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Results: 1 - 15 of 147
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
Thank you to all the witnesses here today. I think we have a good panel that is showing the scope of the challenges and the opportunities to invest and grow clean tech in Canada.
I want to start at the beginning, which is the R and D. I think Mr. Mazier spoke earlier of the government support for R and D at early-stage clean tech. I know that during the Conservative government up until 2015, that budget was slashed considerably. I'm just wondering if you could comment on how important you think that funding for R and D is in the overall process. Then I want to go to different stages, but I'll start there, at the initial R and D.
Also, how do you feel about the government funding projects that fail, and the R and D projects that fail as well? I'd love to hear your comments on that.
Perhaps we can start with Mr. Haley.
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
Specifically on the building retrofits, I do have another question.
It seems that a lot of our logjam is in the energy audits and having people get out and do those audits. I guess this is a question for you and Mr. Germain, because of your work. I know that satellite technology may not be the thing, but what about virtual energy audits in companies that are now saying that they don't have someone to actually go out to homes and that they can do this in a more expeditious manner?
What is your opinion on that?
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you for being here, Ms. Jackson. Thank you to our other guests for being here virtually.
I think it has been a great discussion. We've been in the weeds a lot, which is awesome to understand some of the details. However, I wanted to move back a bit, because it's been suggested by the leader of one of our parties that investing in clean tech alone will solve the climate crisis and that we don't need a price on pollution and we don't need regulation or anything else. All we need, really, is to increase clean tech.
While I agree that clean tech is vital for reaching net zero, I remember my grandmother always saying to me that necessity is the mother of invention. I'm wondering whether our witnesses today could comment on the supply and demand side balance between having the price on pollution and investing in clean tech.
What signal does it send to investors in clean tech when people hear questioning on whether a price on pollution or some of these regulations or mandates are necessary? What kind of impact does that have in this arena?
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
Is there anything else?
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Yes. Thank you.
Earlier today, in fact, with some other members here, we were listening to the special trade envoy from New Zealand. On agriculture, she was talking about the fact that for farmers in New Zealand there were mandates put in place for reductions in methane, that they were getting absolutely no government assistance for any clean tech or anything else, and that they were very proud of the fact that they were undertaking these changes on their own and felt it was their responsibility to do this.
There are models where there are mandates and requirements or prices on pollution being put in place without the support. How important, though, do you think that support for clean tech is in reaching those targets?
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
Thank you, Mr. Lobb, for being here. I appreciate the difficulty that farmers have. I come from a long line of Dutch farmers in hog farming, chicken farming, garden produce and the lot, so I've seen what you're talking about. I agree that there are years when it's tougher than other years. Certainly, climate events have added to that.
I'm really trying to weigh the two sides, because I think the increase in severe climate events has also presented challenges and added costs to our farmers as well. We just have to look at the droughts and the floods and everything else that's going on to see how insurance costs, risk-management costs and just rebuilding have become so expensive for those farmers and for our governments, quite frankly.
While I agree with you that food sovereignty is important and we need to protect our farmers, the question is, how do we best do that? In the short run, with these increasing pressures, I see what you're saying, but you yourself spoke about some innovations in biomass and things that can be done. Certainly, the grid has to be expanded, but there has to be a point at which we want to incentivize more of this technology. We want to encourage people to develop it. If there's no price on pollution, will that be there? How will that market incentive work? Do you have any thoughts on what that balance is?
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
With regard to one of the other output-based pricing systems and the greenhouse gas credits that we're working on right now, do you see that as sufficient to offset the price on pollution for some of these farmers? You mentioned that they're—
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
I don't think that's the intention behind it, because I think that on this committee and in Parliament we all appreciate our farmers and—
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thanks.
I'm actually going to give half of my time to Mr. Turnbull. He has a lot of questions he didn't get to ask. I'm fine with that.
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all of the witnesses for being here, and in particular to the member of Parliament from Ukraine. We really appreciate your time in helping us understand the situation even more fully.
One of the things that you've been talking about this morning that's of concern is the number of internally displaced people in Ukraine right now. The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights estimated at the beginning of May that there were 7.7 million internally displaced people, about 17.5% of the country's population. How is that affecting the production on farms, and what are the major concerns about getting food to these people? You mentioned going into emergency mode as opposed to humanitarian assistance at some point.
I'll follow up later because I did want to speak to Oxfam too about the specific impacts on women of the internally displaced people and refugees as well, but perhaps we could start with what's been happening on the farms as people have been displaced.
Mr. Vauthier, are you able to answer now?
View Leah Taylor Roy Profile
Lib. (ON)
Yes, Dr. Zaburanna, for you and for Mr. Vauthier.
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