Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 30 of 30956
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2021-05-10 11:02 [p.6929]
Expand
moved that Bill C-269, An Act to amend the Fisheries Act (prohibition — deposit of raw sewage), be read the second time and referred to a committee.
He said: Mr. Speaker, it is an honour for me to rise today to introduce my third private member's bill as the member of Parliament for Regina—Qu'Appelle.
The environment, like so many issues, is a subject on which the Liberals are all talk and no real substance. This Prime Minister has become world famous for this. In 2015, he ran on a very thin environmental platform. It was just a few paragraphs long with very few details and no modelling or costing, and was, of course, centred around a carbon tax. We now know that the carbon tax is not revenue neutral and is not actually working. Emissions pre-pandemic went up every year the government was in office.
It is not just on greenhouse gas emissions that the government has failed. The environment goes far beyond climate change. That is why in the last election, the Conservatives ran on a platform that included real action on a whole host of issues, including a very important plank that focused on cleaning up our lakes and rivers.
What do I mean by that? When it comes to the environment, the very first thing the Prime Minister did after taking office was to grant permission to the City of Montreal to dump billions of litres of raw sewage into the St. Lawrence River. The hypocrisy was astounding. The Prime Minister was very successful at portraying himself as someone who was serious about the environment. However, at the very first opportunity, he literally flushed that down the toilet by allowing Montreal, instead of treating that waste water and protecting our precious natural environment, to dump it, untreated and full of all the dangerous substances that were contained within it, into a vital water artery. The current infrastructure minister was the environment minister at the time, and she was directly involved in granting that permission as well. While she was trying to create the illusion that she was some kind of real-life captain planet, she was signing off on one of the biggest dumps of raw sewage in Canadian history.
That is a bit of background on why I have brought forward this bill today. This is a very simple bill, and I probably do not even need my full 15 minutes today to explain it and to talk about the details of it.
Under current legislation, there are various regulatory frameworks and laws that protect our water systems and fish habitat. My bill would amend the Fisheries Act to define raw sewage as what is called, under the act, a deleterious substance. Basically, any kind of substance that would harm fish habitats is prohibited from being emitted into our waterways. Given the background I have just gone over, that legislation also empowers the government to grant exemptions to authorize or issue permits, so to speak, to municipalities that need to emit those types of substances into our rivers, lakes and oceans.
My bill does things. First, it defines raw sewage as a certain type of deleterious substance. Second, it would amend the section that authorizes the government to issue these kinds of permissions and would exclude raw sewage from the list of exemptions. In essence, that means future governments would not be allowed to grant that permission. The bill is basically saying that of all the substances that one municipality or another may seek approval for, untreated waste water would not be allowed to be emitted.
It is a very simple fix. It is a very short bill, and it is very straightforward. I am hoping I can get all parties to support it, especially members of the Liberal Party in the back benches, who are probably frustrated at their own party's record on the environment.
We just have to look at a few examples where the Prime Minister has been all talk and no action. Do they remember the famous billion trees promise in the last election? Here we are, over a year and a half from the 2019 election, and not a single tree has been planted. I know that members of Parliament who come from municipalities where towns and cities have been forced, or feel like they have no choice, to emit these types of substances into the waterways are frustrated not only that municipalities are being allowed to do it but that the federal government has not been responding to the infrastructure needs of those communities. That is something else I would like to talk about for a few moments here.
I recognize that many towns and cities are dealing with an incredible challenge when it comes to their existing infrastructure needs. This new bill would obviously impose a requirement that municipalities have the capacity to deal with unexpected events, whether it is a weather event that adds a tremendous amount of unexpected water flowing through the system or aging and decaying infrastructure that needs to be replaced. This bill, by preventing future dumps of untreated waste water into our water systems, would impose a burden on municipalities.
We have done two things with the bill: One thing is in the bill and one is a future commitment. I have written in a five-year coming-into-force date. That means once the bill receives royal assent, towns and cities across the country would have five years to plan, invest and upgrade their water systems. This timeline is long enough that they would have time to do the necessary work, and is short enough that we can take real action on protecting the environment in the here and now, not just punt the ball years and years down the field.
There is a recent media report indicating that the current environment minister has given a 20-year timeline to municipalities before they even start talking about ending this practice. Of course, a lot of damage can be done to our natural environment in 20 years. That is why the five-year timeline that I have suggested in this bill is much more realistic and effective.
I probably do not need to go into a tremendous amount of detail as to why this bill is necessary and why it is necessary that we stop the practice of dumping untreated water into our water systems. I could cite numerous studies in which scientists and researchers have studied the impact on fish habitat, the depletion of stocks and the types of dangerous trace elements that have been discovered in fish whose habitat is near where the water is emitted.
This happens all across Canada; it is not just unique to the city of Montreal. There was a study done in Toronto in 2018 by an advocacy group called Swim Drink Fish. It had this to say about the state of Toronto waste water back in 2018: Regardless of rainfall, “there isn’t a day that we’ve gone to the harbour that we haven’t been able to find some evidence of sewage contamination.” Also, there were instances in Vancouver in 2016 where over 45 million cubic metres of raw sewage was leaked or otherwise dumped into nearby waterways.
We can all appreciate the importance of protecting our fish habitat. Canadians love our natural environment. It is part of our culture, part of our history and part of our social fabric. Taking all my kids fishing whenever I get the chance is something we really enjoy as a family. My daughters are probably better than I am and my two boys are asking for fishing gear for Christmas and birthdays.
I am very fortunate to represent the Qu'Appelle lakes in my riding, a wonderful area in the Qu'Appelle Valley, but unfortunately in recent years, incidents in Regina have led to the emission of waste water into the Qu'Appelle system. That has had a negative effect on the water quality in the Qu'Appelle Valley. Some of the best moments I have had with my family have been from taking the them to the Qu'Appelle lakes and going out for the day fishing.
I do not need to tell members who represent coastal communities how important the fishing industry is economically and culturally for indigenous populations as well. I missed out on having the benefits of being taken salmon fishing in British Columbia. The timing just did not work out, but of course my British Columbia colleagues in the Conservative caucus are passionate advocates for doing more to protect fish habitat and helping the stocks throughout British Columbia grow again. We all know the importance that the salmon fishing industry has recreationally, for tourism and of course commercially.
The same is true in literally every corner of the country. The ability to fish for fun, for sport, for food or for our livelihoods is incredibly important for all Canadians in every single province and every single community. It is something the government promised to take action on, but like so many promises during the last election, it has completely failed to do it. That is why this private member's bill is necessary.
I am proud to have the support of my Conservative colleagues. This is one more concrete example of where Conservatives take real, tangible and achievable action on the environment. If members look back throughout the history of our party, they will see John Diefenbaker's work on establishing parks and the amount of work the previous Conservative government put into the Clean Air Act, which is legislation that put in meaningful reduction targets. We can also look at the Conservative government in the 1980s, under former prime minister Mulroney, and its work on the acid rain issues. In all the work that Conservative governments have done, we take real, practical action on the environment.
The Liberals say a lot of things during elections, but when they have the opportunity to act, they never seem to do so. That is why this bill is necessary, and I am hoping that all parties will give it quick passage so that it can get to committee and we can take real action on protecting our rivers, lakes and oceans.
propose que le projet de loi C-269, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les pêches (interdiction — immersion ou rejet des eaux usées non traitées), soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
— Monsieur le Président, c'est pour moi un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre pour présenter mon troisième projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire à titre de député de Regina—Qu'Appelle.
L'environnement fait partie des nombreux enjeux à propos desquels les libéraux font de beaux discours sans poser de geste concret. Cette caractéristique du premier ministre est même connue dans le monde entier. Pendant la campagne de 2015, l'environnement était à peine mentionné dans sa plateforme. Il n'y consacrait que quelques paragraphes peu détaillés, sans modèles et sans évaluation de coûts, et qui portaient surtout, évidemment, sur la taxe sur le carbone. On sait maintenant que cette taxe est inefficace et a une incidence sur les recettes fiscales. Entre l'arrivée au pouvoir du gouvernement et le début de la pandémie, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre ont augmenté chaque année.
L'échec du gouvernement ne concerne pas seulement les émissions. Les changements climatiques ne sont pas le seul enjeu environnemental, loin de là. C'est pourquoi pendant la dernière campagne électorale, la plateforme des conservateurs proposait des gestes concrets dans une multitude de domaines, notamment un plan très important axé sur le nettoyage des lacs et des rivières du pays.
Qu'est-ce que j'entends par là? La toute première mesure en matière d'environnement que le premier ministre a prise après son entrée en fonction a été d'accorder à la Ville de Montréal la permission de déverser des milliards de litres d'eaux usées brutes dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent. Voilà qui était très hypocrite de la part d'un premier ministre qui se dit sérieux dans le dossier de l'environnement. À la toute première occasion, plutôt que de traiter les eaux usées et de protéger notre précieux environnement naturel comme il aurait dû le faire, il a permis à la Ville de Montréal de déverser ses eaux usées et toutes les substances dangereuses qu'elles contenaient dans un cours d'eau essentiel. La ministre de l'Infrastructure actuelle était ministre de l'Environnement à l'époque, et elle a participé directement à l'octroi de cette permission. Pendant qu'elle essayait de créer l'illusion qu'elle était une sorte de Capitaine Planète, elle approuvait l'un des plus grands déversements d'eaux usées brutes de l'histoire du Canada.
Voilà qui explique un peu pourquoi j'ai présenté le projet de loi aujourd'hui. Il s'agit d'un projet de loi très simple, et je n'ai probablement même pas besoin de la totalité de mon temps de parole pour l'expliquer en détail.
Il existe actuellement divers cadres réglementaires et lois qui protègent les cours d'eau et l'habitat du poisson. Mon projet de loi modifierait la Loi sur les pêches afin d'exclure les eaux usées non traitées de la définition de substance nocive qu'elle contient. Il est essentiellement interdit de rejeter dans les cours d'eau toute substance qui pourrait nuire à l'habitat du poisson. Compte tenu du contexte que je viens de donner, la Loi donne aussi au gouvernement le pouvoir d'accorder des exemptions ou de délivrer des permis, pour ainsi dire, afin d'autoriser, au besoin, les municipalités à rejeter ce genre de substances dans les rivières, les lacs et les océans.
Mon projet de loi prévoit certaines mesures. Primo, il définit les eaux usées non traitées comme un certain type de substance nocive. Secundo, il modifierait l'article qui permet au gouvernement d'accorder ce genre d'autorisations et il exclurait les eaux usées non traitées de la liste d'exemptions. Ainsi, les prochains gouvernements ne pourraient donc pas accorder de telles autorisations. Le projet de loi prévoit essentiellement que les eaux usées non traitées ne feront plus partie des substances que les municipalités seront autorisées à rejeter en vertu d'une autorisation.
Voilà une solution facile à appliquer. Ce projet de loi est très court, tout en étant très explicite. J'espère que les députés de tous les partis l'appuieront, surtout les députés libéraux d'arrière-ban, qui sont probablement frustrés à la vue du bilan environnemental de leur parti.
Je peux vous donner quelques exemples où le premier ministre n'a pas donné suite à ses belles paroles. Se souviennent-ils de la fameuse promesse aux dernières élections de planter un milliard d'arbres? Cela se passait en 2019 et, plus d'un an et demi après la fermeture des bureaux de vote, pas un seul arbre n'a été planté. Je sais que les députés qui viennent de régions où des municipalités, petites et grandes, ont été forcées — ou ont senti qu'elles n'avaient pas d'autre choix — de déverser ce type de substances dans les cours d'eau sont frustrés, et ce, non seulement parce que les municipalités ont eu l'autorisation de le faire, mais aussi parce que le gouvernement fédéral n'a pas répondu à leurs besoins en infrastructures. Il s'agit d'un autre sujet dont j'aimerais parler pendant quelques instants.
Je sais que beaucoup de villes ont des besoins en infrastructures criants. Ce nouveau projet de loi exigerait que les municipalités aient la capacité de faire face à des événements imprévus, qu'il s'agisse d'une pluie abondante, qui ajoute une énorme quantité d'eau dans le réseau, ou d'un bris dans une infrastructure vieillissante qui nécessite un remplacement. Dans cette optique, le projet de loi, qui préviendrait les déversements d'eaux usées non traitées dans les réseaux d'aqueduc, imposerait un fardeau aux municipalités.
Nous faisons deux choses avec ce projet de loi: la première se retrouve dans le projet de loi lui-même, et la deuxième constitue un engagement pour l'avenir. J'ai inscrit une date d'entrée en vigueur qui se situe dans cinq ans. Autrement dit, une fois que le projet de loi aura reçu la sanction royale, les villes de partout au pays disposeront de cinq ans pour planifier, trouver l'argent nécessaire et mettre à niveau leur réseau d'égout. Cet échéancier leur laisse assez de temps pour réaliser les travaux nécessaires, mais il est aussi assez court pour que des mesures concrètes de protection de l'environnement commencent à être prises dès maintenant, plutôt que de les reporter à plus tard, dans plusieurs années.
Selon un reportage diffusé récemment, les municipalités se sont fait accorder un délai de 20 ans par l'actuel ministre de l'Environnement avant de devoir commencer à envisager de mettre fin à la pratique que nous souhaitons abolir. Évidemment, on peut causer beaucoup de dommage à l'environnement en 20 ans. C'est pourquoi un délai de cinq ans, comme je le propose dans le projet de loi, est beaucoup plus réaliste et efficace.
Je n'ai probablement pas besoin d'expliquer en long et en large pourquoi le projet de loi est nécessaire et pourquoi il faut mettre fin au déversement des eaux usées non traitées dans les systèmes hydrographiques. Je pourrais citer de nombreuses études où des scientifiques et des chercheurs ont examiné l'incidence des eaux non traitées sur l'habitat du poisson, l'épuisement des stocks et les traces d'éléments dangereux qui ont été découvertes dans les poissons dont l'habitat se trouve près d'un endroit où l'eau est déversée.
Cela se produit un peu partout au Canada, et pas seulement à Montréal. Une étude a été menée à Toronto en 2018 par un groupe de défense appelé Swim Drink Fish, qui a déclaré ce qui suit à propos de l'état des eaux usées à Toronto en 2018: « chaque fois que nous nous sommes rendus au port, nous avons constaté que les eaux étaient contaminées par les eaux usées », et ce, qu'il y ait eu ou non des précipitations. En outre, à Vancouver, en 2016, plus de 45 millions de mètres cubes d'eaux usées non traitées ont coulé ou ont été déversés dans les cours d'eau environnants.
Nous savons tous combien il est important de protéger l'habitat des poissons. Les Canadiens aiment la nature, qui fait partie intégrante de notre culture, de notre histoire et de notre tissu social. Ma femme et moi aimons vraiment partir à la pêche en famille, avec tous nos enfants, chaque fois que j'en ai la possibilité. Mes filles sont probablement meilleures à la pêche que moi, et mes fils demandent du matériel de pêche à Noël et pour leurs anniversaires.
J'ai beaucoup de chance de représenter les lacs Qu'Appelle dans la merveilleuse vallée de la rivière Qu'Appelle, dans ma circonscription. Malheureusement, il y a quelques années, à Regina, des rejets d'eaux usées dans le bassin hydrographique de la rivière Qu'Appelle ont eu des conséquences sur la qualité de l'eau dans cette vallée. Les journées de pêche que j'ai passées avec ma famille aux lacs Qu'Appelle figurent parmi les meilleurs moments de ma vie familiale.
Je n'ai pas besoin de dire aux députés qui représentent des communautés côtières combien l'industrie de la pêche est importante, économiquement et culturellement, pour les populations autochtones également. J'ai raté l'occasion qui m'était offerte d'aller à la pêche au saumon en Colombie-Britannique. Le moment ne s'y prêtait tout simplement pas, mais bien sûr, mes collègues de la Colombie-Britannique au sein du caucus conservateur veulent absolument en faire plus pour protéger l'habitat du poisson et favoriser la reconstitution des stocks en Colombie-Britannique. Nous connaissons tous l'importance de l'industrie de la pêche au saumon dans le secteur des loisirs, du tourisme et du commerce.
On peut en dire autant pour le reste du pays. Qu'elle soit récréative, sportive, alimentaire ou professionnelle, la pêche est extrêmement importante pour les Canadiens de toutes les provinces et de toutes les régions. Le gouvernement avait d'ailleurs promis de bouger dans ce dossier, mais comme pour de nombreuses promesses faites pendant la plus récente campagne, il a encore une fois manqué à sa parole. Voilà ce qui rend ce projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire aussi important.
Je suis fier de pouvoir compter sur l'appui de mes collègues conservateurs, car cela montre encore une fois que les conservateurs agissent de manière concrète, tangible et réaliste dans le dossier de l'environnement. Notre bilan se passe d'ailleurs de commentaires: déjà à son époque, le conservateur John Diefenbaker s'est employé à créer des parcs; de son côté, le dernier gouvernement conservateur a consacré énormément d'énergie à l'adoption de la Loi sur la qualité de l'air, d'où proviennent les cibles ambitieuses de réduction des gaz à effet de serre que nous avons présentement. On peut aussi penser au gouvernement conservateur du premier ministre Mulroney, dans les années 1980, et à ses réalisations concernant les pluies acides. Chaque fois, les gouvernements conservateurs ont privilégié les mesures concrètes, pratiques et tangibles dans le dossier de l'environnement.
Les libéraux promettent toutes sortes de choses quand ils sont en campagne, mais dès que vient le temps d'agir, ils sont aux abonnés absents. Voilà pourquoi nous avons besoin de ce projet de loi, et j'espère que tous les partis uniront leurs voix pour le renvoyer sans tarder au comité, car nous pourrons alors protéger concrètement les rivières, les lacs et les océans du pays.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2021-05-10 11:13 [p.6930]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am wondering if the former leader of the Conservative Party has any regrets over Stephen Harper's investments in infrastructure for cleaning up the waterways. This government has done more in five years to invest in infrastructure for cleaner water than Harper did in twice that period of time. Maybe the member could provide some thoughts on that.
Also, as the member criticizes the Liberals on the environment, maybe the former leader of the Conservative Party can explain why he campaigned, literally and adamantly, against the price on pollution when today we see the new leader with a new position. Can he provide his thoughts on the new leader of the Conservative Party's position on the price on pollution?
Madame la Présidente, j'aimerais savoir si l'ancien chef du Parti conservateur a des regrets concernant les investissements effectués par Stephen Harper dans l'infrastructure pour l'assainissement des cours d'eau, car en cinq ans, le gouvernement actuel a fait plus à ce chapitre que ne l'a fait le gouvernement Harper en une période deux fois plus longue. J'aimerais savoir ce qu'en pense le député.
En outre, puisqu'il fait des reproches aux libéraux en matière d'environnement, l'ancien chef du Parti conservateur pourrait peut-être expliquer pourquoi il a fait campagne, littéralement et farouchement, contre la tarification de la pollution alors que, aujourd'hui, nous constatons que le nouveau chef de son parti adopte une nouvelle position à cet égard. Que pense le député de la position du nouveau chef du Parti conservateur à l'égard de la tarification de la pollution?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2021-05-10 11:14 [p.6931]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, on the first point, the parliamentary secretary could not be more wrong. We have had testimony on this at committee, with the Auditor General just slamming the government's record on infrastructure. The infrastructure department under the Prime Minister has absolutely no ability to track the effectiveness of its own programs. We have heard from mayors across this country that they are being told their projects are not eligible for funding because they do not fit into the narrow boxes that the government has defined. The Parliamentary Budget Officer has been extremely critical as well.
The most important thing, perhaps, is the fact that the government has lapsed more than $8 billion in infrastructure programs. This means there are municipalities out there that have put in applications and are being told no, or their applications have been sitting on a desk and the money does not get spent.
A Conservative government would deliver real action on infrastructure and take the important step to ban the—
Monsieur le Président, par rapport à la première partie de la réponse, le secrétaire parlementaire ne saurait dire plus faux. Le comité a entendu des témoignages à ce sujet. La vérificatrice générale a vertement critiqué le bilan du gouvernement en matière d'infrastructure. Sous la direction du premier ministre, le ministère de l'Infrastructure est absolument incapable de mesurer l'efficacité de ses propres programmes. Des maires de partout au pays se font dire que leurs projets ne sont pas admissibles à du financement parce qu'ils ne correspondent pas aux critères limitatifs définis par le gouvernement. Le directeur parlementaire du budget n'y va pas de main morte non plus dans sa critique du gouvernement.
Le pire est sans doute le fait que le gouvernement a laissé plus de 8 milliards de dollars inutilisés dans ses programmes d'infrastructure. Cela signifie que, tandis que des municipalités voient leur demande rejetée ou attendent désespérément son traitement, l'argent n'est pas dépensé.
Un gouvernement conservateur prendrait des mesures concrètes qui donneraient des résultats concrets en matière d'infrastructure et, chose importante, il interdirait...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-05-10 11:15 [p.6931]
Expand
Questions and comments, the hon. member for Repentigny.
Nous reprenons les questions et observations. La députée de Repentigny a la parole.
Collapse
View Monique Pauzé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Monique Pauzé Profile
2021-05-10 11:15 [p.6931]
Expand
Madam Speaker, everyone knows that water is important, that water is life. However, the bill does not prohibit the dumping of pesticides, petroleum products, chemicals or insecticides.
How can my colleague tell me that, in order to improve the health of our waterways, we should continue to allow the dumping of these products but prevent the dumping of untreated waste water?
Madame la Présidente, chacun sait que l'eau, c'est important, c'est la vie. Par contre, le projet de loi n'interdirait pas le déversement des pesticides, des produits pétroliers, des produits chimiques et des insecticides.
Comment mon collègue peut-il me convaincre que, pour améliorer la santé des cours d'eau, il faudrait continuer de permettre le déversement de ces produits et empêcher ceux des eaux usées?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2021-05-10 11:16 [p.6931]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for her question.
Obviously, there are other things in the law that the government could do something about. I decided to focus on one specific issue in this bill.
It makes sense to focus on one specific issue, and the government can do things hand in hand. We can ban the practice of dumping untreated waste water, but at the same time, a Conservative government would commit to making the necessary upgrades for municipalities, focusing on the important infrastructure.
The current government categorizes many things as infrastructure that have never been categorized that way before. Money is not flowing to the much-needed improvements in these types of water systems, and that is why I focused on one particular issue.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue de sa question.
C'est évident qu'il y a d'autres choses dans la loi que le gouvernement peut autoriser. J'ai décidé de cibler un seul enjeu dans ce projet de loi.
Il est logique de se concentrer sur un aspect en particulier, et le gouvernement peut prendre plusieurs mesures à la fois. Nous pouvons interdire l'immersion ou le rejet des eaux usées non traitées, mais un gouvernement conservateur s'engagerait aussi à apporter les améliorations nécessaires pour les municipalités, en se concentrant sur les infrastructures cruciales.
Le gouvernement actuel classe beaucoup de choses comme des infrastructures, alors qu'elles n'ont jamais été considérées comme telles. L'argent n'est pas versé pour financer les améliorations fort nécessaires aux réseaux de ce type, et c'est pourquoi je me concentre sur un aspect en particulier.
Collapse
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2021-05-10 11:17 [p.6931]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I think we can all agree that every community across the country wants to have state-of-the-art waste-water treatment systems. However, they desperately need a federal partner to help them get there.
The bill has a lot of implications for municipalities, commercial fishers and boaters. What would the member say to the small, rural and remote communities, from Vancouver Island to Newfoundland, that simply cannot afford new waste-water systems, or the commercial fishers who could be punished under the terms of the bill? Can the member commit that the Conservative Party would support filling all the gaps for communities that cannot afford to implement waste-water treatment systems and would support the timing of that?
Madame la Présidente, je pense que nous pouvons tous convenir que toutes les collectivités du pays aimeraient avoir des systèmes de traitement des eaux usées à la fine pointe de la technologie. Cependant, elles ont désespérément besoin d'un partenaire fédéral pour y arriver.
Le projet de loi a de nombreuses répercussions pour les municipalités, les pêcheurs commerciaux et les plaisanciers. Que dirait le député aux petites localités éloignées et rurales, de l'île de Vancouver à Terre-Neuve, qui n'ont tout simplement pas les moyens d'installer un nouveau système de traitement des eaux usées, ou aux pêcheurs commerciaux qui pourraient être punis selon les dispositions du projet de loi? Le député peut-il nous assurer que le Parti conservateur serait en faveur d'aider pleinement les collectivités qui ne peuvent pas se permettre de mettre en place un système de traitement des eaux usées et de leur accorder le temps nécessaire pour le faire?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2021-05-10 11:18 [p.6931]
Expand
Madam Speaker, that is a very important question. Obviously, this will require partnership, but it is important to do. We cannot use the different excuses of the lack of coordination between different governments as an excuse to continue this harmful environmental practice. I would say that absolutely a Conservative government will commit to being that partner at the table.
We can look at where this government has lapsed money: $8 billion lapsed in the first year of the government's infrastructure program alone; $35 billion to an infrastructure bank that has completed nothing; $250 million to the Asian Infrastructure Bank. The government has put a lot of money out there into infrastructure that is not going to address the needs of Canadians and Canadian municipalities.
That is what a Conservative government will do. We will be that partner.
Madame la Présidente, il s'agit là d'une question fort importante. De toute évidence, une telle initiative nécessite un partenariat, mais nous nous devons de la prendre. Nous ne pouvons pas nous servir de l'absence de coordination entre les divers ordres de gouvernement comme excuse pour poursuivre cette pratique environnementale nuisible. Je dirais qu'un gouvernement conservateur s'engagerait fermement à être ce partenaire fédéral.
Nous pouvons examiner d'où viennent les fonds inutilisés par le gouvernement actuel: 8 milliards de dollars affectés à la première année du programme d'infrastructure du gouvernement n'ont pas été dépensés, 35 milliards de dollars ont été injectés dans une banque de l'infrastructure qui n'a réalisé aucun projet, et 250 millions de dollars ont été consacrés à la Banque asiatique d'investissement dans les infrastructures. Le gouvernement a investi beaucoup d'argent dans des infrastructures qui ne répondront pas aux besoins de la population et des municipalités canadiennes.
Un gouvernement conservateur répondrait à ces besoins et serait le partenaire recherché.
Collapse
View Francis Scarpaleggia Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Francis Scarpaleggia Profile
2021-05-10 11:18 [p.6931]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would like to begin with a few questions, especially about Conservatives taking real, practical actions.
First of all, why now? Why did the Conservatives not propose this in, say, 2012, when they were drafting and gazetting the waste-water systems effluent regulations? Were they guilty of an oversight at that time? Second, why did the member not introduce his private member's bill in 2015, after he was no longer the Speaker? Third, why four years later, when the member was the leader of his party, did he not include this proposal in the 2019—
Madame la Présidente, je poserai d'abord quelques questions, surtout à propos de l'adoption de mesures concrètes et pratiques par les conservateurs.
Premièrement, pourquoi maintenant? Pourquoi les conservateurs n'ont pas proposé cela, disons, en 2012, quand ils rédigeaient et publiaient dans la Gazette le Règlement sur les effluents des systèmes d’assainissement des eaux usées? Était-ce un oubli? Deuxièmement, pourquoi le député n'a-t-il pas présenté son projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire en 2015, lorsqu'il n'était plus Président de la Chambre? Troisièmement, pourquoi, quatre ans plus tard, quand le député était chef de son parti, n'a-t-il pas inclus sa proposition dans...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-05-10 11:19 [p.6931]
Expand
Order. The member for Trois-Rivières on a point of order.
À l'ordre. La députée de Trois-Rivières invoque le Règlement.
Collapse
View Louise Charbonneau Profile
BQ (QC)
View Louise Charbonneau Profile
2021-05-10 11:19 [p.6931]
Expand
Madam Speaker, there is no French interpretation.
Madame la Présidente, il n'y a pas d'interprétation en français.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-05-10 11:20 [p.6932]
Expand
Just a moment, I have another point of order.
The hon. member for Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston.
Un moment s'il vous plaît, quelqu'un d'autre souhaite invoquer le Règlement.
Le député de Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston a la parole.
Collapse
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Scott Reid Profile
2021-05-10 11:20 [p.6932]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am just very worried that the way this is working out, the member for Lac-Saint-Louis will have his list of enumerated questions and there will be no time for the member to respond. That would be unfair, so I ask you to exercise a bit of discretion.
Madame la Présidente, je suis simplement très inquiet du fait que, de la façon dont les choses se déroulent, le député de Lac-Saint-Louis aura dressé toute une liste de questions, mais il ne restera plus de temps au député pour répondre. Ce serait injuste et c'est pourquoi je vous demande de bien vouloir trancher cette question.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-05-10 11:20 [p.6932]
Expand
This is just a speech, with no responses.
The hon. member for Lac-Saint-Louis.
Il ne s'agit que d'un discours, sans possibilité de réponse.
Le député de Lac-Saint-Louis a la parole.
Collapse
View Francis Scarpaleggia Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Francis Scarpaleggia Profile
2021-05-10 11:20 [p.6932]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would like to begin with a few questions, especially about Conservatives taking real, practical actions.
First of all, why now? Why did the Conservatives not propose this in, say, 2012, when they were drafting and gazetting the waste-water systems effluent regulations? Were they guilty of an oversight at that time? Second, why did the member not introduce his private member's bill in 2015, after he was no longer Speaker. Third, why, four years later, when the member was leader of his party, did he not include this proposal in the 2019 Conservative election platform?
The Fisheries Act already prohibits the deposit of deleterious substances, including sewage, into fish-bearing waters, unless expressly allowed by regulation. The fact is that the Harper government's waste-water regulations gave a de facto exemption to municipalities under the Fisheries Act to deposit a deleterious substance, namely waste water, into fish-bearing waters. This exemption was not carte blanche, however. It came with limits on how much of a regulated substance can be released into the environment. The waste-water regulations also impose deadlines on municipalities for building and upgrading their systems to meet the standards of secondary treatment, a biological process that can remove up to 95% of contaminants.
By way of background, six billion cubic metres of waste water are discharged into marine and freshwater ecosystems in Canada every year. Of this amount, approximately 72% is treated to the level of at least secondary treatment, 25% is under-treated and the remaining 3% is untreated, coming from continuous discharges in communities without a waste-water plant, from releases from combined sewer systems where waste water and storm water flow together in the same pipe and can overflow during heavy rainfalls, from spills due to equipment failure and negligence, and finally, from occasional planned releases deemed necessary to allow for system construction or maintenance.
I would be remiss if I did not point out the Harper government's bungling of the 2015 waste-water release in Montreal, which caught the government off guard in the middle of an election campaign. The planned release was needed to allow maintenance on a key interceptor in the city's waste-water system. It should be noted that Montreal has a single massive waste-water plant, the largest in North America and the third largest in the world, providing primary and secondary waste-water treatment. The city is introducing ozonation, which will allow it to achieve tertiary treatment by 2023, at which time the city will have the largest ozone waste-water plant in the world.
A belt of sewers runs around the island. The whole system is on a slope from west to east, with the treatment plant located at the eastern tip of the island. Gravity draws sewage from all around the island to the plant, reducing the need for energy-consuming pumping stations along the route. There are no alternative waste-water plants on the island, no safety valves, as it were. If the plant gets damaged, that's a huge problem for the city and communities downstream.
In 2015, the city applied to the province for a permit for a planned release and obtained Quebec's authorization to do so. The city also contacted Environment Canada twice, in September 2014 and September 2015, but, as I understand it, was met with radio silence. The Conservative government only realized there was an issue when the story hit the headlines, in Canada and internationally, at which point it cleverly punted the matter until after the election.
On November 9, 2015, the new Liberal government issued a ministerial order under section 37 of the Fisheries Act to require Montreal to make adjustments to its initial release plan. These adjustments were based on the recommendations of an expert panel. It should be noted that the Liberal government did not authorize the release, even though the province had. Section 37 of the act, while not giving the federal government the power to authorize a release like Montreal's, allows the minister to “require any modifications or additions to the work, undertaking or activity or any modifications to any plans, specifications, procedures or schedules relating to it that the Minister considers necessary in the circumstances”. That is what the new minister, the member for Ottawa Centre, did. She ordered changes to the plan to minimize impacts based on the recommendations of an expert panel.
Environment and Climate Change Canada is holding consultations with a view to making improvements to the temporary bypass provisions in sections 43 to 49 of the waste-water systems effluent regulations. Currently under the regulations, a bypass authorization for a release of untreated waste water can only be given for maintenance work that is being done at a waste-water plant, that is, at a final point of discharge, not at other points along the system.
The objective of upcoming amendments to the regulations is to allow the government to provide bypass authorizations for work being done beyond the plant itself, thereby creating a regulatory framework that would encourage better planning of emergency releases such as the one that occurred in Montreal.
Enter Bill C-269, which seeks to make it an offence to proceed with any releases of raw sewage into fish-bearing waters. It sounds great, but as is often the case with private members' bills, they are not drafted with the benefit of appropriate expertise and are often designed more for political effect than to achieve a constructive objective.
If passed, Bill C-269 could have serious unintended consequences for the environment.
First, the proposed prohibition would apply to waste water that is already treated to a high standard. This is because even effluents that are subject to advanced levels of treatment still contain contaminants from raw sewage that have not been separated and removed, as required by the bill. Therefore, all communities across Canada would be in potential violation of the proposed law, notwithstanding their high degree of waste-water treatment in most cases. In effect, they would have to shut down their waste-water plants.
Second, the definition of raw sewage in Bill C-269 is ambiguous and likely to include more than just effluent from human or domestic sources. The bill's definition could include industrial, commercial and institutional effluents that contain low or manageable levels of such sewage. The bill could therefore interfere with the development and implementation of regulations to control industrial effluents. For example, the bill could impede the ongoing process of updating the pulp and paper regulations, a process aimed at, among other things, capturing facilities producing non-traditional products from wood and other plant material, and also aimed at lowering current effluent limits as well as adding limits for additional substances.
Third, the bill would exempt the north, where, to all intents and purposes, the Fisheries Act prohibition against depositing deleterious substances into fish-bearing waters applies wholesale, absent the existence of a bilateral agreement with the federal government for creating an equivalent regulatory framework to the waste-water systems effluent regulations. This means that whatever pollution safeguards and monitoring mechanisms exist today in the north by virtue of a bilateral agreement with the federal government would be thrown into question if this bill passes.
There are many examples of how proposed measures like those in Bill C-269 that are intuitively appealing at first glance are, upon deeper reflection, clearly not the best way forward for either the environment or human health. As a case in point, I would like to refer to the late Dr. David Schindler's work at the Experimental Lakes Area, a real-life freshwater laboratory that garnered a great deal of national attention a few years back when the Harper government tried to close it down.
The conventional wisdom at one point was that nitrogen from waste water was likely causing algal blooms in lakes, suggesting the need for multi-billion dollar investments to alter waste-water treatment plants. However, a 37-year real-time, real-life experiment at the Experimental Lakes Area found that this was not the case and that the culprit was rather phosphorous. This subsequently led to the elimination of phosphates in detergents and avoided massively expensive yet futile investments to upgrade waste-water treatment plants across the country to deal with nitrogen.
In the end, I regret to say that, in reality, this bill may well be more a public relations exercise on a subject that deserves much more serious and well-informed attention.
Madame la Présidente, je voudrais d'abord soulever certaines questions, notamment au sujet des conservateurs, qui disent prendre des mesures concrètes, pratiques et tangibles.
Premièrement, pourquoi maintenant? Pourquoi les conservateurs n'ont pas fait cette proposition avant, disons en 2012, lorsqu'ils ont créé et publié dans la Gazette le Règlement sur les effluents des systèmes d'assainissement des eaux usées? Était-ce un oubli de leur part? Deuxièmement, pourquoi le député n'a-t-il pas présenté son projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire en 2015, après avoir quitté la présidence? Troisièmement, pourquoi, quatre ans plus tard, lorsqu'il était chef de son parti, le député n'a-t-il pas inclus cette proposition dans la plateforme électorale de 2019 des conservateurs?
La Loi sur les Pêches interdit déjà le rejet de substances nocives, y compris d'eaux usées, dans des eaux où vivent des poissons sauf si cela est expressément permis par règlement. La vérité, c'est que le règlement du gouvernement Harper sur les eaux usées accorde de facto aux municipalités une exemption à l'interdiction de rejeter des substances nocives — des eaux usées — dans des eaux où vivent des poissons. Cette exemption ne donnait cependant pas carte blanche aux municipalités. Elle comportait des limites quant à la quantité de substances qui peuvent être rejetées dans l'environnement. Le règlement sur les eaux usées impose également un échéancier aux municipalités pour la mise en place de systèmes respectant les normes en matière d'épuration secondaire, un procédé biologique qui permet de retirer jusqu'à 95 % des contaminants, ou la mise aux normes de leurs systèmes existants.
À titre d'information, six milliards de mètres cubes d'eaux usées sont rejetés chaque année dans les écosystèmes marins et d'eaux douces du pays. Environ 72 % de ces eaux subissent au moins un traitement secondaire, et 25 % sont insuffisamment traitées. Les 3 % restants sont les eaux usées non traitées qui sont constamment rejetées dans les collectivités sans usine de traitement des eaux usées, les eaux usées qui sont rejetées dans des réseaux d'égout qui peuvent déborder lors de pluies abondantes et dans lesquels les eaux usées passent par la même conduite que les eaux pluviales, les eaux contaminées par des déversements attribuables à de l'équipement défectueux ou de la négligence, et enfin, les eaux usées dont le rejet est parfois jugé nécessaire lorsqu'on prévoit construire ou entretenir un réseau.
Je m'en voudrais de ne pas mentionner l'incompétence dont le gouvernement Harper a fait preuve en 2015, en pleine campagne électorale, lorsqu'il a été pris au dépourvu par la décision de la ville de Montréal de rejeter des eaux usées dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent. Ce déversement avait été jugé nécessaire pour entretenir un intercepteur clé du réseau d'eaux usées de la ville. Mentionnons que Montréal a une seule immense usine de traitement des eaux usées — la plus grande d'Amérique du Nord et la troisième en importance dans le monde — qui assure le traitement primaire et secondaire des eaux usées. La ville est en train d'y intégrer un processus d'ozonisation pour que l'usine puisse effectuer un traitement tertiaire d'ici 2023, ce qui en fera la plus grande usine du monde à employer ce procédé.
L'île est ceinturée par un réseau d'égouts incliné d'ouest en est, et l'usine de traitement se trouve à l'extrémité est de l'île. La gravité achemine les eaux usées de toute l'île jusqu'à l'usine, ce qui réduit l'utilisation de stations de pompage énergivores en cours de route. L'île ne comporte aucune usine de rechange pour les eaux usées, donc, aucune soupape de sûreté, pour ainsi dire. S'il arrive un pépin à l'usine, la Ville et les communautés en aval se retrouvent avec un énorme problème sur les bras.
En 2015, la Ville a demandé à la province de Québec l'autorisation de procéder à un déversement planifié et l'a obtenue. La Ville a également communiqué avec Environnement Canada en septembre 2014 et en septembre 2015, mais, si j'ai bien compris, elle n'a obtenu aucune réponse. Le gouvernement conservateur ne s'est rendu compte de la situation qu'une fois qu'on en a parlé dans les médias, au Canada et à l'étranger, et il a habilement reporté la question après les élections.
Le 9 novembre 2015, le gouvernement libéral nouvellement élu a émis un arrêté ministériel en vertu de l'article 37 de la Loi sur les pêches pour exiger que la Ville de Montréal fasse des modifications à son plan initial de rejet d'eaux usées. Les modifications exigées étaient fondées sur les recommandations d'un groupe d'experts. Il faut souligner que le gouvernement libéral n'avait pas autorisé le rejet en question, même si la province l'avait fait. L'article 37 de la loi, bien qu'il ne donne pas au gouvernement fédéral le pouvoir d'autoriser un rejet comme celui-là, permet au ministre d'« exiger que soient apportées les modifications et adjonctions aux ouvrages, entreprises ou activités, ou aux documents s'y rapportant, qu'il estime nécessaires dans les circonstances ». C'est précisément ce qu'a fait la nouvelle ministre, également députée d'Ottawa- Centre. À la lumière des recommandations du groupe d'experts, elle a ordonné que la Ville modifie son plan de manière à réduire au minimum les impacts sur l'environnement.
Environnement et Changement climatique Canada tient actuellement des consultations dans le but d'améliorer les dispositions sur les dérivations temporaires. Ces dispositions sont prévues aux articles 43 à 49 du Règlement sur les effluents des systèmes d'assainissement des eaux usées. En vertu du règlement actuel, une autorisation de dérivation permettant de rejeter des eaux usées non traitées ne peut être donnée que pour des travaux d'entretien effectués à une usine de traitement des eaux usées, c'est-à-dire au point de rejet final, et non à d'autres endroits dans le système.
Les modifications prévues à la réglementation visent à permettre au gouvernement de délivrer des autorisations temporaires de dérivation pour des travaux effectués à l'extérieur de l'usine elle-même, créant ainsi un cadre réglementaire visant à encourager une meilleure planification des rejets d'urgence comme celui qui a été fait à Montréal.
C'est là qu'entre en scène le projet de loi C-269, qui vise à ériger en infraction tout rejet d'eaux usées non traitées dans des eaux où vivent des poissons. Cela semble fantastique, mais il est fréquent que les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire ne soient pas rédigés avec l'aide d'experts et qu'ils visent davantage à obtenir un effet politique qu'à atteindre un objectif constructif, comme c'est le cas en l'occurrence.
S'il est adopté, le projet de loi C-269 pourrait avoir de graves conséquences involontaires pour l'environnement.
Premièrement, l'interdiction proposée s'appliquerait à des eaux usées qui ont déjà été traitées selon des normes élevées, car même les effluents qui sont soumis à des niveaux de traitement avancés contiennent toujours des contaminants provenant d'eaux usées qui n'ont pas été séparés et extraits, comme l'exige le projet de loi. Par conséquent, toutes les collectivités au pays pourraient contrevenir au projet de loi, peu importe le degré de traitement des eaux usées dans la majorité des cas. Ces collectivités devraient donc fermer leur usine de traitement des eaux usées.
Deuxièmement, la définition d’eaux usées non traitées que donne le projet de loi C-269 est ambiguë et pourrait ne pas se limiter aux eaux souillées provenant d’appareils sanitaires ou de sources résidentielles. La définition pourrait en effet englober les effluents des sites industriels, commerciaux et institutionnels qui contiennent de faibles niveaux d’eaux souillées. Le projet de loi pourrait donc nuire à l’élaboration et à la mise en œuvre de règlements visant à contrôler les effluents industriels. Par exemple, le projet de loi pourrait entraver la mise à jour qui a été entreprise des règlements concernant les pâtes et papiers, et dont l’objectif est, entre autres, d’y assujettir des établissements fabriquant des produits non traditionnels à partir du bois et d’autres végétaux, et d’abaisser les limites actuelles des effluents et d’en imposer de nouvelles pour d’autres substances.
Troisièmement, le Nord ne serait pas assujetti à ce projet de loi, car c’est une région où la Loi sur les pêches interdit déjà, de façon générale, le déversement de substances nocives dans les eaux de pêche, sauf si une entente bilatérale passée avec le gouvernement fédéral permet de créer un dispositif réglementaire équivalent au règlement relatif aux effluents des systèmes d’eaux usées. Cela signifie que les mécanismes de contrôle et de surveillance de la pollution qui s’appliquent actuellement dans le Nord, en vertu d’une entente bilatérale avec le gouvernement fédéral, seront remis en question si ce projet de loi est adopté.
Il y a beaucoup d’exemples qui montrent que les mesures proposées dans le projet de loi C-269, même si elles paraissent souhaitables au premier abord, ne peuvent pas, après mûre réflexion, être considérées comme la meilleure façon de protéger l’environnement et la santé de la population. À ce propos, je renvoie au travail du regretté David Schindler de la Région des lacs expérimentaux, un laboratoire de reconstitution de la vie réelle en eau douce qui a fait parler beaucoup de lui il y a quelques années, lorsque le gouvernement Harper a voulu le fermer.
À une certaine époque, on pensait que l’azote provenant des eaux usées était probablement à l’origine de l’apparition des algues dans les lacs, de sorte qu’on envisageait d’investir des milliards de dollars pour modifier les usines de traitement de l’eau en fonction de cette nouvelle donnée. Toutefois, une reconstitution de la vie réelle en eau douce, pendant 37 ans, dans la région des lacs expérimentaux, a démontré que ce n’était pas le cas et que le coupable était plutôt le phosphore. On a donc décidé d’éliminer les phosphates des produits de lessive, ce qui a évité de procéder à des adaptations coûteuses et inutiles des usines de traitement de l’eau pour éliminer l’azote.
Au final, je suis bien obligé de dire que ce projet de loi n’est sans doute qu’un exercice de relations publiques sur un sujet qui mérite plus de sérieux et de diligence.
Collapse
View Monique Pauzé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Monique Pauzé Profile
2021-05-10 11:29 [p.6933]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I wish everyone a happy Monday.
I think that we all agree that water is life. Although we commend the member for his attempt to initiate a debate on water quality and the pollution of our rivers, which is an important subject, the Bloc Québécois cannot support the principle of Bill C-269 because it does not offer any real solutions to sewage dumping.
Yes, effective regulations may be part of the solution to this problem, but what is really needed is major investments in waste water infrastructure.
What is more, the bill is inconsistent. It would allow the regulated dumping of hazardous materials and prohibit the dumping of fetid waste water from urban areas. I will come back to that. Also, clause 2 of the bill, which would add two new subsections, would make it so that the prohibition would not apply in Nunavut, Newfoundland and north of the 54th parallel in Quebec. I am wondering what the rationale for that is, because it does not make any sense.
Basically, Bill C-269 is a bad idea masquerading as a good one. In 2012, the Conservative government established the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations, Canada's first waste water treatment standard. At the time, the federal government estimated that 75% of existing waste water treatment facilities complied with the new standard, and it committed to providing funding to help the remaining 25% achieve compliance.
It created three categories of facilities. The first included the highest-risk facilities, which had to comply with the new standard before 2020. The second and third categories included lower-risk facilities, which had until 2030 and 2040 to comply with the new standard.
The infrastructure minister at the time provided no details about the funding formula that would be introduced to support the new regulations. The Union des municipalités du Québec estimated that it would take $9 billion to upgrade existing municipal facilities and bring them into compliance with the new regulations.
Around that time, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and McGill University conducted a study. According to estimates, the municipal infrastructure deficit, which is what it would cost to upgrade existing infrastructure to meet current standards, was about $31 billion. That was 10 years ago.
Let us fast-forward to today.
According to an article published in the daily Le Devoir in March, 80 Quebec municipalities still do not have waste water treatment plants. According to a Réseau Environnement report cited in the same article, at least $17 billion is needed just to upgrade the existing treatment facilities that are suffering the effects of aging. That amount does not include the investments required to ensure that waste water treatment plants comply with the 2012 regulations and to build treatment plants where they are needed. That being the case, what should the government do? If regulations exist, we must comply, but no one should be expected to do the impossible.
Waste water spills happen frequently in Quebec, so much so that Fondation Rivières has created a rather impressive interactive map using a data set. Furthermore, it identified 60,660 spills in 2019, which lasted a total of 471,300 hours. While the Conservatives brought up Montreal's “flushgate”—when eight billion litres of sewage were dumped into the St. Lawrence River—every chance they got during the 2019 election campaign, people should not assume that the issue of dumping is any less serious anywhere else.
The 2019 campaign also highlighted the fact that Canadian municipalities had dumped 218 billion litres of sewage into waterways without any political party proposing solutions to the problem. Toronto confirmed that, in 2018, more than 7.1 billion litres of waste water leaked into Lake Ontario and other waterways because the combined sewer and stormwater system could not handle the volume of rainstorms.
Furthermore, last year, Canada's National Observer presented Environment Canada data indicating that 900 billion litres of waste water and runoff were discharged in 2018. That figure was for the rest of Canada and did not include Quebec. The 900 billion litres most likely was a conservative figure given the inconsistent monitoring among different municipalities.
In short, this is a significant problem for which we must find real solutions and it has been a concern for the Federation of Canadian Municipalities for many years now. I will say from the outset that the $1.5 billion allocated for the waste water file by the government between 2015 and 2019 is peanuts compared to the real need. It is just a drop in the bucket.
I do not wish to downplay the fact that human waste and runoff are a significant problem, but I must also speak about other worrisome substances. The most recent research has brought to light the health problems caused by endocrine disruptors and the constantly rising presence of microplastics in our waterways. I have mentioned the worrisome presence of these two substances to make the contradiction in Bill C-269 very clear to everyone. In fact, it would continue to allow the discharge into our waterways of all manner of substances as long as it is done in accordance with the 2012 Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations.
I will read a short but incomplete list of the deleterious substances that could still be discharged into our waterways even if Bill C-269 is passed: petroleum products, including oil, gas, diesel and grease; chemical products. pesticides, heavy metals; industrial effluents; cleaning products, such as bleach and detergents; wood preservative products; paint; chlorinated water.
All of the substances I just mentioned could be discharged, but not urban waste water. I have a hard time believing that continuing to allow these substances to be discharged is less harmful to the environment and less detrimental to the health of our waterways than discharging urban waste water.
Any proposed regulations to bring infrastructure in compliance and to deploy 21st-century technology in existing facilities will require a rigorous and integrated approach. Bill C-269 does not meet these criteria, however.
Money is the lifeblood of all infrastructure projects. Nothing happens without money. Just take a close look at the tax system to see how much each level of government collects and how much their fair share should be. The federal government takes 50%, Quebec gets 42% and the municipalities get 8%. Municipalities' share of responsibility for infrastructure went from 30.9% in 1961 to 52.4% in 2002, while the federal government's went from 23.9% down to 6.8% for that same period. This is why I am saying it is impossible for municipalities to keep up.
Now, 20 years later, there is a good chance that the figures are even more telling. There is no doubt that infrastructure spending is required and that making arbitrary and unenforceable prohibitions is not the solution. This is the real way to help municipalities fulfill their waste water treatment responsibilities.
I do want to say that there is some potential for progress on this issue. However, every level of government will have to do its share. We must not only prevent overlapping jurisdictions and confusion, but we must also provide stability for municipalities so that they are in a position to build the best infrastructure to comply with sanitation standards.
No municipality derives pleasure from waste water spills. They want to comply with the standards but simply do not have the means to do so.
Madame la Présidente, je souhaite à tous un bon lundi.
Je pense que nous sommes tous d'accord pour dire que, l'eau, c'est la vie. Bien que nous saluions la tentative de créer un débat sur la qualité de l'eau et la pollution de nos rivières, un sujet important, le Bloc québécois ne peut pas appuyer le principe du projet de loi C-269, parce qu'il s'agit d'un projet de loi qui n'offre aucune réelle solution pour régler la question des déversements d'eaux usées.
Une solution réside certainement dans une réglementation efficace, mais elle se trouve d'abord dans des investissements importants en matière d'infrastructures pour le traitement des eaux usées.
Par ailleurs, le projet de loi est incohérent. D'une part, il permettrait le déversement encadré de matières dangereuses en interdisant celui des eaux usées nauséabondes des régions urbaines. Je reviendrai là-dessus. D'autre part, l'article 2, qui ajouterait deux nouveaux paragraphes, exclurait l'interdiction au Nunavut, à Terre-Neuve et au nord du 54e parallèle au Québec. Je me demande bien ce que justifie cette mesure, car c'est à n'y rien comprendre.
Le projet de loi C-269 est en somme une fausse bonne idée. En 2012, le gouvernement conservateur avait édicté le Règlement sur les effluents des systèmes d'assainissement des eaux usées, qui constituait une première norme canadienne en matière de traitement des eaux d'égout. À l'époque, le gouvernement fédéral estimait que 75 % des installations existantes d'assainissement des eaux usées respectaient la nouvelle norme. Pour ce qui est du 25 % restant, le gouvernement s'était engagé à accorder du financement afin de les aider à s'y conformer.
Il avait établi trois catégories d'installations. La première catégorie regroupe les installations qui posent le plus de risque; elles doivent se conformer à la nouvelle norme avant 2020. Les deuxième et troisième catégories regroupent les installations qui posent moins de risque; elles ont jusqu'en 2030 et 2040 pour se conformer à la nouvelle norme.
Le ministre de l'Infrastructure de l'époque n'avait pas donné de détails sur la formule de financement qui viendrait en appui à la nouvelle réglementation. L'Union des municipalités du Québec, de son côté, avait estimé à 9 milliards de dollars le montant requis pour mettre à jour les installations municipales existantes, afin d'assurer leur conformité à la nouvelle réglementation.
Pendant la même période, la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, conjointement avec l'Université McGill, a enquêté sur la question. Selon les estimations, le déficit des infrastructures municipales, c'est-à-dire ce qu'il en coûterait pour remettre à niveau les infrastructures existantes en fonction des normes actuelles, serait de l'ordre de 31 milliards de dollars. C'était il y a 10 ans.
Revenons à notre époque.
Le quotidien Le Devoir publiait en mars dernier que, à ce jour, 80 municipalités québécoises ne disposaient pas encore d'usines d'épuration des eaux usées. Selon un rapport du Réseau Environnement mentionné dans le même article, il faudrait investir au moins 17 milliards de dollars, simplement pour mettre à niveau les infrastructures de traitement existantes qui subissent les contrecoups du vieillissement. Ce montant ne tient compte ni des investissements requis pour s'assurer que les stations d'épuration des eaux usées sont conformes au Règlement de 2012 ni de ceux requis pour construire des usines d'épuration là où il n'y en a pas. Devant cette réalité, quelle action gouvernementale serait à privilégier? Si règlement il y a, c'est bien qu'on puisse s'y conformer. Or à l'impossible, nul n'est tenu.
Au Québec, les déversements d'eaux usées sont légion. Ainsi la Fondation Rivières a réalisé une carte interactive assez impressionnante à l'aide d'un jeu de données. En outre, elle a recensé 60 660 déversements en 2019, qui ont duré un total de 471 300 heures. Si les conservateurs ont soulevé sans retenue le « flushgate » de Montréal pendant la campagne électorale de 2019, où 8 milliards de litres d'eaux usées ont été déversés dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent, il ne faut pas croire que le phénomène des déversements est moins grave ailleurs.
Lors de la campagne de 2019, on soulignait également le fait que les municipalités canadiennes avaient déversé 218 milliards de litres d'eaux usées dans les cours d'eau sans qu'aucun parti politique propose de solutions à ce problème. Toronto affirme qu'en 2018, plus de 7,1 milliards de litres d'eaux usées ont fui dans le lac Ontario et d'autres cours d'eau, parce que le réseau combiné d'égouts et d'eaux pluviales n'est pas en mesure de gérer le débit des tempêtes de pluie.
De plus, l'an dernier, le Canada's National Observer présentait des données d'Environnement Canada expliquant que 900 milliards de litres d'eaux usées et de ruissellement avaient été déversés en 2018. Cela ne concernait que le reste du Canada et excluait le Québec. Ces 900 milliards de litres étaient sans doute même une quantité conservatrice, compte tenu des suivis aléatoires de différentes municipalités.
Bref, c'est un problème important auquel on doit trouver de vraies solutions et par lequel la Fédération canadienne des municipalités est préoccupée depuis plusieurs années déjà. Je dirai d'emblée que le milliard et demi de dollars qui a été consenti par ce gouvernement entre 2015 et 2019 pour ce dossier des eaux usées ne représente que des miettes devant le besoin réel, pour ne pas dire une goutte dans les rivières et les océans.
Sans vouloir pour autant réduire l'importance des déjections humaines et des eaux de ruissellement sur la pollution des cours d'eau, je dois quand même toucher un mot sur les autres substances préoccupantes. En effet, les recherches les plus récentes ont mis en lumière les problèmes de santé causés par les perturbateurs endocriniens ainsi que la présence sans cesse croissante des microplastiques dans nos cours d'eau. Si je viens de mentionner la présence inquiétante de ces deux substances, c'est pour qu'on note le non-sens que présente le projet de loi C-269, à savoir qu'il permettrait tout de même le déversement dans nos cours d'eau d'une foule de matières, pourvu que le déversement s'effectue dans le respect du Règlement sur les effluents des systèmes d'assainissement des eaux usées de 2012.
Je vais donner une petite liste, quoique incomplète, des substances nocives qui pourraient encore être déversées dans nos cours d'eau en dépit de l'adoption du projet de loi C-269: les produits pétroliers, notamment l'huile, l'essence, le diesel et la graisse; les produits chimiques; les pesticides; les métaux lourds; les effluents industriels; les produits de nettoyage, comme l'eau de javel et les détersifs; les produits de préservation du bois; la peinture; l'eau chlorée.
Tout ce qui précède pourrait être déversé, mais pas les effluents des systèmes d'eaux usées des villes. Il va falloir se lever tôt pour me convaincre que, sur le plan environnemental et pour améliorer la santé des cours d'eau, continuer de permettre le déversement de ces produits est moins dommageable que le déversement des eaux usées urbaines.
Pour proposer une réglementation porteuse de projets permettant la conformité des infrastructures et le déploiement de la technologie du XXIe siècle dans les installations existantes, une approche rigoureuse et intégrée s'impose. Cependant, le projet de loi C-269 ne remplit pas ces critères.
Dans le dossier des infrastructures, c'est l'argent qui est le nerf de la guerre, c'est l'argent qui doit être au rendez-vous. Il suffit de regarder de près la réalité fiscale pour valider la juste part de l'État, de voir quel palier de gouvernement ramasse combien. Pour le fédéral, c'est 50 %; pour le Québec, 42 %; pour les municipalités, 8 %. La charge des municipalités relative aux infrastructures est passée de 30,9 % en 1961 à 52,4 % en 2002, alors que celle du fédéral s'est réduite, passant de 23,9 % à 6,8 % pour la même période. C'est pour ces raisons que je dis qu'il est impossible pour les municipalités d'y arriver.
Vingt ans plus tard, il est fort à parier que les chiffres sont encore plus éloquents. Il ne fait aucun doute que les investissements structurants doivent être consentis, que la solution ne réside pas dans des interdictions arbitraires et inapplicables. C'est la vraie façon de soutenir les municipalités pour qu'elles s'acquittent de leur responsabilité en matière de traitement des eaux usées.
Enfin, je tiens à dire que je crois que ce dossier a quand même le potentiel de progresser. Toutefois, chaque palier doit fournir sa part d'efforts. Il faut non seulement éviter le chevauchement des compétences et la confusion, mais, surtout, fournir aux municipalités des certitudes et les mettre dans une position où elles auront la capacité d'optimiser ou d'installer des infrastructures leur permettant de se conformer aux normes d'assainissement.
Aucune municipalité ne s'adonne de gaieté de cœur au déversement de ces eaux usées. Elles veulent se conformer, mais elles n'en ont tout simplement pas les moyens.
Collapse
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2021-05-10 11:39 [p.6934]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I wish you and all the mothers right across Canada a belated happy Mother's Day. It is an honour today to rise on Bill C-269, tabled by the hon. member for Regina—Qu'Appelle and I am joining you today from the home of the Nuu-chah-nulth people on the unceded traditional territory of the Hupacasath and Tseshaht people, who have a long history as protectors of coastal communities in my riding, which guides my decisions as a member of Parliament every day while I sit in the House of Commons.
We in the New Democratic Party strongly support stopping the flow of raw sewage into our oceans and waterways. We all want to see an end to the dumping of raw sewage and as I stated, we are strong supporters of initiatives that would stop this practice.
However, the bill penalizes those communities that cannot afford to upgrade their systems. We absolutely support the intent of the bill, but it is deeply flawed in its approach. We cannot abandon communities like the Harper government did for a decade and the Liberal government is falling far short.
We know, according to the FCM, that it would cost over $18 billion for communities right across Canada to improve their waste-water systems to stop raw sewage dumping, but the bill does not do anything positive to help get them there. It is in this spirit that I rise to speak to Bill C-269 and express my deep reservations about supporting this legislation. It is not simply a matter of banning raw sewage dumping, but rather how we as communities and as a country support one another in keeping our oceans clean for this generation and for generations to come.
I think about the implications in my riding, because people across my riding are rightfully concerned about our coastal waters and want to take measures to support them. It goes without saying that whether they are environmentalists or people who care about the health of fish or the health of coastal ecosystems, they want to make sure that there are no dangers to the water that surrounds their communities and our communities.
The water in Courtenay—Alberni is not just a source of food, whether it be wild salmon or other fish, but also a refuge for swimmers, boaters and recreation. Ensuring it is clean is critical and crucial to our local economy, our way of life and our food security. It attracts recreation fishers and boaters who invest their money into our restaurants and shops, so it is part of tourism. It draws tourists to stay in our hotels and bed and breakfasts. It grounds us every day and reminds us as residents that we are part of an ecosystem that depends on us to make the decisions that we need to to protect our families, the species and the biodiversity where we live and that surround us.
I think about the bill's impacts not only on the cleanliness of the water, but also on the communities that will be affected. I think about the municipalities that need to have clean water systems, but do not have the resources to build them as well. I think about the boaters and their families who would be impacted by its sweeping generalizations. I think about the decision-making processes we have in place when enforcing environmental regulations and some of the better options we have to make real impacts on the health and safety of our waterways.
I sat in local government in Tofino, British Columbia, so I am very familiar with the challenges in dealing with waste water. The bill literally pits the federal government against these small communities and it shows again that the Conservatives are out of touch with municipalities. I wonder how much consultation the member and the Conservatives have done with these communities that are lacking support to get their waste-water infrastructure in place. Everyone wants that.
We know costs are soaring. We need mechanics, electronics and specialized crews to build waste-water treatment. Obviously we have to pay for work camps in rural or remote communities and inflation is skyrocketing. We know that there is new risk in pricing due to COVID. Again, modern waste-water treatment depends on very modern producers and these producers are highly specialized and they are very expensive.
I talked to the former mayor of Tofino, who is now the minister of municipal affairs in British Columbia. She sat as the mayor for seven years and her number one priority each year in council was getting waste-water treatment in place. They still have not broken ground. It was a deep commitment by their local government.
In fact, in the early 2000s, it was projected that it would be a $12-million cost to build waste-water treatment. When I sat on council in 2008, it was $18 million. When the City applied for funding, it was for $40 million. It rejigged that plan and the figure came back at $57 million. The City put it out for tender and the bids came back at $82 million. It would take a tax increase of $1,000 a household every year for literally over a decade to pay for that.
I think about a small community of 500 people in Newfoundland that has really good staff but is very unlikely to have the capacity to develop an $18-million or $20-million waste-water treatment centre. I know the member who just spoke said the lack of coordination cannot be the problem, but it actually is the problem. We need the government and all parties, not just the Conservative Party because it has tabled this bill, to coordinate and commit to filling the gaps so these communities can get there.
We have heard that people are considering not even running for office in Newfoundland and small communities because they are concerned about the liability around the legislation that is in place currently. We know that in big cities such as Toronto and Montreal, a lot of the infrastructure is old. They would literally need to rip up a lot of their infrastructure to meet the goal of this bill, because the sewer and stormwater systems are integrated. Without understanding the costs and obstacles to meet the goals set out in this bill and the way they are going to meet them, it is actually a big gap and a big problem.
We talked about municipalities. This legislation would immediately punish those communities that have no choice but to dump raw sewage right now. Instead of helping to build the water treatment systems they need, this bill directs sparse municipal resources away from water treatment toward paying the inevitable fines it would create.
We know that between 2013 and 2017, approximately 96% of municipal waste water underwent some form of treatment before it was discharged. This means that around 4% of municipal waste water was discharged untreated, which is still significant, but it is worth examining the reasons this amount of money is dumped into our water waste, such as leaks or dumps of water, which occur for a number of reasons.
For example, in Toronto, more than 7.1 billion litres of raw sewage leaked into Lake Ontario because of the capacity of the city's waste-water system. Much of this occurred because of rainwater amounts, something that even big cities like Toronto are not capable of controlling right now. The systems need serious investments. It would be almost impossible, the cities have cited, even if funding came from the federal and provincial governments, to get facilities up and running by 2030 and to complete those upgrades.
This bill comes into effect within five years of its passing. It is unreasonable to expect communities such as these, which have said they cannot meet its targets, to get there. Small communities that do not have the same resources as bigger cities would incur fines that would be absolutely devastating, and would seriously hamper the work they are doing.
I think about the concerns we have talked about around recreational boaters and commercial boaters. There is a huge concern with this bill's impact on these vessels and the economy. My colleague, the member for St. John's East, is a lawyer. He looked over this legislation and pointed out that every single commercial and recreational vessel that has a waste-disposal system built in would be impacted by this bill. The way it is written, this bill leaves open the possibility of imposing fines on commercial and recreational vessels that dump waste while they are on the water doing any form of business.
At best, this bill conflicts with regulations under the Canada Shipping Act. At worst, it would severely hurt these vessels and the economy. This really has not been looked at closely. We have serious reservations about this regarding the hundreds of thousands of commercial and recreational fishers who would all have to update their vessels, buy new boats or significantly change their operations in order to comply with this bill.
I will touch again on what we want. My friend and former colleague, Tracey Ramsey, introduced a private member's bill to develop a national freshwater strategy. Her bill would have ensured that the federal government consulted and worked with the provinces, municipalities, indigenous peoples and stakeholders. This is what we are asking for. I hope the member takes into consideration what we are offering today. Again, the member missed out on banning toxic substances, which are going into waste-water stream catchment areas, capturing plastics as I have talked about in the past, and ensuring that these systems are upgraded.
Madame la Présidente, je vous souhaite à vous et à toutes les mères du Canada une joyeuse fête des Mères, même si je suis un peu en retard. Je suis heureux de prendre la parole aujourd’hui au sujet du projet de loi C- 269, qui a été présenté par le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle. Je m’adresse à vous depuis la communauté des Nuu-chah-nulth, sur les terres traditionnelles non cédées des Hupacasath et des Tseshaht, qui s’emploient depuis toujours à protéger les communautés côtières de ma circonscription et qui m’inspirent dans toutes les décisions que je prends en tant que député.
Le Nouveau Parti démocratique appuie sans réserve l’interdiction de déverser des eaux usées non traitées dans les océans et les cours d’eau. Il faut mettre un terme à cette pratique, et, comme je l’ai dit, nous appuyons sans réserve les initiatives qui contribuent à l’interdire.
Cela dit, le projet de loi pénalise les collectivités qui n’ont pas les moyens de rénover leur système. Nous appuyons sans réserve le principe du projet de loi, mais son approche laisse beaucoup à désirer. Nous ne pouvons pas laisser tomber des collectivités, comme l’a fait le gouvernement Harper pendant 10 ans et comme le fait le gouvernement libéral depuis qu’il est au pouvoir.
La Fédération canadienne des municipalités nous a dit qu’il en coûterait plus de 18 milliards de dollars pour améliorer tous les systèmes de traitement de l’eau des collectivités afin d’empêcher le déversement d’eaux usées non traitées, mais le projet de loi ne propose rien pour aider les collectivités. C’est dans cet esprit que je m’adresse à vous, pour exprimer les graves réserves que m’inspire le projet de loi C-269. Il ne s’agit pas simplement d’interdire le déversement d’eaux usées non traitées, il faut aussi que les collectivités et le pays tout entier puissent s’entraider afin d’assurer l’assainissement de nos océans pour notre génération et pour les générations à venir.
Les habitants de ma circonscription se préoccupent, avec raison, de la qualité de nos eaux côtières, et ils sont prêts à prendre des mesures pour l’améliorer. Il va sans dire que tous, aussi bien les environnementalistes que ceux qui se préoccupent de la santé du poisson et des écosystèmes, veulent s’assurer que les eaux qui entourent leurs collectivités et les nôtres ne sont exposées à aucun danger.
À Courtenay-Alberni, l’eau n’est pas simplement une source alimentaire, que ce soit le saumon sauvage ou d’autres poissons, c’est aussi un refuge pour la natation, la navigation de plaisance et les loisirs. Il est donc crucial pour notre économie, pour notre qualité de vie et pour notre sécurité alimentaire que cette eau reste saine. Elle attire des pêcheurs sportifs et des plaisanciers qui viennent dépenser de l’argent dans nos restaurants et nos commerces, ce qui dope le tourisme. Elle attire aussi des touristes qui descendent dans nos hôtels et nos cafés couettes. Chaque jour, elle nous rappelle, à nous les riverains, que nous faisons partie d’un écosystème qui dépend des décisions que nous prenons pour protéger nos familles, les espèces et la biodiversité qui nous entourent.
Le projet de loi a donc un impact non seulement sur la qualité de l’eau, mais aussi sur les collectivités. Je pense aux municipalités qui devront se doter d’usines de traitement de l’eau, mais qui n’ont pas les ressources pour les construire. Je pense aux plaisanciers et à leur famille qui seront touchés par les généralisations excessives du projet de loi. Je pense aux mécanismes décisionnels que nous avons mis en place en matière de réglementation environnementale et aux solutions qui seraient à mon avis préférables pour avoir un impact réel sur la santé et la sécurité de nos cours d’eau.
J’ai été membre du gouvernement local de Tofino, en Colombie-Britannique, et je connais donc bien les problèmes qui se posent avec les eaux usées. En fait, le projet de loi dresse le gouvernement fédéral contre les petites collectivités, ce qui montre bien, encore une fois, que les conservateurs ne comprennent pas du tout ce qui se passe au niveau municipal. Je me demande dans quelle mesure le député et ses collègues ont consulté les collectivités qui n’ont pas les moyens d’adapter leurs systèmes de traitement de l’eau, même si elles le voudraient bien.
Nous savons que les coûts sont faramineux. Il faut des mécaniciens, des informaticiens et des travailleurs spécialisés pour construire une usine de traitement de l’eau. Il faut aussi payer pour les camps de travail, dans les collectivités rurales ou isolées, et les prix s’envolent, surtout en cette période de COVID-19. Encore une fois, l’installation de systèmes modernes de traitement des eaux usées nécessite de recourir à des spécialistes, qui coûtent très cher.
J’ai parlé à l’ancienne mairesse de Tofino, qui est aujourd’hui ministre des affaires municipales de la Colombie-Britannique. Elle a été mairesse pendant sept ans, et chaque année, sa priorité était de construire une usine de traitement de l’eau. Les travaux n’ont toujours pas commencé. C’était pourtant une grande priorité de ce gouvernement local.
En fait, au début des années 2000, on prévoyait que la construction d’un système de traitement des eaux usées coûterait 12 millions de dollars. Lorsque je siégeais au conseil municipal en 2008, le coût s’élevait à 18 millions de dollars. Lorsque la ville a fait une demande de financement, le coût est passé à 40 millions de dollars. Elle a remanié le plan et le chiffre s’est élevé à 57 millions de dollars. La ville a alors lancé un appel d’offres et les soumissions ont atteint 82 millions de dollars. Il faudrait une augmentation d’impôt de 1 000 $ par ménage chaque année pendant littéralement plus d’une décennie pour payer cela.
Je pense à une petite communauté de 500 personnes à Terre-Neuve qui a un très bon personnel, mais qui n’a probablement pas la capacité de construire un centre de traitement des eaux usées à coup de 18 ou 20 millions de dollars. Je sais que la députée qui vient de parler dit que le manque de coordination ne peut pas être le problème, mais c’est en fait le problème. Il faut que le gouvernement et tous les partis, et pas seulement le Parti conservateur parce qu’il a déposé ce projet de loi, coordonnent leurs efforts et s’engagent à combler les lacunes pour que ces collectivités puissent y arriver.
Nous avons entendu dire que des gens envisagent de ne même pas se présenter aux élections à Terre-Neuve et dans les petites collectivités parce qu’ils s’inquiètent de la responsabilité liée à la loi actuellement en vigueur. Nous savons que dans les grandes villes comme Toronto et Montréal, une grande partie de l’infrastructure est vieille. Elles devraient littéralement démolir une grande partie de leur infrastructure pour atteindre l’objectif de ce projet de loi, car les systèmes d’égouts et d’eaux pluviales sont intégrés. Si l’on ne comprend pas le coût et les obstacles liés à l’atteinte des objectifs fixés dans ce projet de loi et la façon dont ils vont les atteindre, il s’agit en fait d’une grande lacune et d’un gros problème.
Nous avons parlé des municipalités. Ce projet de loi punirait immédiatement les collectivités qui n’ont d’autre choix à l’heure actuelle que de déverser des eaux usées brutes. Au lieu d’aider à construire les systèmes de traitement des eaux usées dont elles ont besoin, ce projet de loi détourne les maigres ressources municipales du traitement des eaux vers le paiement des inévitables amendes qu’il engendrerait.
Nous savons qu’entre 2013 et 2017, près de 96 % des eaux usées municipales ont subi une forme de traitement avant d’être déversées. Cela signifie qu’environ 4 % des eaux usées municipales ont été déversées sans traitement, ce qui reste important, mais il convient d’examiner les raisons pour lesquelles cette somme d’argent est jetée dans nos eaux usées, comme les fuites ou les déversements d’eau, qui se produisent pour un certain nombre de raisons.
Par exemple, à Toronto, en raison du manque de capacité du système de traitement des eaux usées de la ville, plus de 7,1 milliards de litres d’eaux usées brutes ont été déversés dans le lac Ontario. Cela s’est produit en grande partie à cause de la quantité d’eau de pluie, un phénomène que même les grandes villes comme Toronto ne sont pas en mesure de contrôler actuellement. Les systèmes actuels ont besoin de sérieux investissements. Selon les villes, il serait presque impossible, même si les gouvernements fédéral et provincial fournissaient le financement nécessaire, de mettre de nouvelles installations en service et de terminer les mises à niveau requises d’ici 2030.
Ce projet de loi entre en vigueur dans les cinq années suivant son adoption. Il est déraisonnable de s’attendre à ce que de telles collectivités, qui ont déclaré ne pas pouvoir atteindre ses objectifs, y parviennent. Les petites collectivités qui n’ont pas les mêmes ressources que les grandes villes se verraient imposer des amendes qui seraient absolument dévastatrices et entraveraient sérieusement le travail qu’elles accomplissent.
Je pense aux préoccupations dont nous avons parlé au sujet des bateaux de plaisance et des bateaux commerciaux. L’impact que ce projet de loi aurait sur ces bateaux et sur l’économie suscite une grande inquiétude. Mon collègue le député de St. John’s Est est avocat. Il a examiné le projet de loi et a fait remarquer que tous les bateaux commerciaux et de plaisance dotés d’un système d’élimination des déchets seraient touchés par ce projet de loi. Sous sa forme actuelle, ce projet de loi laisse la possibilité d’imposer des amendes aux bateaux commerciaux et de plaisance qui déversent des déchets alors qu’ils sont sur l’eau pour toute forme d’activité.
Au mieux, ce projet de loi entre en conflit avec le règlement de la Loi sur la marine marchande du Canada. Au pire, il nuirait gravement à ces bateaux et à l’économie. Cette question n’a vraiment pas été examinée de près. Nous avons de sérieuses réserves à ce sujet en ce qui concerne les centaines de milliers de pêcheurs commerciaux et récréatifs qui devraient tous moderniser leurs bateaux, acheter de nouvelles embarcations ou modifier considérablement leurs activités afin de se conformer à ce projet de loi.
Je vais revenir sur ce que nous voulons. Mon amie et ancienne collègue Tracey Ramsey a présenté un projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire visant l’élaboration d’une stratégie nationale en matière d’eau douce. Son projet de loi aurait fait en sorte que le gouvernement fédéral consulte les provinces, les municipalités, les peuples autochtones et les intervenants, et travaille avec eux. C’est ce que nous demandons. J’espère que le député prend en considération ce que nous proposons aujourd’hui. Encore une fois, le député a omis d’interdire les substances toxiques, qui se retrouvent dans les zones de captage des eaux usées, de capturer les plastiques, comme je l’ai déjà dit, et de veiller à ce que ces systèmes soient modernisés.
Collapse
View Ted Falk Profile
CPC (MB)
View Ted Falk Profile
2021-05-10 11:49 [p.6936]
Expand
Madam Speaker, it is a real honour to speak to this private member's bill, Bill C-269, which was presented by the member for Regina—Qu'Appelle. I think it is a fantastic bill and I am going to tell the House why.
Nine hundred billion litres of raw sewage were dumped into Canada's waterways over a five-year period. It is a number that is nearly impossible to wrap one's head around, but a CTV article helpfully described this amount in more visual terms: It is “enough to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool more than 355,000 times”. That is a lot of raw sewage. That particular figure is actually a couple of years old, so we know that it has probably climbed even higher than that. We also know that this data does not necessarily capture the full picture, and that the amount of raw sewage being vented increases each year. Regardless of what that final figure looks like, we clearly have a problem on our hands.
This represents one of the largest sources of pollution in Canada's rivers and oceans. Dumping raw sewage into waterways is putting the biodiversity value of our land, waterways and marine environments at risk. Raw sewage from Canada's largest city ends up in Lake Ontario so often that Toronto city officials advise people to stay away from the city's beaches for at least two days after it rains. In my province of Manitoba, folks who go out on the Assiniboine River regularly see more debris and smell an odour after rainstorms. These are realities that have too often been ignored. It is something we cannot afford to do any longer.
Canada is a big country, and with our sizable land mass come a great number of water resources. We have around 20% of the world's freshwater here within our borders, flowing through some two million lakes and rivers. For some Canadians, the Great Lakes will come to mind, while others will think of the 1,200-kilometre St. Lawrence River. Many folks in my province of Manitoba will think of Lake Winnipeg, which holds some 284 cubic kilometres of water. That is a lot of water.
Whatever body of water or waterway comes to mind, each one is invaluable for the well-being of the communities that rely on it. Each one represents a remarkable natural inheritance and is worth protecting. This is where Bill C-269 comes in. This bill, which proposes to prohibit the dumping of raw sewage in Canadian waterways, will help all Canadians preserve and protect the rich natural heritage that we enjoy. It is a meaningful, common-sense way to protect the environment and waterways that are such big parts of our lives.
As with most of the matters we consider in the House, protecting Canada's waterways is a complex, multi-faceted matter, so much so that it could perhaps be overwhelming for the average person wanting to make a difference by protecting our oceans, lakes and rivers. I really appreciate the simplicity of Bill C-269. It is not flashy. It is not showy. It offers us a tangible, achievable solution. It is a good first step, but let us step back for a moment and talk about the problem. Why is Canada dumping so much raw sewage into our waterways?
Much of the problem can be attributed to Canada's antiquated city and municipal sewer systems. In some communities, older water systems carry both household water and stormwater through the same pipes. When rain or melting snow overwhelms these systems, they tend to be designed to vent the diluted sewage into the nearest waterway. Some cities dump raw sewage into our waterways just to undertake repairs.
Whatever the reason, billions of litres of raw sewage end up in Canadian waterways because municipalities do not have adequate infrastructure or the support to deal with it. No one likes to talk about it. It is sewage that we are discussing, after all, but we need to recognize that the water and waste water produced by residential and commercial establishments, including both human and industrial waste, will continue to find their way into our waterways untreated unless we push for a change to the status quo.
Bill C-269 changes the status quo. Some have argued this morning that it is not comprehensive enough and that it does not include everything it should. It is a great first step. Our previous Conservative government was an early challenger of the status quo. In 2012, Conservatives set new standards for treating waste water. We introduced the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations to address the largest point source of pollution in Canadian waters. The goal was to reduce the threats to fish and fish habitats, and also to protect human health by making sure the fish we eat had not been exposed to toxins.
By decreasing the levels of potentially harmful substances vented into Canada's waterways, we were able to move in the right direction to improve water quality, protect fish ecosystems and ensure Canadians could enjoy freshly caught fish without concern for their health.
While this remains an important policy adjustment, with the passage of time it has become clear that more needs to be done. The Liberals' 2015 platform told Canadians their party would “treat our freshwater as a precious resource that deserves protection and careful stewardship,” yet when the Liberals formed government in 2015, one of their first decisions was to authorize the City of Montreal to dump eight billion litres of raw sewage into the St. Lawrence. An online petition at the time saw more than 95,000 people express their objections to this plan, but the Liberal environment minister gave the City the green light. The Liberals abandoned that platform commitment in record time, but it would be the start of a pattern of the government talking big while refusing to do the hard thing and fix the problem.
By choosing to support this bill, the Liberals could demonstrate to Canadians that they would honour their commitments respecting Canada's water. With the Montreal sewage dump top of mind, maybe it is time we removed the power of federal ministers to give permits to municipalities to dump raw sewage into Canada's waterways. Bill C-269 would have this effect. This would go a long way toward restoring Canadians' confidence in how this and any future government would manage our waterways.
I want to take a moment to advocate for our municipalities. Municipalities have rightly noted that sewer systems need to be updated to ensure they can better protect Canadian waterways. As we discussed in Bill C-269 today, we recognize that partnerships with municipalities would be vital to achieving lasting change: one that would see the end of raw sewage being dumped into waterways. Federal support for local infrastructure priorities is paramount to that end. Unfortunately, we have seen the current government struggle to get the critical infrastructure support that municipalities need out the door.
Just recently, the Auditor General said that the Liberal infrastructure plan has been beset by setbacks, leaving billions unspent or delayed until later this decade. I find it frustrating, and I think many Canadians would agree, that although once again the Liberals are so quick to talk about the importance of caring for our environment, they are so focused on talk that they fail to do the work.
Of course, we know that not every infrastructure dollar will end up constructing water and wastewater infrastructure: Roads, bridges and other projects must be built too, but when the Liberals fail to properly manage billions in infrastructure spending, there will be valuable projects that simply are not built, including those helping to protect Canada's water and waterways. Recognizing the Liberal government's failures in this area, Bill C-269 takes into consideration that municipalities need time to upgrade their wastewater systems. The coming-into-force component of this bill would give municipalities that may not have the capacity to fully treat the water they expel the time to do so. Passing this bill is part of the equation, but Canadians also need the Liberals to get their act together on infrastructure to support the improvements needed to make this happen.
Sometimes, other parties accuse the Conservatives of being stuck in the past, but there is nothing wrong with looking to the past to better understand who we are and how we should move forward. When we look at Canada's past, we see the enormous role of our waterways in the development of our nation. For indigenous peoples they were highways connecting their communities. They brought people together for religious, cultural and economic events. The waterways guided the paths of early European explorers, and helped them out of a vast territory. For fur traders, waterways were trade routes, fostering economic activity. All of our forebears recognized and respected our waterways, and we have benefited from the healthy waterways they left for us.
As we look back, we see that Canadians have relied on our waterways over generations for many things, including transportation, commerce, food, resources and recreation. The past reminds us of the ways in which our waterways have served us, and is a reminder that we must serve as stewards of them as well. I want to encourage all my colleagues to support Bill C-269, so that we too can leave a rich natural inheritance to future generations.
I have heard previous members discuss at length how the previous Harper government did not do something, or how the municipalities do not have enough money. This is a partnership that looks forward to protecting—
Madame la Présidente, c’est vraiment un honneur de parler de ce projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C-269, que le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle a présenté. À mon avis, c’est un projet de loi fantastique, et je vais expliquer à la Chambre pourquoi.
Neuf cents milliards de litres d’eaux usées brutes ont été déversés dans les cours d’eau du Canada sur une période de cinq ans. Il est presque impossible de se faire une idée de ce que ce chiffre représente, mais un article de CTV a décrit utilement cette quantité en des termes plus visuels: c’est suffisant pour remplir plus de 355 000 fois une piscine olympique. Cela fait beaucoup d’eaux usées brutes. Ce chiffre date en fait de quelques années, et nous pouvons donc présumer qu’il a encore augmenté. Nous savons aussi que cette donnée ne reflète probablement pas toute l’étendue du problème et que la quantité d’eaux usées brutes évacuées augmente chaque année. Peu importe le chiffre définitif, il est évident que nous avons un problème sur les bras.
Cela représente l’une des plus grandes sources de pollution des rivières et des océans du Canada. Le déversement d’eaux usées brutes dans les cours d’eau met en péril la valeur de la biodiversité de nos terres, de nos cours d’eau et de nos milieux marins. Les eaux usées brutes de la plus grande ville du Canada aboutissent si souvent dans le lac Ontario que les responsables de la ville de Toronto conseillent aux gens de ne pas fréquenter les plages de la ville pendant au moins deux jours après une pluie. Dans ma province, le Manitoba, les gens qui naviguent sur la rivière Assiniboine après un orage voient régulièrement plus de débris et sentent une odeur. Ces situations ont été trop souvent ignorées. Nous ne pouvons nous permettre d’agir ainsi plus longtemps.
Le Canada est un grand pays, et notre masse terrestre considérable renferme de nombreuses ressources en eau. Environ 20 % de l’eau douce du monde se trouve à l’intérieur de nos frontières et coule dans quelque deux millions de lacs et de rivières. Les Grands Lacs viendront à l’esprit de certains Canadiens, tandis que d’autres penseront au fleuve Saint-Laurent, long de 1 200 kilomètres. Bien des gens du Manitoba penseront au lac Winnipeg, qui contient quelque 284 kilomètres cubes d’eau. C’est beaucoup.
Quel que soit le plan d’eau ou la voie navigable qui nous vient à l’esprit, chacun d’eux est inestimable pour le bien-être des collectivités qui en dépendent. Chacun d’eux représente un patrimoine naturel remarquable et mérite d’être protégé. C’est là que le projet de loi C-269 entre en jeu. En proposant d’interdire le déversement d’eaux usées brutes dans les cours d’eau canadiens, il aidera tous les Canadiens à préserver et à protéger le riche patrimoine naturel dont nous jouissons. C’est un moyen judicieux et sensé de protéger l’environnement et les cours d’eau qui occupent une place si importante dans nos vies.
Comme c’est le cas de la plupart des questions que nous examinons à la Chambre, la protection des voies navigables du Canada est une question complexe et pluridimensionnelle, à tel point qu’elle pourrait peut-être dépasser le simple citoyen qui voudrait contribuer à protéger nos océans, nos lacs et nos rivières. J’apprécie vraiment la simplicité du projet de loi C-269. Il n’est pas tape-à-l’œil. Il ne jette pas de la poudre aux yeux. Il nous offre une solution concrète et réalisable. C’est un premier pas dans la bonne direction, mais prenons un peu de recul et parlons du problème. Pourquoi le Canada déverse-t-il autant d’eaux usées brutes dans ses cours d’eau?
Une grande partie du problème peut être attribuée à la vétusté des réseaux d’égouts urbains et municipaux du Canada. Dans certaines collectivités, les vieux systèmes transportent à la fois les eaux usées et les eaux pluviales dans les mêmes conduites. Lorsque la pluie ou la fonte des neiges engorge ces systèmes, ceux-ci sont généralement conçus pour évacuer les eaux usées diluées dans le cours d’eau le plus proche. Certaines villes déversent des eaux usées brutes dans nos cours d’eau uniquement lorsqu’elles doivent effectuer des réparations.
Peu importe la raison, des milliards de litres d’eaux usées brutes aboutissent dans les cours d’eau canadiens parce que les municipalités ne disposent pas de l’infrastructure suffisante ou du soutien nécessaire pour les traiter. Personne n’aime en parler. Après tout, c’est d’eaux usées que nous parlons, mais nous devons reconnaître que l’eau et les eaux usées produites par les établissements résidentiels et commerciaux, y compris les déchets humains et industriels, se retrouveront encore dans nos cours d’eau sans être traitées, à moins que nous ne fassions pression pour changer le statu quo.
Le projet de loi C-269 change le statu quo. Certains ont fait valoir ce matin qu’il ne va pas assez loin et qu’il ne couvre pas tout ce qu’il devrait couvrir. C’est un excellent premier pas. Le gouvernement conservateur précédent a été un des premiers à remettre en question le statu quo. En 2012, les conservateurs ont établi de nouvelles normes pour le traitement des eaux usées. Nous avons adopté le Règlement sur les effluents des systèmes d’assainissement des eaux usées pour lutter contre la plus grande source ponctuelle de pollution des eaux canadiennes. L’objectif était d’atténuer les menaces pour le poisson et son habitat, ainsi que de protéger la santé humaine en s’assurant que le poisson que nous mangeons n’a pas été exposé à des toxines.
En réduisant les niveaux de substances potentiellement nocives rejetées dans les cours d’eau du Canada, nous avons pu aller dans la bonne direction pour améliorer la qualité de l’eau, protéger les écosystèmes du poisson et faire en sorte que les Canadiens puissent déguster du poisson fraîchement pêché sans craindre pour leur santé.
Cela demeure un ajustement important de la politique, mais avec le temps, il est devenu évident que nous devons en faire plus. Le programme électoral des libéraux en 2015 disait aux Canadiens que leur parti allait traiter « nos plans d’eau douce comme des ressources précieuses qu’il convient de protéger et de gérer avec prudence ». Pourtant, lorsqu’ils ont formé le gouvernement en 2015, l’une de leurs premières décisions a été d’autoriser la Ville de Montréal à déverser 8 milliards de litres d’eaux usées brutes dans le Saint-Laurent. À l’époque, dans une pétition en ligne, plus de 95 000 personnes avaient exprimé leur objection à ce plan, mais la ministre libérale de l’Environnement avait donné le feu vert à la Ville. Les libéraux ont abandonné cet engagement électoral en un temps record, mais ce fut le début d’une tendance du gouvernement à faire de beaux discours tout en refusant de prendre des mesures difficiles et de régler le problème.
En choisissant d’appuyer ce projet de loi, les libéraux montreraient aux Canadiens qu’ils respectent leurs engagements vis-à-vis des eaux canadiennes. Quand on pense à ce qui s’est passé avec le déversement d’eaux usées à Montréal, on se dit qu'il est temps de retirer aux ministres fédéraux le pouvoir d’autoriser les municipalités à déverser des eaux usées non traitées dans les cours d’eau canadiens. C’est ce que propose le projet de loi C-269, ce qui contribuera à rétablir la confiance des Canadiens dans la façon dont le gouvernement actuel et ceux qui lui succéderont gèrent nos cours d’eau.
J’aimerais pendant quelques instants défendre les intérêts de nos municipalités. Elles sont nombreuses à faire remarquer, avec raison, que les systèmes de traitement des eaux ont besoin d’être actualisés afin de mieux protéger les cours d’eau du Canada. Au cours de notre discussion d'aujourd'hui sur le projet de loi C-269, nous avons reconnu que les partenariats avec les municipalités sont essentiels si on veut véritablement changer vraiment les choses et mettre un terme au déversement d’eaux usées non traitées dans les cours d’eau. L’aide du fédéral pour le financement des infrastructures locales est à cet égard indispensable. Malheureusement, nous constatons que l’actuel gouvernement a beaucoup de difficultés à fournir aux municipalités l’aide dont elles ont grandement besoin en matière d’infrastructures.
Encore récemment, le vérificateur général a déclaré que le plan libéral en matière d’infrastructures a connu d’innombrables revers, de sorte que des milliards de dollars n’ont pas été dépensés ou ne seront débloqués que plus tard au cours de la décennie. Comme beaucoup d’autres Canadiens, je trouve frustrant que les libéraux s’empressent toujours de faire de beaux discours sur la nécessité de protéger l’environnement, mais que leurs discours ne sont jamais suivis d’actions concrètes.
Nous savons bien sûr que les crédits consacrés aux infrastructures ne serviront pas tous à construire des infrastructures pour le traitement de l’eau et des eaux usées. Il faut en effet construire aussi des routes, des ponts et d’autres aménagements, mais étant donné que les libéraux ont mal géré des milliards de dollars de financement d’infrastructures, il est évident que certains aménagements, pourtant fort utiles, ne seront pas réalisés, y compris ceux qui servent à protéger nos eaux et nos cours d’eau. Prenant acte de l’impéritie du gouvernement fédéral dans ce domaine, le projet de loi C-269 reconnaît que les municipalités ont besoin de temps pour améliorer leur système de traitement des eaux usées. La disposition d’entrée en vigueur de ce projet de loi donne à celles qui n’ont pas les moyens de traiter toutes les eaux qu’elles déversent un certain délai pour améliorer leur système de traitement. L’adoption de ce projet de loi est nécessaire, mais les Canadiens ont aussi besoin que les libéraux remettent de l’ordre dans leur gestion du financement des infrastructures afin que les installations qui en ont besoin puissent être améliorées.
Les autres partis accusent parfois les conservateurs d’être rétrogrades, mais il n’y a rien de mal à s’inspirer du passé pour mieux comprendre qui nous sommes et où nous allons. Or, quand on se penche sur l’histoire du Canada, on se rend compte du rôle considérable qu’ont joué nos cours d’eau dans la construction de notre pays. Pour les Autochtones, les cours d’eau étaient des voies de communication entre leurs communautés et leur permettaient de se rassembler pour des événements religieux, culturels et économiques. Les cours d’eau ont permis aux premiers explorateurs européens de sillonner notre vaste territoire. Pour les négociants en fourrures, les cours d’eau étaient des routes commerciales qui leur permettaient de générer de l'activité économique. Tous nos ancêtres respectaient nos cours d’eau, et ils nous les ont laissés dans un bon état.
Les Canadiens utilisent les cours d’eau depuis des générations, notamment pour le transport, le commerce, l’alimentation, les ressources et les loisirs. Il est important de se tourner vers le passé pour comprendre le rôle qu’ont joué les cours d’eau au Canada et pour se souvenir qu’il faut continuer de les protéger. J’invite mes collègues à appuyer le projet de loi C-269, car il nous permettra de laisser aux générations futures un héritage naturel riche et en bonne santé.
Certains députés ont dit tout à l’heure que le gouvernement Harper n’avait rien fait, ou que les municipalités n’avaient pas assez d’argent. C’est grâce au partenariat que nous réussirons à protéger…
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-05-10 11:59 [p.6938]
Expand
Resuming debate, the hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change.
Nous poursuivons le débat. Le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique a la parole.
Collapse
View Chris Bittle Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Chris Bittle Profile
2021-05-10 12:00 [p.6938]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I rise today to speak to Bill C-269. Ultimately, the government opposes the bill for multiple reasons, including because it would actually reduce environmental protection. The bill would negatively impact current federal, provincial and territorial collaborations on waste water, it would impose significant financial and practical challenges on all levels of government and it would be redundant and could actually weaken existing federal pollution prevention powers.
Our government is committed to protecting and managing water quality in our rivers, lakes and oceans. We recognize the critical importance of removing raw sewage from our waterways to keep our environment clean and healthy. That is why our government is already implementing a robust and effective approach for addressing waste-water pollution, an approach that is achieving results.
This approach implements the national waste-water strategy that was developed after 10 years of extensive negotiation, co-operation and agreement with provincial and territorial partners. Under this strategy, municipalities and indigenous communities are working hard to build and upgrade important public infrastructure that can safely address significant sources of pollution and protect the environment using predictable and achievable timelines.
In contrast, the bill would impose an arbitrary and unachievable five-year timeline for communities to conduct additional work, while incurring significant new costs, only to address the least significant source of pollution, such as maintenance or storm-water releases. The bill would jeopardize the current national strategy by unilaterally imposing unanticipated requirements upon our provincial and territorial partners, risking a decade of close collaboration and negotiation.
At a time when we are focused on critical national issues such as dealing with COVID, economic recovery, charting a path forward toward a net-zero future, this bill would put significant pressures on federal-provincial—
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi C-269. En bref, le gouvernement s'oppose au projet de loi pour de multiples raisons, notamment le fait qu'il amoindrirait la protection environnementale, qu'il nuirait à la collaboration des gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux concernant les eaux usées, qu'il imposerait à tous les ordres de gouvernement des difficultés considérables d'ordre financier et pratique, qu'il est redondant et qu'il risque d'affaiblir les pouvoirs existants du gouvernement fédéral en matière de prévention de la pollution.
Le gouvernement est résolu à protéger et à gérer la qualité de l'eau de nos rivières, de nos lacs et de nos océans. Nous sommes conscients de l'importance primordiale d'éliminer le rejet d'eaux usées non traitées dans nos cours d'eau afin de garder notre environnement propre et sain. Voilà pourquoi le gouvernement adopte déjà une approche robuste et efficace à l'égard de la pollution par les eaux usées, une approche qui produit des résultats.
Cette approche met en œuvre la stratégie nationale en matière d'eaux usées, qui a été créée conformément à l'entente conclue avec les partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux après 10 ans de coopération et de négociation approfondie. Grâce à cette stratégie, les municipalités et les collectivités autochtones travaillent fort pour aménager et moderniser d'importantes infrastructures publiques capables de remédier en toute sécurité aux sources de pollution et de protéger l'environnement selon des échéances prévisibles et réalisables.
En revanche, le projet de loi imposerait aux collectivités un délai arbitraire et irréalisable de cinq ans pour effectuer des travaux supplémentaires, à des coûts considérables, simplement pour remédier à la source de pollution la moins importante, c'est-à-dire les rejets liés aux travaux d'entretien et les rejets d'eaux pluviales. Le projet de loi compromettrait la stratégie nationale actuelle en imposant unilatéralement des exigences imprévues à nos partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux, mettant en péril l'aboutissement d'une décennie d'étroite collaboration et de négociation.
Alors que nous accordons la priorité à des dossiers nationaux fondamentaux tels qu'intervenir en réponse à la COVID, favoriser la relance économique et tracer la voie vers un avenir carboneutre, ce projet de loi mettrait beaucoup de pression sur la relation entre les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux...
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-05-10 12:02 [p.6938]
Expand
The hon. parliamentary secretary will have eight minutes to conclude his speech when this private member's bill comes up again.
The time provided for the consideration of Private Members' Business has now expired and the order is dropped to the bottom of the order of precedence on the Order Paper.
Le secrétaire parlementaire disposera de huit minutes pour terminer son discours lorsque le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire sera de nouveau mis à l'étude.
Le temps prévu pour l'étude des affaires émanant des députés est maintenant écoulé, et l'article retombe au bas de la liste de priorité du Feuilleton.
Collapse
View Catherine McKenna Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Catherine McKenna Profile
2021-05-10 12:03 [p.6938]
Expand
moved:
That, in relation to Bill C-19, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (COVID-19 response), not more than one further sitting day shall be allotted to the consideration at second reading stage of the Bill; and
That, 15 minutes before the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders on the day allotted to the consideration at second reading stage of the said Bill, any proceedings before the House shall be interrupted, if required for the purpose of this Order, and, in turn, every question necessary for the disposal of the said stage of the Bill shall be put forthwith and successively, without further debate or amendment.
propose:
Que, relativement au projet de loi C-19, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada (réponse à la COVID-19), au plus un jour de séance supplémentaire soit accordé aux délibérations à l’étape de la deuxième lecture de ce projet de loi;
Que, 15 minutes avant l’expiration du temps prévu pour les ordres émanant du gouvernement au cours du jour de séance attribué pour l’étude à l’étape de la deuxième lecture de ce projet de loi, toute délibération devant la Chambre soit interrompue, s’il y a lieu aux fins de cet ordre, et, par la suite, toute question nécessaire pour disposer de cette étape soit mise aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat ni amendement.
Collapse
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Alexandra Mendès Profile
2021-05-10 12:04 [p.6938]
Expand
Pursuant to Standing Order 67(1) there will now be a 30-minute question period.
I invite hon. members who wish to ask questions to rise in their places or to use the raise hand function so the Chair has some idea of the number of members who wish to participate in the question period.
The hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent.
Conformément à l'article 67(1) du Règlement, il y aura maintenant une période de questions de 30 minutes.
J'invite les honorables députés qui souhaitent poser des questions à se lever ou à activer la fonction « main levée » pour que la présidence ait une idée du nombre de députés qui désirent participer à cette période de questions.
L'honorable député de Louis-Saint-Laurent a la parole.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2021-05-10 12:05 [p.6938]
Expand
Madam Speaker, what a sad day for parliamentary democracy. A time allocation motion is unpleasant at any time, even if sometimes it is a necessary evil, but a time allocation motion on a bill dealing with Canadians' right to vote is rubbing salt in the wound.
What we are debating today is the way Canadians will vote in the next election if it is held during the current pandemic, which could very well be the case. In moving this time allocation motion to restrict parliamentarians' right to speak, the government is launching a direct attack on the heart of democracy. That is completely unacceptable.
We are hearing the government say that the opposition parties are doing everything they can to delay the work of Parliament, but that is completely false. The best way to delay the work of Parliament is to prorogue Parliament, like the Liberals did last August. Why is the government not assuming its responsibilities? Why is it not allowing proper and thorough debate on a bill that directly relates to Canadian democracy?
Madame la Présidente, quelle triste journée pour la démocratie parlementaire. Déjà qu'une motion d'attribution de temps n'est pas agréable du tout, même si elle peut parfois être un mal nécessaire, mais une motion d'attribution de temps sur un projet de loi qui porte sur le droit de vote des citoyens tourne le fer dans la plaie.
Ce dont nous débattons aujourd'hui est la façon dont les Canadiens vont voter lors de la prochaine élection si elle a lieu durant l'actuelle pandémie, ce qui risque d'être le cas. En présentant cette motion d'attribution de temps pour restreindre le droit de parole des parlementaires, le gouvernement s'attaque donc directement à la prunelle des yeux de la démocratie: c'est tout à fait inacceptable.
On l'entend déjà dire que les partis de l'opposition font tout pour retarder les travaux parlementaires, or c'est complètement faux. La meilleure façon de retarder les travaux parlementaires, c'est de proroger le Parlement comme les libéraux l'ont fait en août dernier. Pourquoi le gouvernement ne prend-il pas ses responsabilités et ne permet-il pas un débat adéquat et entier sur un projet de loi qui touche directement la démocratie canadienne?
Collapse
View Dominic LeBlanc Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Dominic LeBlanc Profile
2021-05-10 12:06 [p.6939]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent for his intervention and his question.
I understand that he is fully playing his role of leader of the official opposition in the House. However, when I was in the opposition and his party was in power during the Harper years, his government did not hesitate to use time allocation motions regularly, even daily on some occasions. I understand that my colleague has a role to play by expressing a certain degree of indignation, which I freely accept.
However, on the substance of the issue, we believe the time has come for the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs to study Bill C-19 and make amendments if necessary. For the hours of debate that have been held so far, the members of the opposition have already made several suggestions for improving this bill, which, let us be clear, will only be in effect for the next election. I think therefore it is time for the House to refer the bill to the committee to be studied.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon honorable collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent de son intervention et de sa question.
Je comprends qu'il joue pleinement son rôle de leader de l'opposition officielle à la Chambre. Cependant, quand j'étais dans l'opposition et que son parti était au pouvoir dans les années de M. Harper, son gouvernement n'a pas hésité à déposer régulièrement, voire quotidiennement certaines semaines, des motions d'attribution de temps à la Chambre. Je comprends donc que mon collègue a un rôle à jouer en exprimant une certaine indignation, ce que j'accepte avec bonne volonté.
Cependant, sur le fond de la question, nous croyons que l'heure est venue pour le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre d'étudier le projet de loi C-19 et d'y apporter des amendements au besoin. Pendant les heures de débat qui ont eu lieu jusqu'à maintenant, les députés de l'opposition ont déjà fait plusieurs suggestions pour améliorer ce projet de loi, lequel — entendons-nous — ne sera en vigueur que pour les prochaines élections. Je pense donc que le temps est venu pour la Chambre de renvoyer ce projet de loi au Comité pour qu'il soit étudié.
Collapse
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
View Alain Therrien Profile
2021-05-10 12:07 [p.6939]
Expand
Madam Speaker, my colleague must be joking when he says it is time to send the bill to committee.
This act demands consensus. This is about the Canada Elections Act and the right to vote, as my colleague astutely pointed out earlier. There has to be consensus. Over four months of debate, only one Bloc Québécois member has spoken to this bill.
The Liberals introduced Bill C-19 on December 10, 2020, while the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs was already looking into the issue. Instead of waiting for the committee to finish its work, the Liberals decided to introduce a bill, utterly disregarding democratic institutions, such as the committee. Now they are forcing closure with help from the NDP, their usual accomplice for this kind of tactic. They say there has been enough debate and this bill must go to committee. I am not making this up.
The Liberals have trouble managing a legislative calendar. They are a bunch of amateurs. Here is my question. Are they not ashamed to invoke closure on a bill that requires consensus?
Madame la Présidente, c'est une véritable blague que de dire que le temps est venu de renvoyer le projet de loi au Comité.
C'est une loi qui demande un consensus. On parle de la Loi électorale du Canada et du droit de vote, comme mon collègue l'a si bien mentionné plus tôt. On cherche le consensus. En quatre mois de débats, il n'y a eu qu'une personne du côté du Bloc québécois qui est intervenue là-dessus.
Les libéraux ont déposé le projet de loi C-19 le 10 décembre 2020 alors que le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre en étudiait déjà le sujet. Au lieu d'attendre que le Comité termine son travail, les libéraux ont décidé de déposer un projet de loi pour faire fi des institutions démocratiques — comme le Comité. Aujourd'hui, ils imposent un bâillon avec l'aide du NPD, le traditionnel accompagnateur de ce vice de forme. Ce faisant, ils disent qu'il y a eu assez de discussions et que le projet de loi doit être renvoyé au Comité. Cela ne s'invente pas.
Les libéraux ont de la difficulté à gérer un calendrier législatif. C'est une bande d'amateurs. Ma question est la suivante: ne sont-ils pas gênés d'imposer le bâillon sur un projet de loi qui demande un consensus?
Collapse
View Dominic LeBlanc Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Dominic LeBlanc Profile
2021-05-10 12:08 [p.6939]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague from La Prairie.
No, we are not at all ashamed to give Parliament the opportunity to pass a bill that will temporarily amend the Canada Elections Act for the next election only in response to an official request submitted to the House by the Chief Electoral Officer.
My hon. colleague from La Prairie spends his time expressing his lack of confidence in the government by voting against it. It is therefore clear that he wants an election because, otherwise, why would he spend his time doing that?
We think it is a good idea to give Elections Canada a lot more flexibility to protect residents of Quebec's long-term care facilities, for example. The proposed amendments to the Canada Elections Act were introduced in Parliament a few months ago. I would invite my colleague to recognize that, last Friday, when Bill C-19 was debated in the House of Commons, the four Conservative members who spoke about it once again insisted on delaying the vote to send this bill to committee.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon honorable collègue de La Prairie.
Non, nous ne sommes pas du tout gênés de donner la chance au Parlement d'adopter un projet de loi qui apportera à la Loi électorale des modifications temporaires, applicables seulement aux prochaines élections, répondant ainsi à une demande formelle déposée à la Chambre par le directeur général des élections.
Mon honorable collègue de La Prairie passe son temps à exprimer sa défiance envers le gouvernement en votant contre. Il est donc évident qu'il souhaite des élections, car, sinon, pourquoi passerait-il son temps à voter contre le gouvernement?
Nous croyons qu'il serait prudent d'offrir beaucoup plus de flexibilité à Élections Canada pour, par exemple, protéger les résidants des CHSLD au Québec. Les amendements proposés à la Loi électorale ont été présentés au Parlement il y a déjà plusieurs mois. J'inviterais mon collègue à constater que, vendredi passé, quand le projet de loi C-19 a été débattu à la Chambre des communes, les quatre députés conservateurs qui ont parlé ont insisté, encore une fois, pour retarder un vote permettant de renvoyer le projet de loi au Comité.
Collapse
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
2021-05-10 12:10 [p.6939]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to start by recognizing what a frustrating situation we find ourselves in as a Parliament. The election in Newfoundland and Labrador showed very clearly that even if an election during the pandemic did not precipitate a public health crisis on its own, it could have really damaging effects for democracy and for the outcomes of an election.
The government has proposed some temporary changes to the Elections Act. It has not called the bill very often, which has been a point of frustration for New Democrats, but when it has, the official opposition has often found ways to delay and stall.
We have an important bill that really needs to be passed, given that the Prime Minister repeatedly refuses to put everybody at ease and say that he will not unilaterally call an election during the pandemic. Our view is that the responsible response to that is to try to get rules in place exactly because we do not trust the Prime Minister to do the right thing.
Perhaps the government today could allay those concerns and let us know when the Prime Minister intends to commit that he will not call an election during the pandemic. When is that announcement coming?
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à commencer par reconnaître la situation frustrante dans laquelle nous nous trouvons en tant que Parlement. Les élections à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador ont montré clairement que, même si une élection pendant la pandémie ne précipite pas en soi une crise de santé publique, elle peut avoir des effets vraiment néfastes sur la démocratie et sur les résultats d’une élection.
Le gouvernement a proposé quelques changements temporaires à la Loi électorale. Il n’a pas eu recours à ce projet de loi très souvent, ce qui a été un point de frustration pour les néo-démocrates, mais lorsqu’il l’a fait, l’opposition officielle a souvent trouvé des moyens de retarder et de bloquer l’activité.
Nous avons un projet de loi important qui doit vraiment être adopté, étant donné que le premier ministre a refusé à plusieurs reprises de mettre tout le monde à l’aise et de dire qu’il ne déclenchera pas unilatéralement une élection pendant la pandémie. Nous pensons que la bonne réaction à une telle situation est d’essayer de mettre en place des règles, précisément parce que nous ne pouvons pas compter sur le premier ministre pour faire ce qu’il faut.
Peut-être que le gouvernement pourrait aujourd’hui apaiser ces inquiétudes et nous dire quand le premier ministre a l’intention de s’engager à ne pas déclencher d’élection pendant la pandémie. Quand cette annonce sera-t-elle faite?
Collapse
View Dominic LeBlanc Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Dominic LeBlanc Profile
2021-05-10 12:11 [p.6939]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague, the member for Elmwood—Transcona, for his constructive conversation with respect to this legislation. We have taken note, obviously, of his comments in the House during the debate at second reading.
The New Democratic Party has constructively and thoughtfully suggested, for example, some improvements around ensuring that campus voting can take place and potentially using Canada Post locations in small rural communities like those in my riding. The Canada Post office may offer an additional place where people, for example, could apply to receive a special ballot.
Those are precisely the kinds of discussions that we are hoping the procedure and House affairs committee can have around Bill C-19.
We would welcome working with all colleagues around amendments that would improve the legislation. However, we think the time has come for Parliament to take its responsibilities, study the bill in committee and offer Elections Canada the tools necessary should there be an election during the pandemic, and to do so safely and prudently in the interest of protecting everybody who works in elections.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue, le député d’Elmwood—Transcona, de sa conversation constructive au sujet de cette mesure législative. Nous avons pris note, évidemment, de ses commentaires à la Chambre pendant le débat en deuxième lecture.
Le Nouveau Parti démocratique a suggéré de manière constructive et réfléchie, par exemple, certaines améliorations visant à garantir que le vote sur les campus puisse avoir lieu et l’utilisation éventuelle des bureaux de Postes Canada dans les petites collectivités rurales, comme celles de ma circonscription. Le bureau de Postes Canada pourrait offrir un endroit supplémentaire où les gens, par exemple, pourraient demander à recevoir un bulletin de vote spécial.
C’est précisément le genre de débat que nous espérons que le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pourra avoir au sujet du projet de loi C-19.
Nous serions heureux de travailler avec tous nos collègues sur des amendements qui amélioreraient le projet de loi. Cependant, nous pensons que le moment est venu pour le Parlement d’assumer ses responsabilités, d’étudier le projet de loi en comité et d’offrir à Élections Canada les outils nécessaires en cas d’élection durant la pandémie, et de le faire de manière sûre et prudente pour la protection de tous ceux qui travaillent dans le domaine des élections.
Collapse
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
2021-05-10 12:12 [p.6940]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I have heard some comments today from members of the official opposition and the Bloc that seem to suggest that they are not too familiar with the bill or the parliamentary process.
First, the leader in the House for the official opposition said that this would change the way Canadians would vote in the next election, which is not true. It would only change if an election happened during a pandemic; there are sunset clauses on this. Could the minister confirm that these are only temporary measures during the pandemic?
Second, the Bloc suggests that this is a done deal after today, but there is still a lot of parliamentary work to go on from this point. Indeed, the bill would go to committee for rounds of discussion there and then it would come back to the House for another debate.
Could the minister comment on those two points?
Madame la Présidente, j’ai entendu aujourd’hui quelques commentaires de la part de députés de l’opposition officielle et du Bloc qui semblent indiquer qu’ils ne connaissent pas très bien le projet de loi ou le processus parlementaire.
Tout d’abord, le leader de l’opposition officielle à la Chambre a dit que cela changerait la façon dont les Canadiens voteraient aux prochaines élections, ce qui n’est pas vrai. Cela ne changerait que si une élection se tenait pendant une pandémie; il y a des clauses de temporisation à ce sujet. Le ministre pourrait-il confirmer qu’il ne s’agit que de mesures temporaires pendant la pandémie?
Deuxièmement, le Bloc suggère que c’est une affaire réglée après aujourd’hui, mais il y a encore beaucoup de travail parlementaire à faire à partir de maintenant. En effet, le projet de loi sera renvoyé en comité pour une série de débats, puis il reviendra à la Chambre pour un autre débat.
Le ministre pourrait-il commenter ces deux points?
Collapse
Results: 1 - 30 of 30956 | Page: 1 of 1032

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data