Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 25633
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
2021-04-16 10:02 [p.5729]
Expand
Madam Speaker, there have been discussions among the parties and if you seek it I think you will find unanimous consent to adopt the following motion: That, notwithstanding any Standing Order, Special Order or usual practices of the House: (a) the report stage amendment to Bill C-6, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (conversion therapy), appearing on the Notice Paper in the name of the Minister of Justice, be deemed adopted on division; (b) Bill C-6 be deemed concurred in at report stage on division; and (c) the third reading of Bill C-6 be allowed to be taken up at the same sitting.
Madame la Présidente, il y a eu des discussions entre les partis, et je pense que vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime à l'égard de la motion suivante: Que, nonobstant tout article du Règlement, ordre spécial ou usage habituel de la Chambre: a) l'amendement à l'étape du rapport du projet de loi C-6, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (thérapie de conversion), inscrit au Feuilleton des avis au nom du ministre de la Justice, soit réputé adopté avec dissidence; b) le projet de loi C-6 soit réputé adopté à l'étape du rapport avec dissidence; et c) le projet de loi C-6 puisse être étudié à l'étape de la troisième lecture au cours de la même séance.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:02 [p.5729]
Expand
All those opposed to the hon. member moving the motion will please say nay.
An hon. member: Nay.
Que tous ceux qui s'opposent à ce que le député propose la motion veuillent bien dire non.
Une voix: Non.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:02 [p.5729]
Expand
There is one motion in amendment standing on the Notice Paper for the report stage on Bill C-6. Motion No. 1 will be debated and voted upon.
Une motion d'amendement figure au Feuilleton des avis pour l'étude à l'étape du rapport du projet de loi C-6. La motion no 1 sera débattue et mise aux voix.
Collapse
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
View David Lametti Profile
2021-04-16 10:03 [p.5729]
Expand
moved:
Motion No. 1
That Bill C-6, in Clause 5, be amended by replacing line 31 on page 4 with the following:
320.101 In sections 320.102 to 320.105, conversion.
propose:
Motion no 1
Que le projet de loi C-6, à l’article 5, soit modifié par substitution, à la ligne 32, page 4, de ce qui suit:
320.101 Aux articles 320.102 à 320.105, thérapie de.
Collapse
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:03 [p.5729]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Waterloo, the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth.
I want to begin by acknowledging that I am speaking today from the traditional territory of many nations, including the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg—
Madame la Présidente, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec la députée de Waterloo, la ministre de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion et de la Jeunesse.
Tout d'abord, je souligne que j'interviens aujourd'hui depuis le territoire de nombreuses nations, y compris les Mississaugas de Credit, les Anishnabes...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:04 [p.5729]
Expand
I have to interrupt the hon. parliamentary secretary as he needs unanimous consent to split his time.
Does the hon. member have unanimous consent to share his time?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Je dois interrompre le secrétaire parlementaire, car il doit obtenir le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour partager son temps de parole.
Le député a-t-il le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour partager le temps de parole qui lui est alloué?
Des voix: D'accord.
Collapse
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:04 [p.5729]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as I said, I begin by acknowledging I am speaking from the traditional territory of many nations including the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinabe, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat peoples. It is now home to many diverse first nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. I commit every day to honour the treaties by which we share this land, which is ultimately a gift to us from our Creator.
I rise today in the House for the third reading of this important bill which brings forward amendments to the Criminal Code and moves us closer to seeing an end to the damaging practice of conversion therapy, a practice that continues to harm LGBTQ communities in Canada and around the world. This insidious and harmful practice must finally be put to a stop and this bill will bring about that important change.
That is the formal way I would normally start a speech in this House, by acknowledging the land we are on, name the bill and give my opinion on it, but I want to start again to simply say I am a gay man and this is a bill with amendments to the Criminal Code that is deeply personal and incredibly important to me.
While I do not expect everyone to relate to this bill the way I do and acknowledge the fact that out of 338 members in this place there are only four out, self-identified, open LGBTQ members, much smaller than the proportion in Canada's population, I do expect every member in this House to truly wrestle with what it means for them to vote against this bill. If they say they are voting against it as a matter of conscience, then I believe they need to stare deeply into that conscience and ask themselves, “Why would I want to perpetuate an injustice against another human being, a friend, a colleague, a family member, a neighbour, a constituent, anyone who will be hurt by that action; hurt perhaps to the point of death?” Why would they not want to stand with the vulnerable, with the oppressed, with the stigmatized, with the people who need their help the most?
I have heard and read the speeches against these amendments. They are tired and worn-out arguments that come from an age that I had thought we escaped long ago. The political rhetoric is there, trying to not sound like they are living in the stone Age, saying they are not against conversion therapy, just against this bill. They claim that the definition is too broad, that there are drafting errors in the bill, or they say that the escape clauses for religious bodies, escape clauses to help them avoid living up to God's command are not clear enough or wide enough, but I would say to them, as the prophet Micah did:
He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?
It is time for us to talk truth in this place. If someone is against this bill, frankly, they are against me and against people like me, saying ultimately that we are less than they are, that somehow God made a mistake when God created us and that we should change who we are or at least consider changing who we are. I am here to say today that I am not going to change. I do not want to change and no one should be told that they have to change or should change the way God made them to be.
Conversion therapy, at its core, implies that being gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer or two-spirited is somehow wrong. I am here to say that that is not true. I am here to say it is time for this House to declare it by putting to bed the myth that conversion therapy can ever be right in any circumstance in any place at any time. We already know well that LGBTQ communities in Canada have faced and continue to face social and economic disadvantages, and disparities in health, safety, employment, income and housing. These disparities are all linked to historic and systemic stigmatization and discrimination toward my community.
According to a report prepared by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, and based on a series of expert testimony and submissions, a wide range of health disparities are noted, including barriers to accessing health services. Notably, issues persist whereby LGBTQ2 communities are still not able to discuss their sexual orientation with their physician or, if they do, they often need to educate themselves, their health professionals, about their health needs. That same report highlights disparities in employment, income and housing. Strikingly, of the 40,000—
Madame la Présidente, comme je le disais, je veux tout d'abord souligner que j'interviens depuis le territoire de nombreuses nations, y compris les Mississaugas de Credit, les Anishnabes, les Chippewas, les Haudenosaunee et les Wendats. On y trouve de nos jours diverses communautés autochtones, métisses et inuites. Je m'engage à honorer tous les jours les traités selon lesquels nous partageons ces terres, qui, ultimement, sont un cadeau de notre Créateur.
J'interviens aujourd'hui à la Chambre à l'étape de la troisième lecture d'un projet de loi important qui vise à modifier le Code criminel et à nous rapprocher de l'objectif qu'est l'élimination de la thérapie de conversion, une pratique néfaste qui continue de faire du tort aux communautés LGBTQ du Canada et du monde entier. Il est grand temps de mettre fin à cette pratique sournoise et nuisible et le projet de loi nous permettra de faire ce changement important.
C'est ma façon conventionnelle d'entamer un discours à la Chambre: en reconnaissant le territoire sur lequel nous nous trouvons, en nommant le projet de loi à débattre et en donnant mon opinion à son sujet, mais je veux recommencer en disant simplement que je suis homosexuel et les modifications que ce projet de loi propose d'apporter au Code criminel me touchent profondément et revêtent une importance immense à mes yeux.
Bien que je ne m'attende pas à ce que tous puissent se sentir concernés par ce projet de loi comme je le suis, et que sur les 338 députés de cette enceinte, seuls quatre ont déclaré faire partie de la communauté LGBTQ, ce qui constitue une proportion beaucoup plus faible que dans la population canadienne en général, je m'attends à ce que chacun des députés s'interroge sur la signification d'un vote contre ce projet de loi. Si un député affirme vouloir voter contre pour une question de conscience, je crois qu'il devrait alors faire une introspection et se demander: « pourquoi voudrais-je perpétuer une injustice à l'égard d'un autre être humain, d'un ami, d'un collègue, d'un membre de ma famille, d'un voisin, d'un électeur ou de quiconque en subirait les conséquences, peut-être jusqu'à en mourir? » Pourquoi ne voudrait-il pas se tenir aux côtés des personnes vulnérables, opprimées, ou stigmatisées, bref, des personnes qui ont le plus besoin de son aide?
J'ai entendu et lu les discours contre les modifications. Ce sont des arguments fatigués et usés qui proviennent d'une époque que je croyais révolue depuis longtemps. Il y a de la rhétorique politique; les intervenants essaient de ne pas donner l'impression de vivre à l'âge de pierre lorsqu'ils disent qu'ils ne sont pas contre la thérapie de conversion, mais simplement contre le projet de loi. Ils prétendent que la définition est trop large, qu'il y a des erreurs de rédaction dans le projet de loi ou que les dispositions de dérogation pour les organismes religieux, c'est-à-dire les dispositions de dérogation qui visent à les aider à se défiler devant les commandements de Dieu, ne sont pas assez claires ou assez larges, mais je leur répondrais par ces paroles du prophète Michée:
On t'a fait connaître, ô homme, ce qui est bien; Et ce que l'Éternel demande de toi, C'est que tu pratiques la justice, Que tu aimes la miséricorde, Et que tu marches humblement avec ton Dieu.
Il est temps pour nous de parler de vérité à la Chambre. Franchement, si quelqu'un s'oppose au projet de loi, il est contre moi et contre les gens comme moi, car il dit essentiellement que nous sommes moins que lui, que Dieu a fait une erreur en nous créant et que nous devrions changer qui nous sommes ou du moins envisager de changer qui nous sommes. Je suis ici pour dire aujourd'hui que je ne vais pas changer. Je ne veux pas changer et personne ne devrait se faire dire qu'il doit changer ou qu'il devrait changer ce que Dieu a fait de lui.
La thérapie de conversion sous-entend essentiellement qu'être gai, lesbienne, bisexuel, transgenre, queer ou bispirituel est en quelque sorte inacceptable. Je tiens à dire que c'est faux. Je tiens à dire qu'il est temps que la Chambre le proclame en dissipant le mythe voulant qu'il puisse être acceptable dans certains cas et à certains moments d'avoir recours à la thérapie de conversion. Nous sommes déjà bien conscients que les communautés LGBTQ au Canada ont subi et continuent à subir des désavantages sociaux et économiques ainsi que des inégalités en matière de santé, de sécurité, d'emploi, de revenu et de logement. Ces inégalités sont liées à la stigmatisation et à la discrimination historiques et systémiques dont a été victime ma communauté.
Un rapport préparé par le Comité permanent de la santé de la Chambre des communes, qui se fonde sur une série de témoignages d'experts et de mémoires, a signalé de multiples inégalités en matière de santé, notamment des obstacles à l'accès aux services de santé. Plus particulièrement, les membres de la communauté LGBTQ2 éprouvent encore des difficultés: ils sont toujours incapables de discuter de leur orientation sexuelle avec leur médecin ou, s'ils le font, ils doivent souvent informer leurs professionnels de la santé ou s'informer eux-mêmes sur leurs besoins en santé. Le même rapport souligne des inégalités en matière d'emploi, de revenu et de logement. Étonnamment, parmi les 40 000...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:09 [p.5730]
Expand
I apologize for interrupting the hon. parliamentary secretary. We are at report stage, not third reading, and he had only five minutes.
The hon. member for Kingston and the Islands.
Je m'excuse d'interrompre le secrétaire parlementaire, mais nous sommes à l'étape du rapport et non à l'étape de la troisième lecture, et il ne disposait que de cinq minutes.
Le député de Kingston et les Îles a la parole.
Collapse
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
2021-04-16 10:09 [p.5730]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I think if you seek it, you would find unanimous consent for the following motion. I move:
That, notwithstanding any Standing Order, Special Order or usual practices of the House:
a) the report stage amendment to Bill C-6, An Act to amend the Criminal Code, (conversion therapy), appearing on the Notice Paper in the name of the Minister of Justice, be deemed adopted on division;
b) Bill C-6 be deemed concurred in at report stage on division; and
c) the third reading stage of Bill C-6 be allowed to be taken up at the same sitting.
Madame la Présidente, je crois que vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime à l'égard de la motion suivante. Je propose:
Que, nonobstant tout article du Règlement, ordre spécial ou usage habituel de la Chambre:
a) l’amendement à l’étape du rapport du projet de loi C-6, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (thérapie de conversion), inscrit au Feuilleton des avis au nom du ministre de la Justice, soit réputé adopté avec dissidence;
b) le projet de loi C-6 soit réputé adopté à l’étape du rapport avec dissidence;
c) le projet de loi C-6 puisse être étudié à l’étape de la troisième lecture au cours de la même séance.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:10 [p.5730]
Expand
All those opposed to the hon. member moving the motion will please say nay.
The House has heard the terms of the motion. All those opposed to the motion will please say nay.
Hearing no dissenting voice, I declare the motion carried.
Que tous ceux qui s'opposent à ce que le député propose la motion veuillent bien dire non.
La Chambre a entendu la motion. Que tous ceux qui sont contre veuillent bien dire non.
Comme il n'y a pas de voix dissidentes, je déclare la motion adoptée.
Collapse
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2021-04-16 10:11 [p.5730]
Expand
moved that the bill be read the third time and passed.
 propose que le projet de loi soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
Collapse
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:11 [p.5730]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I seek the unanimous consent of the House to split my time with the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth.
Madame la Présidente, je demande le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour partager le temps de parole dont je dispose avec la ministre de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion et de la Jeunesse.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:11 [p.5730]
Expand
Does the hon. member have unanimous consent?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Le député a-t-il le consentement unanime?
Des voix: D'accord.
Collapse
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:11 [p.5730]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I expect this will be even better the second time.
I want to begin by acknowledging that I am speaking from the traditional territory of many nations, including the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishinabe, the Chippewa and the Haudenosaunee and Wyandot peoples, which is also now home to many diverse first nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. I commit every day to honour the treaties by which we share this land, which is ultimately a gift to us from our Creator.
I rise today in the House for the third reading of this important bill, which brings forward amendments to the Criminal Code and moves us closer to seeing an end to the damaging practice of conversion therapy: a practice that continues to harm LGBTQ2 communities in Canada and around the world. These insidious and harmful practices must finally be put to a stop, and this bill would bring about an important change to the laws of Canada.
That is the formal way to start a speech in this place: We acknowledge the land we are on, name the bill we are speaking to, remind the House what its ramifications are and state clearly whether we support it and why.
However, I want to start again and simply say I am a gay man. This is a bill that makes amendments to the Criminal Code. It is a bill that is deeply personal and incredibly important to me. I acknowledge that out of 338 members in this place, there are only four out, self-identified and open LGBTQ2 members, a much smaller proportion than in the population of Canada. While I do not expect everyone to relate to this bill the way I do, I do expect every member in the House to truly wrestle with what it means for them to vote against this bill.
If members say they are voting against it as a matter of conscience, then they need to stare deeply into their conscience and ask themselves why they would want to perpetrate an injustice against another human being, friend, colleague, family member, neighbour, constituent or anyone who would be hurt by that action, perhaps to the point of death. Why would they not want to stand with the vulnerable, the oppressed and the stigmatized? These are the people who need their help the most.
I have heard or read the speeches against these amendments. For me, they are tired and worn-out arguments that come from an age I thought we had escaped decades ago. The political rhetoric is there, the members trying not to sound like they are still living in the stone age. They say they are not against conversion therapy, they are just against this bill. They claim the definition is too broad, or there are drafting errors in the bill, or they say the escape clauses for religious bodies, which help them avoid living up to God's command, are not clear or wide enough.
I say to them, as the prophet Micah did, “He has told you, oh mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God.” It is time for us to talk truth in this place. If someone is against this bill, they are against me and against people like me. They are saying ultimately that we are less than they are, that somehow God made a mistake when God created us and that we should change who we are or at least consider changing who we are.
I am here to say today I am not going to change, and no one should be told that they have to change or should change or even could change who God made them to be. Conversion therapy, at its core, implies that being gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer or two-spirited is wrong. This is not true, and it is time for the House to declare that by putting to bed the myth that conversion therapy can ever be right, in any circumstance or in any place at any time.
We already know very well that LGBTQ2 communities in Canada have faced, and continue to face, a set of social and economic disadvantages. These include disparities in health, safety, employment, income and housing. These disparities are linked to historic and systemic stigmatization and discrimination against LGBTQ2 communities.
According to a report by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health and based on a series of expert testimonies and submissions, a wide range of health disparities are noted. These include barriers to accessing health services, and issues persisting whereby LGBTQ2 individuals are still not able to discuss their sexual orientation with their physicians, or if they do, they have to be the ones to educate their own health professionals about their health needs.
The same report highlights disparities in employment, income and housing. Strikingly, of the 40,000 homeless youth in Canada, between 25% and 40% identify as being part of the LGBTQ2S community.
Just this week, retired Ontario Court of Appeal justice Gloria Epstein's long-awaited independent review found serious flaws in the way Toronto police handled the case of serial killer Bruce McArthur, whose killing spree from 2010-17 left at least eight gay men dead. Justice Epstein said that McArthur's victims were “marginalized and vulnerable in a variety of ways”, and their disappearances were often given less attention or priority than they deserved by the police. They were gay, and many of them were racialized or from communities that police simply did not care much about.
Underneath these findings is the stark truth that the lack of attention is not simply incompetence on the part of the Toronto police force, it is a deeply embedded homophobia. It is systemic homophobia. That kind of homophobia, which leads to people dying and being killed, is only furthered when society allows things like so-called conversion therapy to be practised. Conversion therapy, which undermines the value, the worth and the dignity of LGBTQ2S people aids and abets those who would discriminate against, hurt, damage or kill us.
It is true that, throughout all this, LGBTQ2 communities continue to demonstrate great resilience, resourcefulness, innovation and strength. However, dangerous attitudes and beliefs underpin and fuel all of this. Discrimination is real, stigma is real and harassment is real. Even though hurtful attitudes and beliefs about our community continue to exist, they need to be challenged and they need to be stopped. Thanks to the good work of the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth and the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, we in the House have a chance to do just that by supporting this bill.
It is not LGBTQ2 people and communities who need to be changed or converted. Harmful prejudice, homophobia, transphobia and all forms of discrimination need to be changed and converted into justice, compassion, understanding and respect. Ultimately, they need to be converted into love. That is what we will be able to do collectively as we support this bill and bring it into law to build a better Canada for everyone.
A vast breadth of sexual orientations, gender identities and gender expressions exists. That is nothing to fear. We must, as a society, reach a point where we all understand that each person's sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression are intrinsic parts of who we are. We need to embrace these in ourselves and in other people, even when we do not fully comprehend what they mean.
That is why this is such an important bill. Conversion therapy is based on misinformed assumptions and harmful beliefs. By moving forward with stopping the harmful practice of conversion therapy, we are not only moving to stamp out this practice and protect the lives of LGBTQ2 communities and people, we are also sending an important message. Our gender identities, our gender expressions and our sexual orientations are essential parts of who we are and they are not up for debate. They should be understood, appreciated and celebrated. Then we can have a truly inclusive, cohesive society.
It is obvious I was not born yesterday, which everyone can tell by my tired look. That simply means that I have seen tremendous advances in attitudes toward people like me. Just as I was beginning to understand my sexual orientation, the late prime minister Pierre Trudeau ensured that I would not be a criminal if I chose to act on my sexuality and love another man. I saw the emergence of human rights legislation and court decisions based on the charter that gave me a chance to marry my partner with whom I have shared almost 30 years. I have seen my government apologize to those hurt by systemic homophobia in the public service, the military and our national police force.
Now I am going to be in this virtual chamber when we take the next step to ban conversion therapy. We are not done yet. Old attitudes take a long time to die and a long time to bury, but this is our chance—
Madame la Présidente, je pense que ce sera encore mieux la seconde fois.
Je voudrais d'abord reconnaître que je me joins à vous à partir du territoire traditionnel de nombreuses nations, dont les Mississaugas de Credit, les Anishinabes, les Chippewas, les Haudenosaunee et les Wendats, sans oublier les divers peuples des Premières Nations, des Inuits et des Métis qui y habitent maintenant. Chaque jour, je m'emploie à honorer les traités en vertu desquels nous partageons ce territoire, qui est essentiellement un cadeau de notre Créateur.
Je prends la parole aujourd'hui à la Chambre à l'étape de la troisième lecture de cet important projet de loi qui propose des modifications au Code criminel et qui constitue un pas de plus vers l'élimination de la thérapie de conversion, une pratique qui fait encore beaucoup de mal à des membres de la communauté LGBTQ2 au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde. Il est temps que ces démarches insidieuses et dommageables cessent, et ce projet de loi entraînerait un important changement dans les lois du Canada.
Voilà la manière officielle de commencer un discours dans cette enceinte: reconnaître le territoire sur lequel nous nous trouvons, nommer le projet de loi à débattre, rappeler à la Chambre quels sont les enjeux et dire clairement si nous appuyons ou non le projet de loi et pourquoi.
Cependant, j'aimerais revenir à mon discours en disant, tout simplement, que je suis homosexuel. Les modifications que ce projet de loi propose d'apporter au Code criminel me touchent profondément et revêtent une importance immense à mes yeux. Je souligne que sur les 338 députés, il n'y en a que quatre qui se déclarent ouvertement LGBTQ+, ce qui constitue une proportion beaucoup plus faible que dans la population canadienne en général. Même si je ne m'attends pas à ce que tous les députés partagent mes sentiments à l'égard du projet de loi, j'espère que chacun s'interrogera sérieusement sur la signification d'un vote contre ce projet de loi.
Si un député affirme vouloir voter contre pour une question de conscience, je crois qu'il devrait alors faire une introspection et se demander: « pourquoi voudrais-je perpétuer une injustice à l'égard d'un autre être humain, d'un ami, d'un collègue, d'un membre de ma famille, d'un voisin, d'un électeur ou de quiconque en subirait les conséquences, peut-être jusqu'à en mourir? » Pourquoi ne voudrait-il pas se tenir aux côtés des personnes vulnérables, opprimées, ou stigmatisées, bref, des personnes qui ont le plus besoin de son aide?
J'ai entendu ou lu les discours contre ces modifications. J'estime que ces arguments éculés viennent d'une époque que je croyais révolue depuis des décennies. Les politiciens font ce qu'ils peuvent pour que leur rhétorique ne paraisse pas tout droit sorti de l'âge de pierre lorsqu'ils disent qu'ils ne sont pas contre la thérapie de conversion, mais seulement contre ce projet de loi. Ils prétendent que la définition est trop large, qu'il y a des erreurs de formulation dans le projet de loi ou que les dispositions de dérogation pour les organismes religieux, qui les aident à se soustraire aux commandements de Dieu, ne sont pas assez claires ou assez larges.
Je leur réponds par les paroles du prophète Michée: « On t'a fait connaître, ô homme, ce qui est bien; et ce que l'Éternel demande de toi, c'est que tu pratiques la justice, que tu aimes la miséricorde, et que tu marches humblement avec ton Dieu. » Il est temps de dire la vérité dans cette enceinte. Les gens qui s'opposent à ce projet de loi sont contre moi et contre les gens comme moi. Ils disent finalement que nous valons moins qu'eux, que Dieu a fait une erreur lorsqu'il nous a créés et que nous devrions changer ce que nous sommes ou au moins l'envisager.
Je suis ici pour dire que je n'ai pas l'intention de changer et que, puisque c'est Dieu qui nous a fait ainsi, personne ne devrait se faire dire qu'il doit changer ou qu'il le devrait. À la base, les thérapies de conversion partent du principe que c'est mal d'être gai, lesbienne, bisexuel, transgenre, queer ou bispirituel. C'est faux, et il est temps que la Chambre le dise haut et fort en déboulonnant le mythe voulant que les thérapies de conversion puissent avoir du bon dans certains cas et à certains moments.
Qu'il s'agisse de santé, de sécurité, d'emploi, de revenu ou de logement, nous savons déjà pertinemment que les personnes LGBTQ2 du Canada ont toujours été désavantagées socialement et économiquement et qu'elles le sont encore. Les inégalités qui les affligent tirent leur origine de la stigmatisation et de la discrimination systémiques dont elles ont toujours été victimes.
Selon le rapport produit par le Comité permanent de la santé de la Chambre des communes à partir des témoignages et des mémoires d'une série de spécialistes, ces inégalités touchent aussi le domaine de la santé, puisque les personnes LGBTQ2 ont souvent du mal à obtenir des services de santé ou à discuter de leur orientation sexuelle avec leur médecin — et quand elles le peuvent, c'est souvent elles qui doivent leur expliquer la nature exacte de leurs besoins.
Le même rapport souligne les inégalités en matière d'emploi, de revenu et de logement. Il est frappant que de 25 à 40 % des 40 000 jeunes en situation d'itinérance au Canada s'identifient comme appartenant à la communauté LGBTQ2S.
Pas plus tard que cette semaine, le très attendu examen indépendant de la juge à la retraite de la Cour d'appel de l'Ontario, Gloria Epstein, a été publié. Elle y relève de graves lacunes dans les enquêtes du service de police de Toronto, notamment dans l'affaire du tueur en série Bruce McArthur, dont la folie meurtrière de 2010 à 2017 a fauché la vie d'au moins huit hommes homosexuels. La juge Epstein dit que les victimes de M. McArthur étaient marginalisées et vulnérables de diverses façons et que les services de police n'accordaient souvent pas à la disparition de ces personnes l'attention ou la priorité qu'elle mérite. Les victimes de M. McArthur étaient des homosexuels, et bon nombre d'entre eux étaient racialisés ou provenaient de communautés dont les services de police se soucient peu.
Une dure réalité transparaît derrière ces conclusions: le manque d'attention ne se limite pas à de l'incompétence de la part du service de police de Toronto, mais il est profondément ancré dans l'homophobie. Il s'agit d'homophobie systémique. Cette sorte d'homophobie, qui mène à la mort et à l'assassinat de gens, n'est que renforcée lorsque la société permet des choses comme les prétendues thérapies de conversion, qui minent la valeur et la dignité des personnes LGBTQ2S et qui aident ou encouragent les gens souhaitant nous soumettre à de la discrimination, nous faire du mal, nous causer des préjudices ou nous tuer.
Il est vrai qu'à travers tout cela, les communautés LGBTQ2 continuent de faire preuve d'une grande résilience, ingéniosité, innovation et force. Cependant, des croyances et des comportements dangereux sous-tendent et alimentent tout cela. La discrimination, la stigmatisation et le harcèlement sont bien réels. Les croyances préjudiciables à propos de notre communauté et les comportements blessants vis-à-vis d'elle continuent d'exister et doivent être remis en question; il faut y mettre fin. Grâce au bon travail de la ministre de la Diversité et de l'Inclusion et de la Jeunesse et du ministre de la Justice et procureur général du Canada, nous, à la Chambre, avons la possibilité de faire exactement cela en appuyant ce projet de loi.
Ce ne sont pas les personnes et les communautés LGBTQ2 qui ont besoin d'être changées ou converties. Ce sont les préjugés néfastes, l'homophobie, la transphobie et toutes les formes de discrimination qui doivent faire place à la justice, à la compassion, à la compréhension et au respect et finalement, à l'amour. C'est ce que nous pourrons réaliser collectivement si nous appuyons ce projet de loi et le faisons adopter afin de bâtir un meilleur Canada pour tous.
Les orientations sexuelles, les identités de genre et d'expressions de genre sont diverses et variées et il n'y a rien là d'effrayant. Nous devons tous arriver à comprendre, en tant que société, que l'orientation sexuelle, l'identité de genre et l'expression de genre de chaque personne font intrinsèquement partie de qui nous sommes. Nous devons les accepter en nous et chez les autres, même si nous ne les comprenons pas totalement.
C'est pourquoi ce projet de loi est si important. La thérapie de conversion se base sur des hypothèses improbables et des croyances néfastes. En mettant fin à la pratique néfaste de la thérapie de conversion, non seulement nous y mettons fin, donc, et protégeons la vie des communautés et des personnes LGBTQ2, mais nous envoyons aussi un message important, à savoir que notre identité de genre, notre expression de genre et notre orientation sexuelle sont des éléments essentiels de notre identité qui ne sont pas sujets à débat. Il nous faut les comprendre, les apprécier et les célébrer. C'est comme cela que nous aurons une société véritablement inclusive et solidaire.
De toute évidence, je ne suis pas né d'hier, comme mon air fatigué en témoigne. Cela veut dire que j'ai été en mesure de constater par moi-même les avancées incroyables dans les attitudes envers les personnes comme moi. Au moment même où je commençais à comprendre mon orientation sexuelle, le regretté premier ministre Pierre Trudeau nous a assuré que je ne serais pas traité comme un criminel si je choisissais de vivre ma sexualité et d'aimer un autre homme. J'ai connu l'émergence des mesures législatives sur les droits de la personne et les décisions des tribunaux fondées sur la Charte, qui m'ont permis d'épouser mon partenaire, avec qui j'ai passé presque 30 ans. J'ai vu le gouvernement présenter des excuses à ceux qui ont été malmenés par l'homophobie systémique dans la fonction publique, dans l'armée et dans la police nationale.
J'assisterai à distance aux travaux de la Chambre lorsque nous passerons à la prochaine étape de l'interdiction des thérapies de conversion. Il y a loin de la coupe aux lèvres. Les vieilles attitudes ont la vie dure, mais l'occasion se présente à nous...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:21 [p.5732]
Expand
We have to go to questions and comments. The hon. member for Cloverdale—Langley City.
Nous devons passer aux questions et observations. La députée de Cloverdale—Langley City a la parole.
Collapse
View Tamara Jansen Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tamara Jansen Profile
2021-04-16 10:22 [p.5732]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am so glad that my colleague invoked the words of the prophet Micah, so I am going to invoke the words of the Apostle Matthew, who stated:
Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You are like whitewashed tombs, which look beautiful on the outside but on the inside are full of the bones of the dead and everything unclean.
I have had so many people reach out to me in regard to this bill. Charlotte, a young woman in Calgary, was involved in lesbian activity. She struggled with self-worth and depression. She reached a point in her life when she did not want to continue with her lesbian activity, and her parents supported her choice and helped her find a counsellor who helped her process the feelings. She said:
Because of the counselling, I had a deep sense of love and acceptance. It was not harmful, coercive or abusive in any way.... If you enact the proposed bill, you're banning the exact support that I desperately needed at that time in my life. If this bill is to be truly inclusive, include people like me.
Why will the government not respond to—
Madame la Présidente, je suis vraiment heureuse que mon collègue ait repris les paroles du prophète Michée. Je vais donc citer celles de l'apôtre Matthieu, qui a dit ceci:
Malheur à vous, scribes et pharisiens hypocrites! parce que vous ressemblez à des sépulcres blanchis, qui paraissent beaux au dehors, et qui, au dedans, sont pleins d'ossements de morts et de toute espèce d'impuretés.
Il y a tant de personnes qui ont communiqué avec moi à propos de ce projet de loi. Charlotte, une jeune femme de Calgary, participait à des activités lesbiennes. Elle était aux prises avec des problèmes d'estime de soi et de dépression. Elle est arrivée à un moment de sa vie où elle ne voulait plus poursuivre ses activités lesbiennes, et ses parents ont appuyé son choix. Ils l'ont aidé à trouver une personne pour la conseiller et l'aider à composer avec ses sentiments. Voici ce qu'elle m'a dit:
Le counseling m'a permis de me sentir profondément aimée et acceptée. Ce n'était pas du tout néfaste, coercitif ou abusif […] Si vous adoptez le projet de loi, vous interdirez cette aide dont j'avais désespérément besoin à ce moment de ma vie. Si l'objectif du projet de loi est vraiment d'être inclusif, il devrait s'appliquer aussi à des personnes comme moi.
Pourquoi le gouvernement refuse-t-il de répondre à...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:23 [p.5732]
Expand
I have to give the hon. parliamentary secretary a chance to answer.
The hon. parliamentary secretary.
Je dois donner au secrétaire parlementaire la chance de répondre.
Le secrétaire parlementaire a la parole.
Collapse
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:23 [p.5732]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the first thing I would say is that people like me are not unclean. It is deeply offensive to play Bible baseball like that. I know my Bible very well. That is why I would call him the Apostle Matthew. I understand every word in that scripture, having studied it and having a doctorate in theology. It is offensive to even use that word in the context of this debate.
What we are about is ensuring the safety and security of everyone, including Charlotte and anybody who has doubts or concerns about their sexuality, but not to engage in conversion therapy.
People deserve counselling and support. I spent 25 years of my life as a pastoral counsellor. I am proud of that work. I am proud of the fact that in my Christian heritage we will stand up and defend people, as do people in heritages of every sort and every religious background. This is a time to move beyond—
Madame la Présidente, la première chose que je dirais, c'est que les personnes comme moi ne sont pas impures. Il est profondément offensant que la députée me renvoie la balle ainsi en se servant de la Bible. Je connais très bien ma Bible. Voilà pourquoi je souligne qu'il s'agit de « l'apôtre » Matthieu. Je comprends chacun des mots de ces écritures, puisque je les ai étudiés et que je détiens un doctorat en théologie. Il est offensant que la députée ose employer ce mot dans le contexte de ce débat.
En interdisant la thérapie de conversion, nous voulons assurer la sécurité de toutes les personnes, y compris celle de Charlotte et de quiconque éprouve des doutes ou des préoccupations concernant sa sexualité.
Les gens méritent d'avoir accès à du counseling et à du soutien. J'ai été conseiller pastoral pendant 25 ans. Je suis fier de ce travail. Je suis fier du fait que, dans mon patrimoine chrétien, nous défendons l'intérêt des personnes, comme cela se fait dans d'autres patrimoines et confessions. Le temps est venu de passer outre...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:24 [p.5732]
Expand
Questions and comments, the hon. member for North Island—Powell River.
Nous poursuivons les questions et observations. La députée de North Island—Powell River a la parole.
Collapse
View Rachel Blaney Profile
NDP (BC)
View Rachel Blaney Profile
2021-04-16 10:24 [p.5732]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to thank the member so much for his speech. It was better the second time because it was not interrupted.
I am also grateful to be a part of the House as we look at this important legislation. I recognize this bill will not fix the historic wounds of conversion therapy, nor will it fix the homophobia and transphobia we still see in so many of our communities. I wonder if the member could talk about what the Liberal government will do to build capacity within the SOGIE community so that these challenges can be addressed by the community.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie sincèrement le député de son discours. C'était encore mieux la deuxième fois puisqu'il n'y a pas eu d'interruption.
Je suis également reconnaissante de faire partie de la Chambre alors que nous examinons cet important projet de loi. Je comprends que celui-ci ne réparera pas les torts causés par le passé par la thérapie de conversion ni n'éliminera l'homophobie et la transphobie qui s'observent toujours dans nos collectivités. Le député pourrait-il parler de ce que fera le gouvernement libéral pour renforcer la capacité au sein de la communauté des personnes ayant diverses orientations ou identités sexuelles ainsi que diverses façons de les exprimer, de sorte que celle-ci puisse faire face à ces difficultés?
Collapse
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:24 [p.5732]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to thank colleagues from the New Democratic Party, including the hon. member, for their support. It has been long-standing, rich and important. It is very good to have friends.
The SOGIE community continues to need support, in particular people in other vulnerable and intersectionally biased communities; that is, people who are poor, who are indigenous and who are from racialized communities. I hope the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth will have a chance to talk about that, because I am very pleased with what her department is doing. It is reaching out. It is a cross-departmental secretariat that is ensuring that people have the resources they need. That includes continuing to work for every agency in every country to have the resources, whether through interpretation, cultural dialogue or anything. We are not there yet and we—
Madame la Présidente, je veux remercier mes collègues du Nouveau Parti démocratique, notamment la députée, de leur appui. Ce fut une expérience de longue haleine, riche et importante. Il est bon d'avoir des amis.
La communauté des personnes ayant diverses orientations sexuelles et identités de genre a toujours besoin de soutien, en particulier lorsqu'il s'agit de personnes qui font également partie d'autres communautés vulnérables ayant des enjeux intersectionnels. Je parle des pauvres, des Autochtones et des membres de communautés racialisées. J'espère que la ministre de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion et de la Jeunesse aura l'occasion d'en parler, parce que je suis très satisfait de ce que fait son ministère. Il s'informe auprès des gens. C'est un secrétariat interministériel qui veille à ce que les gens aient les ressources dont ils ont besoin. Il est notamment question de continuer de collaborer avec tous les organismes de tous les pays pour obtenir des ressources, que ce soit au moyen de l'interprétation, du dialogue culturel ou autre. Nous n'y sommes pas encore et nous...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:26 [p.5733]
Expand
One last question, the hon. member for Kingston and the Islands.
Nous avons le temps pour une dernière question. Le député de Kingston et les Îles a la parole.
Collapse
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
2021-04-16 10:26 [p.5733]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to thank my colleague, the parliamentary secretary, for his intervention today, but more importantly for his response to that ignorant first question we heard.
The reality is that, as the LGBTQ movement has been progressing, minds have been changed and people have come to realize the mistakes that were made in the past. I think of my parents, who have come so far from their original positions on gay marriage to where they are now.
Can the member talk from his experience about how we have made progress over the last number of decades, and where we ultimately need to be to establish a full sense of equality for all people in this country?
Madame la Présidente, je veux remercier mon collègue, le secrétaire parlementaire, de son intervention aujourd'hui et, plus important encore, de la réponse qu'il a donnée à la première question, qui trahissait l'ignorance de la personne qui l'a posée.
La vérité, c'est que le mouvement LGBTQ progresse, que les mentalités changent et que la population a compris que des erreurs ont été commises dans le passé. Je pense à mes parents, dont la position concernant le mariage gai a beaucoup évolué avant d'arriver où elle en est aujourd'hui.
Le député peut-il parler de son expérience et de la progression réalisée au cours des dernières décennies et de ce qu'il faut faire pour arriver à établir un véritable sentiment d'égalité entre tous les habitants du pays?
Collapse
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2021-04-16 10:26 [p.5733]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I have seen tremendous change. I have seen people go from complete misunderstanding to great love. I continue to be inspired by them. Some of them sit in the House. Hopefully tomorrow there will be even more sitting in the House who have made that conversion, which needs to be made.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai vu une énorme progression. J'ai vu des gens passer de l'incompréhension totale à l'amour sincère, notamment au sein de la Chambre. J'espère que, dans le futur, encore plus de gens qui siègent à la Chambre auront fait cette transition, qui est nécessaire.
Collapse
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2021-04-16 10:27 [p.5733]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to begin by acknowledging that I am joining the House from Waterloo, Ontario, the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, Anishinaabe and Neutral people.
I also want to thank my dear friend and colleague, the member of Parliament for Don Valley West, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, for sharing his time with me. Mostly, I thank him as a fellow Canadian citizen. I thank him as a fellow member of the human race. I thank him for being his true authentic person he was put on this Earth to be.
It is a privilege to rise in support of Bill C-6, an act to amend the Criminal Code to abolish the destructive practice of conversion therapy in Canada. I rise today with someone else's words, words I have not been able to forget since I first heard them. They are the words of Peter Gajdics, a survivor of six years of conversion therapy, who appeared before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights in December. Mr. Gajdics said:
I still consider it a miracle I didn't die. I left these six years shell-shocked. It was not so much that I wanted to kill myself as I thought I was already dead.
Imagine being parents feeling like they cannot accept part of who their child truly is or who or how they love. That is deep conditioning at work, conditioning that imprisons people in the misguided belief that the only acceptable path is being cisgender or heterosexual, conditioning based on myths, stereotypes and underlying mistruths that are rooted in and perpetuate homophobia, biphobia and transphobia.
It is high time for us to take decisive action to end conversion therapy and to do everything we can to stop violence and discrimination in its tracks. LGBTQ2 rights are human rights.
My mandate letter as the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth asks me to promote LGBTQ2 equality, promote LGBTQ2 rights and address discrimination against LGBTQ2 communities.
A recent global survey tells us that four out of five people who undergo these damaging therapies are younger than 24 years old, and of those, roughly half are under 18 years old. This is far too many young people growing up being told they are invalid, shameful or unnatural, far too many young people being told that how they perceive themselves, who they want to be in this world or who or how they love is wrong.
Bill C-6 get us one step closer to that goal.
These young people are our future. We must protect them. We have to put an end to conversion therapy, especially for children and youth.
I would like to thank the witnesses who appeared before committee, those who contributed submissions and the standing committee members who came together to strengthen the legislation for Canadians. Further defining conversion therapy to include gender expression while making clear the heinous efforts to force people to be something they are not is the target of this legislation.
In addition to the five original prohibited offences, the committee's amendments clarify that conversion therapy performed without consent is to be criminalized and that promoting conversion therapy services or practices is also to be targeted.
Unlike some misguided narratives we have heard about the bill, it would not criminalize another person's values, opinions or beliefs. It does not criminalize a private conversation where these values or beliefs are being expressed. We recognize it is crucial to ensure affirming and supportive guidance and advice remains available to those coming to terms with who they are.
There is no question that these proposed amendments bring us one step closer to building the safer and consciously more inclusive Canada we all imagine. However, we know that achieving this vision will take more than legislation. It will take a transformation of our ideas about and attitudes toward LGBTQ2 communities, a transformation of our broader perspectives on diversity and inclusion. It will take nothing short of a revolution of the hearts and minds of all Canadians.
The Government of Canada is strongly committed to protecting the rights of LGBTQ2 Canadians and ensuring full and equitable participation in society.
We are working with all levels of government and with partners from all sectors to bring about positive change across Canada.
As leaders, as legislators, as Canadians, as compassionate human beings, it is our job to ensure that Canada is a country for everyone, regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression, can live in equity and freedom.
Not long ago, six Conservative members voted against the bill at second reading in the House. Anyone who continues to oppose the proposals in Bill C-6 is in direct opposition to the community.
The bill and all our actions to recognize and protect the rights of LGBTQ2 Canadians are important and necessary steps in building a safer, more equitable and consciously more inclusive Canada we all want. Conversion therapy practices have no place in Canada.
When I think of the courage and resilience of the many survivors who gave their testimony in December, I know that we in the House have a duty to ensure that we do not let them down. We are indebted to their collective strength and steadfastness in the face of oppression of those who speak out.
When children arrive into this world, they are not innately born with prejudice or hatred. Children are taught to hate and to discriminate, taught to be ashamed of who they are and taught that there is only one correct way to live and be. We have to provide a different future for our next generations, an even better and consciously more inclusive future.
Our task is clear: The time to act is now. I urge all members to support this legislation, protect Canadians and uphold human rights for all. For members who oppose Bill C-6, do so in their right but not by speaking with fear or misinformation.
Tomorrow, we mark the anniversary of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Let us all work to create and defend and build on these rights and freedoms. Let us protect these hard-fought rights and freedoms, because I know we can and must do better.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens d'abord à souligner que je prends la parole à la Chambre à partir de Waterloo, en Ontario, sur le territoire traditionnel des Haudenosaunee, des Anishinabes et des Neutres.
Je tiens aussi à remercier mon cher ami et collègue le député de Don Valley-Ouest et secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Affaires étrangères d'avoir partagé son temps de parole avec moi. Je le remercie d'être le citoyen canadien, l'être humain et la personne authentique qu'il était destiné à devenir.
C'est un privilège de prendre la parole pour appuyer le projet de loi C-6, Loi modifiant le Code criminel en vue d'abolir la pratique destructrice de la thérapie de conversion au Canada. J'interviens aujourd'hui en citant les paroles de quelqu'un d'autre, des paroles que je n'ai pas pu oublier depuis que je les ai entendues. Je cite Peter Gajdics, qui a survécu à six années de thérapie de conversion et qui a témoigné devant le Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne en décembre dernier. M. Gajdics a déclaré ceci:
Je considère toujours que c'est un miracle de n'y avoir pas perdu la vie. À la fin de ces six années, j'étais complètement anéanti. Ce n'est pas tant que je voulais me suicider que je pensais être déjà mort.
Imaginez être un parent et ne pas pouvoir accepter un aspect de votre enfant, ou la personne qu’il aime, ou sa façon d’aimer? C’est un conditionnement profond, qui pousse les gens à croire que la seule chose acceptable, c’est d’être hétérosexuel et cisgenre. C'est un conditionnement fondé sur les mythes, les stéréotypes et les préjugés associés à l’homophobie, à la biphobie et à la transphobie.
Il est grand temps que nous prenions des mesures décisives pour mettre fin à la thérapie de conversion et que nous fassions tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir pour stopper la violence et la discrimination. Les droits des membres de la communauté LGBTQ2 sont des droits de la personne.
En tant que ministre de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion et de la Jeunesse, ma lettre de mandat me demande de promouvoir l’égalité des personnes LGBTQ2, de promouvoir les droits de celles-ci et de lutter contre la discrimination dont sont victimes les communautés LGBTQ2.
Selon une récente enquête mondiale, quatre personnes sur cinq qui subissent ces thérapies néfastes ont moins de 24 ans, dont près de la moitié ont moins de 18 ans. C’est beaucoup trop. Trop de jeunes qui grandissent en se faisant dire qu’ils sont invalides, honteux ou contre-nature. Que leur image d’eux-mêmes n’est pas correcte. Ni ce qu’ils veulent être. Ni leur façon d’aimer.
Le projet de loi C-6 nous rapproche un peu plus de cet objectif.
Ces jeunes sont notre avenir. Nous devons les protéger. Il faut arrêter les thérapies de conversion, surtout pour les enfants et les jeunes.
J'aimerais remercier les témoins qui ont comparu devant le comité, ceux qui ont soumis des mémoires et les membres du comité permanent qui ont uni leurs efforts pour renforcer le projet de loi pour les Canadiens. L'objectif du projet de loi est de mieux définir la thérapie de conversion pour y inclure l'expression du genre et d'exposer les efforts odieux déployés pour forcer les gens à devenir ce qu'ils ne sont pas.
En plus des cinq infractions déjà interdites, les amendements du comité visent la criminalisation de l'imposition de la thérapie de conversion sans le consentement de la personne, ainsi que la promotion des services ou des pratiques de thérapie de conversion.
Contrairement à certains discours malavisés que nous avons entendus sur le projet de loi, celui-ci ne vise pas à criminaliser les valeurs, les opinions ou les croyances des gens. Il ne vise pas non plus à criminaliser des conversations privées au cours desquelles on exprime ces valeurs ou ces croyances. Nous reconnaissons qu'il est crucial de protéger les personnes qui offrent leur appui et leurs conseils aux gens qui s'interrogent ou qui tentent de composer avec un aspect de leur identité.
Il ne fait aucun doute que les amendements proposés nous rapprochent un peu plus du Canada plus sécuritaire et volontairement plus inclusif que nous imaginons tous. La réalisation de cette vision implique cependant plus qu'une législation, elle suppose une transformation de nos idées et de nos attitudes envers la communauté LGBTQ et, plus généralement, à l'égard de la diversité et de l'inclusion. Il ne faudra, pour ce faire, rien de moins que de changer radicalement le cœur et l'esprit des Canadiens.
Le gouvernement du Canada est fermement engagé à protéger les droits des Canadiens de la communauté LGBTQ et à assurer leur participation sociale pleine et équitable.
Nous travaillons avec tous les paliers de gouvernement et avec des partenaires de tous les secteurs pour apporter des changements positifs partout au Canada.
En tant que leaders, législateurs, Canadiens et êtres humains compatissants, il nous incombe de faire du Canada un pays où toutes les personnes peuvent vivre librement en égalité, peu importe leur orientation sexuelle, leur identité de genre ou leur expression sexuelle.
Il n'y a pas si longtemps, six députés conservateurs ont voté contre le projet de loi à l'étape de la deuxième lecture à la Chambre. Toute personne qui continue à s'opposer aux projections proposées dans le projet de loi C-6 s'oppose directement à la communauté.
Le projet de loi et l'ensemble des mesures visant à reconnaître et protéger les droits des Canadiens LGBTQ2 sont des étapes importantes et nécessaires pour bâtir le Canada plus sûr, plus équitable et consciemment plus inclusif que nous voulons tous. Les thérapies de conversion n'ont pas leur place au Canada.
Quand je pense au courage et à la résilience des nombreux survivants qui ont témoigné en décembre, je me dis que la Chambre a le devoir de ne pas les laisser tomber. Nous leur sommes redevables de leur force collective et de leur ténacité face à l'oppression.
Quand les enfants viennent au monde, les préjugés et la haine ne sont pas innés en eux. On leur apprend à haïr et à discriminer, on leur apprend à avoir honte de ce qu'ils sont et on leur apprend qu'il n'y a qu'une seule façon appropriée de vivre et d'être. Nous devons offrir un avenir différent aux prochaines générations, un avenir meilleur et consciemment plus inclusif.
Il est manifeste que nous devons prendre des mesures immédiates. J'exhorte l'ensemble des députés à appuyer le projet de loi, à protéger les Canadiens et à défendre les droits de la personne pour tous. Quant aux députés qui s'opposent au projet de loi C-6, c'est leur droit, mais ils ne doivent pas semer la peur ni véhiculer de fausses informations.
Demain, nous célébrons l'anniversaire de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Travaillons ensemble pour créer un environnement propice aux droits et libertés, défendre les droits et libertés, et tirer parti du travail déjà accompli. Protégeons les droits et libertés durement acquis, car je sais que nous pouvons et devons faire mieux.
Collapse
View Karen Vecchio Profile
CPC (ON)
View Karen Vecchio Profile
2021-04-16 10:35 [p.5734]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I do not support conversion therapy, but I do understand some of these concerns. I will be supporting the bill, but there are some concerns when it comes comes to those simple dialogues that we want to have with our children.
As a parent of five children, sometimes having those dialogues can be very difficult. I know there has been a great discussion about what is or is not criminalized. I think many people are just looking for assurance.
Could the minister share her thoughts on this so those people who are concerned feel there is more a balance here?
Madame la Présidente, je suis contre les thérapies de conversion, mais je comprends certaines des préoccupations entourant la question. Je vais appuyer le projet de loi, mais des inquiétudes persistent quant aux conversations franches qu'il serait souhaitable d'avoir avec nos enfants.
En tant que parent de cinq enfants, je comprends qu'il est parfois très difficile d'aborder certains sujets. Je sais que débattre ce qui est criminel ou non a suscité des discussions sérieuses. Je pense que beaucoup de gens ont seulement besoin d'être rassurés.
La ministre pourrait-elle faire part de ses observations sur cet enjeu afin que les gens qui ont besoin d'être rassurés comprennent que le projet de loi vise à établir un équilibre?
Collapse
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2021-04-16 10:36 [p.5734]
Expand
Madam Speaker, first, it is nice to see the member even if it is virtually. She is very thoughtful in her debate and discussion, and that is part of the challenge we sometimes have as members of Parliament: our personal values versus representing our communities. I want to assure the member and all Canadians listening that discussions and open-ended conversations that explore identity are not conversion therapy and they are not targeted in the bill.
Children should be free to ask questions about who they are and to come to know themselves. That is why health care workers, parents, teachers, religious leaders must be able to continue supporting and affirming youth in these conversations and discussions.
The challenge where it becomes conversion therapy is when it is without consent, when it is being imposed, when people are being forced to change who they are or exploring who they are. That is where there is a little misinformation about what the legislation would do. We have worked really hard and have listened to a lot of the community to ensure we have it right. We hear from many people who say we need to go further. I want to assure exploratory—
Madame la Présidente, tout d'abord, je suis contente de voir la députée, même si c'est à distance. Elle s'exprime toujours avec discernement lors des débats et des discussions. Dans notre rôle de parlementaire, il est parfois difficile de faire la part des choses entre nos valeurs personnelles et l'intérêt des habitants de nos circonscriptions. Je tiens à assurer à la députée et à tous les Canadiens qui sont à l'écoute que de parler ouvertement à nos enfants à propos de l'identité n'a rien à voir avec les thérapies de conversion et n'est pas visé par le projet de loi.
Les enfants doivent se sentir libres de poser des questions pour mieux se connaître et définir leur identité. Voilà pourquoi les professionnels de la santé, les parents, les enseignants et les chefs religieux doivent continuer de soutenir les jeunes et de les valoriser lors de conversations et de discussions.
Le vrai problème en ce qui concerne la thérapie de conversion tient à l'absence de consentement, au fait d'imposer un point de vue et de forcer les jeunes à renier leur identité ou à les empêcher de découvrir qui ils sont véritablement. C'est la portée du projet de loi qui suscite un léger malentendu. Nous avons travaillé très fort et consulté de nombreux intervenants de la communauté pour être certains de bien faire les choses. De nombreuses personnes nous demandent d'aller encore plus loin. J'insiste sur le fait que le caractère exploratoire...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:37 [p.5734]
Expand
Moving on to questions and comments.
The hon. member for London—Fanshawe.
Nous passons maintenant aux questions et aux observations.
L'honorable députée de London—Fanshawe a la parole.
Collapse
View Lindsay Mathyssen Profile
NDP (ON)
View Lindsay Mathyssen Profile
2021-04-16 10:37 [p.5734]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to build upon what the member said about this being one step.
During COVID, a lot of the supports in our communities have been greatly impacted. Could she talk about future steps going forward regarding what monies and supports will be provided by the government to our communities to ensure we go that step beyond and to ensure we fully incorporate and encompass the support she talked about in her speech?
Madame la Présidente, j'enchaînerai sur l'idée de la députée, c'est-à-dire que c'est un pas en avant.
La pandémie de COVID a beaucoup ébranlé les mesures de soutien offertes dans nos communautés. La députée pourrait-elle nous parler des prochaines étapes en ce qui concerne le financement et les mesures de soutien que le gouvernement fournira aux communautés afin que nous puissions faire un pas de plus et englober le soutien dont elle a parlé dans son discours?
Collapse
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2021-04-16 10:38 [p.5734]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. member and her party for their unconditional support of protecting and defending LGBTQ2 rights as human rights.
When the pandemic hit, one of the first things our government did when it came to funding agreements was to recognize that the environment and the situation were changing. We wanted to ensure that organizations that were supporting members within the LGBTQ2 community were able to continue their work, because those supports are more necessary today than ever.
In 2019, our government put forward a $20 million community capacity fund for LGBTQ2 communities. It is the first fund of its kind, a fund that will help communities build the foundation they need to support members of their communities. We have also ensured that, as we make appointments, we are more conscious about the diversity of our country to ensure these voices make it to the decision-making table. We have—
Madame la Présidente, je remercie la députée et son parti, car ils protègent et défendent sans réserve les droits des personnes LGBTQ2 en tant que droits de la personne.
Quand la pandémie a frappé, l'un des premiers gestes du gouvernement en ce qui concerne les ententes de financement a été de reconnaître que le contexte et la situation étaient en pleine évolution. Nous tenions à faire le nécessaire pour que les organisations qui soutiennent des membres de la communauté LGBTQ2 puissent poursuivre leur travail, car leur soutien est plus essentiel que jamais.
En 2019, le gouvernement libéral a mis en place un Fonds de développement des capacités communautaires d'une valeur de 20 millions de dollars à l'intention des communautés LGBTQ2. Ce fonds, le premier en son genre, aidera ces communautés à établir les assises dont elles ont besoin pour soutenir leurs membres. De plus, quand nous procédons à des nominations, nous portons plus d'attention que jamais à la diversité du pays afin qu'une diversité de voix se joigne à la table des décideurs. Nous avons...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:39 [p.5734]
Expand
We have one last question.
The hon. member for Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne.
Il y a une dernière question.
La députée de Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne a la parole.
Collapse
View Sherry Romanado Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Sherry Romanado Profile
2021-04-16 10:39 [p.5735]
Expand
Madam Speaker, my aunt and her partner have built a beautiful family and a life together. There is nothing wrong with them, and I would not change them for the world. Could the minister share how this bill will help young people in the LGBTQ2 community find the same happiness that my aunts have found?
Madame la Présidente, ma tante et sa partenaire ont bâti leur vie ensemble et ont une magnifique famille. Il n'y a rien à redire à leur situation, et je ne les changerais pour rien au monde. La ministre pourrait-elle expliquer comment ce projet de loi aidera les jeunes de la communauté LGBTQ2 à trouver le même bonheur que mes tantes?
Collapse
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2021-04-16 10:39 [p.5735]
Expand
Madam Speaker, that member has the courage to share a bit about her family and allow us to enter into her private life. Many people have looked into their families and how this legislation would impact them. Young people are not only our leaders of tomorrow, they are the leaders of today. They need to be their true, authentic selves and we have to support them.
The legislation is one step closer to every individual being able to contribute in a meaningful way and to be proud of the shell that he or she occupies. When we—
Madame la Présidente, la députée a eu le courage de nous parler un peu de sa famille et de sa vie privée. Beaucoup de gens se sont ainsi demandé ce que ce projet de loi aura comme conséquences sur leur famille. Les jeunes ne sont pas juste les dirigeants de demain, ils sont aussi ceux d'aujourd'hui. Ils doivent donc pouvoir être eux-mêmes, authentiques, et nous devons les soutenir dans leur démarche.
Ce projet de loi nous rapproche du moment où chaque personne pourra contribuer de manière tangible à la société tout en étant fière de ce qu'elle est vraiment. Quand nous...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:40 [p.5735]
Expand
Resuming debate, the hon. member for St. Albert—Edmonton.
Nous reprenons le débat. Le député de St. Albert—Edmonton a la parole.
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2021-04-16 10:40 [p.5735]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would seek unanimous consent to split my time with my colleague, the member for South Surrey—White Rock.
Madame la Présidente, je demande le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour partager mon temps de parole avec ma collègue de Surrey-Sud—White Rock.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 10:40 [p.5735]
Expand
Does the hon. member have unanimous consent?
Hearing no objection, the hon. member has consent.
The hon. member for St. Albert—Edmonton.
Le député a-t-il le consentement unanime de la Chambre?
Comme je n'entends aucune objection, le député a le consentement de la Chambre.
Le député de St. Albert—Edmonton a la parole.
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2021-04-16 10:40 [p.5735]
Expand
Madam Speaker, it is an honour to speak to Bill C-6, an act to amend the Criminal Code to ban conversion therapy.
Let me say at the outset that conversion therapy is absurd. It is wrong, and it is harmful. Conversion therapy should be banned. Individuals who perpetrate such harmful acts and seek to coercively change someone's sexual orientation or sexual identity should be held accountable to the fullest extent of the law under the penalty of the Criminal Code. I unequivocally support the purported objective of this legislation, which is why I voted for Bill C-6 at second reading.
I did so notwithstanding the fact that I did have some concerns with the manner in which the bill was drafted. In particular, I had concerns that the definition of conversion therapy was vague and overly broad, and that it could capture not only those circumstances that involve coercive, abusive or otherwise harmful efforts to change someone's sexual orientation or identity, but could also more broadly encapsulate such things as good-faith conversations.
Nonetheless, because I unequivocally support the purported objective of the bill, I was hopeful, as a member of the justice committee, that we could come together at committee to study the bill in detail, hear from a wide range of witnesses and bring forward appropriate amendments where necessary to get the definition right.
It goes without saying that if we are to carve out any law in the Criminal Code to ban conversion therapy, it is absolutely imperative that we get the definition right. At committee, many of the concerns I had with the way in which the bill had been drafted were expressed by a wide range of witnesses, including members of the LGBTQ community, lawyers, medical professionals and members of the clergy.
More specifically, with respect to the definition and some of the issues that arise therefrom, I would first of all note that in the bill, conversion therapy is defined as any “practice, treatment or service”. These terms are not defined anywhere in the Criminal Code, and it should be noted that nowhere in the bill are these terms qualified in order to provide the context in which the practice, treatment or service would apply. Although these terms are found in parts of the Criminal Code, they are not stand-alone terms as they are in Bill C-6.
It is true that the term “treatment” connotes a therapeutic context. However, “practice” or “service” could, without qualification, involve just about any activity. For example, a “practice” could involve a good-faith conversation, and “service” could involve a voluntary counselling session or a religious sermon.
I was concerned that witnesses were expressing concern about the lack of clarity with respect to those terms, but in addition to that, the definition, as provided in Bill C-6, provides that it would ban any practice, treatment or service designed to reduce sexual attraction or sexual behaviour.
The definition is clearly expansive. It goes beyond a clear and targeted definition. Without any qualification, it could arguably include counselling sessions or other supports provided on a voluntary basis by medical professionals and other professionals. It could, arguably, capture good-faith conversations between persons struggling with their sexual identity and medical professionals, parents and other family members, religious leaders and others.
It is important to note that this definition of conversion therapy is not used by any professional body. It is not used by the Canadian Psychiatric Association, the Canadian Psychological Association or their American counterparts. In the face of that ambiguity, which was supported by witness testimony, Conservatives sought to bring forward amendments to get the definition right.
Now, the Minister of Justice, the Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth and other members of the government have repeatedly said that the bill before us would not target voluntary, good-faith conversations. I do not doubt their sincerity when they say that is what they believe. Consistent with that, the website of the Department of Justice states the same.
However, what matters not is the minister's interpretation of the bill. What matters not is what is on the website of the Department of Justice. What matters is, in fact, what is in the bill, which is why Conservatives brought forward an amendment to simply incorporate into the bill the very language that was provided on the website of the Department of Justice. Such language would have provided certainty. It would have provided clarity that good-faith and voluntary conversations would not be the subject of the imposition of criminal charges laid against persons.
Let me be clear that it is a fundamental requirement of the rule of law that a person should be able to know and predict whether a particular act constitutes a crime. Here we have a definition that is vague and overly broad, and therefore is at risk of contravening fundamental justice. It could be deemed contrary to section 7 of the charter as a result.
In closing, the government's intention is a good one, and the intent of the bill is a good one, but it is important that we get the definition right. I am concerned that we have not achieved that in the bill before us.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un honneur pour moi de parler du projet de loi C-6, qui modifie le Code criminel de manière à interdire les thérapies de conversion.
Je tiens à dire avant de commencer que les thérapies de conversion sont tout à fait absurdes. Elles sont néfastes et elles ne devraient pas exister. Elles devraient être interdites. Les personnes qui commettent un acte aussi répréhensible et qui essaient de changer de force l'orientation sexuelle ou l'identité sexuelle d'autrui devraient subir toutes les conséquences de la loi et être sanctionnées par le Code criminel. J'appuie sans réserve l'objectif poursuivi par le projet de loi C-6, et c'est pourquoi j'ai voté en sa faveur à l'étape de la deuxième lecture.
J'ai voté pour même si le libellé du projet de loi m'a fait un peu tiquer. Je trouve notamment que la définition de ce qui constitue une thérapie de conversion est vague et inutilement vaste, au point d'englober non seulement les situations où l'on a recours à des méthodes coercitives, abusives ou généralement néfastes pour changer l'orientation ou l'identité sexuelle d'une personne, mais aussi les discussions de bonne foi.
Néanmoins, parce que j'appuie sans réserve l'objectif avoué du projet de loi, j'avais bon espoir, en tant que membre du comité de la justice, que nous arriverions à nous entendre en comité pour étudier le projet de loi en profondeur, entendre un vaste éventail de témoins et proposer des amendements appropriés pour en arriver à une bonne définition.
Il va sans dire que si nous voulons intégrer au Code criminel une disposition législative interdisant la thérapie de conversion, il est impératif de trouver une bonne définition. En comité, bon nombre des préoccupations que j'avais par rapport à la manière dont le projet de loi avait été rédigé ont été exprimées par divers témoins, dont des membres de la communauté LGBTQ, des avocats, des médecins et des membres du clergé.
Plus précisément, en ce qui concerne la définition et certains problèmes qui en découlent, je souligne d'emblée que, dans le projet de loi, la thérapie de conversion s'entend « d'une pratique, d'un traitement ou d'un service ». Ces termes ne sont définis nulle part dans le Code criminel et il y a lieu de signaler qu'en aucun cas le projet de loi ne les précise afin d'établir le contexte où s'appliquent les termes « pratique, traitement ou service ». Bien que ces termes apparaissent dans certaines parties du Code criminel, ils n'y sont pas isolés comme dans le projet de loi C-6.
Il est vrai que le terme « traitement » comporte une connotation thérapeutique. En revanche, pris isolément, les termes « pratique » ou « service » pourraient s'appliquer à pratiquement n'importe quelle activité. Par exemple, une « pratique » pourrait s'appliquer à une conversation de bonne foi et un « service », à une séance de counselling volontaire ou à un sermon religieux.
Cela m'a préoccupé que des témoins expriment des inquiétudes par rapport à l'imprécision de ces termes, et, en plus, la définition fournie dans le projet de loi C-6 interdirait toute pratique, tout traitement ou tout service visant à réduire toute attirance ou tout comportement sexuel.
À l'évidence, cette définition est large. Il ne s'agit pas d'une définition claire et bien ciblée. Sans autre précision, elle pourrait vraisemblablement désigner des séances de counselling ou d'autres mesures d'aide fournies de façon volontaire par des professionnels de la santé et autres. Elle pourrait vraisemblablement s'appliquer à des conversations de bonne foi tenues entre des personnes se questionnant sur leur identité sexuelle et des professionnels de la santé, des parents ou des membres de la famille, des chefs religieux, entre autres.
Il est important de souligner que cette définition de la thérapie de conversion n'est utilisée par aucun ordre professionnel. Elle n'est pas utilisée par l'Association des psychiatres du Canada, par la Société canadienne de psychologie, ni par leurs équivalents américains. À la lumière d'une telle ambiguïté, étayée par divers témoignages, les conservateurs ont cherché à présenter des amendements visant à corriger la définition.
Le ministre de la Justice, la ministre de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion et de la Jeunesse et d'autres ministériels ont dit à maintes reprises que le projet de loi à l'étude ne viserait pas les thérapies de conversion suivies de façon volontaire et de bonne foi. Je ne doute pas de leur sincérité à cet égard, et le site du ministère de la Justice dit d'ailleurs la même chose.
Cependant, ce qui importe, ce n'est pas comment le ministre interprète le projet de loi ou ce qui se trouve sur le site du ministère de la Justice, mais plutôt ce qui se trouve dans le projet de loi, et c'est pour cela que les conservateurs ont proposé un amendement dans le seul but d'inclure dans le projet de loi la même formulation qui se trouve sur le site Web du ministère de la Justice, ce qui aurait apporté plus de clarté et donné l'assurance que des gens n'auraient pas à faire face à des accusations au criminel pour des thérapies de conversion suivies de façon volontaire.
Soyons clairs: selon un principe fondamental de la primauté du droit, une personne doit être en mesure de savoir et de prévoir si un acte donné constitue un acte criminel. Or, nous sommes saisis d'une définition vague et trop étendue qui risque donc d'aller à l'encontre de la justice fondamentale, et donc, de l'article 7 de la Charte.
En conclusion, les intentions du gouvernement sont bonnes, tout comme celles qui sous-tendent le projet de loi, mais il est important de formuler la définition comme il faut, mais je crains que ce ne soit pas le cas dans le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis.
Collapse
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
2021-04-16 10:50 [p.5736]
Expand
Madam Speaker, if I understand correctly, the member supports the ban on conversion therapy; however, he is hung up on the definition of three individual words, which could be very easily found in any Webster's dictionary, to provide context as to what they mean. Is that what the member is trying to tell this House?
Madame la Présidente, si je comprends bien, le député est favorable à l'interdiction de la thérapie de conversion, mais il se soucie de l'interprétation de trois mots dont on peut trouver très facilement la définition dans n'importe quel dictionnaire. Est-ce bien ce que le député essaie de dire à la Chambre?
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2021-04-16 10:50 [p.5736]
Expand
Madam Speaker, with respect to the hon. member for Kingston and the Islands, it appears he did not listen carefully to my speech.
I noted, yes, that I had concerns with the terms “practice”, “treatment” and “service”, but I also noted concerns about the definition including the reduction of sexual attraction or sexual behaviour. There were many LGBTQ witnesses who appeared before committee who said that they were concerned this would make it illegal or create a chilling effect on counselling services and supports that they have relied on and that have helped them in their development and identity.
Madame la Présidente, le député de Kingston et les Îles ne semble pas avoir écouté attentivement mon intervention.
Oui, j'ai exprimé des inquiétudes par rapport au manque de clarté des termes « pratique », « traitement » et « service ». Cependant, je me suis aussi dit préoccupé par le fait que la définition de ces termes s'applique à la réduction de l'attirance sexuelle ou du comportement sexuel. De nombreux témoins LGBTQ qui ont comparu devant le comité ont dit craindre que cela rende illégaux les services de counseling et de soutien ou que cela entrave ces services sur lesquels ils comptent et qui les ont aidés à cheminer et à définir leur identité.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2021-04-16 10:51 [p.5736]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech.
I understand his concerns about the clarity of the bill's wording, but I wonder if he might take comfort in the fact that, when judges are called to interpret it, in order to exclude good faith conversations, they will also refer to parliamentary work and the debates for context.
Does my colleague take comfort in that?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de son discours.
Je comprends les craintes qu'il manifeste quant à la clarté du texte de loi, mais je me demande s'il ne trouve pas une forme de réconfort dans le fait que, quand les juges auront à l'interpréter, pour exclure les conversations de bonne foi, ils vont aussi se référer aux travaux parlementaires et aux débats pour pouvoir contextualiser la chose.
Mon collègue y trouve-t-il une forme de réconfort?
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2021-04-16 10:51 [p.5736]
Expand
Madam Speaker, it is absolutely essential that, when we draft legislation, we ensure that it is targeted toward demonstrated harms. We should not wait for a judge to interpret it or hope that a judge will interpret the law the way we hope a judge would do in the face of vague and overly broad language, and on a matter that can involve five years behind bars upon conviction.
Madame la Présidente, lorsque nous rédigeons une mesure législative, nous devons absolument veiller à ce qu'elle soit fondée sur les préjudices confirmés. Nous ne devrions pas attendre qu'un juge l'interprète ou, compte tenu du libellé vague et trop large du projet de loi à l'étude, espérer qu'il l'interprète comme nous le souhaitons, quand une condamnation est passible d'une peine d'emprisonnement de cinq ans.
Collapse
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
View Jack Harris Profile
2021-04-16 10:52 [p.5736]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I hear the hon. member profess that he agrees that conversion therapy should be banned and banned criminally, yet he is concerning himself with the definitions about what counselling might mean. Leading lawyers and other people involved, including the Canadian Association of Social Workers and others, have said that good-faith counselling sessions and good-faith therapy would not be covered by this ban.
Is the hon. member just looking for an excuse to fail to pass this bill at third reading?
Madame la Présidente le député prétend convenir que la thérapie de conversion devrait être interdite et reconnue comme un acte criminel. Pourtant, il se préoccupe de ce que le counseling pourrait signifier. Or, d'éminents avocats et d'autres intervenants, y compris l'Association canadienne des travailleuses et travailleurs sociaux, ont indiqué que les séances de counseling et de thérapie qui sont tenues de bonne foi ne seraient pas visées par l'interdiction.
Le député cherche-t-il simplement une excuse pour ne pas adopter le projet de loi à l'étape de la troisième lecture?
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2021-04-16 10:53 [p.5736]
Expand
Madam Speaker, with respect to the member for St. John's East, I voted for this bill at second reading. I heard the testimony of witnesses at the justice committee, in which there were significant concerns expressed. We worked to include language to provide that clarity.
I do not know why the government did not support such language because, had such language been incorporated, I believe we could have this bill pass this place with unanimous support or something very close to it. It is unfortunate that opportunity was missed.
Madame la Présidente, avec tout le respect que je dois au député de St. John’s-Est, j'ai voté pour ce projet de loi à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. J'ai entendu ce que les témoins avaient à dire au comité de la justice, et de sérieuses préoccupations ont été soulevées. Nous avons travaillé pour que le libellé clarifie ce point.
Je ne sais pas pourquoi le gouvernement s'est opposé à ce changement. Si un tel libellé avait été ajouté, je pense que le projet de loi aurait pu être adopté à la Chambre à l'unanimité ou avec un appui très fort. Il est malheureux que nous ayons raté cette occasion.
Collapse
View Joël Godin Profile
CPC (QC)
View Joël Godin Profile
2021-04-16 10:54 [p.5736]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from St. Albert—Edmonton and I would like to hear his thoughts on the fact that I share his concerns.
We agree on the principles of the bill. I think we need to be more inclusive. However, we do not want this to be rushed through and botched this time, as we have come to expect from the Liberals.
Could my colleague comment on the possibility of working with members of the Senate to come up with a definition and clarify this legislation from the outset rather than putting the onus on judges, so we can avoid any potential excesses?
Madame la Présidente, j'aimerais remercier mon collègue de St. Albert—Edmonton et l'entendre sur le fait que j'ai les mêmes préoccupations que lui.
Nous sommes d'accord sur les principes de cette loi. Je pense que l'on se doit d'être plus inclusifs. Cependant, on ne veut pas cette fois de processus accéléré pour bâcler l'affaire, comme ce à quoi nous ont habitués les libéraux.
Mon collègue pourrait-il commenter la possibilité de travailler avec les gens du Sénat pour s'assurer de définir et d'établir la loi de façon claire au départ, afin de ne pas reporter la responsabilité sur les juges et d'éviter des débordements?
Collapse
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michael Cooper Profile
2021-04-16 10:54 [p.5736]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the member for Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier is absolutely right that it is important that we get the definition right. Surely, we want this legislation to pass constitutional muster, and a piece of legislation that has a definition that is vague and overly broad is at risk of a charter challenge, at risk of being found to contravene fundamental justice and at risk of being found to contravene section 7 of the charter.
I had hoped that this would not be the case and that we could have gotten it right, so that we could have a law on the books that would stand.
Madame la Présidente, le député de Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier a tout à fait raison: il est important d'avoir une définition claire. Nous voulons sûrement que ce projet de loi résiste à une contestation constitutionnelle. Une mesure législative qui inclut une définition vague et trop large risque de faire l'objet d'une contestation fondée sur la Charte, d'être jugée non conforme aux principes de justice fondamentale et à l'article 7 de la Charte.
J'aurais souhaité que ce ne soit pas le cas et que nous fassions bien les choses afin d'avoir une loi valide.
Collapse
View Kerry-Lynne Findlay Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Speaker, I rise today not to debate a ban on coercive conversion therapy, but instead to debate the means by which we ban this harmful, damaging practice. I want to make one thing very clear from the outset: I am against forcibly attempting to change an individual’s sexual orientation. I condemn that practice in the strongest possible terms. There is simply no place for this in Canada.
However, there is a place in Canada for compassion. At the justice committee, of which I am a member, we heard testimony from a variety of stakeholders on this bill, including survivors of coercive conversion therapy, members of the 2SLGBTQ+ community, indigenous leaders, academics, doctors, lawyers and faith leaders. I thank all the witnesses for their contributions, especially those who had the strength and courage to share their very personal experiences. I know it could not have been easy.
It is evident to me from having heard these witnesses, read countless briefs and spoken to dozens of constituents that there is a widespread support for banning coercive conversion therapy practices, and there should be. However, as with all legislation, the language must be clear. We need to ensure that judges can interpret and apply the law as it is written, and that Canadians know what the law prohibits and what it does not: in other words, whom it protects and whom it does not. On this point, I have heard repeatedly that the bill’s definition of conversion therapy is unclear and overbroad, as my colleague just said, and may have unintended consequences.
For earlier Liberal speakers to say that those with any concerns are against the communities we are trying to help, and speak from fear, is a harmful, wrong-minded statement. The Minister of Justice has said that the bill would not affect good-faith conversations, which I understand to mean caring, non-coercive discussions with doctors, parents, counsellors, faith leaders or others to whom Canadians, young and old, may turn for support. However, the bill, as drafted, does not say that. Why not? As we all know, what matters is not what the minister says the bill will do, but what the bill actually says. That is the law. That is what judges will apply, from Victoria to St. John’s.
Several witnesses appearing before the committee called for amendments to the bill to clarify its definition, to make it clear that it does not criminalize these good-faith conversations. Coercive conversion therapy should be banned, but we should leave politicization out and remember that we are dealing with real people with real vulnerabilities trying to make their way and needing help at a vulnerable time. We need to clarify, then proceed. The government should welcome the broadest possible support among Canadians for this legislation: nothing more, nothing less.
In fact, when the committee first heard from the Minister of Justice on this bill, the minister admitted, “I will focus on the bill's definition of conversion therapy, because there appears to be some persisting confusion about its scope.” I agree with the minister. There is persisting confusion, and the confusion is about its scope, confusion that we, as parliamentarians, have a duty to rectify.
André Schutten, legal counsel and director of law and policy at the Association for Reformed Political Action Canada, or ARPA, told the committee the definition is ambiguous, unclear and overbroad, and that it “captures helpful counselling and psychological support for children, teens, and adults”.
Colette Aikema explained to the committee that the counselling she received to help her cope with past traumas, including abuse and rape, would be criminalized by this definition of conversion therapy. Ms. Aikema told the committee that her voluntary therapy from a University of Lethbridge counsellor and a faith-based sex addiction group helped save both her marriage and her life. This was powerful testimony that should not be ignored.
We also heard from Timothy Keslick, a member of the 2SLGBTQ+ community, who fears that without further clarification, the therapy he relies on to help him navigate his same-sex relationships would be barred by the bill’s ban on treatment that “repress[es] or reduce[s] non-heterosexual attraction or sexual behaviours”.
Others also expressed the need to clarify the definition of conversion therapy in the bill—
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole aujourd'hui non pas pour débattre de la thérapie de conversion coercitive, mais plutôt pour parler de la façon avec laquelle nous interdisons cette pratique néfaste et dommageable. Je veux d'abord qu'une chose soit bien claire: je m'oppose aux tentatives de changer l'orientation sexuelle d'une personne de force. Je condamne cette pratique le plus vigoureusement possible. Elle n'a tout simplement pas sa place au Canada.
Ce qui a toutefois sa place au Canada, c'est la compassion. Au comité de la justice, dont je fais partie, nous avons entendu le témoignage de divers intervenants sur ce projet de loi, dont des survivants de la thérapie de conversion coercitive, des membres de la communauté 2SLGBTQ+, des dirigeants autochtones, des universitaires, des médecins, des avocats et des dirigeants religieux. Je remercie tous les témoins de leur contribution, surtout ceux qui ont eu la force et le courage de raconter leur expérience très personnelle. Il n'a sûrement pas été facile de le faire.
Il est évident pour moi, après avoir entendu ces témoins, lu d'innombrables mémoires et parlé à des dizaines d'habitants de ma circonscription, que l'adhésion à l'interdiction des pratiques coercitives de thérapie de conversion est très forte, et il doit en être ainsi. Cependant, comme c'est le cas pour toutes les mesures législatives, le libellé doit être clair. Il faut que les juges puissent interpréter et appliquer la loi telle qu'elle est écrite et que les Canadiens sachent ce qu'elle interdit et n'interdit pas, à savoir qui elle protège et qui elle ne protège pas. À ce sujet, j'ai entendu dire à maintes reprises que la définition de la thérapie de conversion contenue dans le projet de loi n'est pas claire et a une portée excessive, comme mon collègue vient de le dire, et que cela pourrait avoir des conséquences imprévues.
Les orateurs libéraux précédents disent que ceux qui ont un quelconque doute sont contre les communautés que nous essayons d'aider et que c'est la peur qui les fait parler, et c'est mal et préjudiciable. Le ministre de la Justice a déclaré que le projet de loi n'affecterait pas les conversations de bonne foi, c'est-à-dire des discussions bienveillantes et non coercitives, selon ce que je crois comprendre, avec des médecins, des parents, des conseillers, des chefs religieux ou d'autres personnes vers lesquels les Canadiens, jeunes et vieux, voudraient se tourner pour obtenir du soutien. Cependant, ce n'est pas ce que le projet de loi, tel qu'il est rédigé, prévoit. Pourquoi? Nous le savons tous, ce qui importe, en fait, ce n'est pas ce que le ministre dit que le projet de loi fera, mais plutôt ce que le projet de loi lui-même dit. C'est la loi. C'est ce que les juges appliqueront, de Victoria à St. John's.
Plusieurs témoins qui ont comparu devant le comité ont réclamé l'amendement du projet de loi pour clarifier sa définition et préciser qu'il ne criminalise pas ces conversations tenues de bonne foi. Il faut interdire les thérapies de conversion coercitives, mais nous devrions nous abstenir de politiser la question et ne pas oublier que nous avons affaire à de vraies personnes ayant de véritables vulnérabilités qui tentent de trouver leur voie et qui ont besoin d'aide à un moment où elles sont particulièrement vulnérables. Nous devons apporter cette clarification, puis aller de l'avant. Le gouvernement devrait jouir de l'appui le plus généralisé possible au sein de la population canadienne pour ce projet de loi: ni plus ni moins.
D'ailleurs, la première fois qu'il s'est adressé au comité au sujet de ce projet de loi, le ministre de la Justice l'a admis, disant: « Je vais m’attarder sur la définition que le projet de loi donne de la thérapie de conversion, car une certaine confusion semble persister quant à sa portée. » Je suis d'accord avec le ministre. Une confusion persiste, une confusion quant à sa portée, une confusion à laquelle nous, parlementaires, avons le devoir de remédier.
André Schutten, conseiller juridique et directeur du droit et des politiques de l'Association for Reformed Political Action Canada, a dit au comité que la définition est ambiguë, trop étendue et trop vague, et qu'elle « inclut des services de counseling et de soutien psychologique utiles pour les enfants, les adolescents et les adultes [..] ».
Colette Aikema a expliqué au comité que le counseling qu'elle a reçu pour l'aider à composer avec les traumatismes qu'elle a vécus, dont de mauvais traitements et le viol, serait criminalisé par cette définition de la thérapie de conversion. Mme Aikema a dit au comité que sa participation volontaire à une thérapie offerte par un conseiller de l'Université de Lethbridge et un groupe confessionnel d'aide aux sexomanes a contribué à sauver son mariage et sa vie. C'était un témoignage percutant dont il faut tenir compte.
Nous avons également entendu Timothy Keslick, un membre de la communauté LGBTQ2S+, qui craint que si l'on ne précise pas davantage la portée du projet de loi, la thérapie sur laquelle il compte pour l'aider à gérer ses relations homosexuelles soit interdite par le projet de loi, puisqu'il s'appliquerait aux traitements qui visent « à réprimer ou à réduire toute attirance ou tout comportement sexuel non hétérosexuels ».
D'autres ont également exprimé la nécessité de clarifier la définition que le projet de loi donne de la thérapie de conversion...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 11:00 [p.5737]
Expand
I apologize. I have to interrupt the member, who will have five minutes to complete her speech next time the bill comes to the floor.
Je m'excuse. Je dois interrompre la députée. Elle aura cinq minutes pour terminer son discours lorsque la Chambre sera de nouveau saisie du projet de loi.
Collapse
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, in the wee hours of October 3, 1974, a volunteer Moncton firefighter, Don MacFarlane, spotted a fire inside a home as he drove past. Off duty, without protective clothing, he entered the home multiple times to rescue a child and four adults. In one case, he dragged a man to safety through the smoke and fire while the victim was overcome.
I am sharing Mr. MacFarlane's remarkable story years later because he considered this all in a night's work and never told anyone except his wife. His bravery went unrecognized until research by the Moncton Fire Fighters Historical Society brought it to light. I was truly honoured last week to recognize Mr. MacFarlane's bravery in a special ceremony.
The people of Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe owe the Moncton Fire Fighters Historical Society a debt of gratitude for adding this incident to the historical record. We owe Don MacFarlane so much more. His selfless actions represent the best of what it means to be Canadian.
My thanks go to Mr. MacFarlane.
Madame la Présidente, aux petites heures du 3 octobre 1974, Don MacFarlane, un pompier volontaire de Moncton, a vu qu'un incendie avait débuté dans une maison alors qu'il circulait en voiture. Il n'était pas en service et n'avait pas d'équipement de protection avec lui, mais il est entré à plusieurs reprises dans la maison pour aller au secours d'un enfant et de quatre adultes. Il a même dû transporter un homme inconscient au travers de la fumée et du feu pour l'amener en sécurité.
Si je parle de la remarquable histoire vécue par M. MacFarlane des années plus tard, c'est que, pour lui, il s'agissait d'une soirée de travail comme les autres et il n'en a jamais parlé à personne, sauf à sa femme. Son courage n'a jamais été souligné jusqu'à ce que la société historique des pompiers de Moncton fasse des recherches et découvre l'affaire. Ce fut un véritable honneur pour moi la semaine dernière de reconnaître le courage de M. MacFarlane dans le cadre d'une cérémonie spéciale.
La population de Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe doit une fière chandelle à la société historique des pompiers de Moncton pour avoir ajouté cet incident aux documents historiques. Nous sommes encore plus redevables à Don MacFarlane. Ses actions altruistes représentent ce qu'il y a de meilleur en chaque Canadien.
Je remercie de tout cœur M. MacFarlane.
Collapse
View Lianne Rood Profile
CPC (ON)
View Lianne Rood Profile
2021-04-16 11:01 [p.5737]
Expand
Madam Speaker, main street is in trouble. Main street businesses in my riding of Lambton—Kent—Middlesex are hanging on by a thread and, sadly, many have gone under. Hair stylists, barbers, spas, fitness gyms are shuttered, again.
Like my colleagues on this side of the House, I have met many business owners who have gone above and beyond to do what was asked. They found ways to get products to shelves and to serve their customers safely. They helped their workforce adjust to the lockdowns. They kept as many on payroll as possible. Their resilience is truly inspiring, but their net revenues are not.
They gave me a message to bring to the House: “We cannot survive another lockdown. No more debts, no more handouts.” They just want the lockdowns to end. They want the government to—
Madame la Présidente, la rue principale est en difficulté. Les entreprises situées sur la rue principale de ma circonscription, Lambton-Kent-Middlesex, ne tiennent qu'à un fil et beaucoup ont malheureusement fait faillite. Des coiffeurs, des barbiers, des spas, des centres de conditionnement physique ont encore une fois fermé leurs portes.
À l'instar de mes collègues de ce côté-ci de la Chambre, j'ai rencontré de nombreux propriétaires d'entreprises qui se sont surpassés pour faire ce qui était demandé. Ils ont trouvé des moyens de mettre des produits sur les tablettes et de servir leurs clients en toute sécurité. Ils ont aidé leur personnel à s'adapter aux mesures de confinement. Ils ont continué à employer autant de personnes que possible. Leur résilience est vraiment inspirante, mais leurs revenus nets ne le sont pas.
Ils m'ont demandé de transmettre le message suivant à la Chambre: « Nous ne pouvons pas survivre à un autre confinement. Nous ne voulons plus de dettes ni de subventions ». Ils veulent juste que les confinements se terminent. Ils veulent que le gouvernement...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 11:02 [p.5738]
Expand
The hon. member for Vaudreuil—Soulanges.
Je cède la parole à l'honorable député de Vaudreuil—Soulanges.
Collapse
View Peter Schiefke Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Peter Schiefke Profile
2021-04-16 11:02 [p.5738]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as I enter my ninth year of remission following treatment for testicular cancer, I rise today to recognize the hard work of nurses and all frontline health care workers who continue to save lives during this health crisis.
Yesterday, as I walked through the halls of Montreal's Jewish General Hospital for my annual blood work and X-rays, the experience was understandably different, but one thing remained the same: the dedication and resolve of our nurses.
I strain to find the words to describe my gratitude to the nurses who cared for me and, indeed, care for us all, so I will try to sum up these heroes with one anecdote. As I was leaving the hospital yesterday, one of the nurses who treated me looked at her colleague and said, “Okay, see you tomorrow. I'm off to the clinic. It's vaccines time”, because in addition to working her shift, she was also giving her time delivering life-saving vaccines to us and those we love.
They are true heroes. On behalf of everyone in this House, I sincerely thank them for everything they do for us and for all Canadians.
Madame la Présidente, cette année, au moment où je commence ma neuvième année de rémission d'un cancer des testicules, je me lève aujourd'hui pour souligner le travail des infirmiers et des infirmières ainsi que des travailleurs de la santé de première ligne qui continuent de sauver des vies pendant cette crise sanitaire.
Hier, alors que je parcourais les couloirs de l'Hôpital général juif de Montréal pour mes analyses de sang et mes radiographies annuelles, l'expérience était naturellement différente. Cependant, une chose n'a pas changé: le dévouement et la détermination du personnel infirmier.
J'ai du mal à trouver les mots pour décrire ma gratitude envers les infirmières qui ont pris soin de moi et, en fait, de nous tous; je vais donc essayer d'illustrer leur héroïsme par une anecdote. Hier, alors que je quittais l'hôpital, l'une des infirmières qui m'ont soignée a regardé sa collègue et lui a dit: « Bon, à demain. Je vais à la clinique. C'est le temps des vaccins ». En plus de son travail, elle donnait de son temps pour nous administrer des vaccins vitaux et en administrer aux gens que nous aimons.
Ils sont des véritables héros. Au nom de la Chambre, je tiens à les remercier sincèrement du travail qu'ils font pour nous et pour tous les Canadiens.
Collapse
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
2021-04-16 11:03 [p.5738]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the pandemic has hit everybody hard, and small businesses are no exception. These are the businesses that drive employment and provide the real basis of our economy.
Last week, I hosted a virtual town hall meeting for Elmwood—Transcona small business owners. I heard from Gary, the owner of a company that provides trips for people with mobility challenges. He received the Canada emergency business account loan, but slow business means paying it off next year. It is completely unrealistic. Roger is a self-employed massage therapist whose business has been devastated by the pandemic. While CERB helped early on, rules for the new benefits disqualify him because he continues to earn some income.
While big banks benefited from huge gifts of liquidity and large firms were allowed to keep wage subsidy money while paying bonuses and dividends, small businesses continue to wait for word on whether they will get an extension on the CEBA or see income support that does not penalize them for making what money they can.
Once again, New Democrats are speaking up for the little guys when we say that small business owners deserve to know what support they can bank on in the years to come.
Madame la Présidente, la pandémie n'a épargné personne, et les petites entreprises n'y font pas exception. Les petites entreprises sont le moteur de l'emploi au pays et elles forment réellement la fondation de notre économie.
La semaine dernière, j'ai animé une assemblée publique qui regroupait les propriétaires de petites entreprises d'Elmwood—Transcona. J'ai entendu le témoignage de Gary, le propriétaire d'une entreprise qui offre des voyages à des personnes ayant une mobilité réduite. Il a reçu un prêt dans le cadre du Compte d'urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes, mais la baisse de son chiffre d'affaires signifie qu'il devra tout rembourser l'année prochaine. Ce n'est absolument pas réaliste. Roger est un massothérapeute à son compte et ses activités professionnelles ont été complètement chamboulées par la pandémie. Bien que la Prestation canadienne d'urgence l'ait aidé au tout début de la pandémie, les règles pour toucher les nouvelles prestations le pénalisent puisqu'il touche encore un certain revenu.
Pendant ce temps, les grandes banques reçoivent de gros cadeaux sous forme de liquidités et les grandes sociétés ont pu conserver l'argent des subventions salariales, ce qui leur a permis de verser des primes et des dividendes. Les petites entreprises, quant à elles, attendent toujours de savoir si elles pourront bénéficier d'une prolongation du Compte d'urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes ou si de nouvelles mesures d'aide seront créées pour éviter d'être pénalisées si elles génèrent un tant soit peu de recettes.
Une fois de plus, les néo-démocrates prennent la parole pour défendre les plus petits joueurs: les propriétaires des petites entreprises méritent de savoir sur quels appuis ils pourront compter dans les années à venir.
Collapse
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
2021-04-16 11:04 [p.5738]
Expand
Madam Speaker, we recognize that the most efficient way to reduce our emissions is to use price mechanisms. I know what colleagues are thinking: There goes the member for Kingston and the Island once again, railing on about the need to price pollution. Guess what, those are not my words. They are, in fact, words that come straight from the new Conservative climate plan. That is right: After five long years of criticizing and lashing out against the government's bold vision on recognizing that pollution should not be free, the Conservative Party has finally figured out this is the right way to go. However, we should not be fooled. As usual, the devil is in the details. Rather than encouraging folks to pollute less, the Conservative plan actually incentivizes them to use more fossil fuels. Yes, that is right. With their plan, the more one burns, the more one earns.
Leadership is not about waiting for public opinion to be on one's side. It is about doing something bold because one believes—
Madame la Présidente, nous reconnaissons que la façon la plus efficace de réduire nos émissions est d'utiliser des mécanismes de tarification. Je sais que les députés se disent « revoilà le député de Kingston et les Îles, qui raconte encore qu'il faut mettre un prix sur la pollution ». Eh bien vous savez quoi? Les paroles que j'ai citées au début n'étaient pas de moi. Elles sont tirées, en fait, du nouveau plan conservateur pour lutter contre le changement climatique. Eh oui: après avoir passé cinq ans à critiquer et à dénoncer la vision audacieuse du gouvernement selon laquelle polluer ne devrait pas être gratuit, le Parti conservateur a enfin compris que c'est la voie à suivre. Il ne faudrait toutefois pas se laisser prendre, car le diable est dans les détails, comme toujours. En effet, au lieu d'encourager les gens à polluer moins, le plan des conservateurs les incite à utiliser davantage de combustibles fossiles. Oui, vous avez bien compris: selon leur plan, plus on consomme de combustibles, plus on y gagne.
Le leadership, ce n'est pas d'attendre que l'opinion publique penche de notre côté. C'est plutôt de poser des gestes audacieux parce qu'on croit...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 11:05 [p.5738]
Expand
The hon. member for Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes.
Le député de Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands et Rideau Lakes a la parole.
Collapse
View Michael Barrett Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I am honoured to inform the House of some of the life-saving first responders we are blessed to have in Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes.
Paramedics Colin Anderson, Scott Speer, Hailey Ireland, Ted Maika, Dan Freeman, Stefan Marquis, Michelle Brown, Chris Scott, Tanya Sinclair and Sandra Ladd all received awards for resuscitating patients. Their coolness under pressure certainly will not be forgotten.
Brockville constables Dustin Gamble, Ross McCullough and Geoff Fearon, as well as sergeants Eric Ruigrok and Shawn Borgford, showed incredible heroism saving the lives of two of our citizens. Our community is grateful to these officers.
We also have a couple of long-time leaders who are retiring after 36 years and 46 years, respectively. Gananoque Police Chief Garry Hull and Leeds and the Thousand Islands Fire Chief Rick Lawson will be stepping aside to enjoy retirement.
This is but a sample of the amazing work that first responders and telecommunicators do for us. They are our friends, our neighbours, and because of their commitment—
Madame la Présidente, j'ai l'honneur de saluer aujourd'hui quelques-uns des extraordinaires premiers intervenants sur lesquels la circonscription de Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands et Rideau Lakes a le bonheur de pouvoir compter.
Les ambulanciers paramédicaux Colin Anderson, Scott Speer, Hailey Ireland, Ted Maika, Dan Freeman, Stefan Marquis, Michelle Brown, Chris Scott, Tanya Sinclair et Sandra Ladd ont tous été récompensés pour avoir réanimé un patient. Leur sang-froid, même sous la pression, ne tombera certainement pas dans l'oubli.
Les agents Dustin Gamble, Ross McCullough et Geoff Fearon, de même que les sergents Eric Ruigrok et Shawn Borgford, de Brockville, ont fait preuve d'un héroïsme sublime en sauvant la vie de deux personnes. Toute la collectivité leur est reconnaissante.
Je salue également deux vétérans remarquables qui prendront leur retraite après respectivement 36 et 46 ans de service: Garry Hull, chef du Service de police de Gananoque, et Rick Lawson, chef du Service des incendies de Thousand Islands.
Ce n'est qu'un minuscule échantillon du travail exceptionnel que font les premiers intervenants et les agents des télécommunications pour le bien de la collectivité. Ce sont nos amis, nos voisins, et grâce à leur dévouement...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-04-16 11:07 [p.5739]
Expand
The hon. member for Mississauga—Erin Mills.
La députée de Mississauga—Erin Mills a la parole.
Collapse
View Iqra Khalid Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Iqra Khalid Profile
2021-04-16 11:07 [p.5739]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I join Muslims in my riding, across Canada and the world in observing the month of Ramadan.
As we fast from sunrise until sunset, and yes, even from water, Muslim Canadians will again this year have Iftars at our homes, isolated from others, missing out on gatherings with loved ones and praying at mosques.
Ramadan is a time to do our part to help those most in need, and I am thinking of community organizations like the Naseeha mental health helpline, which supports mental health for young people.
As Muslim Canadians do their part in supporting community, I am proud to be part of a government that stands shoulder to shoulder with Muslim Canadians to call out and take action against hatred in all its forms, including calling out Islamophobia by its name and proclaiming January 29 as a national day of remembrance of the Quebec City mosque attack and action against Islamophobia.
Our Canadian mosaic is a resilient one. Ramadan Mubarak.
Madame la Présidente, je me joins aux musulmans de ma circonscription, du Canada et du monde entier pour observer le ramadan ce mois-ci.
Alors que nous jeûnons du lever au coucher du soleil — et en effet, nous ne buvons pas d'eau non plus —, les Canadiens musulmans prendront encore cette année leurs iftars chez eux, isolés des autres, parce qu'ils ne peuvent pas se rassembler avec leurs proches ni prier dans une mosquée.
Le ramadan est l'occasion de venir en aide à ceux qui en ont le plus besoin, et je pense aux organismes communautaires comme le service téléphonique d’aide en santé mentale Naseeha, qui offre des services de santé mentale aux jeunes.
Les Canadiens musulmans s'efforcent d'appuyer la collectivité, et je suis fière de faire partie d'un gouvernement qui collabore avec eux pour dénoncer la haine sous toutes ses formes et agir contre elle, notamment en appelant l'islamophobie par son nom et en faisant du 29 janvier une journée nationale de commémoration de l'attentat à la mosquée de Québec et de lutte contre l'islamophobie.
La mosaïque canadienne est résiliente. Ramadan Mubarak.
Collapse
View Lenore Zann Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Lenore Zann Profile
2021-04-16 11:08 [p.5739]
Expand
Madam Speaker, one year ago, on the morning of Sunday, April 19, we the citizens of Cumberland—Colchester, awoke to discover a devastating tragedy had ripped through our normally tranquil corner of the world.
Words cannot express my sorrow for the families and friends who lost loved ones and the RCMP who lost a beloved colleague here in the line of duty. I thank all first responders who risked their own lives trying to save others.
We are Nova Scotians. When we continue to support one another with kindness and generosity, we prove that love wins the day and that violence does not and will never define us.
Madame la Présidente, il y a un an, le matin du dimanche 19 avril, nous, les habitants de Cumberland—Colchester, avons découvert l'horrible tragédie qui venait de frapper notre coin du monde habituellement tranquille.
J'ai peine à exprimer le chagrin que j'éprouve pour les familles et les amis qui ont perdu un proche et pour la GRC, qui a perdu une précieuse collègue dans l'exercice de ses fonctions. Je remercie tous les premiers intervenants qui ont risqué leur vie pour tenter de sauver celle d'autres personnes.
Nous sommes des Néo-Écossais. Quand nous continuons à nous entraider en faisant preuve de bonté et de générosité, nous prouvons que l'amour l'emporte et que la violence ne nous définit pas et ne nous définira jamais.
Collapse
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
2021-04-16 11:09 [p.5739]
Expand
Madam Speaker, April is Parkinson's Awareness Month, and this past week our community came together to honour one of our local residents by proclaiming April 11 as Steve Ludzik Parkinson's awareness day in the city of Niagara Falls.
Steve arrived in Niagara in 1978 to pursue a hockey career, playing Junior A for the Niagara Falls Flyers. He successfully realized his childhood dream by playing professionally in the National Hockey League, and later went on to become a professional hockey coach and broadcaster.
Steve is known for his incredible and selfless contributions made through the creation of his Steve Ludzik Foundation and the establishment of the Steve Ludzik Centre for Parkinson's Rehab at Hotel Dieu Shaver hospital in St. Catharines.
Diagnosed with Parkinson's himself, Steve's work and efforts have made a significant difference in the lives of so many people across Niagara. The motto of Steve's life and fight against Parkinson's is to remain “Ludzy Strong”.
Steve Ludzik is not only a friend to many; he is an inspiration to us all.
Madame la Présidente, avril est le Mois de la sensibilisation à la maladie de Parkinson. Cette semaine, notre collectivité s'est réunie pour rendre hommage à l'un de ses résidants en faisant du 11 avril la journée Steve Ludzik à Niagara Falls afin de sensibiliser les gens à la maladie de Parkinson.
Steve est arrivé dans la région de Niagara en 1978 pour poursuivre une carrière de joueur de hockey dans la catégorie junior A pour les Flyers de Niagara Falls. Il a réalisé son rêve d'enfant en jouant au niveau professionnel dans la Ligue nationale de hockey. Il est ensuite devenu entraîneur et commentateur de hockey professionnel.
Steve est connu pour les contributions incroyables et généreuses qu'il a apportées en créant la Fondation Steve Ludzik et en mettant sur pied le Centre de réadaptation Steve Ludzik pour la maladie de Parkinson à l'Hôtel Dieu Shaver à St. Catharines.
Atteint lui-même de la maladie de Parkinson, Steve a amélioré considérablement la vie de nombreuses personnes dans la région de Niagara grâce à son travail et ses efforts. Lorsqu'on pense à la vie de Steve et à son combat contre la maladie de Parkinson, on pense à « Ludzy Strong ».
Pour beaucoup de gens, Steve Ludzik n'est pas seulement un ami, il est une inspiration.
Collapse
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
2021-04-16 11:10 [p.5739]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I rise today to bring the attention of this House to a painful disorder called endometriosis.
Endometriosis is a gynecological condition that causes severe pain, inflammation, fatigue and infertility. It impacts one in 10 women, as well as transgender and non-binary persons. Despite its prevalence, many women experience long delays to diagnosis.
Our government has provided funding through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to better understand the causes of endometriosis and to enhance science around prevention, diagnosis and treatment.
According to statistics, diseases that mainly affect women receive less research funding and are often under-diagnosed, which means that women are sometimes left to suffer for years without validation or treatment.
We need to do more for all those who are suffering and give them hope for a pain-free future.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour attirer l'attention de la Chambre sur l'endométriose, une maladie douloureuse.
L'endométriose est une condition gynécologique qui cause de fortes douleurs, des inflammations, de la fatigue et l'infertilité. Elle touche une femme sur 10 ainsi que les personnes transgenres et non binaires. Malgré sa prévalence, de nombreuses femmes doivent attendre longtemps avant d'obtenir un diagnostic.
Par l'entremise des Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, le gouvernement a fait des investissements afin de mieux comprendre les causes de l'endométriose et améliorer les connaissances scientifiques en matière de prévention, de diagnostic et de traitement.
Nous savons, selon les statistiques, que les maladies qui touchent principalement les femmes reçoivent moins de fonds pour la recherche et sont souvent sous-diagnostiquées, laissant parfois les femmes souffrir pendant des années, sans validation ni traitement.
Nous devons faire plus pour tous ceux qui souffrent et leur donner l'espoir d'un avenir sans douleur.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 60 of 25633 | Page: 1 of 428

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data