Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 34
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
I'm deeply honoured to be here today on this very exciting and historic day. In my language, the Mi'kmaq language, we would say gelu'lg na'gweg, meaning this is a “great day”. It's a great day for many reasons.
As someone who has been a member of the Indigenous Bar Association for more than 20 years, as a student and then coming back as an indigenous parliamentarian, I have often heard the advocacy and the dream that some day we would see an indigenous nominee to the Supreme Court of Canada. In fact, this is an important thing that the Indigenous Bar Association and the Canadian Bar Association have called for since 2005 when they said it was integral to Canada for us to advance indigenous law through these appointments. It's even more so with the TRC calls to action. Almost a quarter of the calls to action call for justice and equity for indigenous people within the legal system.
Minister Lametti, you spoke to the importance of having a justice system that reflects the Canadian public and how having indigenous laws enrich our Canadian justice system. I'm wondering if you could speak to the gravity of the historic moment that we're at today, where for so many years indigenous people have looked to Canadian laws, despite having their own indigenous laws, and saying they would trust these systems that have been created.
What do you think it means for the justice system today to have this historic day finally upon us?
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
I'd like to thank you both for those comments.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
I have a point of order. I'm sorry, but we're not getting the translation. I see that she's speaking it, so it's probably a technical problem. I hear her translating but we don't get it in the earpiece.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
I'll make that motion, Mr. Chair.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'm always glad to hear from you, Grand Chief Daniels.
As we go through this study, one of the things that keeps popping into my mind is that a lot of the challenges that are being faced are the result of someone besides first nations deciding for first nations how they should manage their health system, what to approve and what not to approve. It's not based on that community's needs or cultural values, but rather what a bureaucrat has decided should be appropriate for our communities.
With the successes I've seen around nations taking on their own jurisdiction, whether it be in education or health, is that part of the solution, Grand Chief, that we need to look at? It's giving nations the ability to take over jurisdiction of their own health with bilateral agreements between the federal government and those nations.
We've seen really good examples of how that's happened, including MK out in Nova Scotia. I wonder if you could speak to that a bit.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Can I ask if you know of any examples of where this is working, where nations have taken over jurisdiction of health? I'm not aware of any. I thought I'd ask you.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Grand Chief.
I have a question for you, Ms. Clark. You said at the end of your report that you had some detailed recommendations. I'm wondering if you could speak to the missing and murdered indigenous women and girls calls for justice or the TRC calls to action. What recommendations would you make for us as a committee to move forward on? Perhaps you could name a few. We have only about a minute, so perhaps you could give me the most pressing ones.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
If any come to mind, yes. I don't want to put you on the spot. I know that there are 231 calls for justice and 90-some calls to action. I'm wondering if you can give us, from the NWAC's perspective, the pressing recommendations that you think we should move forward on as a committee.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
You have some time, and you can put it in writing at a future date. I know it's a lot to ask, but as we try to get a really good study moving forward, we want to have good recommendations moving forward to our government.
Ms. Lee Allison Clark: Absolutely.
Mr. Jaime Battiste: If you could provide those and give it some thought, I think that would be tremendously helpful from the NWAC.
As well, make sure to tell President Whitman I said hi.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
I'd like to thank the witnesses for their testimony. We're hearing you loud and clear about the need, not only to ensure the prices and the costs are done more efficiently, but also the need to catch up in terms of what our government is providing.
When we're looking at some of the issues that are in the northern areas or rural and indigenous communities, one of the things that often comes into my head when I'm thinking about these problems is that often the challenge is that we have to travel as indigenous people to find the services elsewhere.
On the underlying issue of capacity on reserves or in the north, what can we do as a government to try to ensure that communities have the capacity so their community members don't have to travel off reserve or from the north? Is there a way in which we can work with universities? Is there a way we can create programs that increase the amount of indigenous participation in health?
Can you talk to us a little bit about any best practices out there in Canada right now that are working to increase the number of participants we have from the indigenous communities in the health studies?
I guess we could start with Ms. Lidstone-Jones.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Ms. Lidstone-Jones, you talked about something that caught my attention, land-based healing, as an example of a promising practice within indigenous communities. Can you tell us a little more about that and how it's working effectively to address mental health, within indigenous youth especially?
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
That's about it for me, I think.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'd like to thank the witnesses for their testimony so far today.
I come from a first nations community in the Mi'kma'ki called Eskasoni, where we have our own health care unit as well as our own mental health. I know that they're hard-working folks and they've at times come to me with very important asks about the importance of having a health care system that's culturally relevant and in the Mi'kmaq language. It's really important that, when we move forward, it's in a way that's reflective of the indigenous cultures in that area.
I'm very happy to see that, in the most recent budget, 2022, we provided $227 million over two years, starting in 2023, to maintain trauma-informed, culturally appropriate, indigenous-led services to improve mental wellness and support efforts initiated through budget 2021 to “co-develop distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategies.”
I'm wondering if the witnesses could talk a little bit about the importance of ensuring that the health care system is culturally appropriate and reflective of the various indigenous cultures across Canada. I think if we can start in the room that would be a good starting point.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Following that, please make sure that you say hello to Leroy and Amethyst for me, as well. Give my best regards to them.
Can you talk to us about any specific areas around Canada that are getting it right with mental health, and doing it in a way that really reflects the nation-to-nation responsibilities that we have as a government? Are there any that have been successful models for the rest of Canada, where we can see progress being made in a culturally appropriate and reflective way?
Results: 1 - 15 of 34 | Page: 1 of 3

1
2
3
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data