Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 133
View John Baird Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you very much, Madam Chair.
In 2006, our government was elected on a mandate to replace the culture of entitlement and corruption, which was out of control here in our nation's capital, with one of accountability.
We all remember the gun registry fiasco, the HRSDC boondoggle, and the sponsorship scandal, Adscam. It's a shameful legacy for our country and one that we, as a government, have made significant efforts to put behind us.
In February 2006, I was asked by the Prime Minister to serve as President of the Treasury Board and to bring forward our government's number one priority, the Federal Accountability Act, the toughest piece of anti-corruption legislation in Canadian history. Through that legislation we have forever changed the way the federal government conducts its business and have given Canadians both responsible and accountable government.
I was proud of my term as President of the Treasury Board, and I believe my record there speaks for itself. Contrasted with the former Liberal administration that preceded us, one that the Auditor General said “showed little regard for Parliament, the Financial Administration Act, contracting rules and regulations, transparency, and value for money”, the Treasury Board, under our government, took its responsibility to the Canadian taxpayer very seriously.
We provided relentless scrutiny of government spending and challenged countless submissions that came before us. That was our role as we saw it, to be the final guardians of the public purse. In some cases, submissions were outright rejected. Some were deferred in order to obtain more information or to make necessary changes directed by the board. And many times, submissions were approved with conditions imposed in order to ensure the greatest accountability.
This was the case for the Ottawa light rail transit project. On September 28, 2006, the contribution agreement on the Ottawa LRT was put before the federal Treasury Board. This happened right in the middle of a municipal election campaign during which the future of light rail was a hotly contested issue for the people of Ottawa and a major flashpoint in the election.
Many local groups and organizations, city councillors, and civic leaders had come out opposed to the project and called for it to be held back until after the municipal election. In fact, Gord Hunter, a city councillor and a former Liberal Party candidate who had run against me in a previous election, wrote to me in August 2006 and urged me to, in his own words,“Help save the City of Ottawa and withdraw funding Support for this project until the City comes up with a plan that makes more sense. It is your right to do so and it is the right thing to do.”
Two hundred million dollars had been committed by the Government of Canada towards Ottawa's transit, and we had a responsibility to ensure that this federal money was spent wisely and in the best interests of taxpayers. That's what we were elected to do; that's what I was elected to do.
The scrutiny given to this project was just as rigorous as any other brought before the Treasury Board. An added challenge, however, was that the submission was brought to the Treasury Board in the middle of an election campaign, a campaign during which the public was either deeply opposed to the project or had many unanswered questions.
Being put in this undesirable position, many questions come to mind. First, why was it presented to the Treasury Board in the middle of an election? And why was there a sense of urgency to get it approved? Was it because the two leading candidates for mayor were opposed to the project? Would it not be more prudent to wait a few weeks until after the people voted? Why potentially bind a new mayor and council to something they would ultimately be responsible for if they had no say in its design? Would it not be better to let it be their decision? After all, this was the largest investment of infrastructure dollars ever put before the city.
The editorial position of the Ottawa Citizen stated at the time that “A reasonable voter might ask: Why not hold off a few weeks and let the new city council call a vote of its own, just to ensure that, in the eyes of the public, this massive infrastructure project has full legitimacy?”
The former mayor had told his council, as he had told me and the public, that there was an urgency to approve the contribution agreement. He stated that the deadline was October 1, 2006, well in advance of the November 13 municipal election date. In fact, the then mayor went so far as to publicly warn of the dire consequences if the project was not approved prior to Ottawa voters casting their ballots. Ottawa residents were warned of penalties of between $60 million and $80 million if the contribution agreement wasn't signed immediately.
Oddly enough, when that date passed, we were told that the real date was October 4. Then it was October 5, and then, of course, it was October 15.
However, what the contract revealed, and I am one of the few people to this day who've actually read the contract as it is still unfortunately kept secret from the people and taxpayers of Ottawa, was that the city had the right to extend the deadline for another 60 days--well after the municipal election--keeping the prices fixed and allowing the deal to be signed at the latest December 15, 2006, with absolutely no penalty. In other words, we were all lied to in a blatant attempt to further a political agenda.
On October 10, 2006, the Government of Canada gave approval for the project subject to ratification by the new city council that would be elected on November 13. I made it clear at the time that while it was not our place to micromanage the affairs of the city or to choose sides in municipal elections, we felt it was important that a project of such magnitude should have the full support of the people of Ottawa and the soon-to-be-elected city council as they would be the ones who would ultimately have to stand behind the project.
From the very beginning, this project had been shrouded in secrecy with very little information being shared with the public and even city council. In fact, a poll of almost 2,000 people conducted by the Ottawa Business Journal in February 2006 showed over 90% of respondents were “unsatisfied about the city's enforced secrecy amid rumours the project could top $1 billion when all is said and done”. Remember, this was a project that was originally going to cost $600 million, and then $760 million, with an eventual price tagged at $919 million, and there were still many, many uncosted items revealed in the contract that would have kept that price escalating.
In May 2006 former city councillor and mayoralty candidate Alex Munter stated:
I am deeply dismayed by what's happened with light rail expansion. It's been dividing people, dividing communities, because of concerns over secrecy, bad process and potential cost overruns.
It was easy to see that in no time, if it was not brought under control, it would become a $1 billion boondoggle.
To quote again the Ottawa Citizen on this issue:
Turns out there are some people who favour secrecy, who are happy to keep the taxpayer in the dark, and not surprisingly they belong to the federal Liberal party--the same party that when in power was hardly famous for openness and transparency.
On November 13, 2006, Ottawa voters finally had their say. More than 244,000 of them cast ballots in favour of two candidates who did not support the Ottawa LRT project, compared to just 46,000 voters supporting the mayor and his plan for light rail. That's a margin, Madam Chair, of five to one against the proposed light rail deal. The message was loud. The message was clear.
On December 6, 2006, the newly elected city council passed a motion to not proceed with the previous LRT project that was presented to the federal government, but instead chose a new direction that eliminated the downtown portion of the project from the initial proposal. I sent a letter to the City of Ottawa soon after reaffirming the support of the Government of Canada. Our $200 million commitment was, as it always had been, still on the table.
Because the project had not changed, I also indicated that it would take some time for us to ensure due diligence was performed on behalf of taxpayers due to the scope of the project. I also indicated that I believed the consortium would respect the wishes of a new city council and allow them to have additional time necessary to move the project forward.
The provincial government also said they would have to take a look at the new project but were uncertain as to their commitment. Later, on December 14, Ottawa city council had a new vote and decided not to proceed with either plan, opting instead to start from scratch. That was the decision of council, and it was entirely theirs.
This committee is asking whether or not there was political interference in the federal government's decision to approve this funding subject to ratification by the new council. Some would argue that redirecting the O-Train out to Barrhaven on the eve of a federal election campaign in an attempt to save David Pratt was political interference, or that Dalton McGuinty's government sending a letter to the City of Ottawa just 72 hours prior to voting starting in what the Ottawa Citizen described as a push to help Bob Chiarelli “win the election after the polls showed his support sinking” would be political interference.
All I can say is what we did was right for the taxpayers. We made a decision to approve the contribution agreement and let the newly elected city council come up with its own conclusions on the future of light rail. That's what they decided to do from that point on. It was up to them.
Thank you. Merci beaucoup.
Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.
En 2006, les Canadiens ont élu notre gouvernement et nous ont donné le mandat de remplacer la culture de corruption et de « tout m'est dû », qui était hors contrôle, ici, dans notre capital nationale, par une culture de responsabilité.
Nous nous souvenons tous du fiasco du registre des armes à feu, du cafouillis à RHDCC et du scandale des commandites. Tous ces événements donnaient une bien piètre image de notre pays, et c'est pourquoi nous avons tenté, en tant que gouvernement, de nous en éloigner le plus possible.
En février 2006, le premier ministre m'a demandé de devenir président du Conseil du Trésor et de faire connaître la principale priorité de notre gouvernement, la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité, la Loi anticorruption la plus sévère de l'histoire canadienne. Grâce à cette mesure législative, nous avons modifié, pour toujours, la façon dont le gouvernement s'acquitte de ses responsabilités, et nous avons offert aux Canadiens un gouvernement responsable et tenu de rendre des comptes.
Je suis fier de mon mandat comme Président du Conseil du Trésor, et je crois que mon dossier se passe fort bien de commentaires. Si l'on compare les actes du Conseil du Trésor sous l'administration libérale qui nous a précédé, celle dont la vérificatrice générale a dit qu'elle avait fait peu de cas du Parlement, de la Loi sur la gestion des finances publiques, des règles et des règlements sur la passation des marchés, de la transparence et de l'optimisation des ressources, par rapport à ce que le Conseil du Trésor est devenu sous notre gouvernement, on constate qu'il s'est acquitté de ses responsabilités envers les contribuables canadiens de façon très consciencieuse.
Nous avons surveillé étroitement et inlassablement les dépenses du gouvernement, et remis en question un grand nombre de présentations qui nous ont été soumises. À nos yeux, nous devons être les derniers protecteurs du Trésor public. Dans certains cas, les présentations ont été rejetées sans délai. Dans d'autres cas, le Conseil a tenté d'obtenir plus d'information ou a exigé que des changements soient apportés. Dans bien des cas, les présentations ont été approuvées selon certaines conditions visant à garantir une responsabilité optimale.
C'est ce qui s'est produit dans le cas du projet de train léger à Ottawa. Le 28 septembre 2006, l'Accord de contribution concernant le projet de train léger à Ottawa était présenté au Conseil du Trésor fédéral. Nous étions alors en plein coeur d'une campagne électorale municipale au cours de laquelle la question du futur train léger suscitait des débats enflammés au sein de la population d'Ottawa et promettait de jouer un grand rôle dans l'élection.
De nombreux organismes et groupes locaux, de même que des conseillers et des dirigeants municipaux, s'étaient opposés au projet et avaient demandé sa suspension jusqu'à après l'élection municipale. En fait, Gord Hunger, conseiller municipal qui a aussi déjà été candidat pour le Parti libéral et qui m'a affronté dans le cadre d'une élection antérieure, m'a écrit en août 2006 pour me supplier. Je le cite: « Sauvez la Ville d'Ottawa et retenez le financement promis pour ce projet jusqu'à ce que la Ville élabore un plan plus éclairé. Vous avez le droit de le faire, et vous devez le faire. »
Le gouvernement du Canada avait promis un financement de deux cents millions de dollars pour le transport en commun à Ottawa, et nous avions la responsabilité de nous assurer que ces fonds fédéraux étaient dépensés intelligemment et dans l'intérêt supérieur des contribuables. C'est pour cela que nous avons été élus; c'est pour cela que j'ai été élu.
L'examen de ce projet a été tout aussi rigoureux que l'examen de tout autre projet présenté au Conseil du Trésor. Nous faisions toutefois face à un défi supplémentaire, puisque le projet a été présenté au Conseil du Trésor en pleine campagne électorale, et que le grand public était, à ce moment-là, soit fermement opposé au projet, soit incertain parce qu'il n'avait pas obtenu les réponses à de nombreuses questions.
Quand je me suis retrouvé dans cette situation peu enviable, je me suis posé de nombreuses questions. D'abord, pourquoi le projet était-il présenté au Conseil du Trésor en pleine élection? Pourquoi avais-je l'impression que le projet devait être approuvé rapidement? Est-ce que c'était parce que les deux candidats à la mairie en tête s'opposaient au projet? N'aurait-il pas été plus prudent d'attendre quelques semaines, après l'élection? Pourquoi courir le risque d'obliger un nouveau maire et un nouveau conseil à s'acquitter d'une responsabilité dont ils n'auraient pas approuvé la conception? N'était-il pas préférable de les laisser décider? Après tout, il s'agissait du projet d'infrastructure le plus coûteux jamais présenté à la Ville.
À l'époque, l'éditorialiste de l'Ottawa Citizen affirmait ce qui suit: « Un électeur raisonnable pourrait se demander pourquoi on n'attend pas quelques semaines pour laisser le nouveau conseil municipal procéder à son propre vote de façon à ce que, pour le grand public, cet imposant projet d'infrastructure soit pleinement légitime. »
Le maire de l'époque avait déclaré à son conseil, de même qu'au grand public et à moi-même, qu'il fallait approuver l'accord de contribution de toute urgence. Il prétendait que la date d'échéance était le 1er octobre 2006, soit bien avant le 13 novembre, la date de l'élection municipale. En fait, il est allé jusqu'à annoncer publiquement qu'il y aurait des conséquences désastreuses si le projet n'était pas approuvé avant que les électeurs d'Ottawa n'aient déposé leurs bulletins de vote. Il a menacé les résidents d'Ottawa de pénalités allant de 60 $ à 80 $ millions de dollars si l'accord de contribution n'était pas signé sur-le-champ.
Étrangement, après cette date, on nous a dit que la véritable date était plutôt le 4 octobre. Puis ça été le 5 octobre, et, évidemment, le 15 octobre.
Cependant, ce que le contrat révélait — et je suis l'une des rares personnes qui a, à ce jour, véritablement lu le contrat, puisqu'il demeure caché aux habitants et aux contribuables d'Ottawa — c'est que la VIlle pouvait prolonger le délai pendant encore 60 jours, soit jusqu'à bien après l'élection municipale, sans que les prix ne soient modifiés, ce qui permettait à l'accord d'être signé au plus tard le 15 décembre 2006, et ce, sans aucune pénalité. En d'autres termes, on nous a tous menti pour lamentablement tenter de favoriser certains intérêts politiques.
Le 10 octobre 2006, le gouvernement du Canada approuvait le projet, à condition que le nouveau conseil municipal qui serait élu le 13 novembre le ratifie. Comme je l'ai dit clairement à l'époque, nous ne voulions pas nous mêler de la microgestion des affaires municipales, ni choisir un camp dans les élections municipales, mais nous estimions qu'il était important qu'un projet aussi important profite de l'appui total de la population d'Ottawa et du conseil municipal qui serait élu sous peu, puisque ce serait eux qui, au bout du compte, devraient appuyer le projet.
Dès le début, ce projet a été placé sous le sceau du secret, et très peu de renseignements ont été fournis au grand public, et même au conseil municipal. En effet, un sondage mené par l'Ottawa Business Journal en février 2006 auprès de quelque 2 000 personnes a révélé que plus de 90 p. 100 des répondants étaient insatisfaits du secret entourant le silence de la Ville à propos de rumeurs voulant que le projet atteigne 1 milliard de dollars quand tout serait fait. N'oubliez pas que le projet devait, au départ, coûter 600 millions de dollars, qu'il a ensuite été réévalué à 760 millions de dollars et qu'il a fini par être évalué à 919 millions de dollars, sans compter de nombreux éléments non chiffrés que nous avons découverts dans le contrat et qui auraient entraîné une hausse du coût du projet.
En mai 2006, Alex Munter, candidat à la mairie et ancien conseiller municipal, affirmait ce qui suit:
Je suis atterré de voir ce qui s'était passé avec la prolongation du train léger. À cause du secret entourant ce projet, d'une mauvaise exécution et de possibles dépassements des coûts, le projet a divisé les gens et les collectivités.
On pouvait facilement comprendre que, si le projet n'était pas maîtrisé, il deviendrait rapidement un cafouillis de 1 milliard de dollars.
Je cite de nouveau l'Ottawa Citizen à ce sujet:
Il semble que certaines personnes apprécient le secret et sont heureuses de tenir les contribuables à l'écart. Il n'est pas étonnant de constater que ces personnes appartiennent au Parti libéral fédéral, parti qui n'était certainement pas reconnu pour son ouverture et sa transparence quand il était au pouvoir.
Le 13 novembre 2006, les électeurs d'Ottawa ont enfin pu faire connaître leur point de vue. Ils ont été plus de 244 000 à voter pour les deux candidats qui n'appuyaient pas le projet de train léger à Ottawa, par rapport à seulement 46 000 personnes qui ont voté pour le maire et son projet de train léger. Cela signifie, madame la présidente, que pour un électeur favorable au projet de train léger, cinq s'y opposaient. Le message était clair et puissant.
Le 6 décembre 2006, le conseil municipal nouvellement élu déposait une motion pour empêcher le projet tel qu'il avait été présenté au gouvernement fédéral d'aller de l'avant, et choisissait plutôt une nouvelle orientation selon laquelle la partie de la proposition initiale qui touchait le centre-ville était éliminée. Peu après, j'ai envoyé une lettre à la Ville d'Ottawa pour réaffirmer le soutien du gouvernement du Canada. Notre engagement de 200 millions de dollars tenait toujours, et tient encore.
Comme le projet avait changé et qu'il s'agissait d'un projet de grande envergure, j'ai précisé qu'il nous faudrait du temps pour nous assurer que l'on faisait preuve de diligence raisonnable au nom des contribuables. Je mentionnais aussi que, à mon avis, le consortium respecterait la volonté du nouveau conseil municipal et lui donnerait tout le temps requis pour aller de l'avant avec le projet.
Le gouvernement provincial a aussi annoncé qu'il devrait se pencher sur le nouveau projet, et a précisé qu'il ne connaissait pas encore le montant de son engagement. Plus tard, le 14 décembre, le conseil municipal d'Ottawa votait de nouveau et décidait de rejeter les deux plans et de recommencer à partir du début, à la place. C'était la décision du conseil, et la sienne uniquement.
Votre comité veut déterminer si le gouvernement fédéral a fait preuve d'ingérence politique quand il a décidé d'approuver le financement à condition que le nouveau conseil ratifie le projet. Certaines personnes diraient sûrement que le fait de rediriger l'O-Train vers Verrhaven à la veille d'une campagne électorale fédérale pour sauver David Pratt constitue de l'ingérence politique, ou encore que, quand le gouvernement de Dalton McGuinty envoie une lettre à la Ville d'Ottawa seulement 72 heures avant le début de l'élection dans le cadre d'une manoeuvre que l'Ottawa Citizen a qualifiée d'offensive visant à aider Bob Chiarelli à gagner l'élection après que les sondages ont annoncé la baisse de sa popularité, il se rend coupable d'ingérence politique.
Tout ce que je peux dire, c'est que nous avons pris la bonne décision pour les contribuables. Nous avons décidé d'approuver l'accord de contribution et de laisser le conseil municipal nouvellement élu tirer ses propres conclusions au sujet de l'avenir du train léger. C'est ce qu'il adécidé de faire à partir de ce moment. La décision lui appartenait.
Je vous remercie.
Collapse
View Diane Marleau Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Diane Marleau Profile
2008-04-01 9:13
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Baird.
It always was up to city council and you know that. You are here to answer questions about your involvement and using your position as the President of the Treasury Board in a municipal election. That's what you're here to answer for, not whether the project was good, bad, or indifferent. It's about your role in this.
I'm going to go to the Liberals here, to Mr. Mark Holland.
Merci, monsieur Baird.
Ça a toujours été la décision du conseil municipal, et vous le savez. Vous êtes ici pour répondre à des questions sur votre participation et sur le rôle que vous avez joué dans une élection municipale à titre de président du Conseil du Trésor. C'est pour cela que vous êtes ici -- pas pour nous dire que le projet était bon, mauvais ou qu'il vous laissait indifférent. Vous êtes ici pour parler de votre rôle dans cette affaire.
Je vais maintenant laisser la parole aux libéraux, à M. Mark Holland.
Collapse
View John Baird Profile
CPC (ON)
Or any transportation project the city would like to follow.
I think around Ottawa there was a perception that Treasury Board was a group that just met once a week and rubber-stamped things. That was not the case when I was President of the Treasury Board. We held things up, we stopped things, we turned things down, we put on conditions, and we asked a lot more tough questions.
One senior official at Treasury Board said that we asked 20 times more questions than the previous Treasury Board. I'm proud of that. That's exactly what we promised to do when we sought election: to bring a new era of accountability to federal spending. And we delivered.
Ou tout autre projet de transport que la ville voudrait mettre en oeuvre.
J'ai l'impression que, à Ottawa, on pense que le Conseil du Trésor n'est qu'un groupe qui se réunit une fois par semaine pour approuver automatiquement des projets. Ce n'était pas le cas quand j'étais président du Conseil du Trésor. Nous suspendions ou freinions des projets, nous renversions la vapeur, nous imposions des conditions, et nous posions beaucoup plus de questions difficiles.
L'un des hauts fonctionnaires du Conseil du Trésor a affirmé que nous posions 20 fois plus de questions que le conseil précédent. C'est une fierté pour moi. C'est exactement ce que nous avions promis de faire quand nous avons demandé à être élus — nous avons promis d'apporter une nouvelle ère de responsabilité en ce qui concerne les dépenses fédérales. Et nous avons respecté notre promesse.
Collapse
View John Baird Profile
CPC (ON)
The city will make a determination about what they want to do, and they'll have to live with the consequences. They made a decision to start from scratch, believing the proposal was badly flawed.
It was not done on partisan lines. Five former Liberal candidates, including a former Liberal candidate who ran against me, agreed with the decision not to proceed with the proposed light rail project, precisely because they felt it was financially irresponsible. So this was not an issue decided on party lines.
From my perspective, we promised a new era of accountability. We promised we would step in and make the difficult decisions.
If I had wanted to do the easy thing, I would go along to get along, but I wasn't elected to rubber-stamp anything. I wasn't appointed President of the Treasury Board to be a yes-man. Treasury Board, under my leadership, exercised real financial controls, and I think that's what taxpayers expected us to do.
La Ville décidera ce qu'elle veut faire, et elle devra en assumer les conséquences. Elle a décidé de repartir à zéro parce qu'elle estimait que la proposition comportait un trop grand nombre de failles.
Il n'y a pas eu de partisanerie. Cinq anciens candidats libéraux, y compris un ancien candidat libéral qui a fait campagne contre moi, ont approuvé la décision de ne pas aller de l'avant avec le projet de train léger, précisément parce qu'ils estimaient qu'il s'agissait d'un projet irresponsable sur le plan financier. La décision n'a donc pas été prise en fonction des lignes de parti.
Ce que je constate, c'est que nous avons promis une nouvelle ère de responsabilité. Nous avons promis d'agir et de prendre les décisions difficiles.
Si j'avais voulu que les choses soient faciles, j'aurais choisi la voie de la facilité, mais je n'ai pas été élu pour approuver tout ce qui passe. Je n'ai pas été nommé président du Conseil du Trésor pour tout approuver de façon inconditionnelle. Le Conseil du Trésor, sous ma direction, a exercé un véritable contrôle financier, et je crois qu'il a ainsi répondu aux attentes des contribuables.
Collapse
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
Mr. Baird, I'd like to start by asking in what capacity you acted in intervening? Was it in your role as President of the Treasury Board or as political minister for the city of Ottawa?
Monsieur Baird, j'aimerais commencer par vous demander en qualité de quoi vous êtes intervenu? Est-ce que c'était en qualité de président du Conseil du Trésor ou de lieutenant politique pour la Ville d'Ottawa?
Collapse
View John Baird Profile
CPC (ON)
President of the Treasury Board.
Président du Conseil du Trésor.
Collapse
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
Whatever. I guess many of us on the committee were somewhat dumbfounded when the Secretary of the Treasury Board said, “At no point did I say that Treasury Board asked for a copy of that contract”. The Secretary of the Treasury Board told us he had never seen the contract, that you had the contract. Is that the way you act as the President of the Treasury Board?
Peu importe. Je suppose que nous étions nombreux, au comité, à être stupéfaits quand nous avons entendu le secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor affirmer: « Je n'ai jamais dit, à quelque moment que ce soit, que le Conseil du Trésor avait demandé une copie de ce contrat. » Le secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor nous a dit qu'il n'avait jamais vu le contrat, que le contrat était en votre possession. Est-ce que c'est ainsi que vous agissez à titre de président du Conseil du Trésor?
Collapse
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
This is part of an internal memo from the City of Ottawa, dated October 10, 2006:
First let me emphasize that I regret that Minister Baird did not raise questions around the December 15 clauses directly with the City, but instead chose again to go to the media....Had the City been contacted directly, we would have clarified the difference between financial close clauses and the project's exposure to cost overruns....The media transcripts indicate that Mr. Baird has decided to apply the provisions for financial close for a use never contemplated....
So the question is simple: are you telling me that this internal memo is a lie, that these people are lying to their own staff?
Voici un extrait d'une note de service de la Ville d'Ottawa datée du 10 octobre 2006:
Je veux d'abord souligner que je déplore le fait que le ministre Baird n'a pas abordé la question des clauses relatives au 15 décembre directement avec la Ville, mais qu'il a plutôt choisi encore une fois de s'adresser aux médias... S'il avait communiqué directement avec la Ville, nous lui aurions expliqué la différence entre les clauses concernant les arrangements financiers et le risque de dépassement des coûts du projet... La transcription de la déclaration aux médias révèle que M. Baird a décidé d'appliquer les dispositions en matière d'arrangements financiers à des fins qui n'avaient jamais été envisagées...
Ma question est simple: est-ce que vous affirmez que cette note de service est un mensonge, que ces personnes mentent à leurs propres employés?
Collapse
View Meili Faille Profile
BQ (QC)
Welcome to the committee, Mr. Baird.
I would like to follow on from what my colleague was asking about the contract for the light rail transit project. You said earlier that your decision to intervene was fair and just. From reading the memos provided by the City, we know that there had been a good working relationship between Transport Canada and Infrastructure Canada for a number of years. Both of these bodies are experts in managing large infrastructure projects.
As President of the Treasury Board, what is your expertise in this field?
Bienvenue au comité, monsieur Baird.
J'aimerais poursuivre dans la même veine que ma collègue au sujet du contrat pour le train léger. Vous avez soutenu tout à l'heure avoir pris une décision juste en intervenant dans ce dossier. Ce que nous savons, selon les notes de service obtenues de la ville, c'est qu'il y avait une bonne relation de travail entre Transports Canada et Infrastructure Canada depuis plusieurs années. Ces derniers ont de l'expertise en gestion de projets, en gestion de projets d'infrastructure et de grands projets.
Quelle est votre propre expertise dans ce domaine, comme président du Conseil du Trésor?
Collapse
View John Baird Profile
CPC (ON)
He has basically backed up every single thing I have said. The contract was not meant to be seen by the federal government. I was told five times that there were different deadlines when penalties would kick in: October 1, October 4, October 5, and October 15. At some point I said, “This is ridiculous. Show me in writing. Show me in black and white.” They never intended for me to see that contract, because the moment I saw it I knew I had caught them in a lie. When he went before city council and acknowledged that, it backed up every single thing I had said.
I was told there was a huge rush, we had to sign this, and if we didn't there would be an immediate $60 million to $80 million penalty, when in fact the contract itself explicitly allowed, exactly and precisely, for this purpose. If the federal contribution agreement wasn't signed, there could be a 60-day delay.
It's regrettable that I was misled. I don't apologize for asking the tough questions. I didn't get elected to be Mr. Nice Guy and try to get along with everyone. I got elected to fight for taxpayers, to fight for every single taxpayer's dollar. I got elected on a principal agenda of accountability. I was appointed by the Prime Minister to be President of the Treasury Board and be Mr. Accountability--to ask the difficult questions that hadn't been asked for a generation in this town.
Il a essentiellement confirmé chaque chose que j'ai dite. Le gouvernement fédéral n'était pas censé examiner le contrat. On m'a dit à cinq reprises que des pénalités seraient infligées à différentes dates: le 1er, le 4, le 5 et le 15 octobre. À un certain moment, j'ai dit: « C'est ridicule. Je veux le voir par écrit. Je veux le voir noir sur blanc. » Ils n'ont jamais eu l'intention de me montrer ce contrat, car, dès que je l'ai vu, j'ai su qu'ils avaient été pris à mentir. Lorsqu'il s'est présenté devant le conseil municipal et a reconnu ce fait, il a confirmé tout ce que j'avais dit.
On m'a dit que ça pressait beaucoup, et que nous devions signer le contrat, sans quoi on allait immédiatement encourir une pénalité de 60 à 80 millions de dollars, alors que, en vérité, le contrat en lui-même prévoyait explicitement une telle éventualité. Si on ne signait pas l'accord de contribution fédéral, il pouvait y avoir un délai de 60 jours.
Il est regrettable que j'ai été induit en erreur. Je n'ai pas à m'excuser d'avoir posé les questions difficiles. Je n'ai pas été élu pour jouer le rôle du député sympathique qui essaie de s'entendre avec tout le monde. J'ai été élu pour défendre les contribuables, pour faire en sorte que chaque contribuable en ait pour son argent. J'ai été élu à la lumière d'un programme électoral misant principalement sur la responsabilisation du gouvernement. Le premier ministre m'a nommé président du Conseil du Trésor et m'a chargé d'être M. Responsabilité, et mon mandat consiste à poser les questions difficiles, celles qui n'ont pas été soulevées depuis une génération dans cette ville.
Collapse
View Robert Thibault Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Robert Thibault Profile
2008-04-01 10:04
Expand
Thank you, Minister, for the indulgence.
You pointed out the difference between the Treasury Board Secretariat that does the analytical work and Treasury Board itself, which is composed of ministers who make the decisions. You took pride in saying that you asked difficult questions and you got to the bottom of things and did some research before you approved projects, but you had approved this project.
I see the letter from the Secretariat stating that the Treasury Board had approved this project as of December 10, so I presume that the difficult questions and due diligence by you and your colleagues as Treasury Board ministers had already been done.
Before I get to this point, I'd like to take you back. I have 13 years' experience in municipal government, as you have a lot of experience in provincial and federal.... I look at this, and I see in winter 2003 that council had approved the transit expansion. I know from experience that this would come after discussion. It wouldn't come out of thin air.
In May 2004 they announced the project. In May 2005 they signed a memorandum of understanding with Ottawa and with Ontario. Between May 2005 and August 2006 the intergovernmental working group...to oversee the city's progress at meeting the requirements set out in the MOU, the tripartite MOU.
On July 12, 2006, it awards the bid. From mid-September the Treasury Board submission is approved by Minister Cannon, so Transport Canada has looked at this project. They've done their analysis. They've submitted to you as president for approval for funding.
The mayor signs the contract on September 15, 2006. On September 28 to October 6, the Treasury Board meetings are held to approve the terms and conditions of the Ottawa light rail contribution agreement.
On October 6, the Treasury Board president, you, go out and receive the contract. On October 10, you approve the project.
Then later, because you're getting some pressure, you find this way to block it and not have the memorandum of agreement or the cost-sharing agreement signed. So you can't have the contract signed.
Now I'm going to bring you back to what you said at the beginning here. You were concerned very much with corruption. I see you have an understanding of it. I can see that one of the worst cases of corruption that I could find would be when a federal official, a minister of the crown, particularly the President of Treasury Board, would use his authority to influence another election in another jurisdiction, and that's the question we're examining here. I won't say you're guilty of it, but there are difficult questions to answer.
That appears quite relevant here. And then we have other allegations, as you well know, in which Mr. O'Brien is facing serious questions now.
Now, I know Mr. Wayne Wouters. He was my deputy minister when I was at Fisheries. I don't know him for taking quick and unconsidered decisions. I don't know him for wanting to get ahead of his ministers at Treasury Board in approving a project that they would not have approved.
So if he sent that letter on October 10, 2006, I would have to assume that Treasury Board would have gone through all of its due diligence and considerations, both at the secretariat level and at the board level. To say that this was being rammed through by council, when we see the progression from winter 2003 to the election time of November 2006, I find absolutely ludicrous and self-serving on your behalf.
Merci, monsieur le ministre, de votre compréhension.
Vous avez souligné la différence entre le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, qui s'occupe des analyses, et le Conseil du Trésor, qui se compose de ministres qui prennent les décisions. Vous étiez fier de dire que vous aviez posé les questions délicates, que vous étiez allé au fond des choses et que vous aviez mené votre enquête avant d'approuver les projets, mais vous avez approuvé celui-ci.
La lettre du Secrétariat révèle que le Conseil du Trésor a approuvé ce projet le 10 décembre, donc je présume que, en tant que ministres du Conseil du Trésor, vous et vos collègues vous étiez déjà chargés des questions difficiles et de la diligence raisonnable.
Avant d'en arriver à ce point, j'aimerais faire un retour en arrière. Je compte 13 années d'expérience en politique municipale, comme vous, qui en avez beaucoup en politique provinciale et fédérale... Selon ce que je constate, à l'hiver 2003, le conseil a approuvé le prolongement de la ligne nord-sud. Si je me fie à mon expérience, l'approbation d'un tel projet devrait être le fruit de discussions. Elle ne sortirait pas de nulle part.
En mai 2004, on a annoncé le projet. En mai 2005, le gouvernement a signé un protocole d'entente avec la Ville d'Ottawa et le gouvernement de l'Ontario. En mai 2005 et en août 2006, le groupe de travail intergouvernemental... pour vérifier si la Ville parvenait à satisfaire aux exigences énoncées dans le PE, le PE tripartite.
Le 12 juillet 2006, on a attribué le contrat. Vers la mi-septembre, la présentation au Conseil du Trésor est approuvée par le ministre Cannon, ce qui signifie que Transports Canada a examiné le projet. Il a fait son analyse. Puisque vous étiez le président du Conseil du Trésor, le ministère vous a soumis le projet pour que vous en approuviez le financement.
Le maire a signé le contrat le 15 septembre 2006. Du 28 septembre au 6 octobre, le Conseil du Trésor tient des réunions pour approuver les modalités de l'accord de contribution relatif au projet de train léger de la Ville d'Ottawa.
Le 6 octobre, à titre de président du Conseil du Trésor, vous recevez le contrat. Le 10 octobre, vous l'approuvez.
Par la suite, parce qu'on exerce des pressions sur vous, vous trouvez le moyen de bloquer le projet et d'empêcher la signature du protocole d'entente ou de l'entente de partage des coûts. Par conséquent, le contrat ne peut être signé.
Maintenant, je vais vous rappeler ce que vous avez dit au début de votre témoignage. Vous étiez très préoccupé par le risque de corruption. Je constate que vous en comprenez les rouages. Je crois que, si un représentant du gouvernement fédéral, un ministre de la Couronne, notamment le président du Conseil du Trésor, utilisait son autorité pour influencer l'issue d'une élection relative à un autre organe politique, il s'agirait de l'un des pires scénarios de corruption auquel nous aurions affaire, et c'est justement la question sur laquelle nous nous penchons. Je ne dis pas que vous êtes coupable, mais il y a des questions difficiles à trancher.
Ce point me paraît assez pertinent dans le cas présent. Et il y a d'autres allégations, comme vous le savez bien, qui font que M. O'Brien est maintenant dans l'eau chaude.
Je connais M. Wayne Wouters. Il était mon sous-ministre quand je me trouvais à Pêches et Océans. Je sais qu'il n'est pas du genre à prendre des décisions irréfléchies. De plus, il n'a pas l'habitude de prendre de vitesse les ministres du Conseil du Trésor pour approuver un projet auquel ils n'auraient pas donné leur accord.
Donc, s'il a envoyé cette lettre le 10 octobre 2006, je dois présumer que le Conseil du Trésor, à l'échelon tant du Secrétariat que du Conseil, avait déjà mené une évaluation pour déterminer si le projet était conforme aux exigence en matière de diligence raisonnable et tenu compte de diverses considérations. À la lumière de la séquence des événements, de l'hiver 2003 à la période électorale de novembre 2006, il est absolument ridicule et intéressé de votre part d'affirmer que ce projet a été adopté à la hâte par le conseil municipal.
Collapse
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
View Charlie Angus Profile
2008-04-01 10:11
Expand
You did ask Siemens, and they did not like this.
Let's continue the CFRA interview, because it follows with what you are trying to establish here.
John Baird: ...asked for a copy of the contract and we haven't been able to get...it.
Steve Madely: ...Mr. Baird, when did you ask for the contract?
John Baird: Earlier this week.
Steve Madely: The mayor's office says 48 hours ago.
John Baird: Yes, earlier this week.
Steve Madely: So they've committed they'll give you the contract.
John Baird: No, Steve, I've got to be honest with you. That's not...a message that's been communicated to us.
Then we go back to what was said earlier:
Steve Madely: ...the mayor [has been] trying to get you...yesterday on the phone, [and] he was told you were unavailable?
You said:
We have been told, our officials have been told they can't have a copy of the contract.
You are very clear. You were saying that in the media. Yet on the same day as you are saying this, the internal memo of the City of Ottawa says:
City Council will have heard that the President of the Treasury Board has asked to see a copy of the City's contract.... City Council can be assured that the City is moving to respond to this request as quickly as possible, as we have for every other requirement....
The City received the request for a copy...at the end of the day Tuesday, October 3. Staff had not anticipated this.... [This is an] unusual request... [but] we understand,...through the media, [your] due diligence concerns....
And he assures the city that this contract will be given to you as quickly as you had asked for it. You have used the words “misled” and “lied to” every time you have spoken about the city. Again, is this internal memo an attempt by city staff to mislead their own people? They clearly say you had asked for the contract and you were getting a copy of the contract. What you said on CFRA--
Vous l'avez demandée à Siemens, ce qui ne lui a pas plu.
Continuons avec l'entrevue à CFRA parce que l'extrait suivant porte sur ce que vous tentez d'établir ici.
John Baird: ... nous avons demandé une copie du contrat, mais nous avons été incapables d'en obtenir... une.
Steve Madely: .... monsieur Baird, quand avez-vous demandé le contrat?
John Baird: Plus tôt cette semaine.
Steve Madely: Le bureau du maire prétend que vous l'avez fait il y a 48 heures.
John Baird: C'est cela, plus tôt cette semaine.
Steve Madely: Donc, la Ville s'est engagée à vous donner le contrat.
John Baird: Non, Steve, je dois être honnête avec vous. Ce n'est pas... l'information qui nous a été communiquée.
Puis nous revenons à ce qui a été dit plus tôt:
Steve Madely: ... le maire a tenté de vous joindre hier par téléphone, [et] on lui a dit que vous étiez occupé?
Vous avez déclaré ce qui suit:
Nous avons été informés — nos fonctionnaires ont été informés — du fait qu'ils ne pouvaient obtenir une copie du contrat.
Ce que vous dites est très clair. Vous avez tenu ces propos en ondes. Pourtant, le même jour où vous avez fait cette déclaration, la note interne émanant de la Ville d'Ottawa précise ce qui suit:
Le conseil municipal a été informé du fait que le président du Conseil du Trésor avait demandé une copie du contrat... le conseil municipal peut être assuré que la Ville s'engage à répondre à cette demande le plus rapidement possible, comme elle le fait pour toute autre demande...
La Ville a reçu une demande relativement à une copie... à la fin de la journée du mardi 3 octobre. Le personnel ne s'attendait pas à une telle demande... [il s'agit d'une] demande inhabituelle... [mais] nous comprenons, ... par l'intermédiaire des médias, [vos] préoccupations en ce qui concerne la diligence raisonnable...
Et on garantit à la Ville que le contrat vous sera donné le plus tôt possible, comme vous l'avez demandé. Vous avez utilisé les termes « tromperie » et « mensonge » chaque fois que vous avez parlé de la Ville. Encore une fois, cette note correspond-t-elle à une tentative du personnel de la Ville d'induire leurs collègues en erreur? On affirme clairement que vous avez demandé à voir le contrat et que vous en obtiendrez une copie. Ce que vous avez dit sur les ondes de CFRA...
Collapse
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
View Charlie Angus Profile
2008-04-01 10:14
Expand
That was your own personal due diligence. Again, as minister in this very politicized government.... You were acting in that role, not in the role of defending the taxpayers. You were acting in a role on your own.
I don't know what else we can do at this committee with this case. But on the record, I have serious questions about your political judgment and your prudence as a most trusted minister of the Prime Minister--and that's what the President of the Treasury Board has to be.
Vous faisiez plutôt preuve de diligence raisonnable à titre personnel. Encore une fois, comme ministre dans ce gouvernement qui met en place bien des politiques... Vous étiez en train de jouer ce rôle, et non le rôle du défenseur des contribuables. Vous ne jouiez ce rôle que pour votre propre compte.
Je ne sais pas ce que le comité peut faire de plus à ce sujet. Mais je tiens à ce que figure au compte rendu le fait que je me questionne grandement à propos de votre jugement politique et de votre prudence lorsque vous étiez dans le cercle des ministres en qui le premier ministre doit avoir le plus confiance — et c'est justement ce que doit être le président du Conseil du Trésor: un ministre digne de confiance.
Collapse
Justin Vaive
View Justin Vaive Profile
Justin Vaive
2008-03-13 13:03
Expand
I'll read the amendment from Mr. Laforest from the start, in French.
On February 4, 2008, the Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, admitted that he violated Treasury Board guidelines in awarding a contract to Hugh MacPhie for work provided in relation to Budget 2007.
Furthermore, Access to Information requests have shown that the Minister of Finance awarded a disproportionate share of contracts valued at between $24,000 and $24,900 that were untendered, falling just below the level at which contracts must be subject to competitive tendering.
The third paragraph has been completely eliminated and the fourth paragraph reads as follows:
The Public Accounts Committee calls the Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, the Honourable Vic Toews, President of the Treasury Board, Rob Wright, Deputy Minister of Finance, Wayne Wouters, Secretary of the Treasury Board, Hugh MacPhie and Sara Beth Mintz to appear as witnesses in order to further study these situations which appear to be contrary to Treasury Board guidelines.
Je vous lis l'amendement de M. Laforest en français.
Le 4 février 2008, l'honorable Jim Flaherty, ministre des Finances, a admis avoir enfreint les lignes directrices du Conseil du Trésor en accordant un marché public a Hugh McPhie pour des travaux effectués en relation avec le budget de 2007.
En outre, les demandes faites en vertu de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information ont montré que le ministre des Finances avait attribué un nombre important de contrats entre 24 000 $ et 24 900 $ sans appel d'offres d'une valeur de 24 900 $, tout juste sous le seuil à partir duquel un appel d'offres doit être lancé.
Le troisième paragraphe est biffé complètement et le quatrième commence ainsi:
Le Comité des comptes publics a demandé à l'honorable Jim Flaherty, ministre des Finances, à l'honorable Vic Toews, président du Conseil du Trésor, à Rob Wright, sous-ministre des Finances, à Wayne Wouters, secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor, à Hugh McPhie et à Sarah Beth Mintz de venir témoigner afin que le comité puisse se pencher sur ces situations qui semblent contraires aux lignes directrices du Conseil du Trésor.
Collapse
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Marshall, did you have any meetings with the President of the Treasury Board regarding this?
Monsieur Marshall, avez-vous eu des réunions avec le président du Conseil du Trésor au sujet de ce dossier?
Collapse
David Marshall
View David Marshall Profile
David Marshall
2007-05-07 18:26
Expand
Yes.
The President of the Treasury Board would have been involved in discussions sometime before October 2005, because when he announced the new policy on internal audit, there was a reference to separating out auditing from consulting at CAC. So in order to make such an announcement, he would have had to have been given some rationale, and so on. So in that sense, he would have been involved, but I don't know to what extent he was told.
Oui.
Le président du Conseil du Trésor a certainement participé aux discussions avant octobre 2005, parce que lorsqu'il a annoncé la nouvelle politique sur les vérifications internes, il a mentionné la séparation des fonctions de vérification de celles de consultation à CVC. Pour faire une telle annonce, il faut qu'il ait eu une certaine justification, entre autres. Il a donc été partie au dossier à cet égard, mais je ne connais pas l'ampleur de ce qui lui a été révélé.
Collapse
Reg Alcock
View Reg Alcock Profile
Hon. Reg Alcock
2007-04-23 15:38
Expand
Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.
I will be mercifully brief on this. I was not given any instructions as to specifically what the committee would like to hear from me. I have gone through and have read the blues of the investigation to date, and I'll just make some comments on things as they specifically relate to me. Then I'll turn it over to my colleague, who can pick it up from there.
In this committee, when Mr. Williams was the chair shortly after the change of government, the government indicated its intention to bring forward legislation strengthening public service disclosure and to create a new piece of legislation for that. I had worked on that as the chairman of the government operations committee, and we had made a series of recommendations. The Prime Minister at the time, Prime Minister Martin, asked me, as President of the Treasury Board, if I would establish a process and let it be known to the public service that if they had concerns about improprieties within the public service, until such time as there was strengthened legislation in place they could bring it to my office. That was done, I believe, in a presentation before this committee at that time.
I won't go through the chronology of events, because you know better than I the details of the history of this. I want to speak specifically about the actions that were taken by me and by Treasury Board.
We received a package....
I want to clarify just one small discrepancy. Staff Sergeant Lewis said in his testimony here that he'd brought it to our office on February 16. He brought it on February 19. We've had a talk about that, just to acknowledge that it's the case, because all of our records show February 19.
I passed it, according to the protocol we had set up, immediately to the secretary of the Treasury Board. He assigned it to staff; they had a look at it; he then referred it to the Auditor General and to the Deputy Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. In the letter he sent to the deputy minister, he said:
I enclose one of three copies of a document which was provided to the President of the Treasury Board on February 19, 2004. The author explicitly asked that the copies be provided to your minister and to the Auditor General. I would be grateful if you would ensure that this copy is delivered personally to your minister.
As you will see from this document it contains a number of allegations, which the President of the Treasury Board takes very seriously, and which he has undertaken to pursue.
That's signed by the then secretary to the Treasury Board, Mr. Jim Judd.
Subsequently, those documents were delivered, and discussions were held with the commissioner, with the Auditor General, and with the deputy minister. From that, the events involving those individuals and the criminal investigation flowed.
I'm here to answer any questions the committee may have.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.
Je serai miséricordieusement bref. Je n'ai pas reçu d'indications précises quant à ce dont le comité souhaiterait que je parle. J'ai parcouru la transcription des délibérations du comité relativement à l'enquête tenue jusqu'à présent et je vais simplement formuler quelques remarques sur les aspects qui me concernent particulièrement. Je donnerai ensuite la parole à ma collègue, qui pourra continuer en partant de là.
Lorsque M. Williams présidait ce comité peu après le changement de gouvernement, le gouvernement est venu y faire part de son intention d'introduire une nouvelle loi visant à renforcer le régime de divulgation dans la fonction publique. J'avais travaillé là-dessus en tant que président du Comité des opérations gouvernementales et nous avions formulé une série de recommandations. Le premier ministre à l'époque, le premier ministre Martin, m'a demandé, à titre de président du Conseil du Trésor, d'établir un mécanisme et de faire savoir aux fonctionnaires que s'ils avaient connaissance d'irrégularités dans la fonction publique, ils pouvaient les dénoncer à mon cabinet en attendant qu'une législation renforcée soit promulguée. Cela a été fait, je crois, à l'occasion d'une comparution devant le comité à cette époque.
Je ne passerai pas en revue la chronologie des événements, car je vous connaissez mieux les détails de cette affaire que moi. Je veux parler spécifiquement des mesures prises par moi-même et le Conseil du Trésor.
Nous avons reçu un ensemble de documents...
Je dois rectifier une petite divergence. Le sergent d'état-major Lewis a déclaré dans son témoignage ici qu'il a déposé les documents à notre bureau le 16 février. Or, c'était le 19 février. Nous avons eu une conversation à ce sujet, je tiens à vous le signaler, car toutes nos archives montrent que c'était le 19 février.
Conformément au protocole que nous avions mis sur pied, j'ai transmis immédiatement les documents au secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor. Celui-ci les a soumis au personnel, lequel les a examinés, et ensuite il les a transmis au vérificateur général et au sous-ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile. Dans la lettre qu'il a adressée au sous-ministre, il écrivait:
Je joins l'une des trois copies d'un document qui a été remis au président du Conseil du Trésor le 19 février 2004. L'auteur a expressément demandé que des copies soient transmises à votre ministre et au vérificateur général. Je vous serais reconnaissant de veiller à ce que cette copie soit remise en mains propres à votre ministre.
Comme vous pouvez le voir, ce document contient un certain nombre d'allégations, que le président du Conseil du Trésor prend très au sérieux et auxquelles il s'est engagé à donner suite.
C'était signé par le secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor d'alors, M. Jim Juda.
Ces documents ont donc été livrés à leurs destinataires et des discussions ont eu lieu ultérieurement avec le commissaire, le vérificateur général et le sous-ministre. Les événements mettant en jeu ces personnes et l'enquête criminelle ont découlé de là.
Je suis à votre disposition pour répondre aux questions que les membres du comité pourraient avoir.
Collapse
Ron Lewis
View Ron Lewis Profile
Ron Lewis
2007-04-16 16:47
Expand
Thank you.
Mr. Zaccardelli's opening statement in the statement he just made is not, I find, quite correct. I was personally involved in the removal of Mr. Ewanovich and Mr. Crupi, and here's how it happened.
After he cancelled the first investigation, the criminal investigation that I referred to earlier, Mr. Zaccardelli told me on November 26 that if the audit report showed criminal or internal violations, he would go into the appropriate forum, which would have been an internal investigation or a criminal investigation. When the audit was completed in October 2003, there was no documented evidence by the management. In fact, he indicated that he immediately initiated an internal investigation. I can tell you right now that there was no such document. I was going to make another formal complaint because I was aware of the allegations, but the problem I had was that under the RCMP Act, the only person I could go to was Assistant Commissioner Gessie Clément, CO of A Division. She was now implicated in the audit. She was subsequently removed from her position, so I had no way to go formally. I met with now Deputy Commissioner George, and I asked what was going to happen. She said nothing was going to happen. I asked why not, and she said she'd been in contact with Deputy Commissioner Gauvin, her civilian comptroller, and he'd told her that a couple of hundred thousand dollars had been misspent, that they were going to give them a slap on the hand and move on.
I represent senior officers. I'm their spokesperson. I said, “Pass this message on to the commissioner”. I also saw another deputy commissioner at that same time and passed it on through him that if there was no discipline, if there was no investigation, I would go public on behalf of the members I was representing.
She called me back in the office in early November and said Crupi and Ewanovich were gone. He described how they were removed.
Then I went back in on November 23 to Barb George, and I asked about the investigation. I was told, “There's not going to be any investigation.” I said, “Pass this on to the commissioner. If there is no investigation, it's going public.” She called me back into her office on November 24. She said, “I sat up last night with my husband, Tom”, who was also a member and just retired from CSIS. She said, “If he doesn't allow an investigation, because this is the only way we can get it done, through the act, then I will resign.” She said, “Okay, I had a meeting with him last night. Submit your reports.”
I submitted my report on January 5, 2004. Nothing happened. On February 16, 2004, my report, which I provided to the highest level of the RCMP, got leaked. It was photostatted and being passed around everywhere. I then went to the minister--Anne McLellan at the time--I went to the OAG, and I went to the President of the Treasury Board. On Saturday I received, finally, the circumstances of where that went, and it worked its way up to our deputy commissioner, and five days later, in March, the Ottawa city police were contacted.
At no time was an internal investigation ordered. At no time was a criminal investigation ordered, contrary to what Mr. Zaccardelli has said here. And when the internal investigation was finally ordered and the determination that we missed our year for charging members of the RCMP, it was 41 months after my first criminal investigation complaint.
Now, if that's immediate, then there is a whole new term for “immediate”--41 months later. Those are the events we have documentation on.
Merci.
La déclaration liminaire que M. Zaccardelli a faite tout à l'heure n'est pas tout à fait exacte, à mon avis. J'ai été personnellement impliqué dans le renvoi de M. Ewanovich et de M. Crupi, et voici comment les choses se sont passées.
Après avoir annulé la première enquête, l'enquête criminelle dont il a été question, M. Zaccardelli m'a dit le 26 novembre que si le rapport de vérification faisait état d'infractions pénales ou administratives, il mettrait en place le forum approprié, soit l'ouverture d'une enquête interne ou d'une enquête criminelle. Lorsque la vérification a été terminée en octobre 2003, la direction n'a pris aucune mesure documentée. De ce fait, il a prétendu avoir ouvert immédiatement une enquête interne. Je peux vous dire qu'il n'y a aucun document à cet égard. J'allais présenter une autre plainte officielle parce que j'avais connaissance des allégations, mais mon problème était qu'en vertu de la Loi sur la GRC, la seule personne à laquelle je pouvais m'adresser était la commissaire adjointe Gessie Clément, chef de la Division A. Or, elle était maintenant impliquée par la vérification. Elle a été ultérieurement démise de ses fonctions, et je n'avais donc aucune avenue officielle. J'ai rencontré celle qui est aujourd'hui la sous-commissaire George et lui ai demandé ce qui allait se passer. Elle m'a dit que rien n'allait se passer. J'ai demandé pourquoi, et elle m'a dit avoir été en contact avec le sous-commissaire Gauvin, son contrôleur civil, et qui lui a dit que quelques centaines de milliers de dollars avaient été dépensés à mauvais escient, qu'on allait donner une réprimande au responsable et que ce serait tout.
Je représente des agents supérieurs. Je suis leur porte-parole. J'ai dit « Transmettez ce message au commissaire ». J'ai vu aussi au même moment un autre sous-commissaire et ai transmis par son intermédiaire le message que s'il n'y avait pas de sanction disciplinaire, s'il n'y avait pas d'enquête, je ferais une dénonciation publique au nom des membres que je représentais.
Elle m'a convoqué de nouveau à son bureau début novembre et dit que Crupi et Ewanovich étaient partis. Elle a décrit comment cela s'était passé.
Je suis retourné voir Barb George le 23 novembre et lui ai demandé où en était l'enquête. Elle m'a dit « Il n'y aura pas d'enquête ». J'ai dit « Transmettez ceci au commissaire: S'il n'y a pas d'enquête, je saisis les journaux ». Elle m'a rappelé dans son bureau le 24 novembre. Elle m'a dit: « J'ai discuté toute la soirée avec mon mari, Tom », qui était aussi un membre et venait de prendre sa retraite du SCRS. Elle m'a dit « S'il n'autorise pas l'ouverture d'une enquête, parce que c'est la seule façon d'agir aux termes de la loi, je vais démissionner ». Elle m'a dit « C'est bon, je l'ai rencontré hier soir, présentez vos rapports ».
J'ai présenté mon rapport le 5 janvier 2004. Rien ne s'est passé. Le 16 février 2004, mon rapport, que j'avais confié au niveau le plus élevé de la GRC, a fait l'objet d'une fuite. Il a été photocopié et circulait un peu partout. Je me suis alors adressé au ministre — Anne McLellan à l'époque — je me suis adressé au BVG, je me suis adressé au président du Conseil du Trésor. Le samedi, finalement, j'ai obtenu une réaction, l'affaire est remontée jusqu'à notre sous-commissaire et, cinq jours plus tard, en mars, la police d'Ottawa a été appelée.
À aucun moment une enquête interne n'a-t-elle été ordonnée. À aucun moment une enquête criminelle n'a-t-elle été ordonnée, contrairement à ce que M. Zaccardelli a prétendu ici. Et lorsque l'enquête interne a finalement eu lieu, l'année dont nous disposions pour inculper des membres de la GRC était expirée, et cela était 41 mois après ma première plainte demandant une enquête criminelle.
Si cela est une action immédiate, le mot « immédiat » prend un sens entièrement nouveau — 41 mois plus tard. Voilà les événements tels qu'ils sont établis par les documents.
Collapse
Ron Lewis
View Ron Lewis Profile
Ron Lewis
2007-03-28 16:29
Expand
Not only was I interviewed by them in November, as we all were, but I had been in contact with them for several years, because without their help this investigation wasn't going to be started. I had to contact them, the Treasury Board minister, and the minister of the day, Anne McLellan, because the investigation took another year to get started after it was stopped the first time, and I had to force a new investigation. So I was in contact with the OAG's department throughout the years.
Non seulement est-ce que j'ai eu un entretien avec eux en novembre, comme nous tous, j'ai aussi été en communication avec eux depuis plusieurs années parce que cette enquête n'aurait pas débuté sans leur aide. Je devais communiquer avec eux, le ministre responsable du Conseil du Trésor, et la ministre de l'époque, Ann McLellan, parce qu'il a fallu un an avant que l'enquête ne redémarre après avoir été arrêtée la première fois, et j'ai dû forcer la réalisation d'une nouvelle enquête. Je suis donc resté en communication avec le Bureau du vérificateur général au cours des années.
Collapse
Ron Lewis
View Ron Lewis Profile
Ron Lewis
2007-03-28 16:30
Expand
I informed her, the Minister of the Treasury Board, who was Reg Alcock at the time, and the Auditor General herself with the same memo and a package of information to bring their attention to what was going on. Yes, that was required to get the investigation going a second time.
J'ai informé la ministre, le ministre du Conseil du Trésor, soit Reg Alcock à l'époque, et la vérificatrice générale à l'aide de la même note de service et d'une trousse d'information afin d'attirer leur attention sur cette affaire. Oui, c'était nécessaire pour relancer l'enquête une deuxième fois.
Collapse
View David Christopherson Profile
NDP (ON)
Thank you, Chair.
I share the views of my colleague Ms. Sgro.
I look at the letter from the President of the Treasury Board, dated March 13, and it seems to me the relevant sentence is at the end of the third paragraph on page 2, where it says:
Nevertheless, the purpose of the accounting officer's appearance is to support the Minister's, and ultimately the government's, accountability for the way departments and agencies are managed.
This is not a nuanced difference. That is 180 degrees different from what we're saying. We are saying something very different.
And in terms of sending Mr. Franks, I did not agree that the notion of sending a hired consultant to meet with a politician, to negotiate, was the right way to go anyway.
It seems to me, and I agree with Ms. Sgro, based on the argument that we've been dealing with this for months and months and months.... I think this was initiated not long after the class of 2004 came in, and probably Mr. Williams can talk about times before, when this actually got its initial momentum. We're here now. This is not the time to suddenly get shy and to get caught up.
I understand where the government members are coming from. It would be interesting, if they were on this side, to hear what the arguments might be. I hear what they're saying, but I'm not hearing anything strong enough, Mr. Chair, in a non-partisan way, that suggests we should deviate from the course we've set with all-party support. All along we've been all but unanimous at every step. You've provided excellent leadership, Chair, since you've been in office, and Mr. Williams did before you.
Now is the moment of truth. Now is not the time to back away. We're there. And the fact that the executive branch of government doesn't like it--too bad. It's just too bad.
Parliament speaks on this. Parliament decides what the rules of the game are at Parliament's committees. So I think, Chair, that it's time to close this in terms of work. It's no longer a work in progress. I realize you used that term.
We can always amend any policy. On the policy that is there in front of us, today is the day we adopt it and tell the government that this is the way it's going to be. And that's not about pounding tables and trying to get headlines. That's just about making sure we don't go through the nonsense we went through earlier, which happens over and over and over, where you start to get close to where you think you're going to get, where the accountability is, and somebody says, “Oh, I wasn't there”, or they start to say, “That was government policy and that's as much as I can comment on”. Now is the time. Pass this.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je partage l'avis de ma collègue, Mme Sgro.
Je regarde la lettre du président du Conseil du Trésor datée du 13 mars et il me semble que la phrase pertinente se trouve à la fin du troisième paragraphe, à la page 2, où il est dit:
Quoi qu'il en soit, l'objet de la comparution de l'administrateur des comptes est d'appuyer la responsabilisation du ministre et, à terme, celle du gouvernement, quant à la manière dont les ministères et organismes sont gérés.
Ce n'est pas une question de nuance: c'est un virage à 180 degrés par rapport à ce que nous disons. Nous disons quelque chose de très différent.
Quant à l'idée de dépêcher M. Franks, je ne trouvais pas qu'envoyer un expert-conseil que l'on a embauché à une rencontre avec un politicien, pour négocier, était la chose à faire, de toute façon.
Comme Mme Sgro, je pense, vu que nous discutons de ceci depuis des mois... Je pense que ceci a vu le jour peu après l'arrivée de la promotion de 2004, et M. Williams peut sans doute nous parler de ce qui a été fait avant, quand l'idée a pris son envol. C'est nous qui sommes ici maintenant. Ce n'est pas le moment de nous laisser effaroucher et de reculer.
Je comprends la position des députés ministériels. S'ils étaient de ce côté-ci, il serait intéressant d'entendre quels seraient leurs arguments. Je comprends ce qu'ils disent mais je n'entends rien, monsieur le président, dans une optique tout à fait non partisane, qui suffise à me convaincre de nous écarter de la voie que nous avons tracée avec l'appui de tous les partis. À chaque étape, les décisions étaient prises à l'unanimité. Depuis que vous occupez vos fonctions, monsieur le président, vous avez exercé un excellent leadership, comme M. Williams avant vous.
L'heure de vérité a sonné. Ce n'est pas le moment de reculer. C'est le moment décisif. Si ça ne plaît pas à l'exécutif, eh bien tant pis.
C'est le Parlement qui se fait entendre ici. C'est lui qui décide quelles sont les règles dans ses comités. Il est temps de finir notre ouvrage. Ce n'est plus un ouvrage en cours d'élaboration. C'est l'expression que vous avez employée.
On pourra toujours modifier la politique. Quant à celle dont nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui, le moment est venu de l'adopter et de dire au gouvernement que, dorénavant, c'est ainsi que cela va se passer. Il ne s'agit pas de taper sur la table ou de faire les manchettes. Il s'agit de s'assurer de ne pas refaire les bêtises du passé, qui se répètent constamment: dès que l'on s'approche du but, des responsables, il y a quelqu'un qui va dire: « Oh, je n'y étais pas » ou encore « C'était la politique du gouvernement  et c'est tout ce que je peux dire ». Le moment est venu. Adoptez-la.
Collapse
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
Yes, Mr. Chairman. I can remember at least half a dozen cases where we've had witnesses who have told this committee that the interplay between the Treasury Board and this committee is a vital one. The relationship is a critical one in the accountability process. I respect my colleague's comments--Mr. Christopherson's--but the point isn't to have Dr. Franks meet with the President of the Treasury Board and have there be some negotiating aspect. The point is to have all the players involved in the outcome of this document. Dr. Franks said himself that this was a living document in process, and to live up to the same spirit of what he said, there's absolutely no problem with still having him go and meet the President of the Treasury Board on this issue.
Oui, monsieur le président. Je me souviens d'au moins une demi-douzaine de cas de témoins qui ont dit au comité que les échanges entre le Conseil du Trésor et le comité sont essentiels. Ces rapports sont indispensables à la responsabilisation. Je respecte les propos de mon collègue — M. Christopherson — mais ce qui compte, ce n'est pas que M. Franks rencontre le président du Conseil du Trésor et négocie; c'est que tous les intéressés participent à la préparation du document. M. Franks lui-même a dit que le document est en cours d'élaboration, qu'il est dynamique, et pour abonder dans son sens, il n'a aucun problème à ce qu'il rencontre le président du Conseil du Trésor.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:30
Expand
Thank you very much.
I'm here with the Treasury Board Secretary, Mr. Wayne Wouters, and Mr. Charles-Antoine St-Jean. Both of them are here to assist me in answering your questions. I intend to make a brief presentation and then answer any questions that any members may have, Madam Chair. Again, as I say, if I can't answer them, my officials will provide the information either directly or to me and then to you.
May I commence then?
Merci beaucoup.
Je suis accompagné de Wayne Wouters et Charles-Antoine St-Jean, du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor. Ils sont ici pour m'aider à répondre à vos questions. Je vais d'abord faire une brève déclaration liminaire, après quoi je répondrai aux questions des membres du comité. S'il y en a auxquelles je ne peux pas répondre, mes collaborateurs m'aideront à le faire.
Puis-je commencer?
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:31
Expand
Thank you, Madam Chair.
I'm happy to appear before your committee for the first time as the President of the Treasury Board.
I have with me, as I indicated, Mr. Wayne Wouters. I didn't indicate the title of Mr. St-Jean. Of course, he's the Comptroller General of Canada.
Today I'd like to update the committee on the activities of the secretariat in four areas: the implementation of the Federal Accountability Act and action plan, the expenditure management system, the accrual budgeting issue, and large IT projects.
I will begin with some brief remarks, after which I'll be open to answering questions.
Improving accountability in government has been our number one priority since we took office. Our commitment to accountability did not stop with the introduction of the Federal Accountability Act on April 11, nor with royal assent on December 12. We've delivered and will continue to deliver by ensuring that all aspects of the act and its companion action plan are implemented. Together they provide measures to reduce the influence of money in politics, protect whistle-blowers, and improve government contracting.
They strengthen financial management and internal audit functions within departments and ensure more consistent discipline for those who deliberately break the rules. They ensure that agents of Parliament, like the Commissioner of Lobbying and the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner, have the power they need to be effective, independent watchdogs.
But accountability is not just about putting in the right controls and rules to make government work better. It is also about accountability for real results for Canadians. Every year, some $27 billion is transferred to individuals, corporations, and NGOs through grant and contribution programs. Yet time and money are being wasted administering rules and processes that add little to results and nothing to accountability.
I'd like to take a moment to thank my predecessor, Mr. Baird, for the good work he did in this department and the initiatives he commenced. They have certainly made my transition much easier.
My predecessor appointed a blue ribbon panel to recommend ways to make the management of these programs more effective and efficient. The panel will be making its report public in the next few weeks, and I'll be making the government's response public at the same time.
We are also reforming government procurement policy. There is a new code of conduct for procurement that applies to both suppliers and public servants. There is a procurement ombudsman to review practices across the government, consider complaints, and help resolve disputes. These are just a few of the elements of accountability that we are working diligently to put into effect.
I would like to take a few minutes to explain in some detail how we are implementing the act. Let me begin by saying that officials at the secretariat and across government are doing their part to put the act into effect as quickly as possible.
Getting the act passed into law took a lot of hard work. Implementing this complex piece of legislation will take even more time and effort. This is because we need to ensure that all the pieces are in place to ensure a smooth transition.
Some of the major activities that need to be completed are as follows. We are developing several sets of regulations. Those regulations are evident from the act itself, for example, those around the administrative penalties under the Conflict of Interest Act. Some of these will require significant public consultations, and the regulations around the new provisions of the Lobbying Act are a good example of this.
So it's not simply a matter of the act coming into force and simply proclaiming a regulation; consulting needs to be done to ensure that this is done in an appropriate way.
A number of Governor in Council appointments will need to be made. Most of these, including the appointment of the new Commissioner of Lobbying, will require Parliament's review.
A number of the government's administrative policies will need to be amended, including the government's financial management and procurement policies.
Finally, in some cases organizations will need to put new work units in place to administer the new requirements. For example, crown corporations that will now be subject to the Access to Information Act will need to have personnel in place to administer ATI the day it comes into force.
Communications and outreach will also be critical. We will be informing the public, as well as departments and agencies, of the new provisions of the act as they are brought into force. We will ensure that all interested parties are aware of the implications and have the capacity to respond.
The Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act is a case in point. In order for this to be brought into force, several critical steps need to be completed. These include establishing the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal; ensuring that organizations are ready to fulfill their new responsibilities; and approving the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner to administer the act.
With regard to the last point, we are doing our part to select a strong candidate. When we bring forward our nominee for this position, I hope I can count on you as parliamentarians to ensure that the vetting process takes place as efficiently and as fairly as possible.
Training is also critical to the effective implementation of the FAA. We will be working with the Canada School of Public Service to update existing courses and to ensure that appropriate training is provided.
We have a lot to do to implement the act, but we are moving forward to implement the commitments in the federal accountability action plan. For example, there are several reviews under way to make government work better for Canadians, especially those who interact with government on a regular basis. These initiatives include the ongoing renewal of the government's management policies and the blue ribbon panel review of grants and contributions that I mentioned earlier.
In summary, we are working hard to bring the act into force as expeditiously as possible, but each of these activities will require time and resources to ensure that every organization is ready to properly administer the new activities and to comply with the law. The timetable for implementation will be finalized soon, after consultation with affected stakeholders. In the next few weeks, Treasury Board will begin the process of considering the enabling regulations that will implement the act. We will keep working at it until it's done and done right.
Madam Chair, the Federal Accountability Act was this government's first step in enhancing accountability in government. Improving how spending is managed through a new expenditure management system is the next step to ensure Canadians' hard-earned tax dollars are well spent. That's why, in November, we announced the directions for a new expenditure management system. Our goal is to ensure that every tax dollar spent is well spent. For new spending, that means making decisions in the context of other spending in the same area. For existing spending, it means an ongoing systematic review to make sure programs are still relevant and are achieving the intended results and that funding is adequate.
Simply put, our new approach to expenditure management will support managing for results by establishing clear responsibilities for departments to better define the expected outcomes of new and existing programs. Secondly, our new approach will support decision-making for results by ensuring that all new programs are fully and effectively integrated with existing programs by reviewing all spending to ensure efficiency, effectiveness, and ongoing value for money. Finally, we will support reporting for results by improving the quality of department- and government-wide reporting to Parliament. Ultimately, this new system will ensure that all government programs are effective and efficient, focused on results, and provide value for taxpayers' money.
In the time I have remaining, I'd like to address some of the committee's other concerns: the use of full accrual accounting for departmental budgeting and appropriations and our approach to large IT projects. I have received perhaps more briefing on accounting in the last month than I've received in quite awhile, and I'm beginning to understand how diligently my staff work at these issues. I know they're very much interested in what the committee has had to say on these issues, and I intend to work with the committee and work with the department to ensure that any changes in that respect are implemented carefully and indeed benefit Canadians.
I would like to thank you, Madam Chair, and the members of your committee for your efforts in improving financial management and reporting by the Government of Canada.
The benefits of accrual accounting are well accepted. The accrual method of accounting could improve transparency in financial management and therefore accountability. I'm sure you appreciate the complexities involved in designing and implementing such a system. That's why the secretariat is studying the issue carefully. Our position, which will be included in our response to the public accounts committee, will form the basis of the government's position to be presented in the debate on the concurrence motion for your committee's report. Until that time, I don't want to prejudge the outcome of our deliberations.
Another way we are working to improve accountability in government is by strengthening our ability to manage and implement large information technology projects. Specifically, we have developed an action plan, which builds on the progress made, to address the Auditor General's concerns in this area. That includes developing clear expectations with new policy and a directive on the management of IT projects, providing new guidance and tools, training and development programs, and strengthening the secretariat's oversight of large information technology projects.
Madam Chair, the technology underpins the delivery of almost every program and service we deliver to Canadians. That is why we take the management of these IT projects so seriously.
The theme that runs through every one of the activities I've talked about today is about improving accountability in government. I'm proud of the ongoing efforts on behalf of the people of this country that we as parliamentarians have made. Certainly in passing the Federal Accountability Act, we're working hard, I believe, to restore trust in government by ensuring we have the right measures in place to enhance accountability and manage spending, to provide value for money and real results for Canadians. We won't stop until the job is done.
Thank you. I'm prepared to answer questions.
Merci, madame la présidente.
Je suis heureux de comparaître pour la première fois devant votre comité en ma qualité de président du Conseil du Trésor.
Comme je l'ai dit, je suis accompagné de Wayne Wouters et Charles-Antoine St-Jean. Ce dernier, dont je n'ai pas indiqué la fonction, occupe le poste de contrôleur général du Canada
J'aimerais aujourd'hui faire le point sur les activités du Secrétariat dans quatre domaines : la mise en oeuvre de la Loi sur la responsabilité et du Plan d'action correspondant, le système de gestion des dépenses, la budgétisation selon la comptabilité d'exercice, et les grands projets de TI.
Je commencerai par quelques brèves observations, après quoi je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.
Renforcer la responsabilité au gouvernement est notre priorité depuis que nous sommes au pouvoir. Notre engagement en matière de responsabilité n'a pas pris fin avec la présentation de la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité, le 11 avril, ni avec la sanction royale, le 12 décembre. Nous avons agi et continuons d'agir pour que tous les aspects de la Loi et du Plan d'action soit mis en oeuvre. Ensemble, ils fournissent des mesures pour réduire l'influence de l'argent dans la politique, pour protéger les dénonciateurs et pour améliorer la passation des marchés publics.
La Loi et le Plan renforcent les fonctions de gestion financière et de vérification interne au sein des ministères et mettent en place des mesures disciplinaires plus uniformes pour ceux qui enfreignent délibérément les règles. Ils font en sorte que les mandataires du Parlement, comme le commissaire au lobbying et le commissaire à l'intégrité du secteur public, disposent des pouvoirs dont ils ont besoin pour être des chiens de garde efficaces et indépendants.
Cela dit, la responsabilité ne consiste pas seulement à mettre en place de bonnes mesures de contrôle et de bonnes règles pour que le gouvernement fonctionne mieux. Il s'agit aussi de rendre compte de vrais résultats pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes. Chaque année, quelque 27 milliards de dollars sont transférés à des particuliers, des sociétés et des organisations non gouvernementales par l'entremise de programmes de subventions et de contributions. Par contre, du temps et de l'argent sont gaspillés dans l'administration de règles et de processus contribuant peu aux résultats et rien à la responsabilité.
Je tiens à remercier en passant mon prédécesseur, M. Baird, pour l'excellent travail qu'il a fait dans ce ministère et pour les les initiatives qu'il a prises, ce qui a certainement facilité ma prise de fonction.
Mon prédécesseur a mis sur pied un groupe d'experts indépendant chargé de recommander des façons de rendre la gestion de ces programmes plus efficace et plus efficiente. Le groupe espère rendre son rapport public dans les prochaines semaines et je ferai connaître la réponse du gouvernement en même temps.
Nous avons aussi entrepris de réformer la politique d'approvisionnement du gouvernement. Un nouveau Code de conduite pour l'approvisionnement s'applique maintenant aux fournisseurs et aux fonctionnaires. De plus, un ombudsman de l'approvisionnement est chargé d'examiner les pratiques dans l'ensemble du gouvernement, d'étudier les plaintes et d'aider à résoudre les litiges. Ce ne sont là que quelques exemples des mesures de responsabilité que nous travaillons ardemment à mettre en place.
Permettez-moi maintenant de prendre quelques minutes pour vous donner des précisions sur la manière dont nous mettons la Loi en application. Je commencerai en disant que les fonctionnaires du Secrétariat et de l'ensemble du gouvernement font leur part pour que la Loi soit mise en oeuvre aussi rapidement que possible.
Il a fallu travailler dur pour faire adopter la Loi mais la mettre en oeuvre exigera encore plus de temps et d'efforts car c'est un texte législatif complexe et que nous tenons à nous assurer que tous les éléments sont mis en place pour une transition sans heurts.
Voici quelques-unes des principales activités qui devront être exécutées. Nous devons élaborer plusieurs séries de règlements — par exemple, des règlements découlant des nouvelles dispositions de la Loi elle-même, comme ceux concernant les sanctions administratives au titre de la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts. Certains d'entre eux exigeront de larges consultations publiques, et ce sera la même chose pour les nouvelles dispositions de la Loi sur le lobbying.
Il ne s'agit donc pas simplement d'assurer l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi et de promulguer des règlements. Il faut aussi tenir des consultations pour que cela soit fait de manière adéquate.
Il faudra aussi procéder à plusieurs nominations par décret dont la plupart, notamment celle du nouveau commissaire au lobbying, devront être examinées par le parlement.
Il faudra aussi modifier un certain nombre de politiques administratives, notamment les politiques de gestion financière et d'approvisionnement.
Finalement, certaines organisations devront mettre sur pied de nouvelles unités de travail pour l'application des nouvelles exigences. Par exemple, les sociétés d'État qui sont maintenant assujetties aux dispositions de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information devront se doter de personnel pour en assurer l'application quand elles entreront en vigueur.
Les communications et les relations avec le public seront primordiales. Nous informerons le public, de même que les ministères et les organismes, à mesure que les nouvelles dispositions de la Loi entreront en vigueur. Cela permettra de s'assurer que toutes les parties intéressées sont au courant et sont aptes à réagir.
La Loi sur la protection des fonctionnaires divulguateurs d'actes répréhensibles est un exemple concret. Pour qu'elle entre en vigueur, plusieurs étapes cruciales devront être franchies, notamment créer le Tribunal de protection des fonctionnaires divulguateurs d'actes répréhensibles, veiller à ce que les organisations soient prêtes à s'acquitter de leurs nouvelles responsabilités, et approuver la nomination du commissaire à l'intégrité du secteur public, chargé d'appliquer cette Loi.
En ce qui concerne ce dernier point, nous faisons notre part pour choisir un excellent candidat. Lorsque nous proposerons la personne choisie, j'espère pouvoir compter sur vous, parlementaires, pour que le processus d'approbation se déroule de manière aussi efficiente et juste que possible.
Il sera également crucial de dispenser une formation efficace sur la LFR. Pour ce faire, nous travaillerons avec l'École de la fonction publique du Canada afin de mettre à jour les cours existants et de dispenser la formation voulue.
Nous avons donc beaucoup à faire pour la mise en oeuvre de la Loi mais, en même temps, nous faisons le nécessaire pour donner suite aux engagements pris dans le Plan d'action sur la responsabilité fédérale. Par exemple, plusieurs études sont en cours pour faire en sorte que le gouvernement fonctionne mieux pour les Canadiens, notamment ceux qui ont régulièrement des contacts avec lui. Ces initiatives comprennent le renouvellement continu des politiques de gestion et l'examen par le groupe d'experts des programmes de subventions et de contributions dont je parlais tout à l'heure.
En résumé, nous déployons beaucoup d'efforts pour que la Loi entre en vigueur le plus rapidement possible mais chacune de ces activités exigera du temps et des ressources afin que chaque organisation soit prête à gérer correctement les nouvelles activités et à se conformer aux nouvelle dispositions législatives. Le calendrier de mise en oeuvre sera bientôt prêt, une fois que les parties intéressées auront été consultées. Dans les prochaines semaines, le Conseil du Trésor commencera à se pencher sur les règlements habilitants nécessaires pour mettre la Loi en application. Nous continuerons d'y travailler jusqu'à ce que ce soit fait et bien fait.
Madame la présidente, la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité était la première mesure du gouvernement pour rehausser la responsabilité dans l'administration fédérale. Améliorer la gestion des dépenses, au moyen d'un nouveau système, sera la prochaine mesure destinée à garantir que les deniers publics sont bien dépensés. C'est pourquoi nous avons annoncé en novembre les grandes lignes d'un nouveau système de gestion des dépenses, notre objectif étant de veiller à ce que chaque dollar des contribuables soit bien dépensé. En ce qui concerne les nouvelles dépenses, cela obligera à prendre des décisions au sujet des autres dépenses effectuées dans le même domaine. Pour ce qui est des dépenses existantes, elles feront l'objet d'un examen systématique pour s'assurer que les programmes sont encore pertinents et donnent les résultats attendus, et que leur financement est toujours adéquat.
En bref, notre nouvelle approche de la gestion des dépenses reposera sur la gestion axée sur les résultats en établissant des lignes de responsabilité claires pour les ministères, afin de mieux définir les résultats attendus des programmes nouveaux et existants. Deuxièmement, elle appuiera la prise de décision axée sur les résultats en garantissant que tous les nouveaux programmes sont entièrement et efficacement intégrés aux programmes existants, par le truchement d'une révision de toutes les dépenses pour en assurer l'efficience, l'efficacité et l'optimisation. Finalement, nous appuierons la reddition de comptes axée sur les résultats en rehaussant la qualité des rapports des ministères et du gouvernement au parlement. En fin de compte, ce nouveau système garantira que tous les programmes publics sont efficaces et efficients et sont axés sur les résultats et sur l'optimisation des ressources.
Pour terminer, j'aimerais aborder certaines des autres préoccupations du comité, c'est-à-dire l'utilisation de la comptabilité d'exercice pour la budgétisation ministérielle et l'affectation des crédits, et notre approche des grands projets de TI. J'ai probablement participé a plus de séances d'information sur la comptabilité depuis un mois que depuis fort longtemps et je commence à comprendre avec quelle diligence mon personnel se penche sur ces questions. Je sais qu'il est très intéressé par l'opinion du comité et j'entends travailler avec ce dernier et avec le ministère pour faire en sorte que tous les changements dans ce domaine soient mis en oeuvre avec attention et dans l'intérêt concret des Canadiens.
Madame la présidente, je tiens à vous remercier, ainsi que les membres de votre comité, pour les efforts que vous déployez afin de rehausser la gestion financière et la reddition de comptes par le gouvernement du Canada.
Les avantages de la comptabilité d'exercice sont bien connus. C'est une méthode qui peut rehausser la transparence de la gestion financière et, partant, la reddition de comptes. Je suis sûr que vous savez qu'il est complexe de concevoir et de mettre en oeuvre un tel système, et c'est pourquoi le Secrétariat étudie attentivement la question. Notre position, qui fera partie de notre réponse au comité des comptes publics, constituera l'assise de la position que le gouvernement exposera lors du débat sur la motion d'adoption de votre rapport. De ce fait, je ne saurais préjuger de l'issue de nos délibérations.
Une autre mesure destinée à rehausser la responsabilité au sein du gouvernement consistera à renforcer la gestion des grands projets de technologies de l'information. Plus précisément, nous avons dressé un plan d'action pour répondre aux préoccupations du vérificateur général dans ce domaine, en tirant parti des progrès déjà réalisés. Ce plan consiste à établir des attentes claires, avec une nouvelle politique et une directive sur la gestion des projets de TI, à fournir de nouvelles orientations et de nouveaux outils, ainsi que des programmes de formation et de perfectionnement, et à renforcer la supervision des grands projets de TI par le Secrétariat.
Madame la présidente, la quasi-totalité des programmes et services dispensés aux Canadiens fait appel à la technologie. Voilà pourquoi nous prenons la gestion des projets de TI tellement au sérieux.
Le thème commun à toutes les activités dont je viens de parler est l'amélioration de la responsabilité du gouvernement. Je suis fier des efforts déployés à ce sujet par les parlementaires au nom de nos concitoyens. Il est certain que l'adoption de la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité contribuera beaucoup à rehausser la confiance de la population envers son gouvernement en veillant à ce que les bonnes mesures soient prises pour rehausser la responsabilité, pour améliorer la gestion des dépenses, pour optimiser les ressources et pour donner des résultats concrets aux Canadiens. Nous n'aurons de cesse que ce travail soit achevé.
Merci de votre attention. Je suis maintenant prêt à répondre à vos questions.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:45
Expand
I think that's a good question. Some of the provisions of the Federal Accountability Act did in fact come into effect upon royal assent--for example, the designation of deputy ministers and deputy heads as accounting officers; the Director of Public Prosecutions Act, which was a very complex portion of the act that I was involved with in my prior portfolio; and the new mandate for the Auditor General to follow the money to grant and contribution recipients.
Certainly when I was in my prior portfolio I saw that the government was moving as quickly as it could. For example, I think they could have sat and waited for the Director of Public Prosecutions Act to be passed and then commence. In fact in that situation it was felt we could proceed on that issue, and we did. Also, the new electoral financing rules came into effect on January 1. Restriction on gifts to political candidates comes into force on June 12. Other sections either require new regulations or require organizations to perform new functions.
C'est une bonne question. Certaines dispositions de la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité sont entrées en vigueur dès la sanction royale — par exemple, la désignation des sous-ministres et des chefs d'administration comme agents comptables; la Loi sur le directeur des poursuites pénales, qui est un élément très complexe de la Loi dont je me suis occupé dans mon portefeuille précédent; et le nouveau mandat du vérificateur général d'assurer le suivi des sommes versées aux bénéficiaires de subventions et de contributions.
Dans mon portefeuille précédent, j'ai pu constater que le gouvernement essayait d'avancer le plus vite possible. Par exemple, je pense qu'il aurait pu attendre que la Loi sur le directeur des poursuites pénales soit adoptée avant de passer à l'action mais nous avons jugé qu'il n'était pas nécessaire d'attendre. De même, les nouvelles règles sur le financement des élections sont entrées en vigueur le 1er janvier. Les limites concernant les dons aux candidats politiques entreront en vigueur le 12 juin. D'autres dispositions de la loi exigeront de nouveaux règlements ou obligeront les organismes à assumer de nouvelles fonctions.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:47
Expand
All I can say is that when I came into the department a little over a month ago, I reviewed these matters. I've been reviewing these for the past month. I'm satisfied that the department officials are moving in a timely fashion. I'm not in a position to release any kind of a schedule. As I indicated in my notes, that schedule is something we're working on. I can say that each one of these issues involves different considerations, and I'm committed, and I know the department is committed, to moving ahead as quickly as possible.
Tout ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que je me suis penché sur toutes ces questions quand je suis arrivé au ministère, il y a un peu plus d'un mois. J'ai pu constater que les fonctionnaires agissent sans retard mais je ne suis pas en mesure de vous donner un échéancier quelconque. Comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, nous préparons actuellement cet échéancier. Je peux vous dire que chacune de ces mesures englobe un certain nombre de considérations différentes et que je suis déterminé, tout comme le ministère, à agir le plus rapidement possible.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:48
Expand
I guess the short answer to that is that it doesn't change in any substantive way the responsibility of the minister. The minister is still responsible.
Brièvement, je peux vous dire que cela ne change pas foncièrement la responsabilité du ministre, qui reste responsable.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:48
Expand
Absolutely. We believe it's important for the deputies to also be responsible, and that's why they were designated as the accounting officers.
In terms of ministerial responsibility, nothing has changed. What exactly ministerial responsibility involves is another question. I know we had pretty extensive discussion on that during some of the discussions prior to the last election. I know that in front of the public accounts committee, when I was involved in some of the hearings there, that whole issue.... There were some experts who brought forward different ideas on the extent to which ministers should be held accountable in any particular way. This act has not changed ministerial responsibility, whatever one considers that to be.
Absolument. Nous pensons cependant qu'il est également important que les sous-ministres assument leurs propres responsabilités et c'est pourquoi ils ont été désignés agents comptables.
Pour ce qui est de la responsabilité ministérielle, rien n'a changé. Quant à savoir ce que cette notion englobe exactement, c'est une autre question. Je pense qu'il y a eu de longues discussions à ce sujet avant la dernière élection. Je sais que la question avait été abordée par le comité des comptes publics lors de certaines des séances auxquelles j'ai participé. Divers experts avaient proposé des idées différentes sur les choses dont les ministres devraient être tenus responsables de manière particulière. Cette Loi n'a rien changé à la responsabilité ministérielle, quelle que soit la manière dont on interprète ce principe.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:50
Expand
That's exactly the question I asked when I became the minister of this department, President of the Treasury Board--how our procurement policy actually works. The secretary very kindly explained exactly that. Essentially the general rule is that there is a competitive process. That is the main goal of all procurement. In certain situations, for one reason or another--and I'll have the secretary explain that--that is not the practice. There's nothing inappropriate about it. For example, the criteria are well known; those criteria are put out, and we say, “This is what we are looking for”, and then people are asked to match that. I'm perhaps not explaining it properly.
Mr. Wouters can go on.
C'est exactement la question que j'ai posée quand je suis devenu président du Conseil du Trésor : comment fonctionne concrètement notre politique d'approvisionnement? Le secrétaire a eu la bonté de me l'expliquer en détail. La règle générale est qu'il y a un processus compétitif. C'est l'objectif principal de tout approvisionnement. Dans certains cas, pour une raison ou une autre — et je laisserai le secrétaire vous expliquer ça — ce n'est pas la méthode retenue mais il n'y a rien de problématique à cet égard. Par exemple, les critères sont publiés et sont bien connus. Nous disons ce que nous voulons obtenir et nous invitons les fournisseurs à répondre au besoin exprimé. Mon explication n'est peut-être pas très bonne.
M. Wouters, voulez-vous continuer?
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:54
Expand
Thank you, Madame, for the questions. I'm going to let the Comptroller General answer that, by and large.
I do want to say that I certainly saw your recommendations, as a committee, along with the Auditor General's recommendations. I think there is much merit to them.
I was briefed extensively on that issue perhaps about a week ago, about the various types of accounting and the problems with each type. It appeared to me at first blush that the accrual system does provide for a truer reflection of the actual expenditures and the actual state of the government's books at any one time. No doubt, that's why the Auditor General has endorsed that system. All I can say is that I will move in a timely fashion.
Mr. St-Jean.
Merci, madame, de vos questions. Dans l'ensemble, je laisserai le contrôleur général de répondre.
Auparavant, permettez-moi de dire que j'ai certainement vu les recommandations du comité et du vérificateur général, et j'estime qu'elles présentent beaucoup d'intérêt.
J'ai participé à une longue séance d'information sur cette question il y a environ une semaine, au sujet des diverses méthodes comptables et de leurs problèmes respectifs. À première vue, il m'a semblé que la comptabilité d'exercice donne une image plus exacte des dépenses réelles et de la situation réelle des comptes du gouvernement à n'importe quel moment. C'est certainement pour cette raison que la vérificatrice générale a endossé cette méthode. Tout ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que nous avançons sans retard.
M. St-Jean.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 15:58
Expand
Thank you.
The issue of Bill C-11, or the whistle-blower's legislation, I think is important. In speaking with my staff about that particular legislation, I understand there still has to be some consultation with stakeholders, including trade unions and management individuals. We are committed to moving that through as quickly as possible, but I don't want to unilaterally impose a program or a framework that the trade unions, for example, are not happy with. There needs to be that consultation, and I've discussed that particular issue with the secretary.
In terms of the cost, I can't say off the top of my head what that cost is, but perhaps the secretary can advise us.
Merci.
Le projet de loi C-11, sur les dénonciateurs, est important. Mes collaborateurs m'ont dit qu'il y a encore certaines consultations à tenir avec des parties intéressées comme des syndicats et des gestionnaires. Nous sommes décidés à avancer le plus vite possible à ce sujet mais je ne voudrais pas imposer unilatéralement un programme ou un système ne donnant pas satisfaction aux syndicats, par exemple. Il faut tenir ces consultations et j'en ai discuté avec le Secrétaire.
En ce qui concerne le coût, je ne saurais vous répondre de mémoire mais le Secrétaire peut peut-être vous donner des précisions.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:01
Expand
Yes, I'm familiar with that. Thank you for that summary. It's a good summary for all committee members to hear.
The issue of expenditure management is one that I am particularly concerned about, not only because of my experience here in the Treasury Board but also as a result of my role in my previous department. My concern is that when we are initiating new programs, are we also looking at expenditures on programs that are no longer priorities, or that priorities have shifted? I was pleased to see that was one of the Auditor General's concerns as well.
As a result, we as a cabinet have undertaken to make rigorous examinations of all new spending proposals. We are not simply looking at the value of those new spending proposals and assessing the quality and cost-effectiveness of them. We are also taking explicit account of the funding, performance, and resource requirements of existing programs, so that as we're implementing new programs we're also taking a look at how money is being spent in existing programs.
I don't know if most Canadians realize this, but one of the points that was brought to my attention was that in six years, the A-base budget of the Government of Canada went from $45 billion to $90 billion. I thought, “That's a remarkable increase in only six years. Is there something we should be doing to make sure that as we're adding certain things to the A-base—essentially the portion of the budget that rolls over every year and is spent almost automatically—we are reviewing those existing programs?”
So the commitment of our government is to do that through the expenditure management review program, as commented on by the Auditor General,
Oui, je suis au courant. Merci de ce résumé, il est bon que tous les membres du comité aient pu l'entendre.
La gestion des dépenses est une question qui m'intéresse particulièrement, pas seulement à cause de mon rôle au Conseil du Trésor mais aussi à cause du portefeuille que je détenais auparavant. Mon souci est le suivant : quand nous lançons de nouveaux programmes, examinons-nous en même temps les sommes consacrées à des programmes qui ne sont plus prioritaires ou dont les priorités ont pu changer? J'ai constaté avec plaisir que c'est aussi une préoccupation de la vérificatrice générale.
C'est pour cette raison que le Cabinet procède à un examen rigoureux de toutes les nouvelles propositions de dépense. L'objectif n'est pas seulement d'évaluer les nouvelles propositions de dépense mais aussi d'en mesurer la qualité et la rentabilité. Nous tenons aussi explicitement compte du financement, du rendement et des ressources des programmes existants lorsque nous envisageons de lancer de nouveaux programmes.
Je ne sais pas si les Canadiens le savent mais l'une des choses que l'on m'a signalées est que le budget de base A du gouvernement du Canada est passé en six ans de 45 à 90 milliards de dollars. Je me suis dit que c'était une augmentation incroyable en seulement six ans et je me suis demandé s'il y a quelque chose que nous devrions faire pour nous assurer que les programmes existants sont revus lorsque nous ajoutons des choses au budget de base A — c'est la partie du budget qui est reconduite chaque année et qui est dépensée quasi automatiquement.
L'engagement de notre gouvernement est donc de procéder à cette révision dans le cadre du programme d'examen de la gestion des dépenses, comme l'a recommandé la vérificatrice générale.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:08
Expand
I'm going to let Mr. St-Jean answer that, but I do want to reiterate that it is clear that there are distinct advantages to the accrual basis, and I don't think there's going to be much of an argument on that, comparing it simply to the cash accounting or the near cash accounting that is done. Accrual does, in many ways, reflect the whole scope and the size of the organizations, the government's resources and their obligations, their costs. I think it does make more information available to decision-makers.
But I think the question you're asking--why haven't we done more, and when the actual report does come out, are we going to be coordinating it between two particular committees—
Je vais laisser M. Saint-Jean vous répondre mais je veux répéter que la comptabilité d'exercice offre à l'évidence des avantages particuliers — et je ne pense pas qu'il y ait beaucoup de contestation à cet égard — par rapport à la comptabilité de caisse. La comptabilité d'exercice reflète de nombreuses manières la portée et la taille réelles et totales des organismes, des ressources et des obligations du gouvernement et des coûts. Je pense qu'elle permet aux décideurs d'avoir plus d'informations.
Toutefois, les questions que vous posez — pourquoi n'avons-nous pas fait plus, quand le rapport réel sera-t-il publié et allons-nous coordonner avec les deux comités...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:10
Expand
Well, I don't want to state what the report is going to say. I want to say that the government has made considerable progress in implementing accrual accounting in many aspects of financial planning and reporting. As a trend, we see that happening in the Government of Canada. The federal budget and the summary financial statements of the Government of Canada are now all prepared on a full accrual basis.
However, increasing the use of accrual accounting and departmental level budgeting and parliamentary appropriations to departments is a complex one. It will require a significant investment in systems changes. So it's not simply a case of saying, well, we've used this system up until now and tomorrow we're going to use another system. The system changes are in fact quite significant, and the transition would have to be very carefully managed. It includes not only systems but also training.
Without letting the cat out of the bag, we understand that accrual offers a lot of benefits, but there are significant challenges. I think the government has already demonstrated that it is moving in the direction of accrual accounting and will do so on a timely basis. But we don't want to jeopardize the ability to maintain services and other issues like that.
Je ne peux pas vous dire ce qu'il y aura dans le rapport. Je peux par contre vous dire que le gouvernement a fait des progrès considérables dans la mise en oeuvre de la comptabilité d'exercice pour maints aspects de la planification financière et de la reddition de comptes. La tendance est claire au sein du gouvernement du Canada. Aujourd'hui, le budget fédéral et les états financiers sommaires du gouvernement sont tous préparés selon la méthode de comptabilité d'exercice.
Toutefois, étendre cette méthode à l'élaboration des budgets des ministères et aux affectations parlementaires aux ministères est une question complexe. Cela exigera un investissement important dans de nouveaux systèmes. Il ne suffit donc pas de dire que nous avons utilisé un certain système jusqu'à présent et que nous en utiliserons un autre à partir de demain. Les changements nécessaires sont en fait très profonds et il faudra gérer la transition avec prudence. Ce n'est pas seulement une question de systèmes mais aussi de formation professionnelle.
Sans révéler de secret, je peux vous dire que nous savons que la comptabilité d'exercice offre beaucoup d'avantages mais qu'elle pose aussi des problèmes importants. Je crois que le gouvernement a déjà démontré qu'il avance dans cette voie et qu'il a l'intention de continuer de manière opportune, mais nous ne voulons pas mettre en danger notre aptitude à maintenir les services, par exemple.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:17
Expand
I do, and I'm not exactly sure how much I can say. That's the problem with briefings. You don't know what's public and what's private anymore.
J'ai un avis sur la question mais je ne sais pas jusqu'où je peux aller. C'est le problème, avec les briefings : on finit par ne plus savoir ce qui est public et ce qui est privé
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:17
Expand
I'm always cautious before I speak on some of these issues because I don't want to jeopardize any contractual arrangements that may or may not be in place. Certainly, when we're talking about procurement, the government's first position is that it needs to be done on an open and competitive basis in order to get the best price possible.
Secondly, we recognize that many of these contracts offer opportunities for Canadians to develop their skills, that we retain skilled workers and technicians and professionals here in Canada. Again, that is important. I know, for example, under the WTO there are provisions to allow contracts under NAFTA that allow work to be done in-country, so it doesn't have to be shipped off to another country. I think there are good, solid, national reasons for doing that in order to develop our own industry, our own workforce.
I'm just wondering, Mr. Secretary, if you want to add anything to that.
Je suis toujours prudent quand je parle de ces questions car je ne voudrais pas mettre en danger tel ou tel contrat en cours de négociation ou déjà signé. Évidemment, quand on parle d'approvisionnement, la position première du gouvernement est qu'il faut des offres concurrentielles afin d'obtenir le meilleur prix possible.
Deuxièmement, nous savons que ces contrats offrent souvent à des Canadiens la possibilité de perfectionner leurs compétences, ce qui nous permet de garder chez nous des travailleurs qualifiés, des techniciens et des professionnels, ce qui n'est pas négligeable. Je sais par exemple qu'il y a dans le cadre de l'OMC des dispositions permettant, pour les contrats de l'ALENA, que certains travaux soient réservés au pays accordant le contrat, ce qui empêche l'autre pays de les exécuter. Je pense qu'il y a de bonnes raisons tout à fait légitimes pour ce faire, notamment permettre à nos industries et à nos travailleurs de se développer.
Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose, monsieur le Secrétaire?
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:23
Expand
Well, I've not yet seen areas where we've in fact taken money out of a certain area and simply left it without money. I'm not aware of any.
Écoutez, je ne sache pas qu'il y ait un seul domaine dont nous ayons aboli tous les budgets et qui soit aujourd'hui sans argent du tout. Je n'en connais aucun.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:23
Expand
Right. What I've seen in almost every situation I've come across and what people have asked me about is this. For example, we've taken money out of this situation, and yet I've consistently seen in the government announcements that we are simply redirecting the funding. Instead of paying lobbyists to lobby the government to get more money in order to lobby, for example, we wanted to have actual delivery of programs.
For some of the work that I saw, for example, through so-called literacy groups, there wasn't in fact much literacy work being done at all. It was straight advocacy. But I was encouraged to see the actual direct expenditure of money into reading programs and the like. I would prefer that the money actually go to help children, adults, and immigrants learn to read rather than simply paying lobbyists to do it.
En effet. Voici ce que j'ai constaté dans la quasi-totalité des cas dont on m'a parlé. Par exemple, nous avons enlevé de l'argent dans ce secteur mais je continue à voir des annonces du gouvernement Indiquant que nous réorientons simplement les crédits. Au lieu de payer des lobbyistes pour faire des pressions sur le gouvernement pour obtenir plus d'argent pour faire encore plus de lobbying, nous voulons que l'argent serve réellement à dispenser des services.
Par exemple, en ce qui concerne certains groupes dits d'alphabétisation, je ne les ai pas vus faire beaucoup d'alphabétisation. Par contre, j'ai été encouragé de voir que de l'argent était directement consacré à des programmes de lecture, par exemple. Je préfère que l'argent serve réellement à aider les enfants, les adultes et les immigrants à apprendre à lire plutôt qu'à payer des lobbyistes.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:26
Expand
As I understand it, all of the $1 billion in savings have been reallocated in those areas to ensure that those kinds of needs are met. In the literacy area, for example, $81 million is going towards actual literacy programs, as opposed to lobbying groups.
The court challenges program is an interesting example. I believe in the budget there was about $5 million a year, yet no one is able to tell me who got the money. I first asked who got the money years before I was even in the federal government. When I made those kinds of inquiries, they said “I'm sorry, we can't tell you because it would violate solicitor-client privilege.” That was the grossest abuse of solicitor-client privilege I had ever heard of in my life.
For example, when someone is on a legal aid certificate, that's well-known. The source of the funding doesn't in any way violate solicitor-client privilege. So not only did we not know who was getting the money because the group said they couldn't tell us, but we didn't know the criteria under which that money was spent.
If we're going to go down that road in any way, the people who actually receive the money...we have to be clear about that. It has to be open and accountable. Secondly, the criteria.... Those were the fundamental two flaws in the court challenges program that I experienced. It may only be $5 million, but that's a lot of money to many people.
Si je ne me trompe, toute l'économie de 1 milliard de dollars a été réaffectée dans ces secteurs pour satisfaire ce genre de besoins. En alphabétisation, par exemple, 81 millions de dollars sont destinés à des programmes réels plutôt qu'à des groupes de lobbying.
Le Programme de contestation judiciaire est un exemple intéressant. Je crois qu'il avait un budget annuel de 5 millions de dollars environ mais personne ne peut me dire qui a reçu l'argent. La première fois que j'ai demandé qui recevait de l'argent au titre de ce programme, c'était bien des années avant que je fasse partie du gouvernement fédéral. À ce moment-là, on m'a dit : « Désolé, on peut pas vous le dire à cause du privilège avocat-client ». C'était l'abus le plus grossier de ce privilège que j'aie jamais pu constater.
Par exemple, quand quelqu'un bénéficie de l'aide juridique, on le sait. Divulguer la source de l'argent ne constituerait en aucun cas une transgression du privilège avocat-client. Cela veut dire que nous ne pouvions pas savoir non seulement qui obtenait l'argent, puisqu'on ne voulait pas le dire, mais aussi en vertu de quels critères l'argent était dépensé.
Si l'on veut s'engager dans cette voie aujourd'hui, les gens qui reçoivent effectivement l'argent... Il faut que tout soit bien clair. Il faut que ce soit transparent et que l'on rende des comptes. Deuxièmement, les critères... Il s'agissait là à mes yeux des deux principales failles du Programme de contestation judiciaire. Ce n'était peut-être que 5 millions de dollars mais, pour beaucoup de gens, c'était beaucoup d'argent.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:29
Expand
This issue was discussed quite fully at the public accounts committee yesterday, and officials who were there—
Cette question a fait l'objet de longues discussions hier devant le comité des comptes publics et les fonctionnaires qui étaient...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:29
Expand
I'm not going to disclose what I have or have not seen. All I can tell you at this point is that officials were at the public accounts committee yesterday—
Je ne peux divulguer ce que j'ai vu ou pas vu. Tout ce que je peux vous dire pour le moment, c'est que les fonctionnaires qui étaient hier devant le comité des comptes publics...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:30
Expand
Perhaps you can tell me what specific information you would like and I can answer the question.
Peut-être pourriez-vous me dire quelles informations précises vous voulez obtenir et je pourrais peut-être vous répondre?
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:30
Expand
I'll see whether I'm able to do that.
Je vais voir si je peux le faire.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:32
Expand
It wasn't single source, as I understand it.
Ce n'était pas une source unique, si j'ai bien compris.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:33
Expand
Well, you've made all kinds of assumptions and statements and put them all together in what is not, particularly, a very neat package.
Vous venez d'exprimer toutes sortes d'hypothèses et de suppositions dans une déclaration qui n'est pas particulièrement cohérente.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:33
Expand
First of all, to simply suggest that the Minister of National Defence was somehow in some kind of conflict because, I understand, he was a lobbyist for one firm or another.... The assumption you're making here is that he was in conflict, which was not in some way detected, and that there was something inappropriately done.
Tout d'abord, simplement suggérer que le ministre de la défense nationale était en conflit d'intérêts parce qu'il a fait du lobbying pour telle ou telle firme... Vous supposez ici qu'il était en conflit d'intérêts, ce dont personne n'a aucune indication, et qu'il s'est comporté de manière répréhensible.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:34
Expand
Perhaps you would want to call the minister responsible for the contract to ask how that was done.
Vous devriez peut-être poser la question au ministre responsable de ce contrat pour savoir comment ça s'est passé.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:34
Expand
That's right. Well, let me finish now.
I'm prepared to answer questions in respect of my responsibilities in ensuring that there are appropriate Treasury Board rules in place, that appropriate officials are accountable, and that things are done in accordance with that. I don't have all the facts about every contract.
C'est juste. À vous de me laisser terminer ma réponse, maintenant.
Je suis prêt à répondre aux questions concernant mes responsabilités, qui sont de veiller à ce que des règles adéquates soient mises en place par le Conseil du Trésor, à ce que les fonctionnaires rendent des comptes et à ce que les choses soient faites en conséquence. Je ne connais pas tous les détails de tous les contrats.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:35
Expand
You are asking me what the facts of that particular contract are. I don't have all the facts. If you want the facts, bring the minister here. Let him answer. What I am prepared to say is that my responsibility in Treasury Board is to ensure that there is accountability, that there is transparency, and that the business of the government gets done in an effective and efficient manner. So there's all kinds of weighing that goes into dealing with those types of principles.
Now, if you think the Minister of National Defence has done anything inappropriate, please bring that evidence forward, or bring him here.
Vous me demandez des données factuelles sur ce contrat précis. Je ne les connais pas toutes. Si c'est ce que vous voulez, convoquez le ministre pertinent et laissez-le répondre. Ce que je suis prêt à vous dire, c'est que mon rôle au Conseil du Trésor consiste à assurer la responsabilité, la transparence ainsi que l'efficacité et l'efficience de l'action du gouvernement. il y a toutes sortes de facteurs à prendre en considération dans ce contexte.
Maintenant, si vous pensez que le ministre de la Défense nationale a agi de manière répréhensible, fournissez des preuves ou convoquez-le devant de votre comité.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:36
Expand
I'm suggesting that you go right to the horse's mouth and have the minister here, and he can explain exactly what he has done. I'm not going to get into any kind of conjecture in that respect. I've heard the minister explain it in the House in the same way that you have. I'm satisfied on the basis of what I have heard. But if you think there is any basis on which to question that, please bring the minister here and have him answer the questions.
Et je vous réponds d'aller à la source en convoquant le ministre pour qu'il puisse s'expliquer. Je ne vais pas me lancer dans toutes sortes de conjectures à ce sujet. J'ai entendu le ministre s'expliquer devant la Chambre des communes et je suis satisfait de ce que j'ai entendu. Si vous pensez avoir des raisons quelconques d'en douter, n'hésitez pas à le convoquer pour l'obliger à répondre à vos questions.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:36
Expand
I can tell you how procurements generally are done. You've indicated, for example, that this was sole-source. Even that's a matter of debate. As I understand it, it was one of what we call ACANs, so the criteria as to what was required were put out there publicly: who else can meet these criteria?
Je peux vous dire comment se fait généralement l'approvisionnement. Par exemple, vous avez dit qu'il s'agissait d'une source unique. Même cela est contestable. Si je ne me trompe, il s'agissait de ce que nous appelons un PAC, c'est-à-dire un processus dans lequel on publie le cahier des charges en demandant si d'autres entreprises peuvent le satisfaire.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:37
Expand
I think you would have to go to the military to ask that particular question.
Je pense que vous devriez le demander à l'armée.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:38
Expand
I think there have been ten leaks of the report since about 2000.
Je crois qu'il y a eu 10 fuites du rapport depuis environ 2000.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:39
Expand
There are a number of things. As parliamentarians, you can provide us with ongoing advice.
I do note, just before I answer that question, that when you're working in a line department, for example, that will be affected by an act's coming in, you don't want to spend too much money and time on any particular thing if in fact that act is going to be defeated. There was never any guarantee that the act was going to be passed. So managers are put in a very difficult position.
How much money and time do we invest in something that may never come to fruition? That was one of the problems we faced as ministers in a line department. For example, when we implemented the Director of Public Prosecutions position, we were able to bring that into effect virtually immediately upon the coming into force of the act, but that's not without its risks. I could see there being the criticism that after having done all that work and expended the money, suddenly the act wasn't coming forward, and you had expended money. So it was frustrating that the act was held up, I think most of us would admit, for an unduly long period of time in the Senate.
Now that the act is, in great part, in force, one of the things that parliamentarians must consider is how you can help the parliamentary vetting process. I think the act gives unprecedented control to parliamentarians in terms of the appointment process for some of these individuals. The appointments requiring parliamentary oversight include those of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner as an officer of Parliament, the Commissioner of Lobbying as an agent of Parliament, the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner as an agent of Parliament, and the Director of Public Prosecutions. At the present time we have a temporary person in place for the latter, and there will be a permanent one in place.
Again, the reviewing of all of these individuals and that process requires, I think, if not camaraderie, at least a willingness to work together to ensure that the best individuals are put in place.
Il y a plusieurs choses que vous pouvez faire. Tout d'abord, vous pouvez continuellement nous conseiller.
Avant de poursuivre ma réponse, je précise qu'un ministère hiérarchique qui sera affecté par la Loi ne voudra certainement pas dépenser beaucoup d'argent et consacrer beaucoup de temps pour se préparer à la mise en oeuvre d'une loi risquant de ne pas être adoptée. Il n'y avait jamais aucune garantie que cette Loi le serait, ce qui a placé les gestionnaires des ministères dans une situation très difficile.
Combien de temps et d'argent consacrons-nous à quelque chose qui risque de ne jamais voir le jour? C'était l'un des problèmes auxquels nous faisions face comme responsables d'un ministère hiérarchique. Par exemple, quand nous avons créé le poste de directeur des poursuites pénales, nous avons pu le faire quasi immédiatement après l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi mais ce n'était pas sans risques. Il m'était facile d'imaginer les critiques qui seraient formulées si la Loi n'était pas adoptée et que nous avions déjà fait tout ce travail et dépensé l'argent. Il était donc frustrant pour nous que la Loi soit bloquée pendant une période excessive, je pense que tout le monde en conviendra, par le Sénat.
Maintenant que la Loi est entrée en vigueur, en grande mesure, l'une des choses que les parlementaires doivent prendre en considération est le processus d'examen des nominations. Je crois que les parlementaires bénéficieront d'un pouvoir sans précédent en ce qui concerne ces nominations. En effet, les nominations assujetties à un examen parlementaire comprennent celles de commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, comme agent du parlement, de commissaire au lobbying, comme agent du Parlement, de commissaire à l'intégrité du secteur public, comme agent du parlement, et de directeur des poursuites pénales. Pour le moment, une personne a été nommée à titre provisoire dans ce dernier poste mais il y aura plus tard une nomination permanente.
À mon avis, l'examen de toutes ces nominations exigera, sinon de la camaraderie, du moins la volonté de collaborer pour assurer que les meilleures personnes possibles occupent ces postes.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:43
Expand
More importantly, as important as the money is, it can also be seen as almost a contempt of Parliament to presume that Parliament will do something. In a minority situation, that's a very difficult thing to do. I think you're right.
I have to say that in discussing this matter with departmental officials, I've been very impressed with the timely manner in which they're moving. I've reviewed the entire process. No firm schedule has been set, but I'm satisfied that in each and every area they're moving in a timely fashion and there are no significant impediments to that occurring.
Now, those might develop--I might be unaware of them, and the department might be unaware of them--but I'm very satisfied with how the department is moving.
Plus important encore, même si l'argent est important, cela aurait pu être considéré comme un outrage au parlement en supposant qu'il allait agir dans un sens donné. Or, avec un gouvernement minoritaire, c'est très difficile à faire. Vous avez donc raison.
Je dois dire que, lors de mes discussions avec les fonctionnaires à ce sujet, j'ai été très impressionné par la célérité de leurs actions. J'ai revu tout le processus. Aucun échéancier ferme n'a encore été établi mais je sais qu'ils agissent dans chaque cas avec célérité et qu'il n'y a pas d'obstacles notables à franchir.
Certes, des obstacles pourraient bien apparaître — et il y en a peut-être que je ne connais pas, ni le ministère — mais je suis très satisfait de l'action du ministère.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:45
Expand
There are practical issues beyond the control of the government as well when you're dealing with crown corporations. For example, the access to information that.... For example, I know that some of them are coming in April 1, and we assume that those are coming in. But the crown corporation has to hire the staff and has to put the process in place. I trust they will do that in a timely manner as well, but it is something that is beyond the control of the government. We are moving to ensure that what we need to do is being done, and then the crowns will have to move in a timely fashion.
Il y a des questions d'ordre pratique à envisager concernant les sociétés d'État, questions qui ne relèvent pas du gouvernement. Par exemple, je sais que certaines seront assujetties à la Loi le 1er avril et nous supposons qu'elles font le nécessaire en recrutant du personnel et en élaborant des procédures. Je suppose qu'elles feront tout cela de manière opportune mais c'est quelque chose que le gouvernement ne contrôle pas. Nous faisons tout ce qu'il faut dans le cadre de nos propres responsabilités et il faut que les sociétés d'État fassent de même.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:47
Expand
Are you asking me if I agree with you that it was a contempt of Parliament?
Êtes-vous en train de me demander si j'estime comme vous qu'il y a eu un outrage au Parlement?
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:47
Expand
I don't agree. I can explain exactly why I think everything was done in an appropriate fashion. Indeed, had there not been this inordinate delay in the Senate, the concerns you're expressing could have been addressed in an appropriate fashion much earlier.
Non, je ne suis pas d'accord. Je peux vous expliquer exactement pourquoi j'estime que tout a été fait correctement. En réalité, s'il n'y avait pas eu ce retard indu au Sénat, les préoccupations que vous exprimez auraient pu être réglées beaucoup plus tôt de manière adéquate.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:48
Expand
There are certain things, for example, for which we simply couldn't wait for the act to be passed--and the act might never have passed. So I'm prepared to simply say, look, the act is done. We can start off on a new foot. We can work together, and I'm looking to you and your cooperation in terms of ensuring that we get the best people in place to fill these positions now that this system is in place.
Il y a certaines choses qui ne pouvaient tout simplement pas attendre l'adoption de la Loi — d'autant plus qu'elle risquait de ne jamais être adoptée. Je suis donc simplement prêt à dire que la Loi a maintenant été adoptée et que nous pouvons repartir du bon pied. Nous pouvons travailler ensemble et je m'attends à recevoir votre collaboration pour que les meilleures personnes possibles soient choisies pour ces nouveaux postes.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:49
Expand
I don't want to get into that specifically. We were pleased to see that the contract was announced. We think it was a good deal for Canadians.
Je ne veux pas aborder cette question particulière. Nous avons été heureux que le contrat soit annoncé car nous pensons que c'est un bon contrat pour les Canadiens.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:49
Expand
Generally speaking, I would think that a minister who would interfere with an ombudsman would do so at his or her own peril. It would just be—
De manière générale, je crois qu'un ministre qui entraverait l'action de l'ombudsman le ferait à son péril. Ce serait simplement...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:50
Expand
What...that the ombudsman would interfere with the minister?
Que... que l'ombudsman s'ingère dans l'action d'un ministre?
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:50
Expand
But that's done every day, and appropriately so. The ombudsman in fact has a role to appropriately intervene and ask questions and try to resolve certain things, whether we're talking about an ombudsman or an auditor general, who obviously performs a different type of a role. They all intervene.
Mais ça se fait tous les jours, et c'est légitime. En fait, l'ombudsman a précisément pour rôle de s'ingérer de manière appropriée, de poser des questions et d'essayer de résoudre certaines choses, ce qui vaut également pour un vérificateur général, qui joue évidemment un rôle de nature différente. Toutefois, tous deux s'ingérent.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:50
Expand
Well, the role is to ensure that if there are concerns about a particular contracting process, those.... I don't think it's good enough to always say that the rules were followed exactly. If you follow the rules exactly, as a small business person, I will never access these contracts. That is an issue, then. An ombudsman would be able to say yes, the rules were followed, but the problem is that the rules operate unfairly with respect to these small businesses.
In that sense, they advocate for changes, or at least indicate that a change may be necessary. As I understand it, an ombudsman never has the actual power to order the change, but certainly to identify the problem and make recommendations. That's how I see the role of an ombudsman. I'd have to—
Eh bien, son rôle, si l'on a des préoccupations au sujet de la passation d'un marché donné, sera... Je ne pense pas qu'il soit suffisant de dire que les règles seront toujours suivies à la lettre. Si je suis un petit homme d'affaires, je n'obtiendrai jamais ce genre de marché si l'on suit les règles à la lettre. Un ombudsman pourra dire que, même si les règles ont été suivies à la lettre, le problème est qu'elles ont l'effet injuste d'exclure ce genre de petites entreprises.
C'est dans ce sens ce que les petits entrepreneurs demandent des changements ou disent qu'un changement est nécessaire. Si je comprends bien, un ombudsman ne détiendra jamais le pouvoir concret d'ordonner un changement mais il pourra certainement mettre le doigt sur le problème et formuler des recommandations. Voilà comment j'envisage son rôle. Il faudrait...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:52
Expand
Well, first of all, I don't know whether the Manitoban societies ever received any money under that program.
Premièrement, je ne sais pas si les sociétés manitobaines ont jamais reçu d'argent au titre de ce programme.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:52
Expand
Well, it's nice that you tell me that, but the program would never tell us who actually received money. So I have no way of saying—
Je suis heureux de vous l'entendre dire mais les responsables du programme ne nous ont jamais dit qui avait effectivement reçu l'argent. Il est donc impossible de confirmer...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:52
Expand
Well, now, hold on, how would I know that? When I made inquiries, I was told that information could not be disclosed, that it was subject to solicitor-client privilege.
Attendez, comment pourrais-je savoir? Quand je me suis renseigné, on m'a répondu que l'information ne pouvait pas être divulguée à cause du privilège avocat-client.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:56
Expand
Thank you for the question. I'm sorry, but our department and the board does not specifically look at this issue. Mr. Fortier is responsible for this particular issue. I understand he is looking at that, and that's perhaps something you could direct to Mr. Fortier.
Merci de cette question. Je regrette mais notre ministère et le Conseil ne sont pas précisément saisis de cette question. C'est M. Fortier qui en assume la responsabilité. Je crois comprendre qu'il en est saisi à l'heure actuelle et vous devriez peut-être l'interroger directement.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:56
Expand
All I can say is that I have not had a detailed briefing on this, but I know that Mr. Fortier is working with these people to address this particular issue. I'm sorry. If there's something my department can give you on that, I will provide it, but the responsibility lies with Mr. Fortier.
Tout ce que je peux dire, c'est que je n'ai pas eu de briefing détaillé à ce sujet mais je sais que M. Fortier travaille avec ces gens pour régler le problème. S'il y a autre chose que nous pouvons vous donner à ce sujet, nous le ferons mais le dossier relève de M. Fortier.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 16:57
Expand
I'm certainly aware of the appointment. I heard about it in the House as well as you did. I understand this individual is a meritorious individual. He's qualified, if you look at the qualifications that are required to fulfil this particular position.
I know that several allegations have been made in that respect, but I've seen nothing that would indicate to me that he is any less qualified, for example, than other individuals who have been appointed to that particular position. Indeed, I would say he has higher qualifications than some individuals who've been appointed in the past.
Simply because someone is politically associated doesn't mean they should be barred from being considered for a position, provided they meet the qualifications. For example, in Manitoba—
Je suis au courant de la nomination. J'en ai entendu parler en Chambre comme vous. Je crois comprendre qu'il s'agit d'une personne de grand mérite. C'est quelqu'un qui a toutes les qualités requises pour occuper ce poste.
Je sais qu'il y a eu diverses allégations à ce sujet mais je n'ai rien vu qui me permette de penser que c'est une personne moins qualifiée, par exemple, que d'autres qui ont déjà occupé ce poste. En fait, je crois que c'est quelqu'un qui a plus de qualifications que certaines de ces personnes.
Le fait qu'une personne ait une allégeance politique ne signifie pas qu'on devrait lui interdire d'occuper un tel poste, à condition qu'elle possède les qualifications requises. Par exemple, au Manitoba...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:00
Expand
The comment I'd like to make at the onset is that the program will never fully be implemented in the sense that we have the program and this is what it's going to look like, but we in fact do want to ensure that the system is up and running in a timely fashion.
Work is continuing right now. This is not a simple project, and I know that—
Je dois d'abord vous dire que le programme ne sera jamais complètement mis en oeuvre au sens où l'on met normalement en oeuvre des programmes à une date précise. Ce que nous voulons, c'est nous assurer que le système est opérationnel et fonctionne en temps opportun.
Le travail à ce sujet continue en ce moment. Ce n'est pas un projet simple à réaliser et je sais que...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:01
Expand
I think what's different about this is that we actually are looking at past programs to determine that they are still relevant, effective, and efficient, as we're putting new programs in place. We're emphasizing value for money. That was one of the reasons I pointed out in an answer to one of the earlier questions about the A-base budget doubling in six years from $45 billion to $90 billion.
It's something that I was faced with in my own department as a minister prior to coming to this department. As our priorities as a government changed when we came into office from the past government, when we were then implementing these new measures and trying to put them into place and identifying how much it would cost in terms of resources, the question I kept asking was, “What about the things that we are no longer doing? What has happened to those resources?” There didn't seem to be a particularly good way of handling that.
It has been explained to me as to why there was never that emphasis on examining existing programs in order to ensure that those existing resources are being used properly. One of the reasons was that back in about 1995 when the A-base budget was cut to its bones, it was always assumed that everything that was there was absolutely necessary to make the government run, when in fact I think it's a mistake to assume that if it's relevant at one point in time it will continue to be relevant.
We have essentially set up a five-year review of this and are attempting to put the new system in place in about a five-year timeframe.
Ce qui est différent, je crois, c'est que nous analysons les programmes existants pour voir s'ils sont encore pertinents, efficaces et efficients lorsque nous lançons de nouveaux programmes. Notre premier souci est d'optimiser les ressources. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles j'ai dit en réponse à certaines questions que le budget de base A avait doublé en six ans, en passant de 45 à 90 milliards de dollars.
C'est un problème auquel j'étais confronté dans mon propre ministère avant de passer au Conseil du Trésor. Comme nos priorités ont changé par rapport à celles du gouvernement précédent, quand nous avons voulu mettre en oeuvre de nouvelles mesures et déterminer quel en serait le coût, les questions que je me suis posé ont été les suivantes : « Qu'en est-il des choses que nous ne faisons plus? Que sont devenues ces ressources? » Il ne semblait pas y avoir de mécanisme particulier pour répondre à ces questions.
On m'a expliqué pourquoi on ne s'était jamais beaucoup soucié auparavant d'examiner les programmes existants afin de s'assurer que les ressources correspondantes étaient bien utilisées. L'une des raisons est que le budget de base A avait fait l'objet de coupures massives en 1995 et qu'on avait toujours supposé que tout ce qui existait était absolument nécessaire pour le bon fonctionnement du gouvernement, ce qui est en fait une erreur, à mon avis, car on ne doit pas croire que ce qui était pertinent autrefois le sera toujours.
Nous nous sommes donc fixé un échéancier de révision sur cinq ans et tentons actuellement d'instaurer un nouveau système sur une base quinquennale.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:04
Expand
That's something the secretary could answer, and I think it's something Treasury Board is looking at.
C'est une question à laquelle le Secrétaire pourra vous répondre et je pense que le Conseil du Trésor s'y intéresse déjà.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:05
Expand
I would assume that all relevant laws, in terms of laws governing contract or otherwise, would have to be obeyed if they're the applicable laws.
Je suppose que toutes les lois en vigueur doivent être respectées, qu'elles régissent les contrats ou autre chose.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:07
Expand
I heard the minister's answer to that question in the House, and I understand he's looking at it. He's committed to the integrity of Canadian law and the Canadian Constitution, so I assume he will work that out.
J'ai entendu le ministre à répondre à ces questions en Chambre et j'en conclus qu'il est saisi du problème. Comme je sais qu'il attache beaucoup d'importance à l'intégrité des lois canadiennes et de la Constitution canadienne, je suppose qu'il va régler le problème.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:07
Expand
I'm not familiar with the case, but the issue has been raised. I have not seen the contract documents. I'm not familiar with that provision. I'm taking the exchange at its face value in the House, but I don't know.
Je ne connais pas bien le dossier mais la question a été soulevée. Je n'ai pas vu les documents du contrat. Je ne connais pas cette disposition. Je sais ce qui s'est dit en Chambre à ce sujet mais rien de plus.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:08
Expand
I certainly hope the contracts we enter into respect our legal framework, including our Constitution.
J'espère en tout cas que nos contrats sont conformes à nos lois, y compris à notre Constitution.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:09
Expand
I'm familiar with the issue, and I have not received a full briefing on that particular issue. But I am familiar with the report; the department has brought that issue to my attention.
Je suis au courant de cette question mais je n'ai pas reçu de briefing à ce sujet. Je connais le rapport, cependant. On l'a porté à mon attention.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:09
Expand
I don't think this is something the Treasury Board minister is responsible for, but of course one of the concerns I would ask about—
Je ne pense pas que cette question relève des responsabilités du Conseil du Trésor mais, de toute façon, l'une des questions que l'on doit se poser...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:12
Expand
—is what legal and constitutional provisions impact on that.
As much as we want to see that individuals achieve the best and that there is a level playing field, we want to see that Canadians are well-served by their public service. The quality of the service provided by the public service is the one thing I've been consistently impressed with, first in my prior department and now in the current one. Most of my career was spent as a public servant in the province of Manitoba.
One of the things that has been fundamental to the construction of an independent, non-political public service is the merit principle. This principle is placed in a context in many ways, one of which is to ensure that those who come to our country and are not part of the mainstream fit in as quickly as possible.
The civil service has done some good things in that respect. Are there improvements we can make? As I understand it, there are improvements that we can properly and legally make in order to encourage people.
This might be of no interest to you, but it was fascinating to me. When I spoke at the school for new crown attorneys, what was remarkable was how many women there were. In fact most of them were women. That was an interesting thing for me.
When I started out prosecuting many years ago in Manitoba, it was virtually all male, and not necessarily anything but sort of Anglo-Saxon males. Those were the lead people in the department.
That has changed. I see it changing in our—
... est de savoir s'il y a des dispositions légales et constitutionnelles à prendre en considération.
Certes, nous voulons que les gens atteignent le plus haut niveau possible et que les règles du jeu soient égales, mais nous voulons aussi que les Canadiens reçoivent un bon service de leur fonction publique. Je dois dire que j'ai continuellement été impressionné par la qualité du service dispensé, autant dans mon portefeuille actuel que dans le précédent. Vous savez, j'ai fait la majeure partie de ma carrière dans la fonction publique du Manitoba.
L'un des principes fondamentaux qui nous ont permis de bâtir une fonction publique indépendante et non politisée est celui du mérite. Ce principe est appliqué dans de nombreux secteurs et permet aux nouveaux arrivants dans notre pays qui ne font pas partie du courant dominant de s'adapter le plus vite possible.
La fonction publique a fait de très bonnes choses à ce sujet. Des améliorations sont-elles possibles? Je me suis laissé dire qu'il y a des améliorations juridiquement acceptables que l'on peut encore apporter pour encourager les gens.
Voici une chose qui ne vous intéressera peut-être pas mais qui m'a fasciné. Quand je me suis adressé à un groupe de nouveaux procureurs de la Couronne, j'ai été frappé par le nombre de femmes. En fait, la plupart étaient des femmes. J'ai trouvé ça très intéressant.
Quand j'ai commencé ma carrière de procureur au Manitoba, il y a bien longtemps, il n'y avait pratiquement que des hommes et pratiquement tous était des Anglo-Saxons.
Les choses ont changé. Je pense que le changement...
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:12
Expand
But the point is that obviously the public service has been able to attract women, for example, into prosecutorial positions. That's a very healthy, very good thing.
Ce que je veux dire, c'est que la fonction publique a manifestement réussi à attirer des femmes, par exemple, comme procureurs. À mon avis, c'est très sain, c'est une fort bonne chose.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:17
Expand
But perhaps I should say that this is a question that interests me a little more than some of the other questions, but that doesn't mean, on an objective basis, that they aren't all good questions.
Just because there are a lot of rules doesn't necessarily mean you're getting value for money. That was pointed out very clearly by the Auditor General, looking into the sponsorship issue. The Auditor General indicated that there are lots of rules in place, the rules were broken, and so the emphasis needs to be not so much on rules but on accountability.
I think we're taking a positive step forward by actually holding officers accountable, the deputy ministers. As you will recall in that sponsorship situation, a mid-level bureaucrat was able to circumvent the deputy minister and report directly into a minister's office. That was not appropriate; it broke the rules. The deputy in that situation was able to say he was not responsible because he was specifically told to mind his own business in that respect. So what we need to do is to emphasize the accountability, without having a lot of unnecessary rules. What I hear from many organizations, and I tend to agree with them—very good organizations that are doing a lot of good work--is the amount of paperwork they are burdened with to get even small amounts of money.
So, again, what I believe we should be doing in the public service is to hold managers and others responsible for the decisions they make. But where honest mistakes are made, we understand that honest mistakes are made and we try to do better in other situations, but we come down hard on situations where there has been a deliberate breaking of the rules.
Again, I'm very encouraged by the passage of the Federal Accountability Act and the new fraud and criminal offences that have been brought into force as a result of the FAA. I think that is going to ensure that there is a stronger measure of accountability generally, that they know they're held to an objective standard and will be measured accordingly. So I think the FAA is going to help us not to simply create more rules—we have enough rules—but to bring accountability into the situation. Also, of course, we are awaiting the blue ribbon panel on the web of rules, as it's called, to see what we can safely jettison without undermining the integrity of the grants and contribution system.
Je dois cependant admettre que c'est une question qui m'intéresse peut-être un peu plus que certaines autres, mais ça ne veut pas dire, objectivement, que les autres n'étaient pas bonnes.
Le fait qu'il y ait beaucoup de règles ne garantit pas nécessairement l'optimisation des ressources, ce qu'a fait clairement ressortir la vérificatrice générale à l'occasion des commandites. Elle a dit alors qu'il existait beaucoup de règles mais qu'elles avaient été transgressées et qu'il fallait donc mettre l'accent plus sur la reddition de comptes que sur l'adoption de règles.
Je pense que nous avons pris une mesure positive en désignant les sous-ministres comme agents comptables. Lors du problème des commandites, vous vous en souviendrez, un bureaucrate de niveau intermédiaire a pu court-circuiter son sous-ministre et faire rapport directement au ministre. Ce n'était pas acceptable. Il a enfreint les règles. En outre, le sous-ministre a pu dire qu'il n'était pas responsable car on lui avait explicitement intimé de ne pas mettre son nez dans cette affaire. J'en conclus que l'important est de mettre l'accent sur la responsabilité, sans imposer beaucoup de règles inutiles. Ce dont se plaignent beaucoup d'organisations — et j'ai tendance à partager leur point de vue — qui font beaucoup de bon travail, c'est qu'elles sont inondées de paperasse quand elles demandent des sommes même minimes.
À mon avis, dans la fonction publique, l'essentiel est de tenir les gestionnaires responsables de leurs décisions. Certes, tout le monde peut faire une erreur, nous le savons bien, et on doit alors s'efforcer de la corriger mais, dans les cas où quelqu'un a délibérément tenté d'enfreindre les règles, on devrait être extrêmement sévère.
Je suis encouragé par l'adoption de la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité qui a entraîné la définition de nouvelles infractions pénales et de nouveaux types de fraude. Je pense que cela renforcera la responsabilité, de manière générale, car les fonctionnaires sauront qu'ils seront jugés en fonction d'une norme objective. Je crois que la LFR nous aidera non pas à établir de nouvelles règles — nous en avons déjà assez — mais plutôt à assurer la responsabilité. En outre, bien sûr, nous attendons le rapport du groupe d'experts qui nous dira si nous pouvons abolir certaines règles sans miner l'intégrité du système de subventions et de contributions.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:20
Expand
An aging workforce and increasing competition for the skills and knowledge of people are not something that is unique to the Government of Canada. It's affecting us right across the country. It's a challenge for all of us in terms of finding new individuals to fill the places of those who have retired. We are taking measures to deal with this particular issue.
For example, in some situations, I know that on public safety with the RCMP.... Back in 1998, when I was in the provincial government, the federal government at the time shut down Depot, the training centre for RCMP officers. It was at a time when they knew that half of the RCMP officers in Canada would be eligible for retirement within five years. They shut down Depot. That decision had a terrible impact on us, especially in western Canada, where we rely almost exclusively on the RCMP in rural areas.
Those coming into government accelerated the training of RCMP officers from approximately 800 to 1,800. It's put a tremendous strain on the individuals providing the training, and yet we have to provide quality training. Officers are receiving that training. I'm proud to say that my own nephew is going through RCMP training in Regina at this time.
It is a challenge for the public service, particularly the RCMP, in that context. We are responding. We'll continue to respond to that.
The issue of bilingualism in the public service is of course a very important one. We recognize that we are a bilingual nation. There's no question about that. We want to ensure that citizens receive services in the official language of their choice. It is a commitment this government has made.
Le vieillissement de la population et l'intensification de la concurrence pour obtenir des gens compétents ne sont pas des phénomènes particuliers au gouvernement du Canada. On les constate partout au pays. Trouver de nouveaux employés pour remplacer les retraités est un défi pour tout le monde. Nous prenons des mesures pour le relever.
En ce qui concerne la GRC et la sécurité publique, par exemple... En 1998, quand je faisais partie du gouvernement provincial, le gouvernement fédéral avait fermé le Centre de formation des agents de la GRC. Or, nous savions que la moitié de ces agents deviendraient admissibles à la retraite en cinq ans. Cette décision nous a causé un préjudice considérable, surtout dans l'ouest où nous dépendons presque totalement de la GRC dans les régions rurales.
On a dû alors accélérer la formation d'agents de la GRC, en passant de 800 environ à 1 800, ce qui a causé des tensions considérables pour les instructeurs chargés de dispenser une formation de qualité. Aujourd'hui, les agents reçoivent cette formation et je suis fier de dire que mon propre neveu reçoit actuellement une formation de la GRC à Regina.
C'est un défi pour toute la fonction publique et particulièrement pour la GRC mais nous continuerons de le relever.
La question du bilinguisme dans la fonction publique est évidemment très importante. Nous sommes dans un pays bilingue, c'est la réalité et nous tenons à assurer que les citoyens reçoivent les services de l'État dans la langue officielle de leur choix. C'est un engagement que notre gouvernement a pris.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:23
Expand
Absolutely. That was the point I was getting to. It's not simply one principle that we apply, as important as that one constitutional principle is. We also have to see it in the context of the employees' rights as well.
I can tell you that one of the things I've been motivated by, or guided by, was a report that came out in Manitoba. Manitoba went through some very bitter struggles on the language issue--very bitter struggles. One report that I especially rely on--and I know it's not particularly relevant, because the constitutional context is a little bit different--is Judge Chartier's report from Manitoba entitled, “Above All, Common Sense”. Our government, back in 1999 or 1998, implemented that Chartier report in Manitoba in order to ensure, as much as possible, that individuals who wanted language services in a particular language received those services. We rationalized where individuals were receiving that benefit. Quite frankly, it has worked quite well.
Has everyone been happy? No, not everyone has been happy, but by and large, the francophone community in Manitoba I think has benefited from the implementation of that Chartier report. That Chartier report continues to be implemented by the succeeding government--the New Democrats--that came into power after our government.
Absolument. C'est ce que je voulais dire. Ce n'est pas seulement un principe que nous devons appliquer, même s'il est important du point de vue constitutionnel, c'est également un élément à envisager du point de vue des droits des employés.
Je peux vous dire que l'une des choses qui m'ont motivé ou guidé a été un rapport du Manitoba. Le Manitoba a connu des luttes très amères sur la question linguistique — vraiment très amères. L'un des rapports auquel j'attache une importance particulière — et je sais que ce n'est pas particulièrement pertinent car le contexte constitutionnel est un peu différent — est le rapport du juge Chartier intitulé « Avant toute chose, le bon sens ». En 1999 ou 1998, notre gouvernement a mis en oeuvre le rapport Chartier pour garantir le plus possible que les personnes souhaitant des services linguistiques dans une langue donnée puissent les recevoir. Nous avons rationalisé le système de prestation des services et, très franchement, ça a très bien marché.
Est-ce que tout le monde en a été heureux? Non, pas tout le monde mais, dans l'ensemble, la communauté francophone du Manitoba a bénéficié de l'application du rapport Chartier, je crois. D'ailleurs, ce rapport continue d'être appliqué par le gouvernement qui nous a succédé et qui est néo-démocrate.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:26
Expand
It was not the administration; it was the lack of transparency in the program.
Non, pas au sujet de l'administration mais au sujet de son manque de transparence.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:26
Expand
There are none that I'm aware of, no.
Je ne pense pas qu'il y en ait un.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:26
Expand
When I directly contacted them.
Quand je les ai contactés directement.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:26
Expand
It's not a decision that I made in my department. I looked at various other things. I assume that the appropriate principles were applied by the minister in coming to that decision.
Ce n'est pas mon ministère qui a pris la décision. Il y avait d'autres facteurs. Je suppose que le ministre responsable a appliqué les principes pertinents en prenant sa décision.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:27
Expand
Well, for example, what I've not yet been able to figure out is the role of legal aid in that respect. For example, in Manitoba, we had an excellent program--the Public Interest Law Centre--that took all those kinds of cases and did a very good job in that respect. That was run through the legal aid program. It was very transparent, all the principles were in place, it was very open, and it was a very good program. Now, I assume the program is still running in Manitoba.
Ce que je ne saisis pas encore très bien, c'est le rôle de l'aide juridique à cet égard. Nous avions par exemple au Manitoba un excellent programme — le Centre juridique de l'intérêt public — qui s'occupait de ce genre de cas et faisait un excellent travail. Il était géré dans le cadre du programme d'aide juridique de manière très transparente car tous les principes étaient connus et c'était un excellent programme. Je ne vois d'ailleurs pas pourquoi j'en parle au passé car je suppose qu'il existe encore.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:28
Expand
How did you find out that it went through the court challenges program?
Comment savez-vous que c'était grâce au Programme de contestation judiciaire?
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:28
Expand
The media told you, but you weren't able to actually access that information from the court challenges program?
Par les médias mais vous n'avez pas pu obtenir d'informations du Programme lui-même?
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:29
Expand
Assuming the media got it...and I don't know how they would get it when no one else has been able to get it. The only way they'd have been able to get it, probably, is through some kind of leak or by someone specifically telling them they had in fact received it. That concerns me, that information about the expenditure of public money is accessible by only some. And I would think you would agree that where there's an expenditure of public money on an important case like that, the criteria should be public and the amount of money spent should be public, rather than having to rely on discretion.
En supposant que les médias... Je ne sais pas comment ils ont pu obtenir l'information puisque que personne d'autre ne le pouvait. C'est probablement par une fuite quelconque ou parce que quelqu'un leur a dit précisément que c'était le cas. Ce que je n'aime pas, c'est que certaines personnes seulement peuvent savoir comment les deniers publics sont dépensés et je suppose que vous conviendrez avec moi que, lorsque des deniers publics sont consacrés à une cause importante comme celle-là, les critères devraient être connus publiquement, tout comme les sommes dépensées, sans que des fuites soient nécessaires.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:30
Expand
The Minister of Heritage would be able to do that for you because she was responsible as the minister.
Je pense que c'est la ministre de Patrimoine canadien qui pourra vous répondre parce que c'est son dossier.
Collapse
View Vic Toews Profile
CPC (MB)
View Vic Toews Profile
2007-02-06 17:30
Expand
No. All I'm doing is offering my observations and personal experience that it seemed to me a rather odd application of the principle of solicitor-client privilege. I've never heard of that until I heard about it in that context.
Non. Tout ce que j'ai dit à ce sujet reflétait mon expérience personnelle et ma conclusion que cela semblait être une application assez bizarre du privilège avocat-client. Je n'avais encore jamais vu ce privilège être invoqué dans ce contexte.
Collapse
View Pat Martin Profile
NDP (MB)
View Pat Martin Profile
2006-12-12 10:13
Expand
I think the minister underestimates the pushback, though. Minister Toews I think is having the same problem Minister Cotler had. I don't think people realize the entrenched problem of secrecy within the senior bureaucratic level and the reluctance to shine the light of day on the operations of government now.
The Information Commissioner has the unique strength to be able to actually shake loose or shake free some of the senior bureaucrats. What ministers lack I think is the comprehensive background necessary to counter some of these arguments they face. Your role would have to be as champion in that regard, in the service of well-meaning ministers who have been stymied time and time again.
Vic Toews was part of the ad hoc committee that John Bryden put together to try to break this logjam of freedom of information. He himself played an active role in pushing the previous government in this regard. Are you willing to adopt that mantle? In your brief, you said you have to be a champion. Well, that will have to be an aggressive, activist champion, even if it means falling out of favour with the ruling party of the day.
Je pense toutefois que le ministre a sous-estimé la résistance. À ce titre, le ministre Toews est confronté au même problème que le ministre Cotler. Je ne crois pas que les gens saisissent bien que le principe de la confidentialité est vraiment ancré dans les hautes sphères de la bureaucratie et qu'il y a une forte réticence à faire la lumière sur les activités gouvernementales.
Le commissaire à l'information est le seul habilité à intervenir concrètement pour que les grands bureaucrates de l'État changent leur façon de voir les choses. J'estime que les ministres n'ont pas une compréhension suffisante de tout le contexte pour pouvoir contrer certains des arguments qu'on leur fait valoir. Votre rôle consisterait donc à ce chapitre à venir en aide à ces ministres bien intentionnés qui se retrouvent coincés plus souvent qu'autrement.
Vic Toews faisait partie du comité spécial mis sur pied par John Bryden pour supprimer cette entrave à la liberté d'information. Il est lui-même intervenu activement pour faire bouger le gouvernement précédent à cet égard. Êtes-vous disposé à poursuivre dans le même sens? Dans votre mémoire, vous indiquez que vous devez être un champion. Eh bien, il faudra que vous soyez un champion dynamique et actif, même si cela vous fait perdre le soutien du parti au pouvoir.
Collapse
View Rona Ambrose Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'm pleased to be here, and I'm looking forward to sharing a constructive dialogue, both here and also in our new legislative committee dealing with Canada's Clean Air Act.
Again, I'm here specifically to deal with a motion that was tabled by Nathan Cullen, to clarify some of my previous points when appearing in front of this committee, and to take questions from you. I have to say that I appreciate the chance to bring some context to the work of this committee and indeed some much needed honesty and clarification to Canadians about how the previous governments spent some of our taxpayer dollars on the environment. I would also like to discuss the progress that was actually made and discuss why our government feels strongly about moving forward towards setting new targets.
I am very pleased to be here, and I want to say that I'm looking forward to sharing in a constructive dialogue around the actions Canada's new government is taking to improve the health of Canadians and our environment.
I have to say that I appreciate the chance to bring some context to the work of this committee, and indeed, some much-needed honesty to Canadians around how previous governments have spent taxpayers' dollars on the environment, what little progress was actually made and why our government is now stepping forward to get things done.
I would like to take this opportunity today to speak directly to the motion tabled by my honourable colleague, Mr. Cullen.
When our government assumed office less than a year ago, it soon became clear to us that measures being pursued by the previous governments to address climate change were insufficient.
This is not a political observation. This is a statement of fact. Years after signing and ratifying the Kyoto Protocol, and despite having spent or committed billions of dollars of taxpayers' money, the previous government had still not implemented a domestic plan to address climate change.
On the trust of Canadians, previous governments spent--and spent liberally--but delivered precious little in return. In fact, the sole outcomes were soaring greenhouse gas emissions--35% above Canada's Kyoto target--and a divisive politicized debate that Canada's new government is determined to move beyond.
The absence of any coordination or implementation of legitimate measures by previous governments to address climate change is indisputable. That is confirmed by the Commissioner for Environment and Sustainable Development, who, in her most recent report, stated that:
A lack of central ownership, clearly defined departmental responsibilities, integrated strategies and ongoing evaluation systems all point to problems in the government's management of the climate change initiative.
And she continued as follows:
On the whole, the Liberal government's response to climate change is not a good story. On the government-wide level, our audits revealed inadequate leadership, planning and performance. It has not been effective in meeting and deciding on many of the key areas of control. Change is needed.
The environment commissioner reported that:
On the whole, the Liberal government's response to climate change is not a good story. At a government-wide level, our audits revealed inadequate leadership, planning, and performance. ... It has not been effective in leading and deciding on many of the key areas under its control. Change is needed.
The commissioner's messages are important to keep in mind as we move forward as a government to achieve meaningful results on this file. We must create an accountability framework that for the first time in this country will oversee all climate change programs across governments, ensuring Canada's first ever coherent approach. To that end, I've also asked the President of the Treasury Board to have the Auditor General audit all climate change spending across government.
Indeed, the commissioner's observations are reaffirmed as we examine Mr. Cullen's motion and consider just what Canadians and our environment received in return for all the taxpayers' money that previous governments spent so freely.
I believe we have a table to outline the international programs, which we are going to be discussing. Could the clerk please hand them out at this time, in order to help take you through my points in the discussion?
It's important to take you through what the previous government spent, or planned to spend, internationally in four main areas, and how, if at all, that spending has helped Canada toward achieving our Kyoto target: the Clean Development Mechanism and Joint Implementation Office; the Canada climate change development fund; the multilateral World Bank carbon fund and their proposed climate fund.
The Clean Development Mechanism and Joint Implementation Office within the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade was allocated a total budget of $25 million between 2001 and 2006. Tax dollars invested through Canada's CDM office were intended to support the development of an international market for carbon credits and eventual Canadian private sector participation in that market.
The Government of Canada will neither receive credits for this investment nor move closer to our Kyoto target. Instead, a modest portion of this investment facilitates the purchase of international carbon credits for private sector companies, not for the government. At this point, we have no clear indication of how many international credits have been, or will be, generated by the money we invested. CDM is a project-based market mechanism that is intended to provide Canadian companies with a means to access markets and investment opportunities and to stimulate development and marketing of Canadian technology companies.
Based on our support for market-based mechanisms and on the urgency for Canada to engage in projects and programs that directly count towards achieving our Kyoto target, I continue to believe that this program demands strict oversight, and taxpayers' dollars should not be used to facilitate the purchase or generation of international credits for private sector entities. If taxpayers' money is involved, the objective of the program must be clear, and it would be my opinion that we should ask for third-party verification of emissions reductions. We must focus our investments on government-led projects that could count towards our Kyoto target.
The Canada climate change development fund, or the CCCDF, was designed to also help address the causes and effects of climate change in developing countries. The program focused on four main areas: adaptation to climate change, greenhouse gas reduction through the transfer of technologies, carbon sequestration, and building capacity in developing countries.
On this fourth area of focus, the fund specifically emphasized capacity-building assistance for development countries.
When the previous government established this fund, credit generation or purchase was still an option internationally. It wasn't until 2001 that parties to the UNFCC agreed that public funding for these projects should not result in diversion of official development assistance, and that it should be separate from and not counted towards the financial obligations of parties.
The line between international climate change policy and official development assistance begins to blur. In 2004, the OECD's development assistance committee decided that the value of any certified emission reductions or credits from these kinds of projects should be deducted from our official development agency reporting, and some countries have stated since that they intend to do that. It is not the intention of our government to use official development assistance funding to replace our efforts to invest in projects that generate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions or count towards our Kyoto targets.
This program was budgeted $110 million from 2000 to 2001. This money was mainly disbursed for grants to Canadian companies or organizations called Canadian executing agencies as proponents of these international projects. The program also allowed these companies or organizations to keep up to 12% of this public investment for overhead costs. These projects did not result in any verifiable emissions reductions to date. Therefore, the investments in this program did not result in any certified emissions reductions credits, and therefore also will not count towards our Kyoto target. Instead, they will count for our official development assistance through CIDA.
We believe that clarity needs to be brought to this issue. We believe funding for ODA, for official development assistance, is crucial, but must be based on the policy priorities identified through our ongoing work with developing countries.
Canada also invested in the World Bank's carbon funds. The objectives of these emissions trading pilot projects are to generate experience in project implementation, facilitate the transfer of technology, and provide a stream of Kyoto greenhouse gas reduction credits to fund investors in the 2008-2012 period. Through this investment, the Government of Canada purchased an estimated 2.6 million tonnes of greenhouse gas reduction credits. These were called “learning by doing” projects. They will, between 2008 and 2012, deliver an estimated 2.6 million tonnes of international credits, representing a mere 1% of the reductions necessary to meet Canada's Kyoto target.
We're obliged here to consider the facts: $160 million of Canadian taxpayers' money was spent--on what? It was spent on our international climate change programs. In return, 1% of our Kyoto target has been achieved.
We are obliged to consider the facts: $160 million of Canadian taxpayers' money spent. And, in return, 1% of our Kyoto target achieved.
The previous government also planned to spend $1 billion over five years to manage the climate fund, otherwise known as the Canada Emission Reduction Incentives Agency. This fund was not an investment vehicle, but solely a purchasing vehicle for credits. It was also planned that this fund would grow to cost taxpayers about $5 billion for the purchase of further credits.
It became obvious to our government, as we tried to piece this information from various relevant departments together in a coherent fashion, that there was no clear policy framework tying these initiatives together or accounting for results to help meet our Kyoto target.
It spoke truth to that which the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development observed: the previous government did not have an across-the-government coherent approach.
I'd like to address the second part of the motion in terms of my previous comments on the estimate provided by my department on the cost impact if Canada were to meet its Kyoto target entirely through regulatory action.
The analysis shows that making the reductions required by the Kyoto Protocol, which amount to nearly one-third of our projected total emissions in 2010, through domestic regulatory action alone could have a crippling effect on the Canadian economy. Of course, this kind of analysis is complex, and there will always be debate about specific numbers, but it gives a clear picture of the magnitude of impacts that consumers would face.
It is estimated that we could see increases in electricity prices of about 15% in Atlantic Canada, 40% in British Columbia, 65% in Ontario, and between 150% and 200% in Alberta and Saskatchewan. That means between a doubling and a tripling of prices in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Natural gas prices could increase by over 300% in Alberta and by 130% in Ontario. As for our oil industry, there is a possibility that we could move from being a net exporter of oil to a net importer, as production costs soared and facilities closed in response to the punitive regulation that would be required.
I'll also emphasize that this would be a best-case scenario, were emissions reductions of this magnitude even feasible and achieved in the least costly way.
In the real world, the emissions reductions needed in Canada to achieve the Kyoto target are not technically feasible in that timeframe. This is why we need new targets and a new Kyoto framework, and this is the opportunity before us.
That is why we need new targets and a new Kyoto framework. This is the opportunity before us.
Let's move now to the impact of Canada's Clean Air Act, or Bill C-30, on reducing greenhouse gases.
You're familiar with our notice of intent, where Canada's government said we will regulate both air pollution and greenhouse gases, with targets for the short, medium, and long term. By spring 2007, our government will announce ambitious short-term targets for air pollution and greenhouse gases, with sector-by-sector regulations that will come into force starting as early as 2010. As you know, for the medium term, which is 2020 to 2025, we will implement intensity targets that will lead to absolute reductions in emissions and thus support the establishment of a fixed cap on emissions.
Our government also committed to a long-term target of absolute reductions in greenhouse gases by up to 65% from 2003 levels by 2050. We've asked again the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy for advice on specific targets to be selected, and also scenarios of how the targets would be achievable in Canada.
Let me tell you, then, what the long-term target means in terms of emissions reductions. Based on what Canada's greenhouse gas emissions are projected to be in 2050 in a business as usual scenario, this 65% reduction target would reduce our emissions by about 1,435 megatonnes. This is a reduction of almost twice our current total greenhouse gas emissions. A 65% reduction from our 1990 emissions level, which I know is of interest to some of you, would require an emission reduction of 1,485 megatonnes from business as usual.
Some have also called for a long-term target of 80% reduction. This would reduce emissions by 1,575 megatonnes, which is actually only about 10% more than the emission reductions we would see under the 65% target based on 2003 emissions that was put forward or recommended by the national round table.
In its June 21, 2006, report entitled Advice on a Long-term Strategy on Energy and Climate Change, as you know, the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy provided a possible scenario on how a 60% reduction from 2003 emissions levels might be achieved. The key elements of this scenario include increasing energy efficiency and carbon capture and storage, cogeneration, and increased use of renewable energy. These, I would suggest, are the issues we should be discussing and debating today.
By spring of 2007, our objective is to have finalized discussions on a number of important issues, including our short-term reduction targets for both air pollutants and greenhouse gases, the proposed compliance options associated with those regulations, reporting requirements, and timelines.
As you know, the previous government intended to spend some $10 billion on this proposed climate change plan. Here's what Canadian taxpayers might have received for their money. I'll quote from a recent C.D. Howe Institute report written by Professor Mark Jaccard, who heads the energy and research group in the School of Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University.
He found that the previous government's proposed climate change measures would have cost Canada $12 billion by 2012, with much of that money being spent outside of Canada.
Professor Jaccard estimated that the previous government's proposed measures might have reduced emissions by only 175 megatonnes, which is far short of the almost 300 megatonnes we need to meet our Kyoto target.
Professor Jaccard also concluded that if the previous government's plan were to have been implemented for the long term, Canadian taxpayers would have spent “at least $80 billion over the next 35 years” without reducing greenhouse gases below our current levels.
What is needed today is a new Kyoto framework with a strong and accountable domestic vision. The key difference in Canada's new government's approach is our recognition—and this speaks to the other part of the motion—of the need to take coordinated action on air pollutants and greenhouse gases. It only makes sense because most sources of air pollutants are also the sources of greenhouse gases. This will be the first time the federal government takes this kind of coordinated action.
The issue is not smog before greenhouse gases or the reverse, and the issue is not air pollution versus climate change. Both of these issues are of concern to Canadians and both impact upon their health and their environment. The right course of action is to tackle both in a coordinated and efficient action to deliver results for Canadians. By taking that kind of coordinated approach to both types of emissions—a new Kyoto framework, coupled with Canada's Clean Air Act—we will drive solutions to get the greatest results for our effort.
For the first time we will have an integrated, nationally consistent approach focused on mandatory regulations that will achieve significant reductions in emissions from all major industry sectors. We also need a new global approach to addressing climate change, one with achievable targets that maximizes global participation.
Currently, as you know, under the Kyoto Protocol, countries with targets account for less than 30% of global emissions, and this percentage will only continue to decline in the coming years as the emissions of developing countries rise.
Contrary to what you may have seen or heard in the media, this work is beginning to take shape globally, and Canada is participating. In Nairobi, as you know, I led the Canadian delegation to the twelfth conference of the parties to the climate change convention and second meeting of the parties to the Kyoto Protocol.
Canada worked very intensively and successfully with many other countries on initiatives that will help set the scene for a better global approach to climate change in the post-2012 period, and for Canada, this approach must be one that includes broader participation, maximizes the use of technologies and market mechanisms, and takes the country's national circumstances into consideration.
Of the key issues that were taken up in Nairobi, four related to the future of international cooperation on climate change, and Canada secured the results we wanted to enable us to continue to participate in Kyoto. On each of these issues, Canada's negotiators were actively and constructively engaged, based on the positions laid out in our public submissions.
As you know, an extensive work program to inform consideration of our future commitments post-2012 was developed. Canada agreed to this rigorous work program and will undertake our work with diligence.
On the review of the Kyoto Protocol, agreement was reached to conduct a review in December 2008. All industrialized countries, the African countries, the small island states, and several Latin American countries supported the launching of this review so we can move forward with the knowledge of what worked and what didn't work in the next phase of Kyoto.
Canada has consistently stated that more countries need to take on targets or Kyoto will fail. On the issue of the review of procedures for countries taking on commitments, agreement was reached to hold a workshop in May 2007.
As president, I took on the responsibility for moving this issue forward personally. The support of the EU, South Africa, and Russia were key to assuring Canada was able to push for progress on this front, and I am pleased that the question of how countries can voluntarily take on commitments under the protocol will now be formally taken up within the process.
These are all important issues for all countries, but they were a high priority specifically in Nairobi.
I would note that this was a consensus-based approach. If we were trying to “push global warming off the international agenda”, we could have easily blocked consensus on any of these issues, but we did not. On the contrary, the conference was considered a success because of the results achieved on these key issues and the Canadian delegation's crucial role.
Canada's new government is charting a fundamentally new and more productive course on the environment.
Our government is charting a fundamentally new and more productive course on the environment. We are taking, as you know, action on both air pollution and greenhouse gases to protect the health of Canadians and our environment. We're replacing the previous government's unenforceable voluntary approaches with tough mandatory regulations, and we're focusing on achieving clear, measurable, and realistic results in Canada. We are working through the United Nations process to develop a more effective and inclusive global approach to addressing climate change, one that will build on the lessons learned from the current Kyoto and one that maximizes new technologies and mechanisms for reducing greenhouse gases.
We believe this domestic and international approach is the right one for Canada—now and over the long-term. It is an approach that will ensure that Canadians and their children enjoy a healthy environment in the years to come.
We believe this kind of domestic and international approach is the right one for Canada, now and over the long term. It's an approach that will ensure that Canadians and their children enjoy a healthy environment in the years to come.
Merci. Thank you. I'm pleased to take any questions related to the motion before us.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je suis heureuse d'être ici et j'ai bien l'intention de participer à un dialogue constructif, aussi bien devant votre comité qu'auprès du nouveau comité législatif qui étudie la Loi sur la qualité de l'air.
Encore une fois, je suis ici pour traiter d'une motion déposée par Nathan Cullen, afin de préciser les propos que j'ai tenus lors d'une précédente comparution devant votre comité, et de répondre à vos questions. Je suis heureuse d'avoir l'occasion d'apporter un certain contexte aux travaux du comité et de parler en toute honnêteté aux Canadiens de la façon dont le précédent gouvernement a dépensé l'argent du contribuable en matière d'environnement. J'aimerais également parler des progrès réalisés et des raisons pour lesquelles notre gouvernement est déterminé à fixer de nouveaux objectifs.
Je suis très heureuse d'être ici, et je tiens à souligner à quel point j'ai hâte de discuter avec vous de façon constructive des démarches que ce nouveau gouvernement du Canada entreprend pour améliorer la santé des Canadiennes et des Canadiens, et celle de notre environnement.
Je dois dire que j'apprécie cette occasion de pouvoir mettre en contexte le travail de ce comité et, surtout, de pouvoir dire honnêtement à tous les Canadiens comment le gouvernement précédent a dépensé l'argent des contribuables sur le plan de l'environnement, de leur démontrer le peu de progrès qu'il a fait et de leur faire comprendre pourquoi notre gouvernement emboîte présentement le pas pour que les choses s'accomplissent.
J'aimerais également saisir l'occasion de parler directement de la motion déposée par mon honorable collègue, M. Cullen.
Lorsque notre gouvernement est entré en fonction il y a moins d'un an, nous avons rapidement constaté que les mesures prises par les gouvernements précédents pour faire face aux changements climatiques étaient insuffisantes.
Ce n'est pas une réflexion politique, c'est un énoncé de faits. Plusieurs années après avoir signé et ratifié le Protocole de Kyoto, et bien qu'il ait dépensé ou engagé des milliards de dollars de fonds publics, le gouvernement précédent n'avait toujours pas mis en oeuvre de plan intérieur pour réagir aux changements climatiques.
Les gouvernements précédents ont dépensé généreusement pour gagner la confiance des Canadiens, mais ils n'ont obtenu que très peu de résultats concrets en retour. En fait, les seuls effets constatés ont été une forte augmentation des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, qui a atteint 35 p. 100 de plus que l'objectif de Kyoto pour le Canada, ainsi qu'un débat fortement politisé et porteur de désunion, que le nouveau gouvernement du Canada est déterminé à laisser derrière lui.
L'absence de toute coordination ou de toute volonté de mettre en vigueur des mesures légitimes de la part des précédents gouvernements face aux changements climatiques est indiscutable. C'est ce qu'a confirmé la commissaire à l'environnement et au développement durable qui, dans son plus récent rapport, a déclaré ce qui suit:
L'absence de prise en charge centralisée, de responsabilités clairement définies pour les ministères, de stratégies intégrées et de systèmes d'évaluation continue révèle des problèmes dans la gestion gouvernementale de l'initiative de lutte contre les changements climatiques.
Et elle poursuit en disant:
Dans l'ensemble, la réaction du gouvernement libéral face aux changements climatiques est une bien pauvre histoire. Au niveau du vaste contexte gouvernemental, nos audits ont dévoilé des déficiences au niveau du leadership, de la planification et de l'exécution. Ce dernier gouvernement a été inefficace à donner l'exemple et à prendre des décisions sur des sujets clés de contrôle. Un changement s'avère nécessaire.
Et elle en poursuit en disant:
Dans l'ensemble, la réaction du gouvernement libéral face aux changements climatiques est une bien pauvre histoire. Au niveau du vaste contexte gouvernemental, nos audits ont dévoilé des déficiences au niveau du leadership, de la planification et de l'exécution. Ce dernier gouvernement a été inefficace à donner l'exemple et à prendre des décisions sur des sujets clés de contrôle. Un changement s'avère nécessaire.
Il importe d'avoir à l'esprit les messages de la commissaire alors que le nouveau gouvernement s'apprête à obtenir d'importants résultats dans ce dossier. Nous devons créer une structure de reddition de comptes qui, pour la première fois au Canada, va chapeauter l'ensemble des programmes gouvernementaux consacrés aux changements climatiques, afin de doter pour la première fois le Canada d'une approche cohérente. À cette fin, j'ai également demandé au président du Conseil du Trésor de soumettre toutes les dépenses gouvernementales consacrées aux changements climatiques au contrôle de la vérificatrice générale.
Le rappel des propos de la commissaire à l'environnement s'impose dans le contexte de l'étude de la motion de M. Cullen, alors que nous cherchons à savoir ce que les Canadiens et l'environnement ont reçu en contrepartie de tous les fonds publics dépensés avec tant de prodigalité par les précédents gouvernements.
Je crois que nous avons des exemplaires d'un tableau qui présente les programmes internationaux et dont nous allons discuter. Puis-je demander au greffier de les distribuer dès maintenant? Vous pourrez y suivre mon argumentation au cours du débat.
Il est important de vous faire savoir ce que le précédent gouvernement a dépensé ou avait l'intention de dépenser au niveau international dans quatre domaines essentiels, et de déterminer dans quelle proportion ces dépenses ont aidé le Canada à atteindre ses objectifs découlant du Protocole de Kyoto. Il s'agit du Bureau canadien du mécanisme pour un développement propre et de l'application conjointe; du Fonds canadien de développement pour le changement climatique; du Fonds de carbone pour le développement communautaire de la Banque mondiale et du Fonds pour le climat proposé par les Libéraux.
Au sein du ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Commerce international, le Bureau canadien du mécanisme pour un développement propre et de l'application conjointe a reçu un budget total de 25 millions de dollars entre 2001 et 2006. Les fonds publics investis par l'intermédiaire du MDP devaient favoriser la mise en place d'un marché international de crédits de carbone, puis la participation du secteur privé canadien à ce marché.
Le gouvernement du Canada ne va recevoir aucun crédit pour cet investissement, pas plus qu'il ne se rapprochera de ses objectifs découlant du Protocole de Kyoto. Par contre, une partie modeste de cet investissement va faciliter l'achat de crédits internationaux de carbone par des sociétés privées, et non pas par le gouvernement. À l'heure actuelle, on ne sait pas exactement combien de crédits internationaux ont été ou vont être achetés grâce à l'argent investi. Le bureau du MDP est un mécanisme commercial fonctionnant projet par projet, qui vise à donner aux sociétés canadiennes les moyens nécessaires pour accéder aux marchés et aux occasions d'investir, et à stimuler le développement et la commercialisation des sociétés canadiennes de technologie.
Compte tenu de l'appui que nous accordons aux mécanismes axés sur le marché, et de la nécessité urgente, pour le Canada, d'entreprendre des projets et des programmes directement axés sur la réalisation de notre objectif découlant du Protocole de Kyoto, je reste convaincue que ce programme nécessite un contrôle serré, et qu'on ne devrait pas employer l'argent du contribuable pour faciliter l'achat ou la production de crédits internationaux destinés à des entités du secteur privé. Si l'on fait appel à des fonds publics, l'objectif du programme doit être clairement énoncé et je considère qu'il faudrait exiger que la réduction des émissions soit vérifiée par une tierce partie. Nous devons réserver nos investissements à des projets gouvernementaux susceptibles d'être pris en compte dans le calcul de la réalisation de notre objectif découlant du Protocole de Kyoto.
Le Fonds canadien de développement pour les changements climatiques, ou FCDCC, a été conçu pour lutter contre les causes et les effets des changements climatiques dans les pays en développement. Le programme était axé sur quatre principaux secteurs: l'adaptation aux changements climatiques, la réduction des gaz à effet de serre grâce à des transferts de technologies, le piégeage du carbone et le renforcement des capacités dans les pays en développement.
Parmi ces quatre domaines, le fonds mettait particulièrement l'accent sur le renforcement des capacités dans les pays en développement.
Lorsque le précédent gouvernement a créé ce fonds, la production ou l'achat de crédits au niveau international n'était encore qu'une possibilité. Ce n'est qu'en 2001 que les parties signataires de la Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques ont affirmé que les fonds publics destinés à ces projets ne devaient pas être détournés de l'aide publique au développement et qu'ils ne devaient pas être comptabilisés au titre des obligations financières des parties.
La démarcation entre les politiques internationales sur les changements climatiques et l'aide publique au développement commence à s'estomper. En 2004, le Comité d'aide au développement de l'OCDE a décidé que la valeur des réductions certifiées des émissions ou des crédits résultant des projets de ce genre devaient être déduite des états financiers des agences de développement international, et certains pays ont annoncé depuis lors qu'ils entendaient se conformer à cette demande. Notre gouvernement n'a pas l'intention de substituer du financement destiné à l'aide publique au développement aux efforts qu'il devrait déployer pour investir dans des projets de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre qui pourraient être comptabilisées aux fins du Protocole de Kyoto.
Ce programme a reçu un budget de 110 millions de dollars pour 2000-2001. Les fonds ont principalement pris la forme de subventions accordées à des sociétés ou des organismes canadiens appelés agences canadiennes d'exécution dans le cadre de ces projets internationaux. Le programme a également permis à ces sociétés ou organismes de conserver un maximum de 12 p. 100 de l'investissement public au titre de leurs frais généraux. Jusqu'à maintenant, ces projets n'ont occasionné aucune réduction véritable des émissions. Par conséquent, les sommes investies dans ce programme n'ont donné lieu à aucun crédit pour réductions certifiées des émissions, et ne seront donc pas comptabilisées aux fins du Protocole de Kyoto. Elles le seront par contre au titre de l'aide publique au développement accordée par l'intermédiaire de l'ACDI.
Nous pensons qu'il faut faire la lumière sur cette question. Le financement de l'aide publique au développement est à nos yeux essentiel, mais il doit être conforme aux priorités définies dans le cadre de notre collaboration permanente avec les pays en développement.
Le Canada a également investi dans le Fonds de carbone de la Banque mondiale. Les projets pilotes d'échange d'émissions financés grâce à ce fonds ont pour objectif de permettre des expériences en matière de mise en oeuvre de projets, de faciliter les transferts de technologies et de constituer un bassin de crédits pour la réduction des gaz à effet de serre conformément au Protocole de Kyoto, qui permettront de financer des investisseurs au cours de la période de 2008 à 2012. Grâce à cet investissement, le gouvernement du Canada a acheté un montant de crédits pour la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre estimée à 2,6 millions de tonnes. C'est ce qu'on a appelé les projets d'apprentissage sur le tas. Entre 2008 et 2012, ils devraient nous rapporter à titre estimatif 2,6 millions de tonnes de crédits internationaux, soit 1 p. 100 des réductions nécessaires pour atteindre les objectifs canadiens découlant du Protocole de Kyoto.
Force est ici de considérer les faits: on a dépensé 160 millions de dollars recueillis auprès du contribuable canadien dans le cadre de nos programmes internationaux concernant les changements climatiques. En contrepartie, nous avons atteint 1 p. 100 de notre objectif fixé par le Protocole de Kyoto.
Nous sommes bien obligés ici de regarder les faits: 160 millions de dollars provenant des contribuables canadiens ont été dépensés. En échange, on a atteint seulement 1 p.100 de nos objectifs du Protocole de Kyoto.
Le précédent gouvernement avait également prévu de consacrer un milliard de dollars sur cinq ans à la gestion du fonds pour le climat, également connu sous le nom d'Agence canadienne des mesures incitatives à la réduction des émissions. Ce fonds était non pas un véhicule d'investissement, mais uniquement un véhicule d'achat de crédits. On avait également prévu d'en augmenter le montant à environ 5 milliards de dollars aux frais du contribuable canadien pour acheter d'autres crédits.
Lorsque nous avons entrepris de colliger de façon cohérente l'information provenant des différents ministères, il nous est apparu que ces différentes initiatives ne s'intégraient pas dans une structure de politique bien définie et que leurs résultats n'étaient pas comptabilisés aux fins de la réalisation de nos objectifs découlant du Protocole de Kyoto.
Comme l'avait dit la commissaire à l'environnement et au développement durable, le précédent gouvernement n'avait pas d'approche horizontale cohérente.
J'aimerais maintenant aborder la deuxième partie de la motion où il est question de ce que j'ai dit des estimations fournies par mon ministère sur ce qu'il en coûterait au Canada pour atteindre son objectif découlant du Protocole de Kyoto grâce à des mesures d'ordre uniquement réglementaire.
L'analyse montre qu'une intervention par la réglementation intérieure qui viserait à effectuer les réductions exigées par le Protocole de Kyoto, lesquelles représentent près du tiers du total de nos émissions prévues pour 2010, aurait un effet paralysant sur l'économie canadienne. Évidemment, ce genre d'analyse est complexe et on pourra toujours débattre des chiffres, mais nous avons du moins une image précise de l'ampleur des conséquences auxquelles les consommateurs seraient confrontés.
On estime que le prix de l'électricité pourrait augmenter d'environ 15 p. 100 dans le Canada atlantique, de 40 p. 100 en Colombie-Britannique, de 65 p. 100 en Ontario et de 150 à 200 p. 100 en Alberta et en Saskatchewan, soit le prix actuel multiplié par deux ou par trois. Le prix du gaz naturel augmenterait de plus de 300 p. 100 en Alberta et de 130 p. 100 en Ontario. Quant à notre industrie pétrolière, le Canada risquerait de passer du statut d'exportateur net à celui d'importateur de pétrole, à cause de l'augmentation des coûts de production et des usines qu'il faudrait fermer en réaction à la réglementation punitive imposée par les changements.
Je précise par ailleurs qu'il s'agit là du scénario le plus optimiste, dans lequel on pourrait effectuer de la façon la moins coûteuse des réductions d'émissions d'une telle ampleur.
En réalité, les réductions d'émissions dont le Canada a besoin pour atteindre son objectif ne sont pas techniquement réalisables dans des délais aussi courts. C'est pourquoi nous avons besoin de nouveaux objectifs et d'un nouveau cadre pour Kyoto. Voilà l'occasion qui s'offre à nous aujourd'hui.
Voilà pourquoi nous avons besoin de nouveaux objectifs et d'un nouveau cadre pour Kyoto. Voilà l'occasion qui s'offre à nous aujourd'hui.
Passons maintenant à l'impact de la Loi canadienne sur la qualité de l'air, ou projet de loi C-30, sur la réduction des gaz à effet de serre.
Vous connaissez notre avis d'intention, c'est-à-dire que le gouvernement du Canada a déclaré que nous allons réglementer à la fois la pollution atmosphérique et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, en établissant des objectifs à court, moyen et long terme. D'ici le printemps 2007, notre gouvernement annoncera d'ambitieux objectifs à court terme pour la pollution atmosphérique et les gaz à effet de serre, avec une réglementation secteur par secteur qui entrera en vigueur dès 2010. Comme vous le savez, à moyen terme, c'est-à-dire pour la période 2020-2025, nous allons mettre en oeuvre des objectifs d'intensité qui déboucheront sur des réductions en chiffres absolus des émissions et permettront ainsi d'établir un plafond fixe pour les émissions.
Notre gouvernement s'est également engagé à long terme à réduire en chiffres absolus les émissions de gaz à effet de serre de 65 p. 100 par rapport au niveau de 2003 d'ici 2050. Nous avons demandé conseil à la Table ronde nationale sur l'environnement et l'économie quant aux objectifs précis qu'il convient de fixer et nous lui avons aussi demandé d'établir des scénarios quant à la manière dont il serait possible d'atteindre ces objectifs au Canada.
Permettez que je vous explique comment cet objectif à long terme se traduira en fait de réduction des émissions. D'après les prédictions quant aux émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada en 2050, dans le scénario du maintien du statu quo, cet objectif de réduction de 65 p. 100 entraînerait une baisse de nos émissions d'environ 1 435 mégatonnes. C'est près du double de nos émissions totales actuelles de gaz à effet de serre. Une réduction de 65 p. 100 par rapport au niveau de 1990 — je sais que ce scénario vous intéresse — exigerait une réduction des émissions de 1 485 mégatonnes par rapport au maintien du statu quo.
Certains ont aussi réclamé qu'on se fixe comme objectif à long terme une réduction de 80 p. 100. Cela entraînerait une baisse des émissions de 1 575 mégatonnes, ce qui est en fait seulement 10 p. 100 de plus que la baisse des émissions qu'on réaliserait en application de l'objectif de 65 p. 100 des émissions de 2003, objectif qui a été proposé ou recommandé par la Table ronde nationale.
Dans son rapport publié le 21 juin 2006 et intitulé Conseils sur une stratégie à long terme sur l'énergie et les changements climatiques, la Table ronde nationale sur l'environnement et l'économie présente, comme vous le savez, un scénario possible quant à la manière dont on pourrait réaliser une réduction de 60 p. 100 par rapport aux émissions de 2003. Les éléments clés de ce scénario sont l'accroissement de l'efficience énergétique et de la saisie et du stockage du carbone, la cogénération, et l'usage accru de l'énergie renouvelable. Voilà, à mon avis, les questions dont nous devrions discuter aujourd'hui.
D'ici le printemps 2007, notre objectif est de compléter les discussions sur un certain nombre de points importants, notamment nos objectifs à court terme pour la réduction des polluants atmosphériques et des gaz à effet de serre, les options proposées pour se conformer à cette réglementation, les exigences en matière de rapport, et l'échéancier.
Comme vous le savez, le gouvernement précédent comptait dépenser quelque 10 milliards de dollars pour ce plan proposé pour contrer les changements climatiques. Voici ce que les contribuables canadiens auraient pu recevoir pour cet argent. Je cite ici un récent rapport de l'Institut CD Howe rédigé par le professeur Mark Jaccard, qui dirige le groupe de recherche sur l'énergie à la faculté de gestion des ressources et de l'environnement de l'Université Simon Fraser.
Il a constaté que les dernières mesures proposées par le gouvernement précédent relativement aux changements climatiques auraient coûté au Canada 12 milliards de dollars d'ici 2012, une grande partie de cet argent étant dépensé à l'étranger.
Le professeur Jaccard estime que les mesures proposées par le gouvernement précédent auraient pu permettre de réduire les émissions de seulement 175 mégatonnes, ce qui est beaucoup moins que les 300 mégatonnes ou presque dont nous avons besoin pour respecter notre objectif de Kyoto.
Le professeur Jaccard a également conclu que si le plan du gouvernement précédent avait été mis en oeuvre à long terme, les contribuables canadiens auraient dépensé « au moins 80 milliards de dollars au cours des 35 prochaines années » sans réduire les gaz à effet de serre en deçà de nos niveaux actuels.
Ce dont nous avons besoin aujourd'hui, c'est d'un nouveau cadre de Kyoto assorti d'une vision nationale solide et transparente. La différence clé dans l'approche du nouveau gouvernement du Canada, c'est le fait que nous reconnaissons — cela relève de la deuxième partie de la motion — le besoin d'agir de façon coordonnée à la fois pour les polluants atmosphériques et les gaz à effet de serre. C'est logique car la plupart des sources de polluants atmosphériques sont également des sources de gaz à effet de serre. Ce sera la première fois que le gouvernement fédéral agira ainsi de manière coordonnée.
La question n'est donc pas de faire passer le smog devant les gaz à effet de serre ou l'inverse, et il ne faut pas non plus opposer la pollution atmosphérique aux changements climatiques. Ces deux dossiers préoccupent les Canadiens et les deux ont une incidence sur leur santé et leur environnement. La bonne manière de procéder, c'est de s'attaquer aux deux de manière coordonnée et efficiente afin d'obtenir des résultats pour les Canadiens. En adoptant ainsi cette approche coordonnée pour s'attaquer aux deux types d'émissions — un nouveau cadre de Kyoto, conjugué à la Loi canadienne sur la qualité de l'air —, nous allons orienter les solutions de manière à obtenir les meilleurs résultats pour l'effort que nous consentons.
Pour la première fois, nous aurons une approche intégrée et uniforme à la grandeur du pays, fondée sur des règlements d'application obligatoire qui permettront d'obtenir d'importantes réductions des émissions dans tous les grands secteurs industriels. Nous avons aussi besoin d'une nouvelle approche mondiale dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques, une approche dotée d'objectifs réalisables permettant de maximiser la participation de tous les pays du monde.
À l'heure actuelle, comme vous le savez, aux termes du Protocole de Kyoto, les pays qui se sont fixé des objectifs représentent moins de 30 p. 100 des émissions mondiales et ce pourcentage continuera de baisser au cours des prochaines années à mesure que les émissions des pays en développement augmenteront.
Contrairement à ce que vous avez peut-être lu ou entendu dans les médias, ce travail commence à prendre forme sur la scène mondiale et le Canada y participe. À Nairobi, comme vous le savez, j'ai dirigé la délégation canadienne à la douzième Conférence des parties à la Convention sur le changement climatique et à la deuxième réunion des parties au Protocole de Kyoto.
Le Canada a travaillé très intensivement et avec beaucoup de succès de concert avec d'autres pays à des initiatives qui aideront à paver la voie à une meilleure approche mondiale aux changements climatiques au cours de la période postérieure à 2012; pour le Canada, cette approche doit inclure une participation plus étendue, maximiser l'utilisation des technologies et des mécanismes du marché, et prendre en compte la situation nationale de chaque pays.
Parmi les questions clés qui ont été abordées à Nairobi, quatre avaient trait à l'avenir de la coopération internationale dans le dossier des changements climatiques, et le Canada a obtenu les résultats que nous recherchions et qui nous permettront de continuer à participer à Kyoto. Dans chacun de ces dossiers, les négociateurs du Canada ont été très actifs et ont travaillé avec ouverture d'esprit, en se fondant sur les positions énoncées dans nos mémoires publics.
Comme vous le savez, un imposant programme d'activités visant à éclairer l'élaboration de nos futurs engagements pour la période après 2012 a été élaboré. Le Canada a convenu de s'en tenir à ce programme rigoureux et se mettra à la tâche avec diligence.
Pour ce qui est de la révision du Protocole de Kyoto, un accord a été conclu pour effectuer un examen en décembre 2008. Tous les pays industrialisés, les pays africains, les petits États insulaires, et plusieurs pays d'Amérique latine ont appuyé le lancement de cet examen afin que nous puissions aller de l'avant et nous attaquer à la phase suivante de Kyoto en sachant ce qui a fonctionné et ce qui n'a pas fonctionné.
Le Canada n'a cessé de dire qu'un plus grand nombre de pays doivent se fixer des objectifs, faute de quoi Kyoto sera un échec. Sur la question de l'examen des procédures permettant aux pays de prendre des engagements, on a convenu de tenir un atelier en mai 2007.
À titre de présidente, j'ai assumé la responsabilité de m'occuper de ce dossier personnellement. L'appui de l'Union européenne, de l'Afrique du Sud et de la Russie a été déterminant pour permettre au Canada d'insister et d'obtenir que l'on progresse dans ce dossier, et je suis heureuse de constater que l'on va maintenant s'attaquer officiellement, dans le cadre de ce processus, à la révision des formalités permettant aux pays de prendre volontairement des engagements dans le cadre du Protocole.
Tous ces dossiers sont importants pour tous les pays, mais ils étaient particulièrement prioritaires à Nairobi.
Je signale que c'était une approche fondée sur le consensus. Si nous avions tenté « d'exclure le réchauffement planétaire de l'ordre du jour international », nous aurions pu facilement bloquer le consensus dans l'un ou l'autre de ces dossiers, mais nous ne l'avons pas fait. Au contraire, la conférence a été considérée un succès à cause des résultats obtenus dans ces dossiers clés et grâce au rôle crucial qu'a joué la délégation canadienne.
Le nouveau gouvernement canadien est en train de tracer un parcours fondamentalement nouveau et plus productif pour l'environnement.
Notre gouvernement trace une nouvelle voie, fondamentalement nouvelle et plus productive, dans le dossier de l'environnement. Nous prenons des mesures, comme vous le savez, à la fois dans le dossier de la pollution atmosphérique et de la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, afin de protéger la santé des Canadiens et notre environnement. Nous remplaçons l'approche volontaire inapplicable du gouvernement précédent par des règlements rigoureux et d'application obligatoire, et nous mettons l'accent sur l'atteinte de résultats clairs, mesurables et réalistes au Canada. Nous travaillons dans le cadre du processus des Nations Unies pour élaborer une approche planétaire plus efficace et inclusive dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques, approche qui tablera sur les leçons apprises de l'actuel exercice de Kyoto et qui permettra d'utiliser au maximum les nouvelles technologies et mécanismes pour la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre.
Nous sommes persuadés que cette optique intérieure et internationale est la bonne pour le Canada, maintenant et à long terme. C'est une approche qui assurera aux Canadiennes et aux Canadiens, ainsi qu'aux futures générations, un environnement sain pour les années à venir.
Nous croyons que cette approche nationale et internationale est la bonne pour le Canada, aujourd'hui et à long terme. C'est une approche qui permettra aux Canadiens et à leurs enfants de jouir d'un environnement sain au cours des années à venir.
Je vous remercie et je me ferai maintenant un plaisir de répondre à toutes les questions sur la motion dont nous sommes saisis.
Collapse
View Diane Marleau Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Diane Marleau Profile
2006-10-24 11:09
Expand
I call this meeting to order, seeing as we definitely have quorum.
I will remind you that about two weeks ago there was a motion passed at this committee that we have two meetings of hearings on the cuts that were announced. We had the President of the Treasury Board come before our committee last week. We were scheduled today to hear witnesses from Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat; Mr. Hawkes, chief financial officer of the Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada; and witnesses from the Department of Human Resources and Social Development.
Yesterday there were some developments, and I'm going to ask the clerk to explain exactly what happened.
By whom were you notified, and what exactly happened?
Je déclare la séance ouverte, car je vois que nous avons assurément le quorum.
Je vous rappelle qu’il y a environ deux semaines une motion a été adoptée par notre comité afin que nous tenions deux séances sur les compressions annoncées. Le président du Conseil du Trésor a comparu devant notre comité la semaine dernière. Aujourd’hui, nous étions censés entendre des fonctionnaires du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor du Canada; M. Hawkes, chef des finances de Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada, ainsi que des fonctionnaires de Ressources humaines et Développement des compétences Canada.
Quelques événements se sont produits hier, et je vais demander à la greffière de nous expliquer exactement ce qui est arrivé.
De qui avez-vous reçu un avis et qu’est-il arrivé exactement?
Collapse
Bibiane Ouellette
View Bibiane Ouellette Profile
Bibiane Ouellette
2006-10-24 11:11
Expand
It says:
As per his Ministerial responsibilities, the President of the Treasury Board appeared with the Secretary and the Assistant Secretary, Expenditure Management Sector, at the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates on Oct. 17, 2006 to answer questions on spending restraint. Committee Members had 2 hours to ask questions and the President of the Treasury Board and TBS officials believe they have fully answered questions on this matter. Therefore, TBS declines the invitation as they have already appeared.
Public Works replied:
The Minister and Officials will be appearing before the committee in November 2006. The Minister will be pleased to respond to questions with respect to the Expenditure Review Exercise at that time.
Voici ce qu'il dit:
Conformément à ses responsabilités ministérielles, le président du Conseil du Trésor a comparu, accompagné du secrétaire et du secrétaire adjoint, Secteur de la gestion des dépenses, devant le Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires le 17 octobre 2006 afin de répondre aux questions relatives aux compressions des dépenses. Les membres du comité ont eu deux heures pour poser des questions au président du Conseil du Trésor, et les membres du SCT sont d’avis qu’ils ont répondu entièrement aux questions qui leur ont été posées à ce sujet. Par conséquent, le SCT décline cette invitation, étant donné qu’ils ont déjà comparu.
Le ministère des Travaux publics a répondu:
Le ministre et les fonctionnaires comparaîtront devant le comité en novembre 2006. Le ministre sera heureux de répondre aux questions relatives à l’examen des dépenses à cette occasion.
Collapse
View Daryl Kramp Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you.
There are three other reasons, Madame Thibault, other than the fact that we left the Treasury Board president with no questions, and he was still sitting here, and I'm going, “Is there not more?”
The second point is that there has been significant discussion in the House on this issue.
The third point is that there is now a supply day on this issue in the House, going through the same thing again.
The fourth point is that we have this same issue before the other affected committees, all dealing with the same issue. We are simply duplicating what other committees are doing, what other time in the House is being spent, and I suggest we get back to our original purpose.
Why keep on flogging a horse? I recognize people want to make some political hay on a situation like this. Let's deal with the reality, think that over, and I would have hoped you'd have suggested that. If there is more pertinent direct information you honestly feel can be beneficial, I could understand that, but when it's already coming before the House now, on a full supply day with ample hours, what are we doing wasting our time at this point? That's my thought.
Why didn't we just...? Let's get on to the next and do our jobs.
Merci.
Il y a trois autres raisons, madame Thibault, en dehors du fait que nous avons laissé le président du Conseil du Trésor là, sans lui poser de question. Il était toujours là, et je dois demander s'il y a d'autres questions.
Deuxièmement, il y a eu des débats importants à la Chambre sur cette question.
Troisièmement, une journée d'opposition est consacrée à la question à la Chambre, et on revient sur la même chose.
Quatrièmement, les autres comités touchés sont également saisis de la question. Tous, ils étudient la même question. Nous refaisons simplement ce que font déjà d'autres comités et ce qui se fait à la Chambre, et je propose que nous en revenions à notre principale raison d'être.
Pourquoi s'acharner? Je comprends qu'on veuille exploiter une question semblable pour des raisons politiques. Occupons-nous des faits, pensons-y. J'aurais espéré que vous le proposiez. S'il y avait d'autres renseignements directs pertinents que, honnêtement, vous jugez utiles, je pourrais comprendre, mais la Chambre sera saisie de la question, elle y consacrera une pleine journée d'opposition, avec toutes les heures de débat qu'il faut. Pourquoi gaspiller notre temps? Voila ce que je pense.
Pourquoi n'avons-nous pas simplement...? Passons à autre chose et faisons notre travail.
Collapse
View Louise Thibault Profile
Ind. (QC)
I listened to my colleague's argument. If we have an opposition day on this subject today, I think that shows how important it is, regardless of the party.
Mr. Kramp said that he had no further questions for the President of the Treasury Board. I would have had 25 more for Mr. Moloney or Mr. Baird. The latter obviously could decide to answer himself: he is the President of the Treasury Board and he is entitled to decide how he intends to testify before this committee. However, when he spoke, I felt it was a show. First, he criticized the previous government and then patted himself on the back saying how good his government was. It was entirely normal for him to do that; we could have expected it, but I would have liked to ask technical questions and to go into greater depth — as we will be able to do next week — in order to determine how that was done.
I'm going to talk about that today in my speech. We have one item concerning some $20 million in efficiency gains at Health Canada, which were targeted not by Health Canada, but by the Department of Finance or Treasury Board, I don't really know. Having regard to the problems that we've had with the Public Health Agency of Canada concerning things that have been cut, that were not done, regardless of the government in power...
Today we have the opportunity, since we've made the decision to hold two meetings... This afternoon, I'll go and listen to my colleagues as soon as I leave this committee meeting. I'm sure I won't get all the answers to my questions, but I'll nevertheless make my speech. If other colleagues are present, whether it be the parliamentary secretary or a Treasury Board representative, I'll be pleased to ask them questions. If that assists us in our work next week, when we study this matter in detail, well, so much the better.
We've tried to study it in a broad manner, but it's a fundamental subject, because it more particularly affects vulnerable people, minorities in Canada and services to the public, as well as the failure to cut fat from the federal administration.
J'ai écouté l'argumentation de mon collègue. Si nous avons aujourd'hui une journée d'opposition consacrée à ce sujet, cela en démontre à mon avis l'importance, quel que soit le parti.
Monsieur Kramp a dit qu'il n'avait plus de questions à poser au président du Conseil du Trésor. Pour ma part, j'en aurais eu encore 25 à poser à M. Moloney ou à monsieur Baird. Ce dernier pouvait évidemment décider de répondre lui-même: il est le président du Conseil du Trésor et il a le droit de décider de quelle façon il entend témoigner devant ce comité. Toutefois, quand il a pris la parole, pour moi, c'était du spectacle. Il a d'abord critiqué le gouvernement précédent et s'est ensuite pété les bretelles en disant à quel point son gouvernement était bon. C'était tout à fait normal qu'il le fasse; on pouvait s'y attendre, mais j'aurais aimé posé des questions techniques et aller davantage en profondeur — comme nous pourrons le faire la semaine prochaine — afin de savoir comment cela s'est fait.
Je vais en parler aujourd'hui dans mon allocution. Nous avons un item portant sur quelque 20 millions de dollars en gains d'efficience à Santé Canada, lesquels ont été ciblés non pas par Santé Canada mais par le ministère des Finances ou le Conseil du Trésor, je n'en sais trop rien. Compte tenu des problèmes que nous avons eus par rapport à l'Agence de santé publique du Canada en ce qui a trait à des choses qui ont été réduites, qui n'ont pas été faites, quel que soit le gouvernement au pouvoir...
Nous avons l'occasion aujourd'hui, étant donné que nous avons pris la décision de tenir deux réunions... Cet après-midi, j'irai écouter mes collègues dès ma sortie de ce comité. Je suis certaine que je n'obtiendrai pas toutes les réponses à mes questions, mais je vais quand même faire mon allocution. Si d'autres collègues sont présents, que ce soit le secrétaire parlementaire ou un représentant du Conseil du Trésor, il me fera plaisir de leur poser des questions. Si cela amène de l'eau au moulin pour nos travaux de la semaine prochaine, lorsque nous étudierons ce sujet de façon détaillée, eh bien, tant mieux!
Nous avons essayé de l'étudier de manière plus large, mais c'est un sujet fondamental, car il touche plus particulièrement les gens vulnérables, les minorités au Canada et les services à la population, de même que le non-dégraissage de l'appareil gouvernemental.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 100 of 133 | Page: 1 of 2

1
2
>
>|
Show single language
Refine Your Search
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data