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Results: 1 - 15 of 167
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-06-10 18:18 [p.8256]
Mr. Speaker, I listened to the speeches of every one of my colleagues.
To my colleague from Rosemont—La Petite‑Patrie, who suggested protecting French in Quebec by using the Canada Labour Code to give workers the right to file a complaint every time an employer did not comply with Bill 101, I would say that this idea is just a band-aid on a gaping wound. It is not a bad idea, but it will only tie up the union processes that he is quite familiar with, without really fixing the root problem since, despite the complaints, the employer would not feel obligated in the least to use the common and official language of Quebec, French, to communicate with its employees.
To my colleague from Richmond—Arthabaska, who is in favour of the bill, but surprised to be debating it in the House of Commons since it falls under the jurisdiction of Quebec and the provinces, I would say that the refusal by federally regulated businesses to comply with the Charter of the French Language, the argument being that federally regulated businesses do not need to follow Quebec laws, justifies in itself that we are forced to legislate in the House of Commons to ensure that businesses respect Quebec, their own employees and the French language.
To my colleague from Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, who does not see the point of the bill considering the white paper on official languages, I would say that protecting bilingualism will not allow federally regulated businesses to ignore the Charter of the French Language and the common language of Quebec. Even members of the government get around the requirement to offer information sessions and webinars in both official languages by sending invitations through from their parliamentary email account, which is their privilege, rather than using their ministerial email, which would require them to offer translation. Even in the House, asserting the same rights as anglophones can be complicated, and so can filing complaints.
Some would have me believe that Canada will successfully impose on companies located in Quebec what it does not impose on itself. The word that comes to mind is “nonsense”. You would have to be crazy not to understand that Canada wants francophones and Quebeckers to shut up and embrace bilingualism.
To my colleague from Sherbrooke, who says that provincial laws alone are not strong enough and federal laws are absolutely required, besides the fact that this is a paternalistic attitude that I do not like any more than first nations do, I could respond with various examples demonstrating that Quebec laws have more teeth than federal laws. For example, Quebec's environment, labour and consumer protection laws are much more stringent. If federal protections were so strong, a CN employee would not have been fighting in court since 2015 to have his right to work in French acknowledged. If federal protections were so strong, parents would not have had to go all the way to the Supreme Court to obtain equal rights to education in French. There are many examples. I have others. The Official Languages Commissioner says that the public service does not have an inclusive organizational structure in terms of the use of the official languages, and French often becomes the language of translation.
Protecting French here and elsewhere in Canada is important. Bill C-254 does not go against the official languages reform. It completes it and strengthens Quebec, which could be a beacon for all francophone communities.
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-06-10 18:24 [p.8257]
Mr. Speaker, we request a recorded division.
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-06-07 11:50 [p.8001]
Mr. Speaker, we request a recorded division.
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-31 12:11 [p.7600]
Madam Speaker, whenever I hear anything about conversion therapy, I find it really upsetting, because sexual orientation is not a choice people make. I did not choose to be heterosexual any more than homosexual individuals chose their orientation. That is how we were born, it is in our genetic makeup; we got it from our parents.
If someone is struggling, it is only natural they seek psychological support, but do people really want a conversion? Do they really want to change their genetic makeup? How is this possible without psychological consequences, without anxiety and depression?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-14 10:34 [p.7234]
Madam Speaker, it is high time that we passed Bill C-15.
First nations peoples are human beings, and that is precisely what Bill C-15 says. As human beings, they must enjoy the same rights as all other human beings. This is 2021, and it is about time that was acknowledged and implemented.
However, it is not right for parliamentarians, who represent the people, to be denied the right to speak to and discuss these issues.
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-14 13:16 [p.7256]
Madam Speaker, section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, protects the aboriginal and treaty rights of first nations peoples, and here we are with another piece of legislation.
How do we know they will really be protected? How do we know this is not just for show, like the Constitution Act, 1982?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-14 14:04 [p.7263]
Madam Speaker, I had the pleasure of delivering a speech on this topic. One of the comments we kept hearing was that Canada did not have the necessary infrastructure. However, humans lived without plastic from the dawn of time until the 1950s. Without going back in time, what kind of strategies could we adopt to live with less plastic once again?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-13 11:23 [p.7160]
Madam Speaker, I would like to make a small clarification, because I do not like insults nor untruths. Our leader said he was ready for an election, but specified that he would not want one during a pandemic. There is a difference between what is quoted, “bring it on”, and the truth.
That said, will the mail-in ballots be counted in Ottawa or in the ridings? Will it happen the night of or the day after the elections? How will the necessary verifications be carried out?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-13 12:41 [p.7172]
Mr. Speaker, my colleague raised the issue that mail-in ballots would be counted the day after voting day. The last I heard, not only would they be counted the day after, but they would also be counted in Ottawa, not in the ridings.
If that happened, how would the apparent legitimacy of an election be affected?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-07 11:54 [p.6903]
Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois hopes that Davie will build the polar icebreaker that the federal government announced yesterday. We have been waiting for it for years.
Of course, before we celebrate with a parade, we want details. All we have right now is a government press release, but no contract, no formal letter of intent, no start date.
The government is asking us to celebrate no questions asked, which makes it look like an election promise. When will we see a real contract for the construction of the icebreaker signed by Davie?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-07 11:55 [p.6903]
Mr. Speaker, yesterday, I said that we were pleased, and I just said that we are pleased. However, as long as Davie does not have a signed contract for the icebreaker, then this is all just good intentions.
This is not the first time that Davie has been the subject of the federal government's good intentions right before an election. For example, just before the 2019 election, the Prime Minister and his minister responsible for the Quebec City region made a big show of announcing that they wanted Davie to become a partner in the shipbuilding strategy. They announced real opportunities for Davie, just as they are doing now. Two years later, Davie is still not a partner.
Good intentions are not enough. When will we see something tangible? When will we have a signed contract?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-06 10:57 [p.6765]
Mr. Speaker, before the pandemic, Quebec's debt to GDP ratio was 31.2%. Now it is 51.2% and will drop slightly to 49.2%. That is pretty worrisome, especially since that projection leaves little flexibility for the future.
What does my colleague think about the lack of flexibility this budget gives us in case of future crises?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-06 12:00 [p.6774]
Mr. Speaker, the member for Alfred-Pellan said that the pandemic has exposed the inequalities that exist. He gave the example of one of his elderly constituents, who is pleased that she can buy all the food she needs.
I have received dozens of calls from seniors in my riding who are forced to rely on food banks. They are outraged that the Liberal government is claiming to help seniors by giving money to food banks. In so doing, the government is admitting that people are unable to feed themselves with the money they have. At the same time, it is creating two classes of seniors by refusing to help those aged 65 to 74.
How can the member be proud of a budget that creates inequality?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-06 13:46 [p.6790]
Madam Speaker, the Parliamentary Budget Officer published a report stating that Canada's debt-to-GDP ratio will be 49.2% at best, if I remember correctly.
What impact might this have on our finances in the event of a future crisis? Does my colleague think that we have the necessary flexibility if we have to confront another crisis?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
2021-05-06 14:13 [p.6795]
Mr. Speaker, an earthquake struck Quebec City yesterday, and it was felt throughout our nation. Régis Labeaume will be stepping down as mayor of Quebec City after 14 years in office. Mayor Labeaume is, first and foremost, an ambitious visionary, bursting with ideas for his city.
The rest of Quebec first noticed him because of his fiery personality. We later came to see him as a pioneer, who foresaw the new role that cities would take in Quebec politics, and who was determined to make the only French-speaking capital city in North America shine.
He was with us as we went through difficult times, like the massacre at the mosque, and he is with us as we enter an era of great pride, with our culture more vibrant than ever. Business is booming, and Quebec City has earned a place among North America's major cities, without losing its unique character.
Régis needs to spend time with his family, who were generous enough to share him with us. After taking such great care of our city and our capital, he deserves to focus on himself.
On behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I would like to thank you for everything, Régis, and I hope your term ends on a high note.
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