Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 1 of 1
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
2022-04-25 15:28
Expand

Question No. 357—
Ms. Louise Chabot:
With regard to the Cannabis Act: (a) what are the details of the consultations that Health Canada conducted on the production of cannabis for medical purposes, including the (i) guidelines, (ii) results and analyses, (iii) briefing notes; and (b) what are the details of the review of the Cannabis Act, including the (i) findings of the statutory review by the minister responsible that was to be conducted no later than October 17, 2021, (ii) briefing notes?
Response
Mr. Adam van Koeverden (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health and to the Minister of Sport, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), from March 8 to May 7, 2021, Health Canada consulted Canadians on a draft guidance document on factors the department may consider when using the authorities provided by the cannabis regulations to refuse, renew, amend or revoke a registration for personal and designated production of cannabis for medical purposes.
The consultation has since concluded. Health Canada received 677 responses to the consultation through an online questionnaire or email. The department is analyzing the feedback and is currently preparing a report that summarizes the consultation comments and a final version of the guidance document, both of which will be published on the Health Canada website.
Section 151.1 of the Cannabis Act requires that the minister of health cause a review of the act and its administration and operation three years after coming into force (i.e., after October 17, 2021), and that a report, including any findings or recommendations resulting from the review, be tabled in both Houses of Parliament within 18 months.
In response to (b)(i), as set out in the legislation, the legislative review must study the impact of the act on public health. In particular, it must look at the impact on the health and consumption habits of young persons with respect to cannabis use, the impact of cannabis on indigenous persons and communities, and the impact of the cultivation of cannabis plants in a dwelling-house.
The government is committed to putting into place a credible, evidence-driven process for the legislative review, which will assess the progress made towards achieving the objectives of the act. Preparations are under way for the launch of the review.
In response to (b)(ii), briefing note 21-111407-100 M2M, “Preparations for the Cannabis Act Legislative Review”, can be consulted for further detail.

Question No. 361—
Mr. Damien C. Kurek:
With regard to the freezing of bank accounts in relation to the Emergency Economic Measures Order SOR/2022-22: (a) what specific criteria were used to determine whose bank accounts were frozen; (b) were any measures in place to ensure that family members and relatives of individuals involved in the protest did not have their accounts frozen just because of who their spouse or family members are, and, if so, what are the details of these measures; and (c) what specific measures are in place to ensure that individuals who financially supported the protests before the government declared the protests to be illegal do not have their bank accounts frozen for supporting a legal protest?
Response
Hon. Chrystia Freeland (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), financial service providers were responsible for implementing the measures contained in the emergency economic measures order, including ceasing to provide financial services to persons who were directly or indirectly engaged in activities that were prohibited by the emergency measures regulations.
Neither the order nor the regulations required financial service providers to inform the Department of Finance or any other federal department or agency of the specific criteria they used to determine whose bank accounts were frozen.
The RCMP issued a statement indicating that while it remained the responsibility of the financial institutions to make the decision to freeze accounts, the RCMP was diligently working with law enforcement and federal partners to disclose relevant information of individuals and companies suspected of involvement in illegal acts. The list that was provided to financial institutions included identities of individuals who were influencers in the illegal protest in Ottawa, and owners and/or drivers of vehicles who did not want to leave the area impacted by the protest.
In response to (b), the emergency economic measures order required financial service providers to cease providing financial services to persons who were directly or indirectly engaged in activities that were prohibited by the emergency measures regulations.
This requirement did not extend to the family members and relatives of such persons, provided that those family members and relatives were not themselves directly or indirectly engaging in prohibited activities.
In response to (c), the emergency measures regulations and the emergency economic measures order were not retroactive. They were effective only between February 15 and February 23.
The RCMP issued a statement indicating that the list it had provided to financial institutions focused on individuals who were influencers in the illegal protest in Ottawa and owners and/or drivers of vehicles who did not want to leave the area impacted by the protest; and that it did not provide a list of donors to financial institutions.

Question No. 362—
Mr. Dane Lloyd:
With regard to information provided to the Minister of Public Safety, including through his staff, about the police action taken related to the protests in Ottawa on February 18 and 19, 2022: (a) what are the details of all information which was provided to the minister related to the rules of engagement for the police forces in Ottawa on those days, including (i) who provided the information, (ii) the date and approximate time, if known, that the information was provided, (iii) an overview of the information, including any rules of engagement contained in the information; and (b) what are the details of all the information which was provided to the minister related to the authorization of force, both lethal and non-lethal, for the police forces in Ottawa on those days, including (i) who provided the information, (ii) the date and approximate time, if known, that the information was provided, (iii) an overview of the information, including what was known or decided related to the authorization of force?
Response
Ms. Pam Damoff (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the operations of all police are fully independent, whether they be municipal, provincial, or federal.
This police independence is critical. The government may not attempt to influence an investigation in any way, or direct the conduct of specific police operations. Police independence, as qualified in a 1999 Supreme Court decision, Campbell and Shirose, was described as follows:
“While for certain purposes the commissioner of the RCMP reports to the solicitor general (now known as the public safety minister), the commissioner is not to be considered a servant or agent of the government while engaged in a criminal investigation. The commissioner is not subject to political direction. Like every other police officer similarly engaged, he is answerable to the law and, no doubt, to his conscience.”
Our government remains committed to ensuring that law enforcement officers have the resources they need to do their jobs and effectively address threats to public safety after years of cuts from the previous Conservative government.
From the outset, our government was focused on finding solutions that protected Canadians and affected communities and ensured the minimum risk of harm. This included consulting with officials and thoroughly assessing all federal tools and resources, including the possibility of invoking the Emergencies Act. The temporary authorities provided through the act remained in place only for the short time required to address this urgent risk to Canadians’ safety.
With regard to information provided to the Minister of Public Safety, including through his staff, about the police action taken related to the protests in Ottawa on February 18 and 19, 2022, in response to (a), no information was provided to the minister by either Public Safety Canada or the RCMP related to the rules of engagement for the police forces in Ottawa on those days.
In response to (b), no information was provided to the minister by either Public Safety Canada or the RCMP related to the authorization of force, either lethal or non-lethal, for the police forces in Ottawa on those days.

Question No. 363—
Mr. Dane Lloyd:
With regard to information provided to the Minister of Emergency Preparedness, including through his staff, about the police action taken related to the protests in Ottawa on February 18 and 19, 2022: (a) what are the details of all the information which was provided to the minister related to the rules of engagement for the police forces in Ottawa on those days, including (i) who provided the information, (ii) the date and approximate time, if known, that the information was provided, (iii) an overview of the information, including any rules of engagement contained in the information; and (b) what are the details of all the information which was provided to the minister related to the authorization of force, both lethal and non-lethal, for the police forces in Ottawa on those days, including (i) who provided the information, (ii) the date and approximate time, if known, that the information was provided, (iii) an overview of the information, including what was known or decided related to the authorization of force?
Response
Mr. Yasir Naqvi (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Emergency Preparedness, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the operations of all police are fully independent, whether they be municipal, provincial, or federal.
This police independence is critical. The government may not attempt to influence in any way an investigation, or direct the conduct of specific police operations. Police independence, as qualified in a 1999 Supreme Court decision, Campbell and Shirose, was described as follows:
“While for certain purposes the commissioner of the RCMP reports to the solicitor general (now known as the public safety minister), the commissioner is not to be considered a servant or agent of the government while engaged in a criminal investigation. The commissioner is not subject to political direction. Like every other police officer similarly engaged, he is answerable to the law and, no doubt, to his conscience.”
Our government remains committed to ensuring that law enforcement officers have the resources they need to do their jobs and effectively address threats to public safety after years of cuts from the previous Conservative government.
From the outset our government was focused on finding solutions that protected Canadians and affected communities and ensured the minimum risk of harm. This included consulting with officials and thoroughly assessing all federal tools and resources, including the possibility of invoking the Emergencies Act. The temporary authorities provided through the act remained in place only for the short time required to address this urgent risk to Canadians’ safety.
With regard to information provided to the Minister of Public Safety, including through his staff, about the police action taken related to the protests in Ottawa on February 18 and 19, 2022, in response to (a), no information was provided to the minister by either Public Safety Canada or the RCMP related to the rules of engagement for the police forces in Ottawa on those days.
In response to (b), no information was provided to the minister by either Public Safety Canada or the RCMP related to the authorization of force, either lethal or non-lethal, for the police forces in Ottawa on those days.

Question No. 364—
Mr. Dane Lloyd:
With regard to the information provided to the Prime Minister, including through his staff, about the police action taken related to the protests in Ottawa on February 18 and 19, 2022: (a) what are the details of all the information which was provided to the Prime Minister related to the rules of engagement for the police forces in Ottawa on those days, including (i) who provided the information, (ii) the date and approximate time, if known, that the information was provided, (iii) an overview of the information, including any rules of engagement contained in the information; and (b) what are the details of all the information which was provided to the Prime Minister related to the authorization of force, both lethal and non-lethal, for the police forces in Ottawa on those days, including (i) who provided the information, (ii) the date and approximate time, if known, that the information was provided, (iii) an overview of the information, including what was known or decided related to the authorization of force?
Response
Ms. Pam Damoff (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the operations of all police are fully independent, whether they be municipal, provincial, or federal.
This police independence is critical. The government may not attempt to influence an investigation in any way, or direct the conduct of specific police operations. Police independence, as qualified in a 1999 Supreme Court decision, Campbell and Shirose, was described as follows:
“While for certain purposes the commissioner of the RCMP reports to the solicitor general (now known as the public safety minister), the commissioner is not to be considered a servant or agent of the government while engaged in a criminal investigation. The commissioner is not subject to political direction. Like every other police officer similarly engaged, he is answerable to the law and, no doubt, to his conscience.”
Our government remains committed to ensuring that law enforcement officers have the resources they need to do their jobs and effectively address threats to public safety after years of cuts from the previous Conservative government.
From the outset, our government was focused on finding solutions that protected Canadians and affected communities and ensured the minimum risk of harm. This included consulting with officials and thoroughly assessing all federal tools and resources, including the possibility of invoking the Emergencies Act. The temporary authorities provided through the act remained in place only for the short time required to address this urgent risk to Canadians’ safety.
In response to (a), with regard to information provided to the Prime Minister, including through his staff, about the police action taken related to the protests in Ottawa on February 18 and 19, 2022, no information was provided to the Prime Minister by either Public Safety Canada or the RCMP related to the rules of engagement for the police forces in Ottawa on those days.
In response to (b), with regard to information provided to the Prime Minister, including through his staff, about the police action taken related to the protests in Ottawa on February 18 and 19, 2022, no information was provided to the Prime Minister by either Public Safety Canada or the RCMP related to the authorization of force, either lethal or non-lethal, for the police forces in Ottawa on those days.

Question No. 365—
Mr. Jeremy Patzer:
With regard to the Emergency Economic Measures Order: (a) which entities made a disclosure to the Commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, under section 5, and, with respect to each entity, how many disclosures were made, broken down by (i) existence of property, under paragraph 5(a), (ii) transactions or proposed transactions, under paragraph 5(b); (b) which entities made a disclosure to the Director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, under section 5, and, with respect to each entity, how many disclosures were made, broken down by (i)existence of property, under paragraph 5(a), (ii) transactions or proposed transactions, under paragraph 5(b); (c) which institutions of the Government of Canada made a disclosure, under section 6, broken down by (i) institution making the disclosure, (ii) entity to which the disclosure was made, (iii) the nature of the information disclosed; and (d) were any charges laid in relation to breaches of the order and, if so, who was charged and for what offences?
Response
Ms. Pam Damoff (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), as per section 5 of the order, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, RCMP, received disclosures from the following: banks established under Canada's Bank Act and regulated by the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, OSFI; co-operative credit societies, savings and credit unions and caisses populaires regulated by a provincial act and associations regulated by the Cooperative Credit Associations Act; entities authorized under provincial legislation to engage in the business of dealing in securities or to provide portfolio management or investment counselling services; and entities that perform any of the following payment functions: the provision or maintenance of an account that, in relation to an electronic funds transfer, is held on behalf of one or more end users; the holding of funds on behalf of an end user until they are withdrawn by the end user or transferred to another individual or entity; the initiation of an electronic funds transfer at the request of an end user; the authorization of an electronic funds transfer or the transmission, reception or facilitation of an instruction in relation to an electronic funds transfer, or the provision of clearing or settlement services.
In response to (a)(i) and (ii), the RCMP received information from a number of entities described in section 5 (a) and (b) of the order disclosed to the RCMP. This information was developed by those entities in a dynamic environment and, given the short period of time the Emergencies Act was in place, the information was received in an ad hoc manner, with no formal reporting mechanism established. As such, the information in the RCMP holdings may differ from information in other Government of Canada records, or numbers publicly disclosed by entities listed in part (a). The RCMP is currently evaluating information related to the invocation of the order and the mandated reporting. It would be premature to share preliminary data or additional information at this time, while analysis is ongoing to ensure accurate and fulsome reporting from the RCMP. The RCMP is committed to participating in the review of the Emergencies Act required by statute, and to ensuring that an authoritative common understanding of how the act was utilized is available.
In response to (b), given its mandate and specific operational requirements, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, CSIS, does not generally disclose details related to operational activity.
In response to (c)(i), the RCMP made disclosures under section 6. The RCMP cannot provide information on other Government of Canada institutions’ disclosures.
In response to (c)(ii), the RCMP made disclosures to banks, the Canadian Bankers Association, the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada, the Canadian Securities Administrators, the Mutual Funds Dealers Association and credit unions.
In response to (c)(iii), the RCMP disclosed information on 57 entities, broken down into 18 individuals and 39 vehicles. As well, the RCMP identified and disseminated 170 Bitcoin wallet addresses as receiving funds linked to the HonkHonk Hodl crowdfunding campaign.
In response to (d), as there was no criminal enforcement mechanism under the emergency economic measures order, the RCMP did not lay any charges under the order.

Question No. 367—
Mr. Todd Doherty:
With regard to the events on February 17, 2022, near Houston, British Columbia, described by the Royal Canada Mounted Police as "a violent confrontation with employees of Coastal Gaslink", which also included a road blockade: (a) does the Marten Forest Service Road and the Coastal GasLink location near it meet the meaning of "infrastructure for the supply of utilities such as ... gas", for the purposes of paragraph (a) of the definition of "critical infrastructure" in section 1 of the Emergency Measures Regulations; (b) what are the details of the actions taken under the Emergency Measures Regulations to prevent, mitigate or respond to these acts or, if none, why were none taken; and (c) what are the details of the actions taken under the Emergency Economic Measures Order to prevent, mitigate or respond to these acts or, if none, why were none taken?
Response
Ms. Pam Damoff (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to part (a) of the question, the RCMP considers that the Costal GasLink drill site would have met the definition of critical infrastructure set out in section 1 of the emergency measures regulations while they were in force, as a place or land on which infrastructure for the supply of utilities such as gas are located.
In response to part (b), no actions were taken under the emergency measures regulations to prevent, mitigate or respond to these acts. Existing authorities were sufficient. Given that an investigation is ongoing into the events, the RCMP will not comment further on this matter at this time.
In response to part (c), no actions were taken under the emergency economic measures order to prevent, mitigate or respond to these acts. Existing authorities were sufficient. Given that an investigation is ongoing into the events, the RCMP will not comment further on this matter at this time.

Question No. 370—
Mr. Ryan Williams:
With regard to the Canada Pension Plan's (CPP) investments in Russian state owned enterprises, or enterprises with significant ties to Vladimir Putin or the Russian oligarchy: (a) what enterprises are currently owned by the CPP, and what is the value of each investment; (b) has the government directed or advised the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) to divest such holdings, and, if so, what are the details including the date of the direction or advice; and (c) does the CPPIB have plans to eliminate all such holdings from their investment portfolio, and, if so, when will these holdings be eliminated?
Response
Hon. Chrystia Freeland (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the CPPIB was set up by the federal, provincial and territorial governments to prudently invest surplus Canada pension plan funds. The CPPIB operates at arm’s length from Canadian governments.
Under current legislation and regulations, the government is not able to require the CPPIB to disclose its holdings in addition to the disclosure requirements to which CPPIB is subject under the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act. Federal and provincial governments also do not have the authority to cause the CPPIB to divest any holdings.

Question No. 371—
Mr. Ryan Williams:
With regard to the long term impact of using the Emergencies Act to freeze bank accounts of canadian citizens: has the Canada Deposit Insurance Company, the Bank of Canada, or the Department of Finance conducted any analysis on the potential impact of this measure on the long-term stability of Canadian banks, and, if so, what are the details, including the findings of the analysis?
Response
Hon. Chrystia Freeland (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the emergency economic measures order was in effect for only a short period of time, and it only targeted designated persons participating in the illegal blockades and occupations. As at February 21, 2022, we are aware of enforcement action taken by the RCMP under the emergency economic measures order that resulted in the freezing of approximately 280 financial products, e.g., savings and chequing accounts, credit cards and lines of credit, for a total of approximately $7,900,000, including $3,800,000 from a payment processor.
Moreover, there is a statutory obligation pursuant to the access to basic banking regulations for banks to open retail deposit accounts for consumers. Therefore, banks must continue to open retail deposit accounts for any consumer subject to the exceptions in the regulations.
With regard to the Bank of Canada, a search of the records of the Bank of Canada did not produce any results.
With regard to the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation, CDIC, a search of the records of the CDIC did not produce any results.

Question No. 374—
Mr. Eric Melillo:
With regard to the COVID-19 vaccination requirement for federal public servants: (a) how many employees of the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario (FedNor) have been placed on administrative leave without pay as a result of not meeting the requirement; and (b) how many FedNor employees have had their employment terminated as a result of not meeting the requirement?
Response
Hon. Patty Hajdu (Minister of Indigenous Services and Minister responsible for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to the COVID-19 vaccination requirement for federal public servants, information from the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario is as follows: In response to (a), the answer is one; in response to (b), the answer is zero.

Question No. 375—
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to the United Nations (UN) and the February 25, 2022, statement on Twitter from the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement that "fundamental reforms at the UN are required": (a) what specific fundamental reforms is the government seeking at the UN; (b) what action, if any, has the government taken to start making the fundamental reforms; and (c) what is the timeline under which the government would like to see each reform in (a) enacted?
Response
Mr. Robert Oliphant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the following reflects a consolidated response approved on behalf of Global Affairs Canada ministers.
In response to (a), UN reform and redesign are and will continue to be priorities for Canada, as a strong, well-functioning UN system helps protect Canada’s national interests and values. We are committed to a more effective, efficient, relevant and accountable UN. This commitment is reflected in the Minister of Foreign Affairs’ and Minister of International Development’s mandate letters.
Canada supports efforts at the UN to promote better use of resources and find new and innovative ways of working and delivering its mandate more effectively, all with transparency and accountability to member states. Canada also supports effective and inclusive peace operations, conflict prevention, and peacebuilding.
In response to (b), key areas of focus have included governance reform at the executive boards and governing bodies of UN funds, programs and agencies; COVID-19 recovery efforts; financing for development; climate change; promoting national and local ownership for inclusive conflict prevention and peacebuilding; and humanitarian action. Advancing gender equality and protecting and promoting human rights are cross-cutting priorities.
With the UN development system, UNDS, entities, for instance, Canada continues to advocate for more joined-up and coordinated UN responses; greater coherence and integration across UN efforts in development, humanitarian and peacebuilding, the “triple nexus”; sharper results-based approaches and member state accountability, efficiency gains and reducing UNDS overlap and duplication; and innovative financing with links to sustainable development goals, SDG, financing.
Regarding internal management reform, Canada engages in discussions on ways to improve governance and management across the UN system. Sustained efforts include those undertaken through the Geneva Group, a group consisting of contributors to the UN, where Canada continues to advocate and press for efficiencies and cost-effectiveness while aligning resources to priorities. This includes, for example, improving hiring practices to recruit and retain a diverse, gender-balanced and rejuvenated workforce, as well as ensuring proper resourcing.
Canada supports UN Security Council, UNSC, reform and participates in initiatives that seek meaningful reform, including the annual intergovernmental negotiations on UNSC reform, which take place at the UN General Assembly. Canada is also a member of the Uniting for Consensus, UfC, group, a cross-regional group of UN member states that advocates for enhanced regional representation through expanding the council in the non-permanent category only, with the addition of longer-term seats, as well as new two-year seats. UfC does not support the expansion of permanent membership with veto privileges in the UNSC, nor changing the current permanent member configuration.
Canada also supports various initiatives that aim to increase the UNSC’s effectiveness and limit the use of the veto by permanent members, including as a signatory to the political declaration on suspension of veto powers in cases of mass atrocity, as well as the accountability, coherence and transparency group code of conduct. Additionally, Canada recently co-sponsored a new initiative that aims to convene a General Assembly debate immediately after a UNSC permanent member uses its veto on a draft resolution that is vital to the maintenance of international peace and security.
In response to (c), UN system reform is a continued, evolving, incremental process. The timeline for implementation of reforms as well as the pace of progress depend in most cases on intergovernmental processes, configuration of bodies or offices and concerted action of member states.

Question No. 378—
Mr. Pierre Poilievre:
With regard to the Output Based Pricing System (OBPS): (a) how much has the federal government collected from industry; and (b) how much has the federal government paid out under the OBPS in direct rebates to businesses (excluding project-based funding and corporate welfare grants) since it first came into effect?
Response
Hon. Steven Guilbeault (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), pricing carbon pollution is widely recognized as the most efficient way to reduce greenhouse gas, GHG, emissions while driving innovation to provide consumers and businesses with low-carbon options. Canada’s approach to pricing carbon pollution provides flexibility for provinces and territories to implement a carbon pricing system that makes sense for their circumstances, provided that the system meets minimum stringency criteria to ensure that it is stringent, fair and efficient as defined in the federal benchmark.
The federal carbon pollution pricing system, the backstop, has two elements: a regulatory charge on fossil fuels and an output-based pricing system, OBPS, for industrial facilities. The federal OBPS is designed to minimize competitiveness and carbon leakage risks in emissions-intensive and trade-exposed industries.
The federal backstop applies in jurisdictions that request it or that do not have a carbon pricing system that aligns with the federal benchmark.
The fuel charge currently applies in Ontario, Manitoba, Yukon, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Nunavut. The OBPS currently applies in Manitoba, Prince Edward Island, Yukon, Nunavut, and partially in Saskatchewan.
Under the federal approach, the OBPS is designed to put a price on the carbon pollution of large industrial facilities, while limiting the impacts of carbon pricing on their ability to compete in the Canadian market and abroad. Carbon costs can affect businesses that conduct activities that are emissions-intensive and highly internationally traded if they compete with similar businesses in countries that do not have carbon pricing in place. This approach minimizes the risk that businesses will move from Canada to jurisdictions that do not price carbon.
Instead of paying the fuel charge, an industrial facility in the OBPS faces a compliance obligation on the portion of emissions that exceed an annual limit. Covered facilities are required to provide compensation for GHG emissions that exceed an emissions limit and are issued surplus credits if their emissions are lower than the applicable emissions limit. Facilities can sell surplus credits or bank them for use in future years. The methods for providing compensation are one of the following or a combination of both: a) making an excess emissions charge payment electronically to the receiver general for Canada; and b) remitting compliance units, namely surplus credits, federal offset credits, or recognized units.
As of February 22, 2022, the Government of Canada had collected $396.2 million in excess emissions charge payments under the OBPS.
In response to (b), the Government of Canada has committed to return proceeds collected from the OBPS to jurisdictions of origin. Jurisdictions that have voluntarily adopted the OBPS, currently Prince Edward Island, Yukon and Nunavut, can opt for a direct transfer of proceeds collected. Proceeds collected in other backstop jurisdictions, current or past, including Ontario, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan, will be returned through the two program streams of the OBPS proceeds fund.
The decarbonization incentive program, DIP, is a merit-based program that incentivizes the long-term decarbonization of Canada’s industrial sectors by supporting clean technology projects to reduce GHG emissions. Proceeds collected from most OBPS facilities will be returned via DIP to backstop jurisdictions.
The future electricity fund, FEF, stream is designed to support clean electricity projects and/or programs. Proceeds collected from OBPS-covered electricity-generating facilities, i.e., utilities, are expected to be returned through funding agreements with governments of backstop jurisdictions. An open call for project proposals is not anticipated under FEF.
Environment and Climate Change Canada, ECCC, launched the OBPS proceeds fund on February 14, 2022, to return proceeds collected for the 2019 compliance period, approximately $161 million, and those collected in future years, amounts to be confirmed. The DIP stream of the OBPS proceeds fund is currently accepting project proposals that would reduce emissions across Canada’s industrial sectors. ECCC has also engaged with the governments of backstop jurisdictions to initiate negotiations of the bilateral funding agreements under FEF. Given the recent launch of the OBPS proceeds fund, ECCC has not yet returned any proceeds collected from the OBPS

Question No. 381—
Mr. Bob Zimmer:
With regard to the estimated $1,235.4 millions in overpayments of income benefit payments by the government listed on page 147 of the 2021 Public Accounts of Canada, Volume I: (a) what is the breakdown of the estimated overpayments by income support program, including, for each program, the (i) dollar value of overpayments, (ii) number of Canadians who received overpayments; and (b) what are the comparative statistics for each item in (a), broken down by fiscal year since 2016-17?
Response
Ms. Ya’ara Saks (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to payment accuracy figures included in note 10 of the employment insurance operating account financial statements, the payment accuracy information shared in the 2021 public accounts of Canada and included in note 10 of the financial statement represents an estimate of “potential” over/under payments, not actual established overpayments that are being collected. This note is included in the financial statements to provide users with an overview of the operations of the programs and a measure of accuracy of the benefit payments. Specifically, it should be noted that using a monetary unit sampling, MUS, methodology, the EI payment accuracy review program, PAAR, estimates the accuracy of EI benefit payments. The quality services division reviews several hundred files each year to identify undetected errors that could result in possible mispayments, which are either underpayment or overpayment. Based on the sampling method, MUS, and the observance and distribution of the mispayments across the sample, various statistics are generated for the primary goal of testing whether mispayments are below the 5% tolerance limit, with 95% accuracy set as the service standard.
In response to (a), the EI PAAR sample, or the number of files to be reviewed, is established in a manner to estimate mispayments at the overall program level. It does not include sufficient number of items for each subtype, i.e., income support program. As such, these figures are not available.
In response to (i), the actual recorded amounts are disclosed in note 3 of the audited employment insurance operating account financial statements.
The supplementary statement is in section 4, “Consolidated accounts as at March 31”, volume I, “Public Accounts of Canada 2021”, receiver general for Canada, PSPC, Canada.ca: https://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/cpc-pac/2021/vol1/s4/es-ss-eng.html.
In response to (ii), the amount recorded as overpayments in the financial statements is $754 million and is based on actuals and estimated accruals. This represents potentially 388,000 claimants.
In response to (b), as indicated in the response to question (a), the EI PAAR sample is not large enough to provide this data.

Question No. 382—
Ms. Leslyn Lewis:
With regard to the government's action following the Russian invasion of Ukraine: (a) what specific action, if any, is the government planning to take, in response to the invasion, to increase the output capacity of Canadian oil and gas so that Canada doesn't have to rely on foreign oil and gas; (b) what specific action, if any, is the Minister of Natural Resources taking to expedite the approval and construction of pipelines so that Canada doesn't have to rely on foreign oil and gas; and (c) if no specific action is being taken related to (a) or (b), why is the government favouring foreign oil and gas over Canadian oil and gas?
Response
Hon. Jonathan Wilkinson (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, on February 28, 2022, in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the Government of Canada acted decisively to ban the import of crude oil and petroleum products from Russia. Canada produces more oil than required to meet its domestic refining needs. Although Canada does still import oil for certain regional needs, since 2019 there have been no imports of crude oil from Russia. This new ban will ensure that Canada will continue not to import any crude oil from Russia going forward. During the IEA ministerial on March 24, 2022, Canada announced the incremental increase in its oil and gas production of up to 300,000 barrels per day, including 200,000 barrels per day of oil and up to 100,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day of natural gas, by the end of 2022. Most of this additional production is the result of producers bringing forward planned production from 2023. This comes in the context of a release of 30.225 million barrels by the U.S. from its strategic petroleum reserve earlier this month, which was followed by a March 31, 2022, announcement by the President of the United States of another 180 million barrels over the next six months.
In August 2019, the Government of Canada announced the coming into force of the new Impact Assessment Act and the Canada Energy Regulator Act: https://www.canada.ca/en/impact-assessment-agency/news/2019/08/better-rules-for-impact-assessments-come-into-effect-this-month.html. The better rules and regulations outlined in these acts have been implemented to give companies and investors more clarity and certainty, and to ensure good projects can move forward in a timely way. These acts will continue to build public confidence by ensuring that federal decisions made about pipelines, mines, and hydro dams are guided by science, indigenous knowledge, and other evidence.
The Government of Canada remains committed to completing projects currently under way in the proper manner, including the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project, TMX. Once complete, pipeline capacity will increase from the current 300,000 barrels per day to 890,000 barrels per day. The project is 50% complete and is expected to be in service by late 2023. In addition, to enhance market access for Canadian natural gas, the Government of Canada approved three significant expansion projects on the Nova Gas Transmission Limited, NGTL, system since 2020, known as the NGTL 2021, north corridor, and Edson mainline expansions. Last, Enbridge’s Line 3 replacement project has now been completed and is in service on both sides of the border. This is another vital energy infrastructure that will strengthen continental energy security, while improving safety performance, increasing indigenous involvement, and enhancing economic benefits on both sides of the border.
The Government of Canada remains engaged with key international partners, such as Germany and the U.S., on a bilateral basis and in multilateral forums, including the IEA, on providing support in the medium to long term on stabilizing energy markets and the transition to clean energy.
In 2021, the Canada-Germany energy partnership was concluded. The purpose of the energy partnership is to advance engagement on the energy transformation through exchanges on policy, best practices and technologies, as well as through co-operative activities and projects focused on five key areas: energy policy, planning and regulations; resilient electricity systems that can integrate high levels of renewables; energy efficiency; sector coupling and low-carbon fuels; and innovation and applied research.
Under the partnership, Canada and Germany are working together to leverage Germany’s appetite for hydrogen and its efforts to abate sectors. Canada and Germany look to deepen and focus their collaborative work through our energy partnership, particularly in light of the Ukraine invasion and the desire for Canada to contribute to German energy security.
Bilateral work with Germany will draw from, and align with, the work being done under the Canada-EU energy security/green transition and LNG working group. The energy partnership is building a foundation for medium-term exports of responsibly produced LNG and hydrogen. Critical minerals will be added to the energy partnership action plan, in keeping with the Prime Minister and the Chancellor of Germany’s announcement on March 9, 2022, of a new bilateral dialogue on mineral security.

Question No. 385—
Ms. Laurel Collins:
With regard to the Create the Path Table, formerly known as the Market Crisis Joint Working Group, led by Natural Resources Canada, since its inception: (a) what is the membership of this working group as of January 31, 2022; (b) how many meetings have been held; (c) what were the dates of the meetings in (b); (d) who was in attendance at each meeting in (b); (e) what were the topics discussed at each meeting in (b); and (f) what were the agreed-upon action items from each meeting in (b)?
Response
Hon. Jonathan Wilkinson (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, NRCan has never established or led a working group related to Question No. 385.

Question No. 393—
Mr. Rob Moore:
With regard to the government's response to the 2020-2021 Annual Report from the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada, and broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation or other government entity that is subject to the act: (a) what specific action has been taken to abide by the statement from the commissioner who, on page 16 of the report, in reference to the 30-day time limit required by law, states that "The downplaying or tolerance of invalid extensions and delays must end"; (b) on what date was each action in (a) taken; (c) what specific action has been taken to address each of the other concerns raised by the commissioner in the report, broken down by each concern; and (d) on what date was each action in (c) taken?
Response
Mr. Greg Fergus (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the President of the Treasury Board, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada is committed to ensuring that the access to information process supports the transparency and accountability of Canadian federal institutions.
The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, TBS, welcomes the Information Commissioner’s observations and recommendations on how the government can continue to ensure that the right of access to information for Canadians is upheld. TBS continues to work with institutions to support and share guidance, best practices, and operational solutions to help them overcome operational challenges.
The length of extensions that are taken by institutions is assessed on a case-by-case basis wherein the volume and complexity of the information for the specific request are taken into consideration. This includes time extension requirements to consult with other government institutions and/or with third parties. In addition, institutions are required to inform the Office of the Information Commissioner, OIC, when extending the initial request reply period beyond an additional 30 days. There also exists a recourse mechanism whereby a requester who feels that the extension is unreasonable may file a complaint with the OIC.
The government has made significant improvements to access to information over the years. Recent amendments to the Access to Information Act have increased government openness and transparency by requiring the online publication of more government information. In addition, summaries of completed access to information requests are currently published every 30 days on the Open Government portal and removed after a period of two years. TBS is working on extending the retention of these summaries beyond two years.
The Government of Canada remains focused on improving the systems that support access to information and privacy requests, helping institutions to address outstanding requests and continually improving ATI program performance. In budget 2021, the government invested $12.8 million to support further improvements to the online access to information and personal information request service, to accelerate the proactive release of information to Canadians, and to support completion of the Access to Information Act review.
This review is an opportunity to explore how new tools and approaches could improve efficiency and make information more open and accessible to Canadians. The review will further examine the legislative framework, identify improvements to proactive disclosure to make information openly available, and assess processes and systems to improve service and reduce delays.
A list of key actions, implemented, planned or under way, to improve access to information and transparency is available at https://www.canada.ca/en/treasury-board-secretariat/services/access-information-privacy/reviewing-access-information/the-review-process/key-actions-access-information.html.

Question no 357 —
Mme Louise Chabot:
En ce qui concerne la Loi sur le cannabis: a) quels sont les détails des consultations effectuées par Santé Canada sur la production de cannabis à des fins médicales, y compris les (i) lignes directrices, (ii) résultats et analyses, (iii) notes de préparation; b) quels sont les détails de la révision de la Loi sur le cannabis, y compris les (i) résultats d’examen de la loi par le ministre responsable qui devait s’effectuer au plus tard le 17 octobre 2021, (ii) notes d'information?
Response
M. Adam van Koeverden (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Santé et de la ministre des Sports, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse au point a) de la question, du 8 mars au 7 mai 2021, Santé Canada, ou SC, a consulté les Canadiens et les Canadiennes au sujet d’une version provisoire d’un document d’orientation sur les facteurs que le Ministère pourrait prendre en compte au moment d’exercer les pouvoirs qui lui sont conférés par le règlement sur le cannabis pour refuser, renouveler, modifier ou révoquer une inscription pour la production personnelle à domicile, ou à titre de personne désignée, de cannabis à des fins médicales.
La consultation s’est terminée depuis. Santé Canada a reçu 677 réponses par courriel et par l’intermédiaire d’un questionnaire en ligne. Le ministère analyse ces renseignements et travaille à l’élaboration d’un rapport résumant les commentaires formulés lors de la consultation ainsi que d’une version définitive du document d’orientation, qui seront tous deux publiés sur le site Web de Santé Canada.
En réponse au point a)(i) de la question, comme l’indique l’article 151.1 de la Loi sur le cannabis, la ministre de la Santé doit veiller à ce que la Loi et son application fassent l’objet d’un examen dans les trois années suivant l’entrée en vigueur de la Loi, c’est-à-dire après le 17 octobre 2021, et à ce qu’un rapport sur cet examen, notamment toute conclusion ou recommandation qui en découle, soit présenté devant chaque chambre du Parlement au plus tard 18 mois après le début de l’examen.
Comme le prévoit la Loi, l’examen législatif doit considérer les répercussions sur la santé publique, notamment sur la santé et les habitudes de consommation des jeunes à l’égard de l’usage de cannabis, celles du cannabis sur les Autochtones et sur les collectivités autochtones, et celles de la culture de plantes de cannabis dans une maison d’habitation.
Le gouvernement s’est engagé à mettre en place un processus crédible et fondé sur des données probantes pour mener l’examen législatif, qui permettra d’évaluer les progrès réalisés en vue d’atteindre les objectifs de la Loi. Les préparatifs sont en cours pour le lancement de l’examen.
En réponse au point a)(ii), on peut consulter le document 21-111407-100 M2M pour approbation – Préparation de l’examen législatif de la Loi sur le cannabis.

Question no 361 —
M. Damien C. Kurek:
En ce qui concerne le gel des comptes bancaires en lien avec le Décret sur les mesures économiques d'urgence DORS/2022-22: a) quels critères précis ont servi à déterminer les comptes bancaires qui ont été gelés; b) des mesures ont-elles été prises pour ne pas geler les comptes bancaires des membres de la famille et des proches des manifestants uniquement en raison de leur lien avec les manifestants et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de ces mesures; c) quelles mesures ont été prises pour ne pas geler les comptes bancaires des personnes qui ont soutenu financièrement les manifestations lorsqu’elles étaient encore légales?
Response
L’hon. Chrystia Freeland (vice-première ministre et ministre des Finances, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse au point a) de la question, les fournisseurs de services financiers étaient chargés de mettre en œuvre les mesures contenues dans le Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence, notamment de cesser de fournir des services financiers aux personnes qui se livraient directement ou indirectement à des activités interdites par le Règlement sur les mesures d’urgence.
Ni le Décret ni le Règlement n'obligeaient les fournisseurs de services financiers à informer le ministère des Finances, ou tout autre ministère ou organisme fédéral, des critères précis qu'ils utilisaient pour déterminer quels comptes bancaires étaient gelés.
La GRC a publié une déclaration indiquant que, bien qu'il incombait aux institutions financières de prendre la décision de geler les comptes, la GRC a travaillé avec diligence avec les forces de l'ordre et les partenaires fédéraux pour divulguer les informations pertinentes des personnes et des entreprises soupçonnées d'implication dans des actes illégaux. La liste qui a été fournie aux institutions financières comprenait l'identité des personnes ayant agi comme influenceurs lors des manifestations illégales à Ottawa, ainsi que l’identité de propriétaires ou de conducteurs de véhicules qui refusaient de quitter le secteur touché par les manifestations.
En réponse au point b) de la question, le Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence obligeait les fournisseurs de services financiers à cesser de fournir des services financiers aux personnes qui se livraient directement ou indirectement à des activités interdites par le Règlement sur les mesures d’urgence.
Cette obligation ne s'appliquait pas aux membres de la famille et aux proches de ces personnes, à condition que ces membres de la famille et ces proches ne se livraient pas eux-mêmes directement ou indirectement à des activités interdites.
En réponse au point c) de la question, le Règlement sur les mesures d’urgence et le Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence n’étaient pas rétroactifs. Ils n'ont été effectifs qu'entre le 15 février et le 23 février.
La GRC a publié une déclaration indiquant que la liste qu'elle avait fournie aux institutions financières comprenait l'identité des personnes ayant agi comme influenceurs lors des manifestations illégales à Ottawa, ainsi que l’identité de propriétaires ou de conducteurs de véhicules qui refusaient de quitter le secteur touché par les manifestations, et qu’elle n'a pas fourni de liste de donateurs aux institutions financières.

Question no 362 —
M. Dane Lloyd:
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au ministre de la Sécurité publique, y compris par l’entremise de son personnel, à propos de l’intervention policière liée aux manifestations les 18 et 19 février 2022, à Ottawa: a) quels sont les détails de tout renseignement fourni au ministre à l’égard des règles d’engagement des forces policières présentes à Ottawa ces jours-là, y compris (i) qui a fourni l’information, (ii) la date et l’heure approximative, si possible, auxquelles l’information a été fournie, (iii) un résumé de l’information, y compris toute règle d’engagement communiquée; b) quels sont les détails de tout renseignement fourni au ministre en ce qui a trait à l’autorisation du recours à la force, létale et non létale, pour les forces policières présentes à Ottawa ces jours-là, y compris (i) qui a fourni l’information, (ii) la date et l’heure approximative, si possible, auxquelles l’information a été fournie, (iii) un résumé de l’information, y compris les faits connus ou les décisions prises concernant l’autorisation du recours à la force?
Response
Mme Pam Damoff (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Sécurité publique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, les activités de tous les services de police sont entièrement indépendantes, qu’elles soient municipales, provinciales ou fédérales.
L’indépendance de la police est essentielle. Le gouvernement ne peut d’aucune façon tenter d’influencer une enquête ou de diriger la conduite d’opérations policières précises. L’indépendance de la police, telle que définie dans une décision de la Cour suprême de 1999, dans l’arrêt Campbell et Shirose, a été décrite comme telle:
« Bien qu’à certaines fins, le commissaire de la GRC relève du solliciteur général, maintenant connu sous le nom de ministre de la Sécurité publique, il ne devrait pas être considéré comme un fonctionnaire ou un agent du gouvernement dans le cadre d’une enquête criminelle. Comme tous les autres policiers qui ont pris le même engagement, le commissaire n’est pas soumis à des directives politiques. Il est redevable à la loi et, sans doute, à sa conscience. »
Le gouvernement demeure déterminé à veiller à ce que les organismes d’application de la loi disposent des ressources dont ils ont besoin pour faire leur travail et s’attaquer efficacement aux menaces à la sécurité publique après des années de compressions budgétaires du gouvernement conservateur.
Dès le départ, notre gouvernement s’est efforcé de trouver des solutions qui protègent les Canadiens, qui touchent les collectivités et qui réduisent au minimum les risques de préjudice. Cela comprenait la consultation des fonctionnaires et l’évaluation approfondie de tous les outils et ressources fédéraux, y compris la possibilité d’invoquer la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence. Les pouvoirs temporaires conférés par la Loi ne sont demeurés en place que pour aussi peu de temps qu’il était nécessaire pour faire face à ce risque urgent pour la sécurité des Canadiens.
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au ministre de la Sécurité publique, y compris par l’intermédiaire de son personnel, au sujet des mesures prises par la police relativement aux manifestations qui ont eu lieu à Ottawa les 18 et 19 février 2022: en réponse au point a) de la question, Sécurité publique Canada n’a fourni aucune information concernant les règles d’engagement des forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là; et, en réponse au point b) de la question, Sécurité publique Canada n’a fourni au ministre aucune information concernant l’autorisation de recours à la force, autant létale que non létale, pour les forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là.
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au ministre de la Sécurité publique, y compris par l’intermédiaire de son personnel, au sujet des mesures prises par la police relativement aux manifestations qui ont eu lieu à Ottawa les 18 et 19 février 2022: en réponse au point a) de la question, la GRC n’a fourni aucune information concernant les règles d’engagement des forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là; et, en réponse au point b) de la question, la GRC n’a fourni au ministre aucune information concernant l’autorisation de recours à la force, autant létale que non létale, pour les forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là.

Question no 363 —
M. Dane Lloyd:
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au ministre de la Protection civile, y compris par l’entremise de son personnel, à propos de l’intervention policière liée aux manifestations les 18 et 19 février 2022, à Ottawa: a) quels sont les détails de tout renseignement fourni au ministre à l'égard des règles d’engagement des forces policières présentes à Ottawa ces jours-là, y compris (i) qui a fourni l’information, (ii) la date et l’heure approximative, si possible, auxquelles l’information a été fournie, (iii) un résumé de l’information, y compris toute règle d’engagement communiquée; (b) quels sont les détails de tout renseignement fourni au ministre en ce qui a trait à l’autorisation du recours à la force, létale ou non létale, pour les forces policières présentes à Ottawa ces jours-là, y compris (i) qui a fourni l’information, (ii) la date et l’heure approximative, si possible, auxquelles l’information a été fournie, (iii) un résumé de l’information, y compris les faits connus ou les décisions prises concernant l'autorisation du recours à la force?
Response
M. Yasir Naqvi (secrétaire parlementaire du président du Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada et ministre de la Protection civile, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, les activités de tous les services de police sont entièrement indépendantes, qu’elles soient municipales, provinciales ou fédérales.
L’indépendance de la police est essentielle. Le gouvernement ne peut d’aucune façon tenter d’influencer une enquête ou de diriger la conduite d’opérations policières précises. L’indépendance de la police, telle que définie dans une décision de la Cour suprême de 1999, dans l’arrêt Campbell et Shirose, a été décrite comme telle:
« Bien qu’à certaines fins, le commissaire de la GRC relève du solliciteur général, maintenant connu sous le nom de ministre de la Sécurité publique, il ne devrait pas être considéré comme un fonctionnaire ou un agent du gouvernement dans le cadre d’une enquête criminelle. Comme tous les autres policiers qui ont pris le même engagement, le commissaire n’est pas soumis à des directives politiques. Il est redevable à la loi et, sans doute, à sa conscience. »
Le gouvernement demeure déterminé à veiller à ce que les organismes d’application de la loi disposent des ressources dont ils ont besoin pour faire leur travail et s’attaquer efficacement aux menaces à la sécurité publique après des années de compressions budgétaires du gouvernement conservateur.
Dès le départ, notre gouvernement s’est efforcé de trouver des solutions qui protègent les Canadiens, qui touchent les collectivités et qui réduisent au minimum les risques de préjudice. Cela comprenait la consultation des fonctionnaires et l’évaluation approfondie de tous les outils et ressources fédéraux, y compris la possibilité d’invoquer la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence. Les pouvoirs temporaires conférés par la Loi ne sont demeurés en place que pour aussi peu de temps qu’il était nécessaire pour faire face à ce risque urgent pour la sécurité des Canadiens.
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au ministre de la Protection civile, y compris par l’intermédiaire de son personnel, au sujet des mesures policières prises relativement aux manifestations qui ont eu lieu à Ottawa les 18 et 19 février 2022: en réponse au point a) de la question, aucune information n’a été fournie au ministre par Sécurité publique Canada concernant les règles d’engagement des forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là; et, en réponse au point b) de la question, Sécurité publique Canada n’a fourni au ministre aucune information concernant l’autorisation du recours à la force, autant létale que non létale, pour les forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là.
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au ministre de la Protection civile, y compris par l’intermédiaire de son personnel, au sujet des mesures policières prises relativement aux manifestations qui ont eu lieu à Ottawa les 18 et 19 février 2022: en réponse au point a) de la question, aucune information n’a été fournie au ministre par la GRC concernant les règles d’engagement des forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là; et, en réponse au point b) de la question, la GRC n’a fourni au ministre aucune information concernant l’autorisation du recours à la force, autant létale que non létale, pour les forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là.

Question no 364 —
M. Dane Lloyd:
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au premier ministre, y compris par l’entremise de son personnel, à propos de l’intervention policière liée aux manifestations les 18 et 19 février 2022, à Ottawa: a) quels sont les détails de tout renseignement fourni au premier ministre à l'égard des règles d’engagement des forces policières présentes à Ottawa ces jours-là, y compris (i) qui a fourni l’information, (ii) la date et l’heure approximative, si possible, auxquelles l’information a été fournie, (iii) un résumé de l’information, y compris toute règle d'engagement communiquée; b) quels sont les détails de tout renseignement fourni au premier ministre en ce qui a trait à l’autorisation du recours à la force, létale ou non létale, pour les forces policières présentes à Ottawa ces jours-là, y compris (i) qui a fourni l’information, (ii) la date et l’heure approximatives, si possible, auxquelles l’information a été fournie, (iii) un résumé de l’information, y compris les faits connus ou les décisions prises concernant l’autorisation du recours à la force?
Response
Mme Pam Damoff (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Sécurité publique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, les activités de tous les services de police sont entièrement indépendantes, qu’elles soient municipales, provinciales ou fédérales.
L’indépendance de la police est essentielle. Le gouvernement ne peut d’aucune façon tenter d’influencer une enquête ou de diriger la conduite d’opérations policières précises. L’indépendance de la police, telle que définie dans une décision de la Cour suprême de 1999, dans l’arrêt Campbell et Shirose, a été décrite comme telle:
« Bien qu’à certaines fins, le commissaire de la GRC relève du solliciteur général, maintenant connu sous le nom de ministre de la Sécurité publique, il ne devrait pas être considéré comme un fonctionnaire ou un agent du gouvernement dans le cadre d’une enquête criminelle. Comme tous les autres policiers qui ont pris le même engagement, le commissaire n’est pas soumis à des directives politiques. Il est redevable à la loi et, sans doute, à sa conscience. »
Le gouvernement demeure déterminé à veiller à ce que les organismes d’application de la loi disposent des ressources dont ils ont besoin pour faire leur travail et s’attaquer efficacement aux menaces à la sécurité publique après des années de compressions budgétaires du gouvernement conservateur.
Dès le départ, notre gouvernement s’est efforcé de trouver des solutions qui protègent les Canadiens, qui touchent les collectivités et qui réduisent au minimum les risques de préjudice. Cela comprenait la consultation des fonctionnaires et l’évaluation approfondie de tous les outils et ressources fédéraux, y compris la possibilité d’invoquer la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence. Les pouvoirs temporaires conférés par la Loi ne sont demeurés en place que pour aussi peu de temps qu’il était nécessaire pour faire face à ce risque urgent pour la sécurité des Canadiens.
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au premier ministre, y compris par l’entremise de son personnel, au sujet des mesures prises par la police relativement aux manifestions qui ont eu lieu à Ottawa les 18 et 19 février 2022: en réponse au point a) de la question, aucune information n’a été fournie au premier ministre par Sécurité publique Canada concernant les règles d’engagement des forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là; et, en réponse au point b) de la question, Sécurité publique Canada n’a fourni au premier ministre aucune information concernant l’autorisation du recours à la force, autant létale que non létale, pour les forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là.
En ce qui concerne l’information fournie au premier ministre, y compris par l’entremise de son personnel, au sujet des mesures prises par la police relativement aux manifestions qui ont eu lieu à Ottawa les 18 et 19 février 2022: en réponse au point a) de la question, aucune information n’a été fournie au premier ministre par la GRC concernant les règles d’engagement des forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là; et, en réponse au point b) de la question, la GRC n’a fourni au premier ministre aucune information concernant l’autorisation du recours à la force, autant létale que non létale, pour les forces de police à Ottawa ces jours-là.

Question no 365 —
M. Jeremy Patzer:
En ce qui concerne le Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence: a) quelles entités ont fait une communication au commissaire de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada conformément à l’article 5 et, en ce qui concerne chaque entité, combien de communications ont été faites, ventilées par (i) l'existence de biens en sa possession ou sous son contrôle, en vertu de l’alinéa 5a), (ii) toute transaction, réelle ou projetée, en vertu de l’alinéa 5b); b) quelles entités ont fait une communication au directeur du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité conformément à l’article 5 et, en ce qui concerne chaque entité, combien de communications ont été faites, ventilées par (i) l'existence de biens en sa possession ou sous son contrôle, en vertu de l’alinéa 5a), (ii) toute transaction, réelle ou projetée, en vertu de l’alinéa 5b); c) quelles institutions du gouvernement du Canada ont fait une communication conformément à l’article 6, ventilées par (i) l’institution qui a fait la communication, (ii) l’entité à laquelle la communication a été faite, (iii) la nature de l’information communiquée; d) des accusations ont-elles été portées concernant des violations du décret et, le cas échéant, qui a été accusé et pour quelles violations?
Response
Mme Pam Damoff (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Sécurité publique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, compte tenu de son mandat et de ses exigences opérationnelles précises, le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité ne divulgue généralement pas de détails sur les activités opérationnelles. Pour ce qui est de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, ou GRC, en réponse au paragraphe a) de la question, la GRC a reçu des communications de la part des entités suivantes conformément à l’article 5 du Décret: les banques établies en vertu de la Loi sur les banques du Canada et régies par le Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières; les coopératives de crédit, caisses d’épargne et de crédit et caisses populaires régies par une loi provinciale et les associations régies par la Loi sur les associations coopératives de crédit; et les entités autorisées en vertu de la législation provinciale à se livrer au commerce des valeurs mobilières ou à fournir des services de gestion de portefeuille ou des conseils en placement. La GRC a aussi reçu des communications de la part de toute entité exécutant l’une ou l’autre des fonctions suivantes: la fourniture ou la tenue d’un compte détenu au nom d’un ou de plusieurs utilisateurs finaux en vue d’un transfert électronique de fonds; la détention de fonds au nom d’un utilisateur final jusqu’à ce qu’ils soient retirés par celui-ci ou transférés à une personne physique ou à une entité; l’initiation d’un transfert électronique de fonds à la demande d’un utilisateur final; l’autorisation d’un transfert électronique de fonds ou la transmission, la réception ou la facilitation d’une instruction en vue d’un transfert électronique de fonds; ou la prestation de services de compensation ou de règlement.
Pour ce qui est de la ventilation demandée aux alinéas (i) et (ii), la GRC a reçu des informations d'un certain nombre d'entités décrites à l'article 5(a) et (b) de l'ordonnance divulguée à la GRC. Ces renseignements ont été élaborés par ces entités dans un environnement dynamique et, compte tenu de la courte période pendant laquelle la Loi sur les mesures d'urgence était en vigueur, les renseignements ont été reçus de façon ponctuelle, sans qu'aucun mécanisme de rapport officiel ne soit établi. Par conséquent, l'information contenue dans les fonds de la GRC peut différer de l'information contenue dans les autres dossiers du gouvernement du Canada ou des chiffres divulgués publiquement par les entités énumérées dans la partie a). La GRC évalue actuellement les informations relatives à l'invocation de l'ordonnance et aux rapports obligatoires. Il serait prématuré de partager des données préliminaires ou des informations supplémentaires pour le moment, alors que l'analyse est en cours pour assurer un rapport précis et complet de la GRC.
La GRC s'engage à participer à l'examen de la Loi sur les mesures d'urgence exigé par la loi et à veiller à ce qu'une compréhension commune faisant autorité de la façon dont la Loi a été utilisée soit disponible.
En réponse à l’alinéa (i) du paragraphe c), la GRC a communiqué des informations en vertu de l’article 6. La GRC ne peut pas fournir de renseignements sur d’autres institutions du gouvernement du Canada.
En réponse à l’alinéa (ii) du paragraphe c), la GRC a fait des communications aux banques, à l’Association des banquiers canadiens, à l’Organisme canadien de réglementation du commerce des valeurs mobilières, aux autorités canadiennes en valeurs mobilières, à l’Association canadienne des courtiers de fonds mutuels et aux coopératives de crédit.
En réponse à l’alinéa (iii) du paragraphe c), la GRC a communiqué des renseignements sur 57 entités, soit 18 individus et 39 véhicules. Elle a aussi recensé et communiqué les adresses liées à 170 portefeuilles de bitcoins ayant reçu des fonds en lien avec la campagne de socio financement HonkHonkHodl.
Finalement, en réponse au paragraphe d), comme le Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence ne prévoyait aucun mécanisme de répression criminelle, la GRC n’a pas déposé d’accusation en vertu de ce décret.

Question no 367 —
M. Todd Doherty:
En ce qui concerne les événements survenus le 17 février 2022 près de Houston, en Colombie-Britannique, décrits par la Gendarmerie royale du Canada comme une confrontation violente avec des employés de Coastal GasLink, et qui comprenaient en outre des barrages routiers: a) la route de service forestier Marten et l’emplacement de Coastal GasLink, à proximité, correspondent-ils à la définition des « infrastructures servant à la fourniture de services publics tels que ... le gaz » pour l’application de l’alinéa b) de la définition d’infrastructures essentielles de l’article 1 du Règlement sur les mesures d’urgences; b) quels sont les détails des mesures prises dans le cadre du Règlement sur les mesures d’urgences et visant à prévenir ou à atténuer ces actes ou à y répondre ou, si aucune mesure n’a été prise, pourquoi; c) quels sont les détails des mesures prises dans le cadre du Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence et visant à prévenir ou à atténuer ces actes ou à y répondre ou, si aucune mesure n’a été prise, pourquoi?
Response
Mme Pam Damoff (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Sécurité publique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse au paragraphe a) de la question, la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, ou GRC, considère que le site de forage de Coastal GasLink aurait répondu à la définition d’infrastructure essentielle énoncée à l’article 1 du Règlement sur les mesures d’urgence pendant qu’il était en vigueur, en tant qu’endroit ou terrain sur lequel sont situées des infrastructures servant à fournir des services publics, comme le gaz.
En réponse au paragraphe b), aucune mesure n’a été prise en vertu du Règlement sur les mesures d’urgence pour prévenir ou atténuer ces actes ou y répondre. Les autorisations existantes étaient suffisantes. Étant donné qu’une enquête est en cours sur les événements, la GRC ne commentera pas davantage cette affaire pour le moment.
En réponse au paragraphe c), aucune mesure n’a été prise en vertu du Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence pour prévenir ou atténuer ces actes ou y répondre. Les autorisations existantes étaient suffisantes. Étant donné qu’une enquête est en cours sur les événements, la GRC ne commentera pas davantage cette affaire pour le moment.

Question no 370 —
M. Ryan Williams:
En ce qui concerne les investissements du Régime de pensions du Canada (RPC) dans des entreprises d’État russes ou des entreprises ayant des liens importants avec Vladimir Poutine ou l’oligarchie russe: a) quelles entreprises appartiennent actuellement au RPC et quelle est la valeur de chaque investissement; b) le gouvernement a-t-il ordonné ou conseillé à l’Office d’investissement du Régime de pensions du Canada (OIRPC) de se départir de ces avoirs et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails, y compris la date de l’ordre ou de l'avis; c) l’OIRPC a-t-il l’intention de se départir de tous ces avoirs dans son portefeuille d’investissements et, le cas échéant, quand s’en départira-t-il?
Response
L’hon. Chrystia Freeland (vice-première ministre et ministre des Finances, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, l’Office d’investissement du régime de pensions du Canada, ou OIRPC, a été créé par les gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux pour investir prudemment les fonds excédentaires du RPC. L’OIRPC fonctionne de manière indépendante des gouvernements canadiens.
En vertu des lois et règlements actuels, le gouvernement n’est pas en mesure d’exiger que l’OIRPC divulgue ses avoirs en plus des exigences de divulgation auxquelles l’OIRPC est soumis en vertu de la Loi sur l’Office d’investissement du régime de pensions du Canada. Les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux n’ont pas non plus le pouvoir d’obliger l’OIRPC à céder ses avoirs.

Question no 371 —
M. Ryan Williams:
En ce qui concerne l’incidence à long terme du recours à la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence pour geler les comptes bancaires de citoyens canadiens: la Société d’assurance-dépôts du Canada, la Banque du Canada ou le ministère des Finances ont-ils réalisé une analyse pour déterminer l’incidence potentielle de cette mesure sur la stabilité à long terme des banques canadiennes et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de cette analyse, y compris ses conclusions?
Response
L’hon. Chrystia Freeland (vice-première ministre et ministre des Finances, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence n’a été en vigueur que pendant une courte période et n’a ciblé que les personnes désignées qui participaient aux barrages routiers et aux occupations illégales. En date du 21 février 2022, l’application du Décret sur les mesures économiques d’urgence par la Gendarmerie royale du Canada a entraîné à notre connaissance le gel d‘approximativement 280 produits financiers — comptes d’épargnes et comptes chèques, cartes de crédit et marges de crédit, par exemple — pour un total d’environ 7,9 millions de dollars, incluant le gel du compte d’un service de traitement de paiements d’une valeur de 3,8 millions de dollars.
De plus, le Règlement sur l’accès aux services bancaires de base oblige les banques à ouvrir des comptes de dépôt de détail aux consommateurs. Les banques doivent donc continuer à ouvrir des comptes de dépôt pour tous les consommateurs, sauf dans les circonstances prévues au Règlement.
Une recherche dans les dossiers de la Banque du Canada n’a relevé aucune occurrence.
Une recherche dans les dossiers de la Société d’assurance-dépôts du Canada n’a relevé aucune occurrence non plus.

Question no 374 —
M. Eric Melillo:
En ce qui concerne la vaccination obligatoire des fonctionnaires fédéraux contre la COVID-19: a) combien d’employés de l’Agence fédérale de développement économique pour le Nord de l’Ontario (FedNor) ont été mis en congé administratif sans solde parce qu’ils ne satisfaisaient pas à cette exigence; b) combien d’employés de la FedNor ont été licenciés parce qu’ils ne satisfaisaient pas à cette exigence?
Response
L’hon. Patty Hajdu (ministre des Services aux Autochtones et ministre responsable de l’Agence fédérale de développement économique pour le Nord de l’Ontario, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en ce qui concerne la vaccination obligatoire des fonctionnaires fédéraux contre la COVID-19, les renseignements de l’Agence fédérale de développement économique pour le Nord de l'Ontario indiquent qu’un seul employé a été mis en congé administratif sans solde et qu’aucun employé n’a été licencié.

Question no 375 —
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne l’Organisation des Nations Unies (ONU) et les propos que le secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Services publics et de l’Approvisionnement a publiés sur Twitter le 25 février 2022, voulant que « l’ONU nécessite des réformes fondamentales »: a) quelles sont précisément les réformes fondamentales que le gouvernement souhaite voir à l’ONU; b) quelles mesures le gouvernement a-t-il prises, le cas échéant, pour entamer les réformes fondamentales; c) quel est le délai dans lequel le gouvernement souhaiterait que chaque réforme décrite en a) soit adoptée?
Response
L’hon. Robert Oliphant (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Affaires étrangères, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, ce qui suit reflète la réponse consolidée approuvée au nom des ministres d’Affaires mondiales Canada.
En réponse à la partie a) de la question, la réforme et la réorganisation de l’Organisation des Nations unies, ou ONU, demeureront prioritaires pour le Canada, car un système onusien fort et efficace contribue à protéger les intérêts et les valeurs nationales du Canada. Nous sommes déterminés à rendre l’ONU plus efficace, efficiente, pertinente et responsable. Cet engagement est reflété dans les lettres de mandat de la ministre des Affaires étrangères et du ministre du Développement international.
Le Canada soutient les efforts déployés par l’ONU pour promouvoir une meilleure utilisation des ressources et trouver des moyens nouveaux et novateurs de travailler et de s’acquitter plus efficacement de son mandat, le tout dans la transparence et la responsabilité envers les États membres. Le Canada soutient également les opérations de paix efficaces et inclusives, la prévention des conflits et la consolidation de la paix.
Concernant la partie b) de la question, les principaux domaines d’intérêt ont compris: la réforme de la gouvernance au sein des conseils d’administration et des organes directeurs des fonds, programmes et organes de l’ONU; les efforts de redressement face à la COVID-19; le financement du développement; le changement climatique; la promotion de l’appropriation nationale et locale pour une prévention des conflits et une consolidation de la paix inclusives; ainsi que l’action humanitaire. La promotion de l’égalité des genres et la protection et la promotion des droits de la personne sont des priorités transversales.
En ce qui concerne les entités du Système des Nations unies pour le développement, ou SNUD, par exemple, le Canada continue de préconiser: des réponses davantage concertées et coordonnées de l’ONU; une plus grande cohérence et intégration des efforts de l’ONU en matière de développement, d’aide humanitaire et de consolidation de la paix, soit le « triple lien »; des approches plus précises axées sur les résultats et la responsabilisation des États membres, des gains d’efficacité et la réduction des chevauchements et des doubles emplois du SNUD; et un financement novateur lié au financement des Objectifs de développement durable.
En ce qui concerne la réforme de la gestion interne, le Canada prend part à des discussions sur les façons d’améliorer la gouvernance et la gestion dans l’ensemble du système onusien. Les efforts soutenus comprennent ceux entrepris par le Groupe de Genève, un groupe composé de contributeurs à l’ONU, où le Canada continue ses efforts de plaidoyer et ses pressions pour obtenir des gains d’efficacité et de rentabilité tout en alignant les ressources sur les priorités. Il s’agit, par exemple, d’améliorer les pratiques d’embauche afin de recruter et de conserver une main-d’œuvre diversifiée, équilibrée entre les genres et rajeunie, et d’assurer un ressourcement adéquat.
Le Canada appuie la réforme du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies, ou CSNU, et participe à des initiatives dont le but est d’obtenir une réforme concrète, notamment les négociations intergouvernementales annuelles sur la réforme du CSNU qui ont lieu à l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies. Le Canada est également membre du groupe « Unis pour le consensus », un groupe interrégional d’États membres qui préconise une représentation régionale accrue en élargissant le Conseil dans la catégorie des membres non permanents seulement, en ajoutant des sièges à plus long terme ainsi que de nouveaux sièges de deux ans. Ce groupe ne soutient pas l’expansion du statut de membre permanent avec droit de veto au sein du CSNU, ni le changement de la composition permanente actuelle.
Le Canada soutient également diverses initiatives visant à accroître l’efficacité du CSNU et à limiter l’utilisation du droit de veto par les membres permanents, y compris en tant que signataire de la Déclaration politique sur la suspension du droit de veto dans les cas d’atrocité de masse ainsi que du Code de conduite du groupe Responsabilité, cohérence et transparence. De plus, le Canada a récemment coparrainé une nouvelle initiative dans le but de convoquer un débat de l’Assemblée générale immédiatement après qu’un membre permanent du CSNU ait utilisé son droit de veto sur un projet de résolution qui est essentiel pour le maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales.
Au sujet de la partie c) de la question, la réforme du système onusien est un processus continu, évolutif et progressif. Le calendrier de mise en œuvre des réformes ainsi que le rythme des progrès dépendent dans la plupart des cas des processus intergouvernementaux, de la configuration des organes ou des bureaux ainsi que de l’action concertée des États membres.

Question no 378 —
M. Pierre Poilievre:
En ce qui concerne le système de tarification fondé sur le rendement (STFR): a) quelles sommes le gouvernement fédéral a-t-il perçues de l’industrie; b) quelles sommes le gouvernement fédéral a-t-il versées en remises directes aux entreprises au titre du STFR depuis son entrée en vigueur (à l’exclusion du financement par projet et des subventions aux entreprises parasites)?
Response
L’hon. Steven Guilbeault (ministre de l’Environnement et du Changement climatique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, la tarification de la pollution par le carbone est largement reconnue comme le moyen le plus efficace de réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre tout en stimulant l’innovation pour offrir aux consommateurs et aux entreprises des options à faibles émissions de carbone. L’approche du Canada pour une tarification de la pollution par le carbone offre aux provinces et aux territoires la marge de manœuvre nécessaire pour mettre en œuvre un système de tarification du carbone adapté à leur situation, à condition que ce système réponde à des critères minimaux de rigueur afin de garantir qu’il est rigoureux, équitable et efficace, tel que défini dans le modèle fédéral.
Le système de tarification de la pollution par le carbone du gouvernement fédéral, le filet de sécurité, comporte deux éléments: une redevance réglementaire appliquée aux combustibles fossiles et un système de tarification fondé sur le rendement, ou STFR pour les installations industrielles. Le STFR fédéral est conçu de manière à réduire les risques liés à la compétitivité et aux fuites de carbone pour les industries à forte intensité d’émissions et exposées aux échanges commerciaux.
Le filet de sécurité fédéral s’applique aux provinces et aux territoires qui le demandent ou qui n’ont pas de système de tarification du carbone conforme au modèle fédéral.
La redevance sur les combustibles s’applique actuellement à l’Ontario, au Manitoba, au Yukon, à l’Alberta, à la Saskatchewan et au Nunavut. Le STFR s’applique pour sa part au Manitoba, à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard, au Yukon, au Nunavut, et partiellement à la Saskatchewan.
Dans le cadre de l’approche fédérale, le STFR est conçu pour mettre un prix sur la pollution par le carbone des grandes installations industrielles, tout en atténuant les effets de la tarification du carbone sur leur capacité de concurrencer sur le marché canadien et à l’étranger. Les coûts du carbone peuvent avoir une incidence sur les entreprises qui mènent des activités à forte intensité d’émissions et qui font l’objet d’échanges internationaux importants, si elles font concurrence à des entreprises semblables dans des pays n’ayant pas mis en place une tarification du carbone. Cette approche permet de réduire le risque que des entreprises quittent le Canada pour s’installer dans des pays qui ne fixent pas de prix à la pollution par le carbone.
Au lieu de verser la redevance sur les combustibles, une installation industrielle visée par le STFR aura une obligation de conformité pour la partie des émissions qui dépasse la limite annuelle. Les installations assujetties doivent verser compensation pour les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au-delà de la limite d’émissions applicable et reçoivent des crédits excédentaires si leurs émissions sont en deçà de la limite d’émissions applicable. Les installations peuvent vendre des crédits excédentaires ou en mettre en réserve pour les utiliser dans les années à venir. Les modes de versement de la compensation sont l’une ou une combinaison des deux méthodes suivantes: effectuer un paiement électronique de la redevance pour émissions excédentaires au receveur général du Canada; remettre des unités de conformité, à savoir des crédits excédentaires, des crédits compensatoires fédéraux ou des unités reconnues.
En date du 22 février 2022, le gouvernement du Canada avait perçu 396,2 millions de dollars en paiements de la redevance pour émissions excédentaires dans le cadre du STFR.
Concernant la partie b) de la question, le gouvernement du Canada s’est engagé à remettre les produits perçus dans le cadre du STFR aux administrations d’origine. Les administrations d’origine qui ont volontairement adopté le STFR, l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard, le Yukon et le Nunavut, peuvent choisir un transfert direct des produits perçus. Les produits recueillis dans les autres provinces et territoires assujettis au filet de sécurité, présentement ou dans le passé, notamment l’Ontario, le Nouveau-Brunswick, le Manitoba et la Saskatchewan, seront remis par le truchement du Fonds issu des produits du STFR dans le cadre de deux volets de programme:
Le Programme d’incitation à la décarbonisation, ou PID, est un programme fondé sur le mérite visant à encourager la décarbonisation à long terme des secteurs industriels du Canada en soutenant des projets de technologie propre pour réduire les émissions de GES. Les produits recueillis auprès de la majorité des installations assujetties au STFR seront retournés par le truchement du PID aux administrations assujetties au filet de sécurité fédéral.
Le Fonds pour l’électricité de l’avenir, ou FEA,: est un volet vise à soutenir les projets ou programmes d’électricité propre. Il est prévu que les produits recueillis auprès des installations de production d’électricité assujetties au STFR, c’est-à-dire les services publics, seront retournés par le biais d’ententes de financement avec les gouvernements des administrations assujetties au filet de sécurité fédéral. Un appel de propositions ouvert n’est pas prévu dans le cadre du FEA.
Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, ou ECCC, a lancé le Fonds issu des produits du STFR le 14 février 2022 pour remettre les produits prélevés pour la période de conformité de 2019, soit environ 161 millions de dollars, et ceux prélevés dans les années à venir, dont les montants sont à confirmer. Le volet du PID du Fonds issu des produits du STFR accepte présentement des propositions de projet qui visent à réduire davantage les émissions des secteurs industriels partout au Canada. ECCC a également communiqué avec les gouvernements assujettis au filet de sécurité fédéral afin de commencer les négociations des ententes de financement bilatérales dans le cadre du FEA. Compte tenu du lancement récent du Fonds issu des produits du STFR, ECCC n'a pas encore restitué les produits collectés dans le cadre du STFR.

Question no 381 —
M. Bob Zimmer:
En ce qui concerne les versements excédentaires de prestations de revenu par le gouvernement, estimés à 1 235,4 millions de dollars, comme mentionné à la page 150 du Volume I des Comptes publics du Canada 2021: a) quelle est la ventilation des versements excédentaires estimés par programme de soutien du revenu, en incluant, pour chaque programme, (i) la valeur en dollars des versements excédentaires, (ii) le nombre de Canadiens qui ont reçu des versements excédentaires; b) quelles sont les statistiques comparatives pour chaque élément en a), ventilées par exercice depuis 2016-2017?
Response
Mme Ya’ara Saks (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre de la Famille, des Enfants et du Développement social, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, l'information sur l'exactitude des paiements communiquée dans les Comptes publics du Canada 2021 et incluse dans la note 10 des états financiers représente une estimation des paiements excédentaires ou insuffisants « potentiels », et non des paiements excédentaires réels qui sont perçus. Cette note est incluse dans les états financiers pour donner aux utilisateurs un aperçu des opérations des programmes et une mesure de l'exactitude des paiements de prestations. Plus précisément, il convient de noter qu’en utilisant une méthodologie d’échantillonnage en unités monétaires, ou EUM, le Programme de Vérification de l’exactitude des paiements, ou VEP, de l’assurance-emploi estime l’exactitude des paiements de prestations d’assurance-emploi. La division des Services de la qualité examine plusieurs centaines de dossiers chaque année afin de repérer les erreurs non détectées qui entraînent de possibles paiements erronés, lesquels sont enregistrés comme des moins-payés ou des trop-payés. En fonction de la méthode EUM, ainsi que de l’observation et de la répartition des paiements erronés dans l’échantillon, diverses statistiques sont générées dans le but principal de vérifier si les paiements erronés sont inférieurs à la limite de tolérance de 5 %, soit une précision de 95 % établie comme norme de service.
En réponse la partie a) de la question, l’échantillon de la VEP de l’assurance-emploi, le nombre de dossiers devant être examinés, est établi de manière à estimer les paiements erronés à l’échelle du programme dans son ensemble. L’échantillon ne comprend pas suffisamment d’éléments pour chaque sous-type, c’est-â-dire chaque programme de soutien du revenu. Par conséquent, ces données ne sont pas disponibles.
Concernant la partie a)(i), on peut se référer aux montants réels inscrits à la Note 3 des états financiers vérifiés du Compte des opérations de l’assurance-emploi.
L’État supplémentaire – Section 4: Comptes consolidés au 31 mars – Volume I: Comptes publics du Canada 2021 – Receveur général du Canada – TPSGC – Canada.ca est disponible au https://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/cpc-pac/2021/vol1/s4/es-ss-fra.html.
Concernant la partie a)(ii), le montant enregistré à titre de versements excédentaires dans les états financiers est de 754 millions de dollars et est basé sur des montants réels et estimés, représentant potentiellement 388 000 prestataires.
En réponse à la partie b) de la question, comme indiqué à la question en a), la taille de l’échantillon de la VEP de l’assurance-emploi n’est pas suffisamment grande pour fournir ces données.

Question no 382 —
Mme Leslyn Lewis:
En ce qui concerne les mesures prises par le gouvernement à la suite de l’invasion de l’Ukraine par la Russie: a) quelle mesure précise, le cas échéant, le gouvernement planifie-t-il prendre, en réaction à cette invasion, pour faire augmenter les capacités de production de pétrole et de gaz naturel au Canada, de manière à ce que les Canadiens ne soient pas obligés de dépendre du pétrole et du gaz étrangers; b) quelle mesure précise, le cas échéant, le ministre des Ressources naturelles prend-il pour accélérer l’approbation et la construction de pipelines, de façon à ce que les Canadiens ne soient pas obligés de dépendre du pétrole et du gaz étrangers; c) si aucune mesure particulière liée aux points a) et b) n’est prise, pourquoi le gouvernement favorise-t-il le pétrole et le gaz étrangers par rapport au pétrole et au gaz canadiens?
Response
L’hon. Jonathan Wilkinson (ministre des Ressources naturelles climatique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le 28 février 2022, en réponse à l’invasion de l’Ukraine par la Russie, le gouvernement du Canada a agi de manière décisive en interdisant les importations de pétrole brut et les produits pétroliers en provenance de la Russie. Le Canada produit plus de pétrole qu’il n’en a besoin pour satisfaire ses besoins de raffinage. Bien qu’il importe toujours du pétrole pour répondre à certains besoins régionaux, depuis 2019, il n’a importé aucun pétrole brut en provenance de la Russie. Cette nouvelle interdiction permettra au Canada de s’assurer qu’il pourra continuer de ne pas importer de pétrole brut de la Russie à l’avenir. Au cours de la réunion ministérielle de l’AIE du 24 mars 2022, le Canada a annoncé une hausse graduelle de sa production de pétrole et de gaz d’un maximum de 300 000 barils par jour, soit 200 000 barils de pétrole par jour et un maximum de 100 000 barils équivalent pétrole par jour de gaz naturel, d’ici la fin de 2022. La majorité de cette production additionnelle découle du fait que les producteurs ont reporté la production planifiée en 2023. Cela s’inscrit dans le contexte où les États-Unis ont permis l’utilisation de 30,225 millions de barils de sa réserve de pétrole stratégique plus tôt au cours du mois. De plus, le 31 mars 2022, le président des États-Unis, a annoncé que 180 millions de barils supplémentaires seraient accessibles au cours des six mois suivants.
En août 2019, le gouvernement du Canada a annoncé l’entrée en vigueur de la nouvelle Loi sur l’évaluation d’impact et de la Loi sur la Régie de l’énergie du Canada. On peut consulter le site www.canada.ca/fr/agence-evaluation-impact/nouvelles/2019/08/de-meilleures-regles-pour-les-evaluations-dimpact-entreront-en-vigueur-ce-mois-ci.html. Les règlements améliorés énoncés dans ces lois ont été mis en œuvre pour offrir plus de clarté et de certitude aux entreprises et aux investisseurs et pour s’assurer que les bons projets pourront progresser rapidement. Ces lois permettront de continuer à rétablir la confiance du public en s’assurant que les décisions fédérales relatives aux pipelines, aux mines et aux barrages hydroélectriques seront fondées sur la science, les connaissances autochtones et des données probantes.
Le gouvernement demeure résolu à terminer les projets en cours de la manière appropriée, notamment le projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, ou TMX. Une fois le projet terminé, la capacité pipelinière passera de 300 000 à 890 000 barils par jour. Ce projet est achevé à 50 % et devrait être en service à la fin de 2023. En outre, pour améliorer l’accès au marché du gaz naturel canadien, le gouvernement du Canada a approuvé trois importants projets d’agrandissement rattachés au réseau de Nova Gas Transmission Limited, ou NGTL, depuis 2020, connus comme étant le Projet d’agrandissement du réseau de NGTL, le Projet d’agrandissement du couloir nord et le Projet d’agrandissement de la canalisation principale Edson. Enfin, le projet de remplacement de la canalisation 3 est maintenant terminé et en service des deux côtés de la frontière. Il s’agit d’une autre infrastructure d’approvisionnement énergétique cruciale qui permettra de consolider la sécurité énergétique continentale, tout en améliorant la performance de la sécurité, en augmentant la participation des Autochtones et en multipliant les avantages économiques des deux côtés de la frontière.
Le gouvernement du Canada continue d’interagir avec des partenaires internationaux clés, comme l’Allemagne et les États-Unis, sur une base bilatérale et dans le cadre de forums multilatéraux, dont l’AIE, afin d’offrir un soutien à moyen terme et à long terme pour stabiliser les marchés de l’énergie et assurer la transition vers une énergie propre.
En 2021, le partenariat énergétique entre le Canada et l’Allemagne a été conclu. Ce partenariat a pour objectif d’encourager la mobilisation dans le cadre de la transformation énergétique grâce à des échanges sur les politiques, les pratiques exemplaires et les technologies, ainsi qu’au moyen d’activités et de projets concertés ayant trait à cinq secteurs clés: Politiques en matière d’énergie, planification et réglementation; Systèmes d’électricité résilients qui peuvent intégrer des niveaux élevés d’énergies renouvelables; Efficacité énergétique; Couplage de secteur et carburants à faibles émissions de carbone; et Innovation et recherche appliquée.
Dans le cadre du partenariat, le Canada et l’Allemagne collaborent pour satisfaire l’appétit germanique en matière d’hydrogène, et tirer parti de ses efforts pour calmer les secteurs. Le Canada et l’Allemagne souhaitent approfondir et concentrer leurs travaux de collaboration dans le cadre du partenariat, surtout à la lumière de l’invasion de l’Ukraine et du souhait du Canada de favoriser la sécurité énergétique de l’Allemagne.
Des travaux bilatéraux avec l’Allemagne s’appuieront sur les travaux réalisés par le groupe de travail Canada-UE sur la sécurité énergétique, la transition verte et le GNL, et iront de pair avec ceux-ci. Le partenariat s’appuie sur des exportations à moyen terme de GNL et d’hydrogène produits de manière responsable. Les minéraux critiques seront ajoutés au plan d’action du partenariat énergétique, dans le respect de l’annonce du premier ministre et du chancelier allemand du 9 mars 2022 sur un nouveau dialogue bilatéral sur la sécurité des minéraux.

Question no 385 —
Mme Laurel Collins:
En ce qui concerne le groupe « Create the Path Table », auparavant surnommé le groupe de travail conjoint sur la crise des marchés, dirigé par Ressources naturelles Canada, depuis sa création: a) quelle était la composition de ce groupe de travail au 31 janvier 2022; b) combien de réunions ont été organisées; c) à quelles dates ont eu lieu les réunions énumérées en b); d) qui était présent à chacune des réunions énumérées en b); e) quels ont été les sujets de discussion à chacune des réunions énumérées en b); f) quelles ont été les mesures de suivi convenues à chacune des réunions énumérées en b)?
Response
L’hon. Jonathan Wilkinson (ministre des Ressources naturelles climatique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, Ressources naturelles Canada n'a jamais établi ou dirigé un groupe de travail lié à la Q-385.

Question no 393 —
M. Rob Moore:
En ce qui concerne la réponse du gouvernement au Rapport annuel 2020-2021 du Commissariat à l’information du Canada, ventilé par ministère, organisme, société d’État et autres entités du gouvernement assujetties à la loi: a) quelle mesure précise a été prise afin de donner suite à l’énoncé de la commissaire qui, à la page 16 du rapport, déclare au sujet du délai de 30 jours prévu par la loi: « Il faut cesser de faire peu de cas des prorogations et des retards injustifiés ou de les tolérer »; b) à quelle date chacune des mesures en a) a-t-elle été prise; c) quelle mesure précise a été prise à l’égard de chacune des préoccupations soulevées par la commissaire dans son rapport, ventilé par préoccupation; d) à quelle date chacune des mesures en c) a-t-elle été prise?
Response
L’hon. Greg Fergus (secrétaire parlementaire du premier ministre et de la présidente du Conseil du Trésor, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement du Canada s’engage à ce que le processus d’accès à l’information soutienne la transparence et la responsabilisation des institutions fédérales canadiennes.
Le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor du Canada, ou SCT, accueille favorablement les observations et les recommandations de la commissaire à l’information sur la façon dont le gouvernement peut continuer à assurer le respect du droit d’accès à l’information des Canadiens. Le SCT continue de travailler avec les institutions pour soutenir et partager des conseils, des pratiques exemplaires et des solutions opérationnelles afin de les aider à surmonter les défis opérationnels.
La durée des prolongations que les institutions mettent en œuvre est évaluée au cas par cas, en tenant compte du volume et de la complexité des informations pour une demande donnée. Cela inclut les demandes de prolongation de délai pour consulter d’autres institutions gouvernementales et/ou des tiers. En outre, les institutions sont tenues d’informer le Commissariat à l’information, ou CI, lorsqu’elles prolongent le délai de réponse à la demande initiale au-delà de 30 jours supplémentaires. Il existe également un mécanisme de recours par lequel un demandeur qui estime que la prolongation est déraisonnable peut déposer une plainte auprès du Commissariat à l’information.
Le gouvernement a apporté d’importantes améliorations à l’accès à l’information au fil des ans. Les récentes modifications à la Loi sur l’accès à l’information ont accru l’ouverture et la transparence du gouvernement, en exigeant la publication en ligne d’un plus grand nombre d’informations gouvernementales. En outre, les résumés des demandes d’accès à l’information traitées sont actuellement publiés tous les 30 jours sur le portail du gouvernement ouvert et retirés après une période de deux ans. Le SCT travaille à prolonger la conservation de ces résumés au-delà de deux ans.
Le gouvernement du Canada demeure déterminé à améliorer les systèmes qui appuient les demandes d'accès à l'information et de protection des renseignements personnels, à aider les institutions à traiter les demandes en suspens et à améliorer continuellement le rendement du programme d'accès à l'information. Dans le budget de 2021, le gouvernement a investi 12,8 millions de dollars pour appuyer d'autres améliorations au Service de demande d'accès à l'information et de renseignements personnels en ligne, pour accélérer la diffusion proactive de l'information aux Canadiens et pour appuyer l'achèvement de l'examen de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information.
Cet examen représente une occasion d’explorer les améliorations que pourraient apporter de nouveaux outils et de nouvelles approches en vue d’accroître l’efficacité et de rendre l’information plus ouverte et plus accessible aux Canadiens. L’examen approfondira le cadre législatif, cernera les améliorations à apporter à la divulgation proactive pour rendre l’information accessible à tous et évaluera les processus et les systèmes pour améliorer le service et réduire les délais.
Une liste de mesures clés de mises en œuvre, planifiées ou en cours, en vue d’améliorer l’accès à l’information et la transparence est disponible au www.canada.ca/fr/secretariat-conseil-tresor/services/acces-information-protection-reseignements-personnels/revision-acces-information/le-processus-dexamen/principales-mesures-matiere-acces-information.html
Collapse
Access to information requestsBank accountsBanks and bankingBloc Québécois CaucusBritish ColumbiaCanada Pension PlanCanadian investments abroadCannabisCannabis ActCarbon pricingChabot, Louise ...Show all topics
Result: 1 - 1 of 1

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data