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Results: 1 - 15 of 74
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, it is not news to my colleagues that the cost of living has now made things so difficult that more and more Canadians are living paycheque to paycheque. The Conservatives have made concrete suggestions to give them a bit of relief: Cancel the January 1 tax increase and above all cancel the carbon tax that the government wants to triple.
What is the government doing? It refuses to listen. Is it too much to ask this government and the Prime Minister of Canada to please listen and be compassionate?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, people nowadays feel like they have lost control of both their wallets and their lives. Government spending is driving up the cost of living. This Liberal government has doubled our national debt, which is now more than that of all previous governments put together. It is the most spendthrift government in history. The more it spends, the more prices go up.
As a result, families are being forced to make changes to what they eat in order to deal with the 10% increase in the cost of food. Seniors are delaying their retirement and seeing their savings evaporate with inflation. Students are sleeping in shelters. Thirty-year-olds are living in their parents' basements because of the cost of housing. Single mothers are watering down their children's milk to cope with the 10% increase over the past year.
It is not surprising that people are worried. Most are barely keeping their heads above water. These are citizens of our country. Our duty is to serve them. We must give them hope.
The new Conservative leader will put people first: their paycheques, their savings, their homes and their country.
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, Conservative members have spoken every day in the House about what we are hearing in our ridings. We hear terrible stories about the cost of living. More and more Canadians are going to food banks. Mothers have to make painful choices. Young students have to sleep in shelters. Winter is coming, and families will have trouble heating their homes.
We are asking the Prime Minister to have a heart and show some compassion. Could he scrap his plan to increase taxes?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the price of basic foods is skyrocketing. For example, bakery products are up 16% in one year. Butter costs 26% more and is now $8.26. Thousands of Quebec families are struggling to make ends meet. Instead of wanting to help them, the Prime Minister wants to increase the burden on families. There is only one thing to do: Cancel the tax increase.
Can we count on him?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the riding I represent stretches from the St. Lawrence River to the American border. A very large part of it is rural.
With the high cost of gas, it is very expensive for my constituents who have to drive to work, do errands or access health care.
To help these people, the Prime Minister needs to do just one thing: Cancel the planned tax hike on gas and paycheques. Does he have the guts to do that?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, according to the National Payroll Institute, 85% of Canadians are worried about inflation and rising interest rates. Furthermore, 37% of them are living from paycheque to paycheque and have to spend everything they earn or even more than they earn. Things are starting to look bad.
This government could not care less. It is not interested in coming up with a concrete plan to help these people.
Once and for all, will the government pledge not to raise taxes again?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the government is looking through rose-coloured glasses.
The reality is that inflation is eroding Canadians' morale. The cost of food is up 10.8% over last year, the largest increase in the last 40 years. Parents are struggling to feed their children properly and have to make agonizing choices.
This government, however, wants to raise taxes for taxpayers who are already stretched to the limit.
The question is very simple. Will the Prime Minister give Canadians a break, yes or no, and promise not to raise taxes any further?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, passports are a major issue. In an interview with Paul Arcand this morning, the minister said that she knew for months that the situation was going to become problematic.
She let the situation deteriorate. Her negligence is typical of this government. The number of applications the government needs to deal with has gotten so out of hand that we have lost count. The minister misled Canadians by telling them that they would get their passports on time when she knew full well such would not be the case.
Can she now set the record straight in the House and tell us how many thousands of people are waiting in line outside to get their passports?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, people have to bring a tent and camp out on the sidewalk overnight just to get a passport. This is happening in Canada, a G7 country. That department is in chaos. Passport Canada is processing 75,000 applications per week, down from more than 90,000 before COVID.
Employees need to be allowed back to work in person, so the business hours can be extended at all offices. Can the minister put away the talking points and give us some real answers?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the cost of groceries increased by almost 10% in April. It was the fifth month in a row that food prices had increased by more than 5%. The cost of gas was more than $2 per litre. In the greater Quebec City area, house prices have increased by 21% over the past year.
With wage increases averaging about 3%, people are struggling to get by. Can the Minister of Finance offer Canadians some real answers?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Emergency Preparedness, the very colleague of the Minister of Public Safety, said, “I am not aware of any recommendation from law enforcement. Quite frankly, this was a decision of government”.
This completely contradicts what the Minister of Public Safety said. He has misled Canadians and the House. There must be consequences.
Will the Prime Minister do the right thing and ask for his resignation?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, contrary to what the Minister of Public Safety said, neither the RCMP nor the Ottawa Police Service asked the government to invoke the Emergencies Act. However, true to form, whenever the Prime Minister is confronted with his contradictions, he dodges the issue or blames others, and when that does not work, he takes cheap shots, which is what he has been doing throughout question period. Ministerial responsibility appears to be a foreign concept for this government.
Will he ask his minister to resign?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, on April 26, the Minister of Public Safety said, with regard to emergency measures, “I don't want to speak for every last serving member of law enforcement, but there was a very strong consensus that we needed to invoke the act.”
We now know that there was no such consensus at any time. He has misled Canadians. He no longer deserves the confidence of the House.
Will the minister do the only honourable thing left to do: apologize and resign?
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, it is always someone else's fault. Being a minister comes with great responsibility.
The minister stated several times, “It was on the advice of law enforcement that we invoked the Emergencies Act.” However, law enforcement never asked for draconian measures.
Rex Murphy wrote in the National Post that, for the sake of his integrity, the minister should resign.
What is he waiting for—
View Dominique Vien Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, my question is very simple.
He misled the House, so he should apologize and step down. Period.
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