the same as a Parliament.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-05-30 17:40
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and I would like to thank all of the panellists for their presentations today and for their very helpful answers to some difficult questions, I'm sure.
First of all, regarding the discussion on orphan wells, I want to say to Mr. Saddleback, thank you for at least mentioning that those investments have been able to create indigenous jobs in western Canada and have certainly helped the environment.
I know what the PBO has said. Even though they estimated it at $361 million, they projected it to go to $1.1 billion by 2025. However, let's not ignore the fact that industry itself has very minimal security deposits on any of this cleanup and that this has been a program implemented by the government since 2020, which has invested $1.7 million into this particular project. I really think that in energy transition, we also need to look at when companies transition out of the industry and what they leave behind.
I'd be interested in hearing the feedback of people on the panel about that as well.
I'm going to ask a second question as well, and hopefully they'll have an opportunity to answer both.
I know that, especially with the First Nations Major Projects Coalition, you have partnerships in LNG, and you've talked several times about having equity to invest and how that contributes to indigenous jobs. I'd like to hear where you head is in terms of that space and what the government should be doing.
Also, Mr. Swampy, you talked about UNDRIP, which I support, though I'm not sure if you support it or if your interpretation of UNDRIP is different from my understanding of it. UNDRIP will have a tremendous impact in helping and aiding indigenous people going forward in resource development in Canada. I'm not seeing your optimism on that and I'd like to get more clarification.
So, I have three questions. One is a general question, one is to Ms. Gale, and one is to Mr. Swampy. You can start with the last and go backwards if you want, Mr. Chair.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-05-30 17:44
I didn't say it was the lowest; I said it was minimal. Their deposits were minimal, according to the PBO report.
We can move now to my next question. That was for the First Nations Major Projects Coalition.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-04-25 16:02
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you for your presentations today and to our guests online.
It's very interesting. I'm going to start my questions on the uranium side, on the nuclear side. I say “uranium” because my riding is in Labrador and we have a lot of uranium. I'm happy to see that it is a critical mineral in Canada and the opportunity to really see that develop.
In addition to that, I come from one of the areas in Canada that probably has the best geological compound for repository waste storage of nuclear as well. It's something that has always been highlighted and brought forward. Obviously, it's one of the areas that has always been a concern whenever we talk about nuclear and whenever we talk about uranium and advancing that industry. I think it is a concern for Canadians. One of my questions is, then, on how we address that.
My second question is with regard to production. We see what's happening with nuclear production in Canada today. How much production do we need to get to? What does that increase look like? What's our transmission ability to bring that to provinces and territories around the country?
I'll stop there and listen to your responses.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-04-25 16:05
Is there enough time to address my second question, which is transmission capacity for nuclear energy? What does that look like, getting it to the provinces and territories?
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-04-25 16:06
I'm not an expert in this. When you look at the current transmission of oil-generated power, is it the same kind of transmission capacity or is it done differently? Are there different ways that you can get it, or is it transmitted in the same medium?
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-04-25 16:07
Thank you.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-04-04 16:03
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I would like to thank our guests who are before the committee today. Thank you for your opening comments.
I also want to say to my colleague who just asked questions that the critical minerals study that was released has a lot of the information in it in terms of mineral production, quantities and exports. A lot of that information is in that report as well. I just wanted to point that out.
My colleague talked about the impact on jobs. We know that in a just transition there are going to be new opportunities and new jobs. I'd like to focus on that as well. We know that transitioning with energy means transitioning with jobs and employment. We have to be very proactive to protect Canadians and to ensure that they can make this transition and that they have the skills they need to do it.
What sectors do you predict will have the greatest employment opportunities and growth? I think in identifying these sectors, we can get a very good picture of where some of those jobs are going to be and what skills will be required.
That's for whoever would like to go first. It's probably Mr. Brown.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-04-04 16:07
That's good information, and I'm sure our committee will certainly entertain doing that as well.
You were talking about creating a just transition advisory body. To help our committee move forward with our study, can you tell us what this advisory body would do? What role do you guys see for it? What would be the relationship between it and the net-zero advisory body that we're looking at as well?
I don't want the public to be bogged down with all of these committees, so understanding what their role is in working with industry, unions, provinces and territories and, of course, indigenous governments will give us a better understanding of the work we're going to undertake in the next few weeks as well.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-04-04 16:09
Okay.
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-03-21 15:46
Excuse me, Mr. Chair.
My translation is not working.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-03-21 15:46
I can hear you now.
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-03-21 16:18
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I'm speaking to you today from my riding in Labrador in eastern Canada. I'm coming to you from the unceded lands of the Inuit and the Innu people of Labrador.
I'd like to first of all thank you for your expertise and for the work that you do every day around this important topic of climate carbon reduction and emissions. Education of Canadians is very critical in the work we need to do together to move forward and to be able to transition from fossil fuel. I appreciate your expertise and testimony.
I'm going to start with Mr. Séguin.
When you presented today, you talked about five requirements that you felt should be implemented. We've been hearing testimony from witnesses relating to a possible cap on emissions and focusing on a decrease in emissions rather than a decrease in production. I'm wondering what your thoughts would be around this or if you would have some recommendations that you'd like to propose on those two things.
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