Committee
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 193
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you for giving me the floor, Mr. Chair.
I, too, would like to make the following comments. I'm an anglophone, as you know, from Quebec, and there's a certain reality in Quebec for the linguist minority community there. I can tell you first and foremost that the law seeks to promote and protect French in Quebec and across Canada. I think that we are all unanimous on that. There's no hesitation. There's no reconsideration. We're all speaking the same language.
However, I do also want to echo some of the comments that have been made. I will express them in English. Bill 96, of course, was enacted last summer in 2022. It has become the new charter of the French language and replaces the old Bill 101. The issue with Bill 96.... The anglophone linguistic community in Quebec is very anxious and fearful of this law. It has become the new charter. Why the use of the pre-emptive clause, the notwithstanding clause, is of great concern for the anglophones is that this linguistic minority community in Quebec has rights. It has guaranteed rights by virtue of the Quebec charter of the French language as well as the Canadian Constitution. Therefore, this law, Bill 96, is shielded from any contestation that any linguistic minority community, such as the anglophone community in Quebec, would have. It poses a grave problem. Any reference to it in a federal law, you can understand, is of considerable worry for this community.
What I would like to do is walk through.... The amendment speaks about deleting, specifically, lines of what we have in Bill C-13. I would like to walk the committee through and read the lines that my colleague is suggesting we delete. Then I would like to make some comments on that.
In subclause 2(2), we start with “And whereas the Government of Canada”. We keep that. The amendment is proposing to delete the following:
is committed to enhancing the vitality and supporting the development of English and French linguistic minority communities—taking into account their uniqueness, diversity and historical and cultural contributions to Canadian society—as an integral part of the two official language communities of Canada, and to fostering full recognition and use of English and French in Canadian society;
And whereas the Government of Canada is committed to protecting and promoting the French language, recognizing that French is in a minority situation in Canada and North America due to the predominant use of English;
And whereas the Government of Canada is committed to cooperating with provincial and territorial governments and their institutions to support the development of English and French linguistic minority communities, to provide services in both English and French, to respect the constitutional guarantees of minority language educational rights and to enhance opportunities for all to learn both English and French;
Mr. Chair, this is what we're proposing to do away with.
I would like to remind the committee that Canada's character is founded on the principle that we have two official languages. We have two official linguistic minority communities. There has been, during the course of the study, one colleague in particular who has almost put in doubt that there's a linguistic anglophone community in Quebec. However, I can guarantee you that it exists. It is a healthy community. It is made up of 1.3 million anglophones in Quebec. Therefore, I think that what we're proposing here is deviating from all the linguistic regimes that we find in this beautiful country of ours. I would say that the law is there to be able to ensure symmetry.
I can tell you, first and foremost, that I will be voting against this amendment for obvious reasons. I would almost say to members around this committee that we're putting in doubt the bedrock of this country, founded on these two official languages, by interposing one and only one linguistic regime.
These are my comments.
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Again, just to make it clear to my colleague who is proposing this, it is an exclusion that he's proposing. We want to take out the parts that I read before to be able to infer the amendment that he is proposing.
If I could address the officials, Mr. Chair, I would like to know what the ramifications are of replacing the paragraphs I have read out with the proposed amendment.
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
I have a subsequent question.
May I, Mr. Chair?
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Just to pursue that line of thought, what would you say with regard to the ramifications for recognizing French as a minority situation in the rest of Canada? Does this amendment take that into account or does it not?
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
In essence, then, it puts into question the symmetry of English and French in Canada. At the same time, it does not recognize that French is in a minority situation across the land and recognizes one linguistic regime over all others across the country.
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My next question is, again, for the government officials.
We know that the scope, from the get-go, is to promote and protect the French language across the country. Our views are in Quebec. The anglophones were quite in agreement with that premise, so long as it's not to the detriment of the linguistic minority community and, in Quebec, obviously, the anglophones.
I want to have your opinion on the amendment that's being proposed.
In doing away with lines 19 to 44 on page two.... I will take the time to read them and ask you if this would meet that objective. That is, would we, in fact, by deleting all of these paragraphs, be promoting and protecting the French language, and not to the detriment of the anglophone linguistic communities in Quebec?
And whereas the Government of Canada recognizes the importance of providing opportunities for everyone in Canada to learn a second official language and the contribution of everyone in Canada who speaks both official languages to a mutual appreciation between the two official language communities of Canada;
And whereas the Government of Canada recognizes the importance of supporting sectors that are essential to enhancing the vitality of English and French linguistic minority communities and protecting and promoting the presence of strong institutions serving those communities;
And whereas the Government of Canada recognizes that the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation contributes through its activities to enhancing the vitality of the English and French linguistic minority communities and to the protection and promotion of both official languages;
And whereas the Government of Canada recognizes the importance of the contribution of francophone immigration to enhancing the vitality of French linguistic minority communities and that immigration is one of the factors that contributes to maintaining or increasing the demographic weight of those communities;
And whereas the Government of Canada recognizes the presence of English or French linguistic minority communities in each province and territory;
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Ms. Boyer, your reading of this amendment is similar to mine, so it is also my understanding that several important elements would be lost, particularly to the detriment of minority language communities, without achieving the objective of promoting and protecting French.
Thank you.
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Welcome, Minister Petitpas Taylor, among us this morning. Thank you for taking the time.
My questions, the first ones at least, are going to be centred around the English-speaking minority community in Quebec.
This community has expressed clearly that Bill C-13 must safeguard their minority language rights. This has become even more important, as you know, since the enactment of Bill 96 in Quebec last June. Therefore, they're requesting that Bill C-13 not harm them. I'd like to have your comments and thoughts on that.
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
With regard to the federally regulated businesses, let's delve a bit more into that. We've heard about the different jurisdictions and the concerns about which laws apply. Since 1996, federally regulated companies have had the option of following Quebec's linguistic regime rather than the federal rules.
Does anything change in this regard with Bill C-13? Do federally regulated companies still have a choice of opting for the Official Languages Act or the provincial regime in Quebec, and if so, do you see an issue with this?
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
I'm going to take you back to the course of the summer and your consultations in which I participated. I thank you for taking the time to do your cross-Canada consultations with stakeholders across the country.
I was just wondering about the following. Have you had an opportunity since then to consult other stakeholders in the various minority language community groups, to hear more of their thoughts or their potential amendments to the bill? More specifically, I draw your attention to the court challenges program, which I know you're a fan of, as am I.
Again, bringing it back to the context of Quebec with the enactment of Bill 96, do you not see that as a challenge? Because of this use of the notwithstanding clause, the court challenges program will almost be obsolete for the English minority language communities.
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the minister for being with us this afternoon.
Minister, I'm going to address some of the questions I have for you in French. The first one maybe carries a bit through the question that was asked of you by my colleague on the opposite side.
Why could Treasury Board not handle coordination as the central agency, instead of the Department of Canadian Heritage?
I would like to hear more from you on that subject.
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Minister.
I am going to continue in the same vein, the delegation of powers.
Some people have criticized the delegation of powers to deputy heads at Treasury Board. Bill C-13 limits the power of general delegation to a specific delegation to institutions.
How has this delegation of powers been used in the past?
Results: 1 - 15 of 193 | Page: 1 of 13

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data